Metro Vancouver Drivers Say It Is Harder to Find Parking Spots

Drivers aged 35-to-54 are more likely to say they ignore parking tickets than those aged 18-to-34 and those aged 55 and over.

Vancouver, BC [December 18, 2018] – A sizeable proportion of drivers in Metro Vancouver think it is tougher to find parking spots in the region, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites who drive to school or work on weekdays, four-in-five (81%) say it is “moderately harder” or “much harder” to find a parking spot in their municipality when they need one.

Across Metro Vancouver, 18% of drivers say they have received a parking ticket from a municipality over the past two years, while 20% have received a ticket from a parking management company.

While 76% of drivers say they quickly paid the fine from the last parking ticket they received from a municipality, only 51% of those who received a ticket from a parking management company behaved in the same fashion.

In addition, while 13% of drivers say they never paid the fine from the last ticket issued by a municipality, the proportion jumps to 34% for tickets issued by a parking management company.

“Some drivers are clearly not taking parking tickets seriously,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This is particularly significant among drivers aged 35-to-54, who are more likely to say they never pay any type of parking fine, compared with their younger and older counterparts.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 25, 2018, among 513 adults in Metro Vancouver who drive to school or work on weekdays. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.3 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Metro Vancouverites Ponder Regulations for Ride-Hailing

Most residents support having a cap on the number of drivers, as well as a Class 4 license requirement.

Vancouver, BC [November 26, 2018] – Most residents of Metro Vancouver believe people who want to operate a ride-hailing service should hold a driver’s license that requires more training, a medical exam and security checks, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 57% say they are in favour of only allowing drivers with a commercial (or Class 4) license to operate a ride-hailing service.

Conversely, three-in-ten respondents (30%) would allow drivers with a standard (or Class 5) license to operate a ride-hailing service.

Two thirds of Metro Vancouverites (66%) want the provincial government to cap the number of ride-hailing drivers to reduce traffic congestion.

In contrast, one-in-four (23%) think the provincial government should have no restrictions on the number of ride-hailing drivers, even if this creates traffic congestion.

Earlier this month, the Government of British Columbia announced that ride-hailing services will be allowed to operate in the province by the Fall of 2019.

Almost half of Metro Vancouverites (49%) believe this is a reasonable timeline, because it takes time to review the effect of ride-hailing on existing transportation options.

Two-in-five Metro Vancouverites (42%) believe this is not a reasonable timeline and think ride-hailing should be allowed in the province earlier than the Fall of 2019.

“Women (55%), residents aged 55+ (53%) and voters who supported the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the last election (59%) are more likely to think the government’s ride-hailing timeline is reasonable,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Men (47%), residents aged 18-to-34 (also 47%) and voters who supported the BC Liberals in the last election (52%) are more likely to say the timeline is not reasonable”.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 25, 2018, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Wpcpey

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Canadians Say Drivers Are Worse than Five Years Ago

In the past month, seven-in-ten Canadians witnessed a driver not signaling before a turn.

Vancouver, BC [October 31, 2018] – Canadians are not particularly thrilled with the behaviour they are observing on the country’s roads, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 50% of Canadians say drivers in their city or town are worse than they were five years ago, while only 4% say they are better.

The areas where most residents believe drivers are getting worse are British Columbia (64%), Atlantic Canada (59%), Alberta (53%) and Ontario (51%).

Seven-in-ten Canadians (71%) saw a driver not signalling before a turn in the last month, including 83% of British Columbians. In addition, three-in-five (61%) witnessed a car taking up two or more spots in a parking lot, including 77% of those in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

In the past month, almost half of Canadians (48%) saw a driver not stopping at an intersection, 45% witnessed cars turning right or left from an incorrect lane and 42% had a “close call” while in their vehicle.

Only 16% of Canadians did not witness any major problems on the roads in the past four weeks, including 26% of Quebecers.

A majority of Canadians (58%) believe there are specific groups or people in their city or town who are worse drivers than others. This proportion includes 68% of British Columbians, 60% of Albertans and 58% of Ontarians.

“Equal proportions of Baby Boomers and Millennials (60%) say there are some drivers who are worse than others in their municipality,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Those who volunteered a follow-up response were more likely to blame each other, with Canadians aged 18-to-34 pointing the finger at old drivers, and those aged 55 and over saying young drivers are responsible.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 27 to August 30, 2018, among 1,001 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Haljackey

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

High Support for Transportation Projects in Metro Vancouver

Almost nine-in-ten residents are in favour of taking SkyTrain to the UBC Point Grey campus.

Vancouver, BC [October 18, 2018] – Two pending transportation projects are backed by a sizeable proportion of Metro Vancouver residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, two thirds (68%) say they agree with the construction of the proposed Surrey–Newton–Guildford Light Rail Transit (LRT) project in Surrey.

In the City of Surrey, 62% of residents are in favour of the proposed LRT project, while 34% are not.

Four-in-five Metro Vancouver residents (82%) agree with the extension of the SkyTrain Millennium Line underneath Broadway to Arbutus in Vancouver—including 81% of those who live in the City of Vancouver.

In addition, 87% of Metro Vancouverites support extending the Millennium Line beyond Arbutus to the University of British Columbia (UBC) campus at Point Grey.

“Most residents of Metro Vancouver are keen to see these transportation projects through,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support is similarly high among those who drive, take public transit or bike to school or work.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 4 to October 7, 2018, among 635 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: PoYang

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Welcome Automated Speed Enforcement

The use of red light cameras to capture speeding vehicles is endorsed by seven-in-ten residents. 

Vancouver, BC [August 13, 2018] – Most British Columbians support the use of technology to enforce speed limits in the province’s roads, a new Research Co. survey has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, seven-in-ten residents (70%) approve of the use of speed-on-green cameras, or red light cameras that also capture vehicles that are speeding through intersections.

Automated speed enforcement works by using cameras or sensors to pick up a vehicle speeding. A ticket is then issued to the owner of the vehicle. Driver’s license points are not issued as the driver of the vehicle cannot be identified.

The provincial government announced last fall that red light cameras located at 140 intersections would record 24 hours a day. In the fall, the provincial government is expected to announce the number and locations of cameras that would be used to identify speeding vehicles.

In addition to the speed-on-green cameras, most British Columbians also endorsed three other types of automated speed enforcement.

Across the province, 71% of residents approve of using fixed speed cameras, or cameras that stay in one location and measure speed as a vehicle passes. These cameras can be placed in school zones or on other roads.

In addition, almost two thirds of British Columbians (65%) approve of using mobile speed cameras, which can be moved from place to place and measure speed as a vehicle passes.

A majority of residents (55%) also approved of point-to-point enforcement, which uses cameras at two or more distant points on a road. The average speed of vehicles that pass between points is calculated and tickets are issued to vehicles whose average speed over the distance was excessive.

“There is high support for all four types of automated speed enforcement across the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Point-to-point enforcement is the most contentious of all four, with more than a third of residents disapproving of its use.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 2 to August 5, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca