Most Canadians Are Not Getting Enough Sleep Each Night

Money and relationships are the two issues that are more likely to make it harder for Canadians to fall asleep.

Vancouver, BC [January 14, 2020] – Just over a third of Canadians are actually meeting the night sleep guidelines issued by Health Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 35% of Canadians say their typical night’s sleep on a weekday or workday lasts from 7 to 9 hours—matching the recommendations endorsed by Health Canada.

Almost two thirds of Canadians (64%) say they slumber for fewer than 7 hours on a typical night’s sleep on a weekday or workday.

On weekends, the proportion of Canadians who reach the recommended guidelines of 7 to 9 hours of sleep rises to 45%. However, more than half (51%) still spend fewer than 7 hours in bed.

Across the country, 17% of Canadians claim to be “very well rested” after a typical night’s sleep on a weekday or workday, while 53% say they are “moderately well rested.” Conversely, three-in-ten Canadians (30%) are “not too well rested” or “not well rested at all” on a weekday or workday.

Women (38%), Canadians aged 18-to-34 (35%) and residents of Manitoba and Saskatchewan (34%) are more likely to say that they are usually “not too well rested” or “not well rested at all” when facing a new workday or weekday.

The proportion of Canadians who feel “very well rested” or “moderately well rested” rises to 75% after a typical night’s sleep on a weekend or non-workday.

One-in-four Canadians (25%) say they never find it hard to sleep at night during the course of an average week. More than a third (36%) find it hard to sleep for 1 or 2 days each week, while almost two-in-five (39%) have a difficult time sleeping at least 3 days a week.

Practically half of Canadians (49%) say worrying about money and financial matters made it harder for them to fall asleep at night over the course of the past month.

“Albertans (62%) are significantly more likely to say that they were kept awake by financial concerns than residents of all other regions,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Women are also more likely to have lost sleep because of financial matters than men (54% to 43%).”

Almost a third of Canadians (32%) lost sleep at night because they were concerned about relationships and family, while a similar proportion (29%) had trouble sleeping because of health worries.

About one-in-four Canadians (23%) say they had difficulty falling sleep because they were concerned about work—including 41% of those aged 18-to-34 and 3% of Albertans.

Significantly fewer Canadians say domestic politics and issues (6%) or international politics and issues (also 6%) kept them awake at night.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 18 to December 20, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Have Favourable View of UK, Split on USA

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians have a positive opinion of Saudi Arabia, Iran and North Korea.

Vancouver, BC [January 10, 2020] – More than four-in-five Canadians hold a favourable opinion of the United Kingdom, but just under half feel the same way about the United States, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 83% of Canadians have a positive view of the United Kingdom.

At least seven-in-ten Canadians hold positive opinions on four other nations: Germany (73%), Italy (72%), Japan (also 72%) and France (70%). More than half of Canadians (52%) have a positive view of South Korea.

Canadians are split when assessing the United States, with 47% saying they have a positive opinion of the country and 48% stating they have a negative one.

Canadian men are more likely to have a positive opinion of the United States than Canadian women (50% to 42%). Canadians aged 18-to-34 are also more likely to hold favourable views on the United States (53%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (43%) and 55 and over (45%). 

“A majority of Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in last year’s federal election (64%) have a positive opinion of the United States,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are decidedly lower among Canadians who voted for the Liberals (42%) or the New Democrats (31%) last year.”

Just under half of Canadians (46%) have a positive view of Mexico, while more than a third (36%) have a positive opinion of India and three-in-ten (30%) have a favourable view of Venezuela.

Just over one-in-four Canadians have a positive opinion of China (27%) and Russia (26%), while more than three-in-five (61%) have a negative view of each country.

In the specific case of China, the proportion of positive opinions varies greatly around the country: 29% in Atlantic Canada, Ontario and Quebec, 28% in Alberta, 22% in British Columbia and 17% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians have a positive view of Saudi Arabia (17%), Iran (14%) and North Korea (11%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 18 to December 20, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Ontarians and Albertans Dismayed by Their Current Premiers

More than half of residents of each province say they would be “better off” with a different person in charge.

Vancouver, BC [January 8, 2020] – As a debate over national unity continues in Canada, a large proportion of Albertans and Ontarians are dissatisfied with their current provincial heads of government, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Canadians believe their province would be better off with a different premier in charge.

The proportion of residents who are unhappy with their provincial head of government is highest in Ontario (60%), Alberta (57%), Atlantic Canada (52%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 52%). Fewer than half of residents of Quebec (44%) and British Columbia (42%) feel the same way.

In addition, 50% of Canadians believe their province would be better off with a different Prime Minister in Ottawa. 

Majorities of residents of Alberta (65%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (59%), British Columbia (53%) and Ontario (51%) believe their province would be better off with someone other than Justin Trudeau in charge of the federal government. Fewer than half of those living in Atlantic Canada (48%) and Quebec (38%) concur.

One-in-four Canadians (25%) believe their province would be better off as its own country, including 40% of residents of both Alberta and Quebec. 

Separatist sentiment in Alberta has increased by 10 points since a Research Co. survey conducted in July 2019 and by six points in Quebec since a Research Co. survey conducted in October 2018.

Finally, 16% of Canadians say their province would be better off joining the U.S. and becoming an American state—a feeling that is more pronounced in Alberta (22%) and Quebec (20%).

“The level of disagreement with the notion of a province joining the United States is highest among Canadians aged 55 and over at 87%,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers also amount to a majority among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (71%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (66%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 18 to December 20, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

One-in-Five Canadians Currently Pay Attention to Astrology

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to believe in the concept than their older counterparts.

Vancouver, BC [January 1, 2020] – A majority of Canadians question the concept of studying the movements and relative positions of celestial objects to make observations about human affairs and terrestrial events, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than a third of Canadians (36%) say they “definitely” or “probably” believe in astrology, while more than half (55%) “probably” or “definitely” do not.

Women (40%) are more likely to lend credence to astrology than men (30%). While only 27% of Canadians aged 55 and over believe in the concept, the proportion increases to 37% among those aged 35-to-54 and 49% among those aged 18-to-34.

“Across Canada, Ontario has the largest proportion of residents who express a belief in astrology at 42%,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Alberta has the lowest at 27%.”

When asked about their current attitude towards the concept, one-in-five Canadians (20%) acknowledge currently paying attention to astrology—including 30% of those aged 18-to-34, 25% of Ontarians and 25% of Atlantic Canadians.

More than one-in-four Canadians (27%) say they used to pay attention to astrology, but don’t anymore. A majority (54%) claim to have never paid attention to the concept, including 62% of those aged 55 and over.

Belief in other concepts was slightly lower across the country. One third of Canadians (33%) believe in haunted houses, or buildings being inhabited by spirits of dead people, while 58% do not.

Just over three-in-ten Canadians (31%) believe in mediumship, or mediating communication between living human beings and spirits of dead people, while 60% do not.

The same proportion (31%) believe in clairvoyance, or gaining information about an object, person, location or physical event through extrasensory perception, while 58% do not.

On these three concepts, there is a sizeable gender gap, with more women in Canada believing in haunted houses (40%), mediumship (39%), clairvoyance (36%) than men (25%, 22% and 26% respectively).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 2 to December 6, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians More Stressed Over Holiday Season Than Last Year

Two thirds of Canadians prefer “Merry Christmas” as a greeting, down nine points since 2018.

Vancouver, BC [December 20, 2019] – While half of Canadians expect a relatively easy-going December, three-in-ten believe this time of the year will bring tension, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 50% of Canadians say they expect the current holiday season to be “more fun than stressful”, down seven points since a similar survey conducted in 2018.

Conversely, 30% of Canadians (+5) believe the holiday season will be more stressful than fun, and 20% are undecided.

“More than one third of Canadians aged 35-to-54 (36%) are foreseeing more tension than entertainment this month,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “British Columbia is ahead of all other regions on the expectations of a fun holiday season (60%), while Alberta and Atlantic Canada have the lowest numbers (45% and 44% respectively).”

Across the country, 65% of Canadians (-9 since 2018) say “Merry Christmas” is their preferred greeting for the season, while 18% (+4) say “Happy Holidays” is their favourite.

“Merry Christmas” remains extremely popular with Canadians aged 55 and over (73%), residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (75%) and Conservative Party voters in this year’s federal election (also 75%).

Conversely, the groups that express the highest penchant for “Happy Holidays” are Canadians aged 18-to-34 (26%) and Quebecers (31%).

There is a sizeable change in the way Canadians are feeling about spirituality compared to 2018. Across the country, 48% of Canadians claim that religion is “very important” or “moderately important” in their daily lives—a 10-point increase since 2018.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 2 to December 6, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca