Appetite for Political Correctness Rises in Canada, Sinks in U.S.

One-in-five Americans (20%) claim to never act “politically correct”, compared to just 11% of Canadians.

Vancouver, BC [September 28, 2022] – Residents of Canada and the United States hold differing views on the concept of “political correctness”, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 55% of Canadians and 45% of Americans support the use of “political correctness” in their respective countries.

The term “political correctness” has been used to describe language and/or behaviour that seeks to minimize possible offenses to racial, cultural and gender identity groups, among others.

Since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2020, support for “political correctness” has increased by five points in Canada and fallen by eight points in the United States.

“Canadians who voted for the Conservatives in 2021 (41%) and Americans who identify as Independent (35%) or Republican (29%) are less likely to endorse political correctness,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are higher among (66%) in the United States (66%) and among Canadians who voted for the Liberals (64%) or the New Democrats (67%) in 2021.”

There is little change when Canadians are asked about their own behaviour, with just over a third (34%, +2) claiming to always act “politically correct” because it’s the right thing to do. Two-in-five (40%, =) sometimes act “politically correct” because it’s the safe thing to do, while only 11% (=) do not act “politically correct” because it’s the wrong thing to do.

In the United States, the proportion of Americans who claim to never act “politically correct” increased to 20% (+5), while those who sometimes act “politically correct” rose to 41% (+4). About one-in-four Americans (24%, -12) say they always act “politically correct” because it’s the right thing to do.

As was the case in 2020, more than half of Canadians and Americans think three groups in society should act in a “politically correct” manner “always” or “most of the time”: teachers (75% in Canada and 64% in the U.S.), politicians (72% in Canada and 60% in the U.S.) and journalists (67% in Canada and 55% in the U.S.).

Significantly fewer Canadians (41%) and Americans (28%) believe comedians should act in a “politically correct” way “always” or “most of the time”.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%, +5) and just under three-in-five Americans (59%, -3) are in favour of adding a disclaimer to explain that programs or movies are presented “as originally created” and “may contain outdated cultural depictions.”

Opposition grew in the United States toward the notion of printing new editions of books that remove words that may be deemed offensive to a specific race or ethnicity (65%, +6). More than half of Canadians (55%, -6) feel the same way (55%, -6).

A similar scenario ensues when residents of the two countries are asked about re-dubbing movies to remove words that may be deemed offensive to a specific race or ethnicity. Just under two thirds of Americans are opposed (64%, +7), along with a majority of Canadians (56%, -6).

Methodology: Results are based on online surveys conducted from September 16 to September 18, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Want King to Focus on Reconciliation and Environment

More than half of Canadians would have preferred a full holiday to observe and mark the passing of Queen Elizabeth II.

Vancouver, BC [September 22, 2022] – More than two thirds of Canadians think the country’s new head of state should make an effort to address two pressing issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, almost seven-in-ten Canadians (69%) believe King Charles III should advance the cause of reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, while almost three-in-four (74%) want him to commit to reduce the carbon footprint of the entire Royal Family.

More than half of Canadians (55%) say they would have preferred to see Prince William become King of the United Kingdom and the other 14 Commonwealth realms, including Canada.

Women (57%), Canadians aged 35-to-54 (58%) and British Columbians (59%) are more likely to be supportive of William’s ascension to the throne.

When asked about the fact that King Charles III will be featured on coins and bills that will be used in Canada, 56% of Canadians say they do not have a problem with this situation, while one third (34%) disagree.

Animosity towards the presence of King Charles III on Canada’s currency reaches 42% among Canadians aged 18-to-34 and 38% among women.

More than half of Canadians (54%) believe Queen Elizabeth II’s passing should have been observed and marked with a full holiday for everyone, while 9% would have preferred a full holiday for public sector employees only.

Just under three-in-ten Canadians (29%) think a holiday should not have been considered at all—a proportion that jumps to 39% among Conservative Party voters in the 2021 federal election.

Compared to a Research Co. survey conducted in February 2022, the perceptions of Canadians on the country have changed.

More than a third of Canadians (36%) say they would prefer for Canada to have an elected head of state, down 13 points since February. In contrast, just over three-in-ten Canadians (31%, +10) would like for Canada to remain a monarchy, while 24% (+6) do not care either way.

“More than a third of Albertans (42%), Atlantic Canadians (40%) and British Columbians (34%) are supportive of the continuation of the monarchy in Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower in Ontario (31%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (26%) and Quebec (25%).”

The notion of an elected head of state is more prevalent among Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (39%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (also 39%) in the 2021 federal election than among those who cast ballots for the Conservatives (32%).

Positive perceptions of six members of the Royal family have improved since February. Almost half of Canadians (46%, +11) have a favourable view of King Charles III, while just under a third (32%, +5) feel the same way about Queen Consort Camilla.

Just over two thirds of Canadians hold favourable views on William, Prince of Wales (67%, +9) and Catherine, Princess of Wales (also 67%, +7). The rating is lower for Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex (64%, +14) and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex (53%, +9).

A majority of Canadians (52%, +4) believe Canada will still be a monarchy in twenty years, while just over three-in-ten (31%, +1) think the country will have an elected head of state.

Residents of Alberta are significantly more likely to predict Canada remaining a monarchy in 2042 (65%) than their counterparts in Atlantic Canada (60%), Ontario (55%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (51%), British Columbia (45%) and Quebec (also 45%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from September 16 to September 18, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Canadian Couples Did Mostly Well Cohabiting During Pandemic

Significant gender gaps are observed when Canadians ponder their spouse or partner’s cleanliness and ability to prepare meals.

Vancouver, BC [September 20, 2022] – While most Canadians appear to be content with the manner in which their spouse or live-in partner behaved during the COVID-19 pandemic, there are some components of life at home where the discrepancies between genders are evident, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of adults who are living with their spouse or partner, 70% of respondents say they “strongly approve” of their significant other’s performance during the COVID-19 pandemic, while 22% “moderately approve.”

Canadians aged 55 and over who are living with their spouse or partner are more likely to say they “strongly approve” of their pandemic performance (80%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (64%) and aged 18-to-34 (58%).

“More than seven-in-ten Atlantic Canadians (76%) and Quebecers (72%) are particularly happy with the way their spouse or live-in partner managed the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The rating is slightly lower in British Columbia (69%), Ontario (68%), Alberta (67%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (65%).”

In spite of this high level of satisfaction, there are certain aspects of life at home where a significant difference between men and women is observed.

More than three-in-five men (63%) say they are “very satisfied” with their spouse or live-in partner on the matter of keeping the home clean and tidy. The proportion of women who feel the same way about their spouse or live-in partner is markedly smaller (41%).

While 73% of men are “very satisfied” with their spouse or live-in partner’s personal hygiene, the proportion drops to 64% among women.

A gender gap also emerges on the issue of cooking meals, with 67% of men saying they are “very satisfied” with the involvement of their spouse or live-in partner, compared to 56% of women.

The satisfaction levels are fairly stable across cohabiting couples on five other issues: taking care of pets (65%), taking care of children (62%), providing emotional support when needed (59%), making decisions about what to do (55%) and overall attitude and demeanour (also 55 %).

Almost half of Canadian adults who are living with their spouse or partner (47%) say their experience during the COVID-19 pandemic made them grow closer as a couple. More than two-in-five (44%) report no change, while 7% believe they grew more distant.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from August 14 to August 21, 2022, among a representative sample of 1,135 adults in Canada who are living with their spouse or partner. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.9 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

More in Canada and U.S. Feel Climate Change is Major Crisis

Most Canadians and Americans are willing to pay higher taxes in order to adequately address global warming.

Vancouver, BC [September 13, 2022] – The concerns of residents of Canada and the United States about global warming have increased over the past two years, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 68% of Canadians (+6 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2020) and 60% of Americans (+9) feel that climate change is a “major crisis”.

Almost seven-in-ten Canadians (69%, +5) and three-in-five Americans (60%, +7) think global warming is a fact and is mostly caused by emissions from vehicles and industrial facilities.

About one-in-five respondents in the two countries (20% in Canada and 21% in the United States) believe climate change is a fact and is mostly caused by natural changes. Only 5% of Canadians and 12% of Americans brand global warming as a theory that has not yet been proven.

“Belief in human-made climate change is low among Republicans in the United States (35%) and Conservatives in Canada (47%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are strikingly different among Democrats in the United States (80%) and Liberal Party voters in Canada (82%).”

Majorities of Canadians and Americans (59% and 61% respectively) say they are willing to pay higher taxes to adequately address climate change. Only two other issues come close to this level of acceptance for higher taxation: schools (CAN 57%, USA 64%) and homelessness (CAN 57%, USA 61%).

Fewer Canadians and Americans are willing to pay higher taxes in order to adequately address four other issues: forest fires (55% and 58% respectively), floods (52% and 56% respectively), housing improvements (51% each) and transit improvements (44% and 46% respectively).

Sizeable majorities of Canadians and Americans believe three groups should be doing more now to deal with issues related to climate change that are happening or impacting people directly now: companies and corporations (75% and 70% respectively), governments (69% and 65%) and individuals and consumers (67% and 65%).

Most residents of both countries also believe that more action is required to address issues related to climate change that may happen or impact people directly in the future from companies and corporations (76% in Canada and 70% in the United States), governments (72% and 66% respectively) and individuals and consumers (68% and 65%).

Parents of children under the age of 18 were asked about the effect of conversations they have had with their kids about climate change. Significant proportions of parents in Canada (85%) and the United States (79%) say they are recycling more as a result of these chats.

Practically half of American parents (49%) and a majority of Canadian parents (55%) claim to be driving less, and more than two-in-five (44% in the United States, 47% in Canada) say they are taking shorter showers as a result of conversations about global warming with their children.

Fewer parents in each country acknowledge taking other steps, such as reducing their consumption of meat (CAN 36%, USA 30%), changing the way they voted in a federal election (24% each) or changing the way they voted in a local election (CAN 18%, USA 21%).

Methodology: Results are based on online studies conducted from August 19 to August 21, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Just Under Half of Canadians Dread Their City or Town’s Drivers

Practically seven-in-ten Canadians saw a driver not signaling before a turn in the past month. 

Vancouver, BC [September 6, 2022] – The level of confidence that Canadians bestow upon drivers in their city or town has dropped drastically over the past year, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 48% of Canadians think drivers in their city or town are worse now than five years ago, up 18 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2021.

More than half of Canadians who live in Atlantic Canada (61%, +36), British Columbia (57%, +13) and Ontario (56%, +26) say drivers are worse now. The proportions are lower in Alberta (43%, +10), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (42%, +7) and Quebec (34%, +10).

More than half of Canadians aged 55 and over (58%, +22) and aged 35-to-54 (52%, +20) claim that drivers in their city or town are worse now than five years ago. The proportion is lower among Canadians aged 18-to-34 (34%, +13).

The survey also tracks the incidence of six specific occurrences on the country’s roads over the past month. Practically seven-in-ten Canadians (69%, +14) say they witnessed a driver not signalling before a turn, a proportion that climbs to 74% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

A majority of Canadians (54%, +13) recently observed a car taking up two or more spots in a parking lot.

Practically half of Canadians (49%, +11) saw a driver not stopping at an intersection. This behaviour is more prevalent in Atlantic Canada (58%), British Columbia (55%) and Ontario (54%).

Two-in-five Canadians (40%, +8) witnessed a driver turning right or left from an incorrect lane, including 49% of British Columbians.

More than a third of Canadians (37%, +9) went through a close call, such as having to slam the brakes or steer violently to avoid a collision—including 48% of Atlantic Canadians and 44% of Albertans.

“Only 15% of Canadians say they did not see any illegal or regrettable behaviour on the road over the past month,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This represents a 12-point drop since our previous survey in 2021.”

Just under three-in-five Canadians (58%, +7) claim that there are specific groups or people in their city or town who are worse drivers than others—a proportion that rises to 67% in British Columbia.

As was the case last year, the top four responses issued by Canadians who point the finger at a specific group for bad driving behaviours are “young” (40%, +8), “Asian (19%, +3), “elderly” (18%, -3) and “immigrant” (8%, +2).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 19 to August 21, 2022, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Americans More Upset Than Canadians When Pondering Freedom

Just over half of residents of each country feel their vote in federal elections does not make a difference.

Vancouver, BC [August 25, 2022] – Residents of the United States are significantly more likely than their counterparts in Canada to keep their political views to themselves, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 49% of Americans and 32% of Canadians say they cannot express their political views sometimes because they fear reprisals.

“Most Republicans in the United States (55%) claim to withhold their political views sometimes, compared to 47% of Democrats and 48% of Independents,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In Canada, this behaviour is more pronounced among those who voted for the People’s Party (68%), the Green Party (43%) and the Conservative Party (41%) in last year’s federal election.”

While more than seven-in-ten Americans (73%) feel that their freedoms are under attack by elected politicians, only 39% of Canadians hold the same sentiment.

More than three-in-five Americans (62%) and just over two-in-five Canadians (41%) believe their respective federal governments are oppressive and controlling.

More than half of Americans (52%) and Canadians (51%) feel that their vote in federal elections does not make a difference.

More than a third of Canadians think four issues are worse now than ten years ago: the ability of people to disagree with each other on social media (46%), the ability of people to disagree with each other in conversation (40%), the ability of people to convince others about looking at an issue differently (38%) and the ability of people to question stories they learn about in the media (37%).

Americans are significantly more likely to believe that certain elements of public discourse have deteriorated over the past decade, including the ability of people to disagree with each other on social media (63%), the ability of people to disagree with each other in conversation (62%), the ability of people to convince others about looking at an issue differently (58%) and the ability of people to question stories they learn about in the media (50%).

More than one-in-five Canadians say they find themselves disagreeing with other people “many times” about COVID-19 mandates and vaccines (26%), federal politics (24%) and provincial politics (22%).

In the United States, at least one-in-four residents disagree with other people “many times” about national politics (40%), COVID-19 mandates and vaccines (36%), state politics (28%), immigration (also 28%), morality (25%) and local politics (also 25%).

More than three-in-ten Canadians (31%) say they stopped talking to a person, or avoided a person, on account of a disagreement related to COVID-19 mandates and vaccines. Fewer Canadians chose the same route to deal with a person who they disagreed with on morality (22%), religion (20%), federal politics (19%) and immigration (18%).

In the United States, at least one-in-five Americans have ceased talking to a person, or avoided a person, due to a disagreement on national politics (32%), COVID-19 mandates and vaccines (30%), morality (25%), religion (24%), immigration (22%) and state politics (21%).

Methodology: Results are based on online studies conducted from August 19 to August 21, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Canadians Say Their City or Town is Noisier Than in 2021

More than a third of the country’s residents (36%) have been bothered by unnecessary noise from vehicles in their own homes.

Vancouver, BC [August 23, 2022] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians have been bothered by a variety of noises while inside their homes, and practically half claim that their surroundings are not as quiet as they were in 2021, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians believe their city or town has become noisier over the past year, up 22 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in January 2021.

Just over two-in-five Canadians (41%, +18) think their street is noisier now than it was in 2021, while three-in-ten (30%, +2) feel the same way about their homes.

More than two-in-five Canadians of Indigenous (44%) and South Asian (41%) descent feel their home is noisier now, along with 32% of women, 40% of Canadians aged 18-to-34 and 37% of British Columbians.

When asked about specific disturbances that have bothered them at home over the past year, more than a third of Canadians (36%, +6) mention unnecessary noise from vehicles (such as motorcycles and cars revving up).

At least one-in-four Canadians were also subjected to construction-related noises (such as roofing, land clearing and heavy machinery) (29%, new), loud people outside their home (28%, +8), dogs barking (27%, +3), a car alarm (25%, +5) and yard work (such as lawnmowers and leaf blowers) (also 25%, +6).

Fewer Canadians were disturbed over the past 12 months by nine other noises, including loud music playing inside a vehicle (21%, +3), power tools (such as electric saws and sanders) (21%, +3), drivers honking the horn excessively (20%, +8), yelling or screaming at a nearby home (19%, +1), loud music at a nearby home (18%, +1), fireworks (18%, +2), a loud gathering or party at a nearby home (17%, +2), a home alarm (10%, +1) and cats meowing (7%, +2).

“Compared to 2021, there is significant growth in the proportion of Canadians who have been bothered at home by drivers honking the horn excessively,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In British Columbia, three-in-ten residents (30%) have experienced this nuisance.”

Practically three-in-four Canadians (74%, -5) have not taken any action to deal with noise at home. About one-in-seven (14%, +2) have worn earplugs or earmuffs to mitigate noise—including 20% of Quebecers and 22% of Canadians aged 18-to-34.

Fewer Canadians have chosen to report noise concerns to the police (8%, +3), acquired hardware to mitigate noise while inside their home (such as noise cancelling headphones or earphones) (7%, =) or moved away from their previous dwelling because of noise (5%, +1).

Methodology: Results are based on an online survey conducted from August 14 to August 16, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Few Canadians Want to Go Back to Imperial Measurement System

A sizeable majority of the country’s residents rely on feet and inches, and not metres, to measure a person’s height.

Vancouver, BC [August 15, 2022] – While Canadians are not particularly supportive of moving away from the International Metric System, many continue to use Imperial measurements in their daily lives, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, only 29% of Canadians would like to see the country adopting the Imperial system. More than half (56%) disagree and would carry on with the International Metric System.

“Practically two-in-five Canadians aged 55 and over (38%) would go back to the Imperial system of units,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This wish is less prevalent among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (23%) and aged 18-to-34 (24%).”

When asked about how they personally measure six different things, majorities of Canadians gravitate towards Imperial units in three specific cases.

Four-in-five Canadians (80%) measure a person’s height in feet and inches, while 20% rely on metres and centimetres.

More than three-in-four Canadians (76%) use pounds when calculating a person’s weight, while 24% rely on kilograms.

Three-in-five Canadians (59%) measure the temperature of their ovens in degrees Fahrenheit, while 41% use degrees Celsius.

Feet and inches are the preferred units to measure a person’s height for Canadians aged 18-to-34 (71%), aged 35-to-54 (79%) and aged 55 and over (88%).

Across Canada, three other measurements are more likely to be conducted using the International Metric System.

More than four-in-five Canadians (84%) calculate the amount of liquid in a container using litres, while 16% rely on quarts and gallons.

More than four-in-five Canadians (82%) measure a vehicle’s speed in kilometres per hour, while 28% use miles per hour.

More than three-in-four Canadians (77%) gauge the temperature outside their home in degrees Celsius, while 23% rely on degrees Fahrenheit.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 1 to August 3, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

A Third of Canadian Households Experienced COVID-19 Recently

The country’s residents are divided on whether restrictions and mandates were lifted at the right time in their community.

Vancouver, BC [August 8, 2022] – A growing number of Canadians acknowledge that their household has been negatively impacted by COVID-19 over the past few weeks, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 37% of Canadians say themselves, or someone else in their household, became infected with COVID-19 after restrictions and mandates were lifted in their community, up 14 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2022.

Across the country 46% of Canadians (+3) believe restrictions and mandates were abandoned too early in their community, while 44% (-5) think the decision was made at the right time.

“More than half of Atlantic Canadians (55%) appear disappointed with the absence of restrictions and mandates related to COVID-19,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower in Alberta (48%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (47%), British Columbia (45%), Quebec (also 45%) and Ontario (43%).”

Compared to May, there is little fluctuation when Canadians are asked about the possible return of specific regulations. Two thirds (66%, -2) would be satisfied if they have to wear a mask or face covering when entering an indoor premise. Slightly smaller proportions of Canadians would feel the same way if a reduction of capacity at venues (such as cinemas, theatres, concert halls and sports arenas) is implemented (63%, -1) or if proof of vaccination is required once again to go to restaurants or public events (60%, -1).

Three-in-five Canadians (60%, +1) believe it is only a matter of time before everyone catches COVID-19, and a majority (54%, +2) claim that, as long as people are vaccinated, the virus is a minor nuisance. In addition, 63% of Canadians (+3) foresee being vaccinated against COVID-19 at least once again in the next six months.

Just over two thirds of Canadians (68%) state that the worst of COVID-19 is definitely or probably “behind us”, down eight points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2022.

More than three-in-four Canadians (77%, -1) continue to brand COVID-19 as a real threat—including 82% of those aged 55 and over.

Public satisfaction with the pandemic performance of the federal government dropped from 61% in May to 55% this month. The rating is highest in Quebec (60%) and Atlantic Canada (58%), followed by Ontario (53%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (52%), British Columbia (49%) and Alberta (48%).

The satisfaction rating also fell this month for provincial administrations (53%, -10) and municipal governments (59%, -6).

In the four most populous provinces of Canada, the level of satisfaction with COVID-19 management is highest in British Columbia (62%, =), followed by Quebec (58%, -9), Ontario (48%, -17) and Alberta (39%, -14).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 1 to August 3, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Great11

Two-in-Five Canadians Expect National Economy to Decline

Positive perceptions of Justin Trudeau as an economic manager have fallen to 41% across the country. 

Vancouver, BC [August 28, 2022] – A majority of Canadians perceive the nation’s finances in a negative light, and there is a significant increase in the proportion of the country’s residents who foresee a worsening situation, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 57% of Canadians consider the economic conditions in Canada right now as “bad” or “very bad”, up three points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2022.

Only two-in-five Canadians (40%, -1) describe the country’s economic conditions as “very good” or “good” today.

Positive views on the national economy reach 55% in Quebec (+7). The rating is significantly lower across all other regions of Canada, including British Columbia (37%, -3), Atlantic Canada (36%, -7) Ontario (34%, -9), Alberta (32%, -1) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (30%, +4).

Just 13% of Canadians (-7) believe the Canadian economy will improve over the next six months, while 40% (+10) predict a decline and 40% (-1) foresee conditions staying as they are.

While 57% of Canadians (-1) define their own personal finances today as “very good” or “good”, just over two-in-five (41%, +3) describe them as “bad” or “very bad.”

Only 41% of Canadians (-6) express confidence in Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to do the right thing to help the economy, while a majority (52%, +4) distrust him.

“Two thirds of Albertans (68%) have misgivings about Trudeau as an economic manager,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The negative rating is lower in British Columbia (55%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (53%), Atlantic Canada (51%), Ontario (48%) and Quebec (46%).”

More than a third of Canadians (37%, =) trust Governor of the Bank of Canada Tiff Macklem to make the right decisions to help the nation’s finances. The rating is lower (26%) for federal Leader of the Opposition Candice Bergen.

There are some significant changes in the perceptions of Canadians on inflation. More than four-in-five (81%, -2) continue to expect higher prices for a week’s worth of groceries over the next six months, and majorities also foresee paying more for a new car (68%, -3) and a new television set (57%, -5).

The needle moved on two items, with 61% of Canadians (-21) expecting to pay more for gasoline in the next six months and only 44% (-28) thinking real estate will be more expensive.

Half of Canadians have worried “frequently” or “occasionally” about the safety of their savings (50%, +6) and the value of their investments (50%, +9) over the past couple of months.

Fewer Canadians are preoccupied about unemployment affecting their household (34%, +3), being able to pay their mortgage or rent (34%, +3) or their employer running into serious financial trouble (24%, -2).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from July 11 to July 13, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Generation X Moves Toward Music Streaming Services in Canada

Compared to last year, fewer Canadians aged 35-to-54 are listening to music on the radio.

Vancouver, BC [July 22, 2022] – The proportion of Canadians who relied on a radio to listen to music on a weekly basis has dropped since last year, as more members of Generation X embrace streaming platforms, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 60% of Canadians heard music on a regular radio over the past week, down six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2021.

Just over two-in-five Canadians (41%, +1) say they listened to music on a streaming service over the past seven days, while fewer than one-in-four (23%, -7) accessed music files stored in a computer or a phone.

Over the past week, fewer Canadians heard music on an LP record, cassette or CD (13%, -2) or on satellite radio (12%, =).

“The data shows a marked generational divide when it comes to how Canadians are listening to music,” says Mario Canseco. President of Research Co. “While Canadians aged 18-to-34 were quicker to adopt streaming platforms, their counterparts aged 35-to-54 are now clearly moving in the same direction.”

Practically three-in-five Canadians aged 18-to-34 (59%) are listening to music on a streaming service, while less than half (45%, down 17 points since February 2019) are using a radio.

Almost half of Canadians aged 35-to-54 (48%, +3 since 2021) are listening to music on a streaming platform, while 62% (-8) rely on the radio.

Two thirds of Canadians aged 55 and over (67%, -3) hear music on the radio, while 27% (-1) listen on a streaming platform.

Almost one-in-four Canadians (24%, +4) paid to access a music streaming service in the last month, including 40% of those aged 18-to-34 and 26% of those aged 35-to-54.

In the last month, significantly fewer Canadians paid for and downloaded a song online (11%, =) or purchased a compact disc or LP record (7%, -3).

Canadians remain divided when asked to ponder if, in this day and age, music creators are being fairly compensated for their work. While 40% think they are (=), 40% (-1) claim that they are not.

While only 30% (-2) of Canadians aged 55 and over believe music creators are being fairly compensated right now, the proportion rises to 45% (+3) among those aged 35-to-54 and to 55% (+1) among those aged 18-to-34.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from July 11 to July 13, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

One-in-Four Canadian WhatsApp Users Face Scams, Fake News

The vast majority of messages received on the app (84%) are personal, while fewer than one-in-five (16%) are work-related.

Vancouver, BC [July 15, 2022] – Just over two-in-five Canadians who rely on WhatsApp have never encountered one of four different setbacks while using the instant messaging application, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 45% of Canadians say they use WhatsApp, including 68% of those aged 18-to-34 and 55% of Ontarians.

More than three-in-four Canadian WhatsApp users (76%) say they rely on the application to send text messages “every day” or “a few days a week.”

More than half of WhatsApp users in Canada (55%) share pictures through the app “every day” or “a few days a week”, a proportion that rises to 74% among those aged 18 to 34.

Fewer Canadian WhatsApp users make audio phone calls (46%), share news articles (44%) or make video phone calls (42%) “every day” or “a few days a week” through the application.

Over the course of an average week, 84% of all WhatsApp messages received by Canadians are personal in nature (from friends and family), while the remaining 16% are work-related (dealing with co-workers, tasks or clients).

Only 41% of Canadian WhatsApp users say they have not encountered any one of four problems when using the app.

Almost two-in-five Canadian WhatsApp users (38%) acknowledge that they had to block a person on the app, including 52% of Atlantic Canadians.

More than a quarter of Canadian WhatsApp users (27%) say they were added to a group without their consent, a proportion that rises to 41% in Quebec.

One-in-four Canadian WhatsApp users received “fake news” or misinformation on the app (24%) or were targeted by a scam (23%).

“About a third of Canadian WhatsApp users aged 18-to-34 (32%) are successful at pinpointing misinformation,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are decidedly lower among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (24%) and aged 55 and over (16%).”

WhatsApp users in British Columbia are more likely to have been targeted by a scam while using the application (26%) than those in Alberta and Quebec (24% each), Ontario (23%), Atlantic Canada (22%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (17%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 25 to June 27, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Ten Canadians Say Justin Trudeau is Worst Recent PM

Pierre Trudeau (19%) and Stephen Harper (17%) are ahead when Canadians are asked who the best recent head of government is.

Vancouver, BC [July 8, 2022] – The perceptions of Canadians on the tenure of Justin Trudeau have worsened over the past year, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 29% of Canadians think Justin Trudeau has been Canada’s worst prime minister since 1968, up seven points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in July 2021.

“Animosity towards Justin Trudeau is decidedly strong in one Canadian province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Almost half of Albertans (49%) consider him the worst recent prime minister.”

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians (17%) think Stephen Harper has been the worst prime minister since 1968. The numbers are lower for Pierre Trudeau (6%, =), Kim Campbell (also 6%, +1), Brian Mulroney (5%, -2), Jean Chrétien (also 5%, +2), Joe Clark (3%, -1), Paul Martin (2%, =) and John Turner (also 2%, =).

When asked who Canada’s best recent head of government has been, 19% of Canadians (-1) select Pierre Trudeau, while 17% (+1) pick Harper. Justin Trudeau is third with 12% (-1), followed by Chrétien (9%, +2) and Mulroney (8%, -1).

Pierre Trudeau leads Harper as the best recent prime minister among Canadians aged 55 and over (27% to 21%). There is a virtual tie among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (Harper 18%, Pierre Trudeau 17%), while Justin Trudeau leads among Canadians aged 18-to-34 (19%).

British Columbians are split when assessing the best recent head of government (Pierre Trudeau 19%, Harper 17%). Pierre Trudeau tops the list in Quebec (23%), Ontario (22%) and Atlantic Canada (also 22%), while Harper is ahead in Alberta (35%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (28%).

The survey also asked questions about 10 different politicians who served as leaders of the Official Opposition in Ottawa over the past five decades.

Just under one-in-four Canadians think the last two leaders of the Conservative Party—Andrew Scheer and Erin O’Toole—would have made good prime ministers (23% each).

The rating on this question is lower for former Conservative Party leader Rona Ambrose (22%, -2), former Canadian Alliance leader Stockwell Day (20%, =) and two former Liberal Party leaders: Stéphane Dion (18%, -2) and Michael Ignatieff (also 18%, -1).

Three-in-ten Canadians (30%, -1) think former Progressive Conservative leader Robert Stanfield would have made a good head of government. The results are similar for former New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Tom Mulcair (29%, -1) and former Reform Party leader Preston Manning (28%, =).

A majority of Canadians (52%, +2) believe former NDP leader Jack Layton would have made a good prime minister—a proportion that rises to 58% in Quebec and 62% among Canadians aged 55 and over.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 25 to June 27, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Bobak Ha’Eri

Separation from Canada Enthralls Some Albertans and Quebecers

Half of Canadians (51%) believe their province would be better off with a different Prime Minister in Ottawa.

Vancouver, BC [July 1, 2022] – A third of residents of Alberta and Quebec hold positive feelings towards the notion of sovereignty, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 33% of Albertans (-5 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in December 2021) and 32% of Quebecers (+2) say their respective provinces would be better off as independent countries.

Support for outright sovereignty is lower among residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (28%, +10), Ontario (25%, +2), Atlantic Canada (21%, +7) and British Columbia (19%, +3).

“Expressed support for separation has diminished in Alberta over the past six months, but remains the highest in Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In Quebec, with a provincial election looming, support for sovereignty has risen slightly.”

Across the country, 17% of Canadians (-1) think their province would be better off joining the United States and becoming an American state.

In Alberta, the proportion of residents who express a preference for joining the United States has dropped markedly, from 25% in December 2021 to 14% in June 2022.

A majority of Canadians (51%, +2) think their province would be better off with a different Prime Minister in charge.

Residents of Alberta are more likely to believe that their province would benefit from having a different head of government in Ottawa (64%, -1). The proportions are lower in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (60%, +4), British Columbia (53%, =), Atlantic Canada (52%, +14), Ontario (48%, -1) and Quebec (45%, +3).

Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to believe that their province would be better off under a different Prime Minister (52%) than their counterparts aged 18-to-34 (50%) and aged 35-to-54 (49%).

More than half of Canadians (51%, =) say their province would be better off with a different premier in charge.

Almost two thirds of Albertans (65%, -8) would prefer to have a different person in charge of the provincial government right now. The rating is significantly lower in Quebec (48%, =), Ontario (43%, -14) and British Columbia (41%, +6).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 18 to June 20, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Flag First, Health Care Down as Canadians Assess Sources of Pride

Fewer than half of Canadians say Parliament (45%) and the Monarchy (37%) make them proud.

Vancouver, BC [June 28, 2022] – While Canadians continue to rank the flag as their main source of pride, perceptions on the country’s health care system have dropped dramatically since 2021, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample asks Canadians to say if 12 institutions and features elicit feelings of pride among them.

Just under four-in-five Canadians (78%, +1 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in 2021) say they are proud of the flag.

More than two thirds of Canadians express pride in multiculturalism (69%, -1) and hockey (also 68%, +2).

Majorities of Canadians are proud of five other institutions and features: the Canadian Armed Forces (65%, -2), bilingualism (59%, =), the health care system (58%, -8) , Indigenous culture (also 58%, -4) and the state of democracy in Canada (57%, -5).

Just under half of Canadians express pride in the Canadian economy (49%, =) and the Canadian justice system (also 49%, -3). The ranking is lower for Parliament (45%, -5) and the Monarchy (37%, +3).

Three years ago, 77% of Canadians were proud of the health care system,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In 2022, the proportion has dropped by 19 points to 58%.”

Men are significantly more likely to say that the health care system is a source of pride (66%) than women (51%). On a regional basis, the health care system scores best in Ontario (71%), followed by Alberta (69%), British Columbia (59%), Atlantic Canada (51%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (50%) and Quebec (45%).

While 57% of Canadians are proud of the state of democracy in Canada, there are significant differences across the political spectrum. Fewer than half of Conservative Party voters in the 2021 federal election (48%) say the state of democracy in Canada is source of pride. The rating is higher among Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (55%) or the Liberal Party (79%) last year.

More than half of Ontarians (54%) are proud of Parliament. The rating on this question is lower in Quebec (46%), Atlantic Canada (42%), British Columbia (41%), Alberta (35%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (31%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 18 to June 20, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Fewer Than One-in-Five Canadians Prefer Black Coffee

When asked to select the best way to cook a steak, 27% of Canadians cast their vote for “medium”.

Vancouver, BC [June 14, 2022] –  A plurality of Canadians express a fondness for the middle ground when assessing how they personally enjoy coffee and steak, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample showed Canadians two photographs with various shades of coffee and steak, and asked them to select what they usually consume.

Across the country, one-in-ten residents (10%) say they do not eat steak and about one-in-seven (15%) do not drink coffee.

Just under one-in-five Canadians (17%) selected the #1 option or black coffee, including 21% of men and 20% of those aged 55 and over.

“Only 13% of Atlantic Canadians usually take their coffee without any creamer,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is higher in Quebec (15%), Ontario (16%), Alberta (17%), British Columbia (21%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (22%).”

The proportion of Canadians who selected shades #2, #3 and #4—adding a little bit of milk or creamer to their cup of coffee—stands at 18% across the country.

More than two-in-five Canadians (43%) take their coffee with a larger amount of milk or creamer, choosing shades #5, #6 and #7. This group includes 50% of women in Canada, but only 34% of men.

Shades #8 and #9—where the milk or creamer content is significantly greater—are selected by a combined 8% of Canadians, including 13% of Albertans.

Among the five shades of steak tested in the survey, more than one-in-four Canadians (27%) selected #3 or medium—including 29% of men and 32% of British Columbians.

Equal proportions of Canadians chose shade #4 or medium well (17%) or shade #5 or well done (also 17%). Well done steak is particularly fashionable among Atlantic Canadians (24%) and Quebecers (21%).

Just over one-in-five Canadians (21%) preferred shade #2 or medium rare, while 9% opted for shade #1 or blue.

The rarest of steaks are preferred by 14% of Canadians of Indigenous or First Nations origin.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 22 to May 24, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. 

Find our data tables and photographs here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two-in-Five Canadians Would Take Nickel Out of Circulation

Men (47%) are more likely to support getting rid of the five-cent coin than women (33%).

Vancouver, BC [June 7, 2022] – While practically half of Canadians are willing to keep the nickel, support for abandoning the five-cent coin has increased since 2019, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 40% of Canadians support taking the nickel out of circulation, up four points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2019.

Almost half of Canadians (49%, -6) oppose abolishing the five-cent coin, while 11% (+2) are undecided.

There is a substantial gender gap when Canadians think about the nickel. While 47% of men support its abolition, the proportion drops to 33% among women.

Across Canada, 43% of residents aged 18-to-34 are in favour of taking the five-cent coin out of circulation. The proportion is lower among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (38%) and aged 55 and over (37%).

“More than half of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (58%), British Columbia (52%) and Atlantic Canada (also 52%) support keeping the nickel,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion of five-cent coin fans is lower in Quebec (49%), Ontario (47%) and Alberta (46%).”

More than seven-in-ten Canadians (71%, -4) agree with the federal government’s decision to take the penny out of circulation in February 2013.

Male respondents are more likely to agree with dropping the one-cent coin (77%) than their female counterparts (66%).

The level of agreement with abolishing the penny is highest among Canadians aged 18-to-34 (74%), followed by those aged 55 and over (72%) and those aged 35-to-54 (65%).

More than seven-in-ten residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (75%), Ontario (71%) and Quebec (also 71%) agree with taking Canada’s one-cent coin out of circulation. The numbers are lower in Alberta (69%) and British Columbia (65%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 22 to May 24, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Motorbicycle

Russia is Now the Least-Liked Country for Canadians

Vancouver, BC [May 31, 2022] – Few Canadians are expressing a favourable view of the Russian Federation, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, only 12% of Canadians have a positive opinion of Russia, while 77% hold negative views and 10% are undecided.

“Negative opinions on Russia are extremely high among Canadians aged 55 and over (87%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Sizeable majorities of Canadians aged 35-to-54 (76%) and aged 18-to-34 (69%) convey similar feelings.”

Positive perceptions of the Russian Federation have dropped by 12 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2021. Russia is now the least-liked of the 15 countries included in this tracking survey, below North Korea (13%, -1) and Iran (16%, =).

In a separate Research Co. poll conducted in February, only 1% of Canadians thought that the Canadian government should support the Russian Federation in what were then the early stages of an international crisis involving Ukraine.

Only one-in-five Canadians (20%, =) hold favourable views on China. The rating is higher for Saudi Arabia (24%, +1), Venezuela (31%, +3) and India (37%, =).

While 30% of Canadians aged 18-to-34 have a positive opinion of China, the rating falls to 21% among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 and to 10% among those aged 55 and over.

More than seven-in-ten Canadians have a favourable view of the United Kingdom (73%, +2) and Italy (73%, +4). More than two thirds also express positive opinions on Germany (70%, +1), Japan (69%, =) and France (69%, +1).

More than half of Canadians (56%, +6) express a favourable view of the United States. The rating is slightly lower for Canada’s other free trade partner in North America, Mexico (50%, +5).

Only 48% of British Columbians hold a positive opinion of the United States. The rating is higher in Quebec (54%), Atlantic Canada (57%), Alberta (also 57%), Ontario (59%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (60%).

Seven-in-ten Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2021 federal election (70%) hold favourable views on the United States. The numbers are slightly lower among those who cast ballots for the Liberal Party (66%) but drop markedly among those who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP) (43%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 22 to May 24, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Four Canadians Say Worst of COVID-19 is Now Behind Us

The satisfaction rating for the way provincial governments have managed the pandemic improved in Alberta and Quebec.

Vancouver, BC [May 24, 2022] – As a significant proportion of Canadians sense the end of the pandemic, positive views on the performance of various levels of government in managing COVID-19 have increased, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 76% of Canadians think the worst of COVID-19 is now “behind us”, up 14 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in April.

Four-in-five residents of Alberta and Ontario (80%) believe that the pandemic is unlikely to worsen, along with 76% of Quebecers, 71% of residents of British Columbia, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and 70% of Atlantic Canadians.

More than three-in-four Canadians (78%, -4) consider COVID-19 as a real threat—including 81% of those aged 55 and over.

A survey released by Research Co. earlier this month showed that 45% of Canadians were “anxious” about the end of COVID-19 restrictions and mandates in their community.

More than three-in-five Canadians (61%, +4) are currently satisfied with the way the federal government has dealt with COVID-19.

Sizeable majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (83%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (71%) in the 2021 Canadian federal election are happy with how Ottawa has managed the pandemic. The proportion is lower among those who voted for the Conservative Party last year (42%).

This month, the satisfaction rating also improved for provincial governments (63%, +6) and municipal administrations (65%, +5).

In the four most populous provinces, the level of satisfaction is highest in Quebec (67%, +8), followed by Ontario (65%, +4), British Columbia (62%, +1) and Alberta (53%, +16).

The satisfaction rating also rose across Canada for the federal chief public health officer (66%, +5) and for provincial health officers or chief medical officers (66%, +6).

“The numbers are remarkably consistent when Canadians rate the way their provincial health officers or chief medical officers are dealing with COVID-19,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Ontario is at the top of the list among the four most populous provinces at 67%, followed by Quebec with 66%, Alberta with 65% and British Columbia with 63%.”

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 14 to May 16, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Hold Mixed Views on End of Pandemic Regulations

COVID-19 infections have hit almost one-in-four Canadian households since the end of restrictions and mandates.

Vancouver, BC [May 20, 2022] – While almost half of Canadians endorse the decision to abandon all regulations related to the COVID-19 pandemic, more than two-in-five believe the call was made too soon, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians believe COVID-19 restrictions and mandates were “definitely” or “probably” lifted at the right time in their community, while 43% think they were lifted too early.

At least half of residents of Ontario (52%) and Alberta (50%) believe restrictions and mandates came to an end at the right time. The proportions are lower in British Columbia (49%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 49%), Quebec (47%) and Atlantic Canada (44%).

Almost one-in-four Canadians (23%) report that either themselves or someone else in their household became infected with COVID-19 after restrictions and mandates were lifted in their community—a proportion that rises to 36% among those aged 18-to-34 and to 27% among Quebecers.

“More than half of Canadians who endured a COVID-19 infection after restrictions and mandates were lifted (52%) feel that this decision was taken too soon,” says Mario Canseco. “Still, 42% of these respondents believe the regulations were halted at the correct time.”

Just over three-in-five Canadians (61%) say they would be satisfied if proof of vaccination was required once again in the future to go to restaurants or public events. Higher proportions of Canadians would be satisfied if two other restrictions and mandates returned: a reduction of capacity at venues (such as cinemas, theatres, concert halls and sports arenas) (64%) and having to wear a mask or face covering when entering an indoor premise (68%).

A majority of Canadians (52%) state that, as long as people are vaccinated, COVID-19 is a minor nuisance. This includes 58% of those who have experienced the virus personally or in their household after the end of restrictions and mandates.

Larger proportions of Canadians agree that it’s only a matter of time before everyone catches COVID-19 (59%) and expect to be vaccinated against the virus at least once again in the next six months (60%).

Compared to a similar Research Co. survey conducted in April, fewer Canadians (45%, -11) say are “anxious” about the end of COVID-19 restrictions and mandates in their community.

This month, there are also marked drops in the proportion of Canadians who, over the course of the next two weeks, intend to continue wearing a mask or face covering when entering an indoor premise (54%, -6) or every time they leave their home (35%, -10).

Two thirds of Canadians (66%, +8) are planning to visit relatives or friends in person in the next fortnight. In addition, more than half of Canadians will have dinner (52%, +6) or lunch (51%, +8) at a sit-down restaurant in the same span.

Canadians are also more likely to be planning a visit to the theatre or cinema (27%, +5), to a live concert (17%, +6) and to a live sporting event (14%, +3) than last month.

Travel plans are also on the rise, with 30% of Canadians (+8) intending to take a trip by car for an overnight stay in the next two weeks, while 16% (+3) are considering a trip by airplane.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 14 to May 16, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca