BC’s Three Biggest Cities Get Satisfactory Grades on Most Issues

Vancouver posts the highest score on dealing with transportation, while Burnaby is ahead on handling crime.

Vancouver, BC [January 29, 2020] – More than two thirds of residents of Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby are pleased with the way their municipal governments have handled three specific issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative samples in the three cities, 79% of residents say their municipal administration has done a “very good” or “good” job in providing sanitation services.

In addition, 70% of residents are satisfied with how parks and recreation facilities are being managed, and 69% think their municipal government is enhancing their overall quality of life.

More than three-in-five residents of Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby are also content with what their municipal governments are doing to protect the environment (66%), promote tourism (65%), foster artistic and cultural activities (also 65%) and manage development and growth (63%).

At least half of residents are satisfied with the way Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby are dealing with transportation (57%), dealing with crime (54%), making City Hall work in a transparent and unbiased fashion (52%), handling the city’s finances (52%) and engaging with regular people (50%).

“There are some subtle differences between the three cities when it comes to public safety,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 60% of Burnaby residents endorse the performance of their administration, the proportion falls to 54% in Vancouver and 52% in Surrey.”

The lowest ranked issue across all three cities is dealing with homelessness and poverty (44%). Satisfaction with this file rises to 52% in Surrey, but is lower in Vancouver (42%) and Burnaby (39%).

The assessment of City of Vancouver residents on many services has increased markedly since a Research Co. survey conducted in October 2018, particularly on managing development and growth (from 24% to 62%), dealing with crime (from 44% to 54%) and protecting the environment (from 55% to 64%).

A similar situation is observed in Surrey, where the current administration has a higher ranking than the previous one on issues such as promoting tourism (from 39% to 64%), dealing with transportation (from 24% to 57%) and enhancing quality of life (from 36% to 68%).

The approval rating for the three mayors is very similar: 52% for Vancouver’s Kennedy Stewart, 51% for Burnaby’s Mike Hurley and 50% for Surrey’s Doug McCallum.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 2 to January 6, 2020, among 1,200 adults in Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age and gender in each municipality. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 2.8 percentage points for each municipality, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

End of Free Parking at Granville Island Splits Metro Vancouverites

More than a third of recent visitors (35%) arrived by public transit, while 45% travelled to Granville Island in their own vehicles.

Vancouver, BC [December 27, 2019] – The decision to eliminate free parking at Granville Island is causing different reactions among residents of Metro Vancouver, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 33% of residents say they are “less likely” to go to Granville Island after the cancellation of free parking from 11:00 am to 6:00 pm. More two-in-five (42%) say this decision will not affect their plans, and one-in-five (19%) are now “more likely” to visit.

“Two-in-five Metro Vancouverites who drive to Granville Island (40%) claim to be less likely to visit under the new parking regime,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However, more than half of them (58%) say they will not be deterred by this new regulation.”

Almost one-in-five Metro Vancouverites (18%) have been to Granville Island six times or more over the past two years, while 42% have been visited two to five times.

While more than one third of recent visitors to Granville Island (35%) relied on public transit to get there, a higher proportion (45%) arrived in their own vehicle. This includes 38% of residents of the City of Vancouver, as well as majorities of visitors from Surrey (55%), Burnaby (56%) and other municipalities in the Lower Mainland (52%).

The main reason to visit Granville Island continues to be shopping at the Public Market (56%, up seven points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November 2018), followed by sightseeing (20%) and getting a meal or snack (19%).

Other reasons cited for visiting Granville Island are shopping at a store that is not located inside the Public Market (13%) and going to an Arts and Culture performance (9%). 

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 9 to December 12, 2019, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.7 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Seven-in-Ten Vancouverites Happy with Separated Bike Lanes

Men and residents aged 55 and over are more likely to believe that the city currently has too many separated bike lanes.

Vancouver, BC [December 13, 2019] – More than two thirds of City of Vancouver residents appear satisfied with bike infrastructure, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative municipal sample, practically seven-in-ten Vancouverites (69%) support having separated bike lanes in the city, while 25% are opposed and 5% are undecided.

“It is not surprising to see 90% of Vancouverites who commute to school or work on a bike express support for this type of infrastructure,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “We also see that majorities of Vancouverites who commute by taking public transit (79%) and driving (69%) are also in favour of having separated bike lanes.”

Across the city, 40% of residents believe Vancouver currently has the right number of separated bike lanes. In addition, 30% of Vancouverites think there are too many separated bike lanes and some should be removed, and 21% feel there are not enough separated bike lanes and more should be added.

About a third of Vancouverites aged 55 and over (33%) and aged 35-to-54 (32%) believe that the city has too many separated bike lanes at this stage. The proportion is significantly lower among residents aged 18-to-34 (24%).

Men are also more likely to believe that some separated bike lanes should be removed than women (36% and 24% respectively).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 12 to November 15, 2019, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Gas Prices Stirring New Behaviours in British Columbia Drivers

Just under one-in-five drivers in the province have gone to the United States with the sole purpose of purchasing cheaper fuel.

Vancouver, BC [December 11, 2019] – A significant proportion of drivers in British Columbia are taking steps to deal with the cost of fuel in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, half of drivers in British Columbia (51%) say they have purchased gas for their vehicle in their community even if the tank was not near empty because prices were suddenly lower.

Drivers in Vancouver Island (56%) are more likely to have purchased gas after they noticed a drop in prices.

Two-in-five drivers in the province (39%) say they have purchased less gas for their vehicle in their community—or did not fill up the entire tank—because prices were suddenly higher.

Almost half of drivers in the Fraser Valley (47%) have chosen not to completely fill up because of inflated gas prices.

Just under one-in-five drivers in British Columbia (18%) say they have driven to the United States with the sole purpose of purchasing cheaper gas for their vehicle.

“Two-in-five drivers who reside in the Fraser Valley (40%) say they have visited the United States only to get gas in the past year” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “They have been joined by one-in-five (21%) drivers in Metro Vancouver.”

The Government of British Columbia recently introduced legislation to compel oil and gas companies to disclose supply and pricing data. More than four-in-five British Columbians (85%) support this legislation, including 90% of residents aged 55 and over.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 27 to November 29, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Drivers Not Signaling Still the Biggest Problem in Canadian Roads

Almost half of Canadians say drivers in their city or town are worse than they were five years ago.

Vancouver, BC [November 20, 2019] – While some progress has been observed since last year, a significant proportion of Canadians continue to have negative experiences with drivers in their municipality, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-five Canadians (61%) say they witnessed a driver not signaling before a turn in the past month, down 10 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2018.

Almost half of Canadians (47%, -14) saw a car taking up two or more spots in a parking lot, and a smaller proportion (44%, -4) witnessed a driver not stopping at an intersection.

Albertans were more likely to see a car occupying more space than necessary in the past month (61%), while residents of Manitoba and Saskatchewan were more likely to witness drivers zooming through intersections (48%).

Over the past month, more than a third of Canadians also experienced a close call on the road, such as slamming the breaks or having to steer violently to avoid a collision (35%, -7) and saw a car turning right or left from an incorrect lane (34%, -11)

“This year’s survey shows some improvement, as fewer Canadians are reporting regrettable behaviour from drivers on the road,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion of respondents across the country who did not experience any problems increased from 16% in 2018 to 21% this year.”

Almost half of Canadians (47%, -3) say drivers in their city or town are worse than they were five years ago, while 40% believe they are the same and 7% think they are better now.

There are only two provinces where a majority of residents claim that driving behaviour has deteriorated: Alberta (57%, +4) and Ontario (52%, +1). British Columbia had the worst score on this question in 2018 (64%). The number dropped to 48% in 2019.

Once again, a majority of Canadians (56%, -2) state that there are specific groups or people in their city or town who are worse drivers than others. The proportion of Canadians who feel this way is highest in Alberta (65%), British Columbia (59%) and Ontario (also 59%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 4 to November 6, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca