Canadians Pick Trudeau to Manage Pandemic, O’Toole for Jobs

One-in-ten Conservative Party voters from 2019 say they will cast a ballot for the People’s Party in this month’s election.
 
There is no clear leader on two matters: housing, homelessness and poverty, and transportation projects.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 15, 2021] – The incumbent prime minister is the first choice of Canadians to handle issues such as health care and the COVID-19 pandemic, while the leader of the official opposition is preferred for financial and public safety concerns, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
The online survey of a representative national sample asked Canadians to select which one of the five federal party leaders who are running nationwide campaigns is the best person to manage 16 different issues.  
 
More than a third of Canadians (36%) think Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is better suited to handle the COVID-19 pandemic, followed by Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole with 22%, New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Jagmeet Singh with 12%, People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier with 6% and Green Party leader Annamie Paul with 2%.  
 
More than three-in-ten Canadians also pick Trudeau to manage foreign affairs (31%), child care (also 31%) and regulations related to firearms (also 31%).  
 
Earlier in the campaign, Erin O’Toole was tied with Justin Trudeau on the foreign affairs file,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the final week before votes are cast, Trudeau has a five-point lead on this particular issue.”  
 
The Liberal leader is also ahead of all rivals on being the best person to handle immigration (29%), health care (also 29%), the environment (28%), Indigenous issues and reconciliation (27%), seniors care (26%), and racism and discrimination (also 26%).  
 
One third of Canadians (33%) believe O’Toole would be the best leader to manage the economy and jobs, followed by Trudeau with 29%, Singh with 15%, Bernier with 4% and Paul with 2%.  
 
The Conservative leader is in first place on three other issues: crime and public safety (29%), accountability and leadership (27%), and energy and pipelines (also 27%).  
 
There is a tie on two specific concerns. Across the country, 25% of Canadians select either Trudeau or Singh as the best leaders to manage housing, homelessness and poverty. When asked about transportation projects, equal proportions of respondents pick Trudeau and O’Toole (25% each).  
 
Paul gets her best rating on the environment (14%), while Bernier scores highest on the COVID-19 pandemic (6%).  
 
In a survey released by Research Co. this week, health care, the economy and jobs, housing homelessness and poverty, and the environment were identified as the most important issues facing Canada.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 13, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Tobi 87
 
 

Liberals Regain Lead, Conservatives and NDP Drop in Canada

One-in-ten Conservative Party voters from 2019 say they will cast a ballot for the People’s Party in this month’s election.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 14, 2021] – As Canada heads to the final week of campaigning in the 2021 federal election, the governing Liberal Party is ahead of its competitors, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 34% of decided voters in Canada would support the Liberal candidate in their constituency, up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in late August.  
 
The Conservative Party is second with 30% (-2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (-2), the Bloc Québécois with 7% (+1), the People’s Party with 5% (+2) and the Green Party with 3% (-1). In addition, 1% of decided voters in the country would back a different party or an independent candidate.  
 

The Conservatives remain ahead of the Liberals among male voters (36% to 31%) and voters aged 55 and over (35% to 31%). The Liberals hold the upper hand over the Conservatives among female voters (38% to 25%) and voters aged 35-to-54 (39% to 30%). The Liberals are also in first place among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (37%, with the NDP at 27% and the Conservatives at 18%).  
 
In Atlantic Canada, the Liberals remain the most favoured option for voters (40%, with the Conservatives at 34%). In Quebec, the governing party holds an eight-point lead over the Bloc (37% to 29%).  
 
Half of decided voters in Alberta (50%) would support the Conservative candidate in their constituency, along with more than two-in-five (43%) of those who reside in Saskatchewan and Manitoba.  
 
The race remains closely contested in Ontario, where the Liberals are slightly ahead of the Conservatives (37% to 34%) and in British Columbia, where the three main federal parties are virtually tied (30% for the Conservatives, 29% for the New Democrats and 28% for the Liberals).  
 
The People’s Party is benefiting from a higher level of support in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (9%), Alberta (7%) and Ontario (6%). In fact, 10% of Canadians who supported the Conservatives in the 2019 federal election say they will be voting for the People’s Party in 2021.  
 
Almost one-in-four Canadians (23%, -3) think health care is the most important issue facing the country today, followed by the economy and jobs (22%, +2), housing, homelessness and poverty (16%, +1) and the environment (12%, -1).  
 
Across Canada, the NDP’s Jagmeet Singh continues to post the highest approval rating among the five leaders who are running nationwide campaigns (49%, -2), followed by Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau (43%, -2), Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole (40%, -1), Annamie Paul of the Green Party (23%, +2) and Maxime Bernier of the People’s Party (15%, =).  
 
Singh also remains ahead on personal momentum, with 27% of Canadians saying their opinion of him has improved since the start of the campaign. The numbers on this indicator are lower for O’Toole (22%), Trudeau (15%), Paul (12%) and Bernier (8%).  
 
On the “Best Prime Minister” question, Trudeau remains in first place with 33% (+1), followed by O’Toole (26%, =), Singh (18%, -2), Bernier (5%, +2) and Paul (2%, +1).  
 
“A third of Canadian women (33%) feel Justin Trudeau is the best person to manage the federal government, while only one-in-five (19%) select Erin O’Toole,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The race is significantly tighter among male voters on this same question, with Trudeau at 34% and O’Toole at 33%.”
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 13, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Dave Doe
 

Tokyo Olympics Coverage Compelling for Younger Canadians

Support for a Canadian boycott of the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics reaches 56% across the country.
 
Vancouver, BC [September 10, 2021] – While a majority of Canadians tuned in to this year’s Summer Olympics, almost two-in-five event watchers report that they did not pay as much attention to the competition as they had in the past, a new Research Co. poll has found.
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 58% of Canadians say they watched at least some coverage of the most recent Summer Olympics, which were held in Tokyo earlier this year.
 
Canadians aged 18-to-34 were more likely to watch the Summer Olympics (62%) than their counterparts aged 55 and over (58%) and aged 35-to-54 (56%).
 
Among those Canadians who tuned in to the Tokyo 2020 games, almost two-in-five (38%) admit that they watched less coverage than in past Summer Olympics. A similar proportion (40%) enjoyed the same amount as in previous editions, while 21% say they watched more coverage.
 
While 46% of Canadians aged 55 and over say they watched fewer Olympic events this year, one third of those aged 18-to-34 (33%) say they were exposed to more coverage in 2021.
 
Canadians who watched television coverage were asked about the platforms they relied upon. Across the country, more than half of the time spent on Tokyo 2020 (52%) was enjoyed live on television, while 24% amounted to tape delayed broadcasts.
 
Just under a quarter of the time that Canadians spent watching the games (24%) took place via streaming, either live (12%) or tape delayed (also 12%).
 
“There are some sizeable age differences when it comes to the platforms that Canadians used to watch events during the Tokyo 2020 games,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While Canadians aged 55 and over relied on streaming only 17% of the time, the proportion rises to 39% for those aged 18-to-34.”
 
A majority of Canadians (56%) say they think Canada should boycott the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing over China’s human rights record, up two points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in March.
 
Men (61%), Canadians aged 55 and over (60%), Albertans (61%) and British Columbians (59%) are more likely to endorse the notion of Canadian athletes not participating in the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Wiiii

Canadians Hold Mixed Views on Which Leader is Best on Issues

Just under one-in-five Canadians (17%) say they intend to vote by mail in this year’s federal election.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 6, 2021] – As the federal election campaign continues, the three main federal party leaders are connecting in different ways with Canadians on the most important issues facing the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, just under a third of Canadians (32%) think Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is the best person to handle crime and public safety.  
 
Trudeau is also the preferred choice of Canadians to manage immigration (30%), health care (29%) and the environment (28%).  
 
Official opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole is the top option for Canadians to handle the economy and jobs (34%), energy and pipelines (32%), and accountability and leadership (27%). O’Toole and Trudeau are tied, with 30% each, when Canadians are asked about the best leader to manage foreign affairs (30%).  
 
New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Jagmeet Singh is the most popular leader to deal with housing, homelessness and poverty (27%), with Trudeau and O’Toole tied at 24%.  
 
Health care is identified as the most important issue facing Canada for 26% of respondents, followed by the economy and jobs with 20%, housing, homelessness and poverty with 15% and the environment with 13%.  
 
The survey also asked Canadians about other characteristics and topics related to the three main federal party leaders. Trudeau emerged as the most popular option to be the Prime Minister in the event of another Quebec referendum (31%) and to represent Canada at the next round of climate change talks (30%).  
 
The incumbent prime minister is also ahead on four personality traits: having a drink with you at the local bar (28%), being on your sports team (also 28%), babysitting your kids or a relative’s kids (25%) and being part of your trivia quiz team (23%, with Singh close behind at 21%).  
 
Singh is practically tied with Trudeau on two of the items tested: having a coffee or tea with you at the local coffee shop (27%, with Trudeau at 26%) and giving you a good recommendation on a book to read (22%, with Trudeau at 21%).  
 
More than three-in-ten Canadians express a preference for O’Toole on three separate matters: negotiating with U.S. President Joe Biden on trade and security issues (34%), being the Prime Minister in the event of a terrorist attack (32%) and negotiating with Russia over Arctic sovereignty (31%).  
 
“There is a theme developing when it comes to the perceptions of Canadians on the three main party leaders,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While Trudeau and Singh score highly on some of the personality traits, like hanging around at a bar or coffee shop, O’Toole has a decisive advantage on foreign policy items.”  
 
This week, there will be two televised debates organized by the Leaders’ Debate Commission. More than two-in-five Canadians (42%) agree with the Commission’s decision to not extend an invitation to these debates to People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier, while 33% disagree and 25% are undecided.  
 
The results are similar when Canadians are asked about the presence of Maverick Party leader Jay Hill on the televised meetings, with 44% agreeing with the decision to leave him out, 27% disagreeing and 29% saying they are not sure.  
 
Almost half of Quebecers (49%) are in favour of the Commission’s decision to leave both Bernier and Hill off the stage.  
 
Across the country, 17% of Canadians say they plan to vote by mail this year—a proportion that includes 30% of British Columbians and 21% of Albertans.  
 
While more than one-in-four Canadians (26%) plan to cast their ballot during Advance Voting from September 10 to September 13, more than two-in-five (44%) intend to vote on Election Day (September 20).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Conservatives Close Gap in Canada as Liberal Lead Disappears

Justin Trudeau’s approval rating fell to 45% (-5 since June), but he is still ahead of Erin O’Toole in the “Preferred PM” question.
 
Vancouver, BC [August 31, 2021] – The federal election in Canada is currently a dead heat between the two most prominent parties in the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 33% of Canadian decided voters would cast a ballot for the candidate of the Liberal Party in their riding, down five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June.
 
The Conservative Party remains in second place with 32% (+2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 22% (+2), the Bloc Québécois with 6% (+1), the Green Party with 4% (-1) and the People’s Party with 3% (+2). Fewer than 1% of decided voters would vote for the Maverick Party, for another party or for an independent candidate.
 
In June, the Liberals were ahead of the Conservatives by 15 points among female decided voters in Canada. This month, the advantage has narrowed to just eight points (36% to 28%). The Tories are now in first place among male decided voters (36% to 31%).
 
The Liberals are still popular among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (34%, followed by the NDP with 29%) and among decided voters aged 35-to-54 (38%, with the Conservatives at 32%). The Tories hold a seven-point advantage over the Liberals among decided voters aged 55 and over (37% to 30%).
 
The Liberals are in first place among decided voters in Atlantic Canada (40%) and Quebec (also 40%). The Conservatives have outright leads in Alberta (49%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (46%).
 
There are close races developing in two Canadian provinces. In Ontario, the Conservatives and the Liberals are essentially tied (36% and 35% respectively). In British Columbia, the Liberals—who were leading in a Research Co. survey conducted in early August—have fallen to third place (28%), with both the Conservatives and the New Democrats at 32%.
 
There is some movement when Canadians are asked about the most important issue facing the country. Health care is first with 26% (-3), followed by the economy and jobs with 20% (-3) and housing, homelessness and poverty with 15% (+1). The environment is fourth on the list with 13% (+6).
 
“While health care remains the dominant issue for Atlantic Canadians and Quebecers, financial matters are crucial for those who reside in Alberta,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “One-in-five Ontarians and British Columbians are worried about housing, but the issue that has seen the biggest gains since June is the environment.”
 
The approval rating for Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau stands at 45% at the end of the month. This is higher than the numbers posted by Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole (41%, +7) and lower than NDP leader Jagmeet Singh (51%, +1).
 
Just over one-in-five Canadians (21%, -11) approve of the way Green Party leader Annamie Paul is handling her duties, while there was no significant movement for People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (15%, +1).
 
When Canadians are asked which one of the five leaders who are running nationwide campaigns would make the best head of government, the incumbent prime minister also lost some ground. Trudeau is in first place with 32% (-5), followed by O’Toole (26%, +11), Singh (20%, +4), Bernier (3%, =) and Paul (1%, -1).
 
Since the start of the campaign, Trudeau posts a negative momentum score (-24, with 39% of Canadians saying their opinion of him has worsened). Paul and Bernier are also in negative territory (-18 and -19 respectively), while O’Toole is even and Singh is at +10 (with 27% of Canadians reporting a better assessment of the current NDP leader).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Separatist Feelings Drop in Quebec, Remain Stagnant in Alberta

Most Albertans and Ontarians believe their provinces would be better off with a different premier in charge.  
 
Vancouver, BC [August 20, 2021] – While almost half of Canadians believe their province would benefit from having a different prime minister, fewer residents of Quebec are expressing sympathy towards secession, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 25% of Quebecers believe their province would be better off as its own country, down 11 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2020.  
 
Only Alberta has a larger proportion of residents who believe they would be better off as a nation (28%, unchanged since May 2020, and lower than the 40% observed in December 2019).  
 
Almost half of Canadians (47%) think their province would be better off with a different Prime Minister in Ottawa, up nine points since May 2020.  
 
More than half of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (58%) yearn for someone other than Justin Trudeau to have responsibility over the federal government. The proportion is lower in Alberta (50%), Ontario (48%), British Columbia (46%), Atlantic Canada (38%) and Quebec (37%).  
 
When asked is their province would be better off with a different premier in charge, 47% of Canadians agreed, while just over a third (37%) disagreed.   Two thirds of Albertans (68%) and a majority of Ontarians (54%) think their provinces would be better off with a different head of government.  
 
“Since May 2020, the numbers for the premiers of Alberta and Ontario have worsened on this question,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There is an increase in negative perceptions of eight points for Jason Kenney in Alberta and of 16 points for Doug Ford in Ontario.”  
 
The proportion of residents who are not particularly pleased with their premiers is lower in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (50%), Quebec (38%), Atlantic Canada (37%) and British Columbia (36%).
 
Across Canada, only 13% of respondents believe their province would be better off joining the United States and becoming an American state, down four points since May 2020. This feeling is more prevalent among residents of Alberta and Quebec (each at 17%).
 
Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 12 to August 14, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Feel Trudeau is Better for Province Than Harper

Roughly the same proportion of the province’s residents would be “very upset” with a win for the Liberals or the Conservatives.
 
Vancouver, BC [August 17, 2021] – Most residents of British Columbia believe the tenure of Justin Trudeau as Prime Minister of Canada has been beneficial for the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 54% of British Columbians think the province has been treated “very well” or “well” by Trudeau, while one third (34%) believe it has been treated “poorly” or “very poorly.
 
Respondents are almost evenly split when assessing the effect of the federal government headed by Stephen Harper on British Columbia, with 38% saying he treated the province “very well” or “well” and 42% believing he behaved “poorly” or “very poorly.”
 
“Almost half of British Columbians aged 55 and over (48%) hold a favourable view on the way the current federal government is treating the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Just over a third (35%) feel the same way about the previous federal administration.”
 
Across British Columbia, just over half of residents (51%) say they would be “very upset” if the Conservative Party forms the government again in Ottawa. Animosity towards a Tory administration rises to 53% among Green Party voters in 2019, 68% among Liberal voters and 72% among New Democratic Party (NDP) voters.
 
Just under half of British Columbians (48%) say they would be “very upset” if the Liberals win the next election and remain in power, including 85% of Conservative voters, 61% of Green voters and 54% of NDP voters.
 
Only 35% of British Columbians would be “very upset” if the NDP forms the government for the first time in Ottawa after the next federal election. This includes two thirds of Conservative voters (66%), but significantly lower proportions of those who voted for the Liberals (43%) or the Greens (32%) in 2019.
 
Four of the current ministers in the federal government represent constituencies located in British Columbia and are seeking re-election this year as candidates for the Liberal Party.
 
Minister of National Defence Harjit Sajjan has the best approval rating of the four BC-based federal ministers (37%), followed by Minister of Environment and Climate Change Jonathan Wilkinson (31%), Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion Carla Qualtrough (29%) and Minister of Digital Government Joyce Murray (27%).
 
Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 7 to August 9, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca
 

Most Canadians Believe Systemic Discrimination is a Problem

Fewer than half of Canadians say they know who to contact in order to file a human rights complaint.

Vancouver, BC [August 6, 2021] – A majority of Canadians believe that some of the country’s institutions exhibit policies or practices that contribute to less favourable outcomes for minority groups, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, almost two thirds of Canadians (64%) believe systemic discrimination is a problem in the country.

Women (67%), Canadians aged 55 and over (65%) and residents of Ontario (67%) and British Columbia (also 67%) are more likely to agree that systemic discrimination is a problem in Canada.

More than four-in-five Canadians of African descent (86%) believe systemic discrimination is a problem in the country, along with majorities of respondents whose origins are Southeast Asian (72%), South Asian (71%), First Nations (70%), East Asian (65%) and European (63%).

While three-in-four Canadians (76%) say they know what systemic discrimination is, only half (50%) believe that most Canadians have a sense of what systemic discrimination is.

“There is an evident disconnect in the personal views of Canadians on systemic discrimination and what they think the rest of the country’s residents are aware of,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The survey outlines a 26-point gap between what Canadians feel individually and what they assume is true collectively.”

Across the country, three-in-four Canadians (75%) say they know when their human rights have been violated—a proportion that rises to 77% among those aged 55 and over and to 79% in Atlantic Canada.

When asked if they know who to contact in order to file a human rights complaint, only 45% of Canadians answered affirmatively.

Majorities of Canadians of four different ethnicities say they know who to talk to if their human rights are violated: South Asian (66%), First Nations (60%), Southeast Asian (56%) and African (55%). The proportion is lower for respondents of European (44%) and East Asian (37%) descent.

Methodology: Results are based on an online survey conducted from July 9 to July 18, 2021, among 2,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.2 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Split on the State of Race Relations in the Country

Almost half of Canadians think the country should be a mosaic, where cultural differences within society are preserved.
 

Vancouver, BC [July 30, 2021] – While a large proportion of Canadians continue to voice support for multiculturalism, the public is deeply divided when assessing the current state of affairs in the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, just over two-in-five Canadians (41%,) think race relations in Canada have improved over the past two years, down eight points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in July 2020.

A similar proportion of Canadians (38%, +9) believe race relations have worsened since 2019.

Majorities of Canadians whose ancestry is South Asian (58%), First Nations (53%) and African (also 53%) feel race relations have improved since 2019. The numbers are lower among respondents of Southeast Asian (43%), East Asian (41%) and European (34%) origins.

Almost half of Canadians (47%, +6) think Canada should be a mosaic, where cultural differences within society are valuable and should be preserved.

Conversely, just over a third of Canadians (35%, -11) prefer the concept of the melting pot, where immigrants assimilate and blend into Canadian society.

Almost three-in-four Canadians (73%, -1) think the policy of multiculturalism has been “very good” or “good” for the country, while 16% (-2) consider it “bad” or “very bad.”

“Support for multiculturalism is highest among women (75%), Canadians aged 18-to-34 (79%) and British Columbians (81%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The concept is endorsed by majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (84%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (79%) and the Conservative Party (66%) in the 2019 federal election.”

Almost half of Canadians have personally experienced racism on social media (49%) and on day-to-day social interactions (49%), while fewer say they have endured racism at school (41%), at work (40%), during interactions with police or law enforcement officers (35%) or during interactions with the health care system (32%).

Just under three-in-five Canadians of First Nations descent (59%) say they have endured racism during interactions with the health care system—along with 62% of South Asians and 68% of Africans.

More than seven-in-ten Canadians of African descent (72%) have experienced racism on social media, along with at least three-in-five of their counterparts of First Nations (68%), South Asian (61%) and Southeast Asian (60%) origins.

More than half of Canadians say they have witnessed racism on social media (58%) and on day-to-day social interactions (53%). More than a third have also perceived racism at school (47%), at work (43%), engaging with police and law enforcement officers (42%) and dealing with the health care system (36%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online survey conducted from July 9 to July 18, 2021, among 2,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.2 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Pierre Trudeau Ahead of Harper as Best Recent PM for Canadians

More than one-in-five Canadians select either Justin Trudeau or Stephen Harper as the worst of the past nine prime ministers.

Vancouver, BC [July 23, 2021] – Pierre Trudeau remains the most liked of Canada’s nine recent heads of government, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 20% of Canadians select Pierre Trudeau as the best prime minister since 1968, down three points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in July 2020.

Stephen Harper is second on the list with 16% (=), followed by Justin Trudeau with 13% (-2), Jean Chrétien with 7% (-4) and Brian Mulroney also with 7% (-1).

Fewer Canadians mentioned Paul Martin (3%, +1), Joe Clark (2%, +1), John Turner (2%, +1) or Kim Campbell (1%, -1). Almost three-in-ten (29%, -7) are undecided.

Justin Trudeau is the preferred choice for Canadians aged 18-to-34 (18%, with his father at 15% and Harper at 12%). Harper leads among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (18%, with Pierre Trudeau at 15% and Justin Trudeau at 14%). Canadians aged 55 and over pick Pierre Trudeau (29%, with Harper at 18%).

When asked who the country’s worst head of government since 1968 has been, 22% of Canadians select Justin Trudeau (+4), while 21% pick Harper (-2).

All of the remaining past prime ministers are in single digits: Mulroney (7%, +1), Pierre Trudeau (6%, -1), Campbell (5%, -1), Clark (4%, =), Chrétien (3%, -1), Martin (2%, -1) and Turner (also 2%, -1). More than a quarter of Canadians (27%, =) are undecided.

“The regional disparities are evident when Canadians assess their least favourite recent prime ministers,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than two-in-five Albertans (44%) select Justin Trudeau on this question, while just over one-in-four Quebecers (26%) pick Harper.”

Canadians were also asked about nine different politicians who served as leaders of the Official Opposition in Ottawa over the past five decades.

Half of Canadians (50%, -4) think former New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Jack Layton would have made a good prime minister. About three-in-ten Canadians feel the same way about former Progressive Conservative leader Robert Stanfield (31%, +1) and former NDP leader Tom Mulcair (30%, -2).

The rating is slightly lower for former Reform Party leader Preston Manning (28%, +2), and former Conservative Party leaders Rona Ambrose (24%, -3) and Andrew Scheer (23%, -3).

The lowest ranked former opposition leaders on this question are Stockwell Day of the Canadian Alliance (20%, -2) and former Liberal Party leaders Stéphane Dion (also 20%, -2) and Michael Ignatieff (19%, -1).

Methodology:  Results are based on an online survey conducted from July 16 to July 18, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Vaccine Hesitation Drops, Satisfaction with Rollout Rises in Canada

Seven-in-ten Canadians say they are still wearing a mask every time they go out, including 76% of women.

Vancouver, BC [July 20, 2021] – More Canadians are pleased with the way their federal and provincial administrations have managed the inoculation process related to the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than seven-in-ten Canadians are satisfied with the vaccination plans and phases outlined by their province (73%, +12 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May) and with the pace of vaccination efforts in their province (also 73%, +15).

A similar proportion of Canadians are content with the procurement of COVID-19 vaccine doses from the federal government (72%, +15).

This month, almost nine-in-ten Canadians (88%, +5) acknowledge that they have already been inoculated against COVID-19, or plan to have their first shot when it becomes available to them.

Fewer than one-in-ten Canadians (8%, -5) say they will “definitely” or “probably” not get vaccinated. This marks the first time in nine different surveys conducted since April 2020 that the proportion of Canadians who plan to refuse a COVID-19 shot is in single digits.

In December 2020, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) stated that it expected to have enough COVID-19 vaccine doses to inoculate every willing Canadian by the end of September 2021.

“In February 2021, only 45% of Canadians expected the vaccination goal outlined by the PHAC to actually be met,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This month, practically three-in-four Canadians (74%) believe the milestone will be reached.”

Across the country, seven-in-ten Canadians (70%, -5) say that they wear a mask every time they go out, including 76% of women and 75% of Canadians aged 55 and over.

This month sees sizeable reductions in the proportion of Canadians who are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection (24%, -6) and who are losing their temper more than usual at home (16%, -4).

The indicators are mostly stable on other behavioural aspects related to the pandemic, including the proportion of Canadians who are overeating or eating more than usual at home (27%, -2),  not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection (16%, +1), having a bath or shower less often (14%, -2), drinking more alcohol than usual at home (also 14%, +1) and brushing their teeth less often than before the pandemic (9%, -2).

Methodology:  Results are based on an online study conducted from July 9 to July 11, 2021, among 1,000 Canadian adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Satisfaction with Pandemic Handling Increases Across Canada

Three-in-four Canadians think the border with the United States should remain closed to non-essential travel.

Vancouver, BC [July 15, 2021] – While more Canadians are content with the way all levels of government have managed the COVID-19 pandemic, a majority of the country’s residents believe it is too soon to fully reopen the border with the United States, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than three-in-five Canadians (61%) are satisfied with the way the federal government has dealt with the COVID-19 outbreak, up 10 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May.

“Residents of Atlantic Canada (73%) and Quebec (67%) are more likely to be satisfied with the way Ottawa has managed the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “They are joined by majorities of Canadians who reside in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (62%), Ontario (54%), Alberta (53%) and British Columbia (52%).”

More than three-in-five Canadians are also satisfied with the way their municipal governments (63%, +8) and their provincial governments (62%, +10) have handled COVID-19.

The satisfaction rating increased in the four most populous provinces. British Columbia (71%, +10) and Quebec (71%, +10) continue to post significantly higher numbers than Ontario (51%, +9) and Alberta (46%, +12).

More than seven-in-ten Canadians (72%, +17) think the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic is now behind us, while 15% (-12) believe it still lies ahead.

In spite of the fact that most Canadians think the pandemic will not worsen, 77% believe that COVID-19 is still “a very serious” or “moderately serious” problem, while 19% deem it “not too serious” or “not a problem.”

Just under four-in-five Canadians (79%, -5 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May) believe that all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise should wear a face covering while inside.

There are reductions in the proportion of Canadians who would like to prohibit non-essential travel from one province to another (65%, -9) and non-essential travel inside provinces (59%, -8). In addition, 71% (-8) would continue to place all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period.

Across the country, 75% of Canadians (-5 since May) think the border with the United States should remain closed to non-essential travel—a proportion that rises to 80% in British Columbia and 85% among Canadians aged 55 and over.

Methodology:  Results are based on an online study conducted from July 9 to July 11, 2021, among 1,000 Canadian adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadian Views on the United States Become More Positive

China, Iran and North Korea continue to be ranked at the bottom among 15 different nations tested.

Vancouver, BC [July 9, 2021] – For the first time in two years, half of Canadians hold a favourable opinion of the United States, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 50% of Canadians have a positive opinion of the United States, while 40% hold negative views.

“In July 2020, as the last presidential campaign was underway south of the border, only 32% of Canadians viewed the United States favourably,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion of positive responses has increased by 18 points over the past 12 months.”

Three-in-five residents of Quebec (60%) have a favourable view of the United States, along with 53% of those who reside in Saskatchewan and Manitoba. The rating is lower in Alberta (49%), Ontario (45%), Atlantic Canada (43%) and British Columbia (42%).

More than half of Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party (57%) and the Liberal Party (55%) in the 2019 federal election relate positively to the United States, along with 37% of those who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP).

More than two thirds of Canadians continue to hold favourable views of the five other nations that—along with Canada and the United States—are part of the G7: the United Kingdom (73%, +5 since December 2020), France (also 73%, +2), Italy (also 73%, -2), Germany (69%, -3) and Japan (68%, -3).

Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to express a positive opinion of the United Kingdom (86%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (71%) and aged 18-to-34 (63%).

More than half of Canadians (57%, -3) hold favourable views on South Korea, while more than two-in-five feel the same way about Mexico (49%, -2) and India (41%, -3).

The rating remains significantly lower for Venezuela (29%, -2), Russia (28%, +2), Saudi Arabia (23%, =), China (21%, +2), Iran (17%, +2) and North Korea (15%, +3s).

China’s favourability rating is currently highest in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (26%), but drops to 23% in Quebec, 22% in Ontario, 19% in Atlantic Canada and 18% in both Alberta and British Columbia.

Methodology: 

Results are based on an online study conducted from July 2 to July 4, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Losing Pride in Specific Institutions and Features

The proportion of Canadians who say they are proud of the Armed Forces has fallen by 22 points since 2019.

Vancouver, BC [July 1, 2021] – Fewer Canadians are expressing a positive emotional connection with important components of life in the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than three-in-four Canadians (77%) say they are proud of the Canadian flag, down five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in 2020.

At least two thirds of Canadians express pride in multiculturalism (70%, -1), the Canadian Armed Forces (67%, -7), the health care system (66%, -9) and hockey (also 66%, +2).

Compared to a Research Co. poll conducted in 2019, pride in the Canadian Armed Forces has fallen by 22 points. Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to express pride in the Canadian Armed Forces (73%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (67%) and aged 18-to-34 (60%).

This year, about three-in-five Canadians say they are proud of Indigenous culture (62%, =), the state of democracy in Canada (also 62%, -4), and bilingualism (59%, -2).

Just over half of Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election (54%) are proud of indigenous culture. The proportion is significantly higher among those who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (72%) and the Liberal Party (75%).

About half of Canadians express pride in the Canadian justice system (52%, -3), Parliament (50%, -3) and the Canadian economy (49%, -4).

While two thirds of Canadians who voted for the Liberals in the last federal election (68%) say they are proud of Parliament, only a third of those who supported the Conservatives (34%) share the same view.

“In 2019, 80% of Canadians said they were proud of the Canadian economy,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This year, the proportion has fallen by 31 points to 49%.”

The Monarchy remains the lowest ranked of the 12 institutions and features tested, with 34% of Canadians saying it makes them proud, down six points since 2020.

British Columbia has the highest proportion of residents who are proud of the monarchy (44%) while Quebec has the lowest (29%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 24 to June 26, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Home Gardening is More Prevalent in Western Canada

British Columbians and Albertans are more likely to be growing or cultivating plants at home than Canadians in other provinces.

Vancouver, BC [June 24, 2021] – More than three-in-five Canadians are enjoying gardening at home, with the number climbing in two western provinces, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 63% of Canadians say they currently grow or cultivate plants in their home, either indoors or outdoors.

The proportion of Canadian home gardeners is highest in British Columbia (67%) and Alberta (also 67%), followed by Saskatchewan and Manitoba (65%), Ontario (64%), Quebec (59%) and Atlantic Canada (53%).

“More than two thirds of Canadians aged 55 and over (68%) are home gardeners,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer Canadians aged 18-to-34 (63%) and aged 35-to-54 (57%) are growing or cultivating plants at home.”

Canadian women are more likely to be partaking in home gardening (68%) than their male counterparts (57%).

Just under two-in-five Canadian home gardeners (39%) grow or cultivate plants at home mostly for ornamental purposes, while 27% do so mostly for consumption. 

One third (34%) of home gardeners are interested in growing or cultivating plants both for ornamental purposes and consumption—including 44% of those who reside in British Columbia.

Across the country, 14% of Canadian home gardeners say they spend more than $200 a year on tools, plants and seeds. In contrast, 23% say they devote anywhere from $101 to $199, 37% spend anywhere from $50 to $100 and 26% devote less than $50 on a yearly basis.

Just under one-in-four Canadian home gardeners (23%) think the plants they grow or cultivate are better than most others in their neighbourhood. While 61% of home gardeners see little difference, 7% admit that their plants are worse than most others in the area where they reside.

Canadian home gardeners who spend more than $200 a year on tools, plants and seeds are significantly more likely to think that their plants are superior to others in their neighbourhood (36%) than those who make a lower investment in their hobby.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 12 to June 14, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Liberals Have Eight-Point Lead Over Tories in Canada

Health care is the most important issue facing the country for three-in-ten Canadians, followed by the economy and jobs.

Vancouver, BC [June 17, 2021] – The governing Liberal Party remains ahead of its rivals in Canada’s federal political scene, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 38% of Canadian decided voters would support the Liberal candidate in their constituency if a federal election were held tomorrow, up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March.

The Conservative Party is second with 30% (+2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (=), the Bloc Québécois with 5% (-2), the Green Party also with 5% (-1) and the People’s Party with 1% (=).

The Liberals are ahead of the Conservatives by 15 points among female decided voters (40% to 25%). Among male decided voters, the Liberals are barely ahead of the Conservatives (37% to 35%).

This month, the Liberal Party fares best with decided voters aged 55 and over (41%, with the Conservatives at 36%) and decided voters aged 18-to-34 (40%, with the NDP at 29%). The race is closer among decided voters aged 35-to-54 (36% for the Liberals, and 34% for the Conservatives).

The Liberals remain the most popular federal party among decided voters in Atlantic Canada (49%), Ontario (42%) and Quebec (39%). The Conservatives continue to dominate in Alberta (50%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (also 50%). In British Columbia, the New Democrats are in first place (34%), followed by the Liberals (31%) and the Conservatives (27%).

Half of Canadians (50%, -6) approve of the way Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is handling his duties.

NDP leader Jagmeet Singh posted the same approval rating as Trudeau (50%, +4). The numbers are lower for Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole (34%, +1), Green Party leader Annamie Paul (32%, +2) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (14%, -1).

More than a third of Canadians select Trudeau when asked which one of the main party leaders would make the best prime minister (37%, -3). For the first time, Singh is in second place on this indicator (17%, +5), followed by O’Toole (15%, =), Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (3%, +1), Bernier (3%, +1) and Paul (2%, -1).

Health care is identified as the most important issue facing the country by 29% of Canadians (-4), followed by the economy and jobs (23%, -1), housing, homelessness and poverty (14%, +5), the environment (9%, +2) and COVID-19 (7%, -4).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from June 12 to June 14, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Makaristos

Most Canadians Unwilling to Provide High Marks to Justice System

Majorities of respondents say the courts are too soft on offenders and need to address bias against Indigenous Canadians.  

Vancouver, BC [June 11, 2021] – Many Canadians appear dissatisfied with the way the justice system works in the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-four Canadians (76%) say the justice system needs more resources because it takes too long to get cases dealt with—a proportion that rises to 86% among Canadians aged 55 and over.  

Seven-in-ten Canadians (71%) believe the outcome of cases in Canada’s justice system depends heavily on how good your lawyer is, an opinion that reaches 76% in Ontario.  

Three-in-five Canadians (61%) think that the justice system is too soft on offenders when it comes to criminal cases. Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election are more likely to feel this way (73%) than those who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (68%) or the Liberal Party (63%).  

A majority of Canadians (57%) state that the justice system has not done enough to address bias against Indigenous Canadians—a proportion that rises to 60% in Quebec.  

Across the country, 29% of Canadians give the justice system in the country a grade of 8 to 10. This positive rating is highest in British Columbia (35%), followed by Alberta (34%), Ontario (32%), Quebec (29%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (28%) and Atlantic Canada (24%).  

More than two-in-five Canadians (43%) provide a grade of 5 to 7 to the justice system, while one-in-five (21%) rate it from 1 to 4.  

Canadians were also asked about their last experience with four different components of the justice system. Just over one-in-four (26%) consider that the last resolution they received in criminal court was unfair to them.  

Slightly smaller proportions of Canadians believe their last resolution was unfair on family court (22%), traffic and bylaw disputes (20%) and small claims (19%).

“While Canadians are more likely to report that the justice system was fair to them the last time they went to court, some discrepancies persist,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “On family court, men are more likely to consider that the resolution was unfair to them (25%) than women (19%).”

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 3 to June 5, 2021, among 1,000 Canadian adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Support Paid Leave for Couples After Miscarriage

Across the country, 13% of Canadians say themselves or their partner have experienced a miscarriage.

Vancouver, BC [June 4, 2021] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians are in favour of allowing people who have experienced a pregnancy loss to have paid time off from work, a new Research Co. poll has found.

New Zealand’s Parliament recently voted to pass legislation that would allow couples who go through a miscarriage or stillbirth to have three days of paid leave.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 78% of Canadians support enacting similar legislation in Canada, while only 10% are opposed and 13% are undecided.

Support for allowing paid leave to people who experience a pregnancy loss reaches 80% among women, 81% among Canadians aged 55 and over, and 83% among British Columbians.

Across the country, 13% of Canadians say themselves or their partner have experienced a miscarriage, defined as the loss of a pregnancy before 20 weeks of gestation. In addition, about one-in-five say they know a family member (19%) or a friend (18%) who went through this complication.

Fewer Canadians have faced two other setbacks. Just under one-in-ten (8%) report that themselves or their partner experienced infertility, or trying to get pregnant for at least a year with no success, and 3% endured a stillbirth, defined as the loss of a pregnancy after 20 weeks of gestation.

Most Canadians who have experienced miscarriage and/or stillbirth say they received enough information and support from their family (70%) and their friends (66%). The numbers are lower for their family doctor or general practitioner (58%) and their workplace (41%).

Three-in-ten Canadians (30%) who endured a miscarriage or stillbirth state that their family doctor did not provide enough information and support after the loss, while one-in-four (24%) feel the same way about their workplace.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 17 to May 19, 2021, among 1,000 Canadian adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Vaccine Rollout Opinions Improve in Some Canadian Provinces

Almost two thirds of respondents think the goal to inoculate every willing Canadian by the end of September 2021 will be attained.

Vancouver, BC [May 28, 2021] – The perceptions of Canadians on the way COVID-19 vaccination efforts are advancing have improved markedly this month, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 57% of Canadians are satisfied with the procurement of COVID-19 vaccine doses from the federal government, up nine points since a similar survey conducted in March 2021.

Majorities of Canadians are also content with the vaccination plans and phases outlined by their province (61%, +7) and with the pace of vaccination efforts in their province (58%, +10).

“The same regional differences that we currently see across Canada when it comes to COVID-19 management are also present on the vaccine rollout,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While more than three-in-five residents of Quebec (69%) and British Columbia (62%) are satisfied with the pace of vaccination efforts, only 48% of those in Ontario and Alberta feel the same way.”

In December 2020, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) stated that it expected to have enough COVID-19 vaccine doses to inoculate every willing Canadian by the end of September 2021.  

Almost two thirds of Canadians (65%) believe the vaccination goal outlined by the PHAC will be attained, up 20 points since a similar survey completed in February 2021.  

This month, 83% of Canadians say they have already been vaccinated against COVID-19, or plan to have a first shot when it becomes available to them, while 13% will “definitely” or “probably” not get inoculated—including 20% of those who voted for Conservative Party candidates in the 2019 federal election.  

More than four-in-five Canadians (84%, +1) agree with regulations that require all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask while inside.  

Three-in-four Canadians (75%, -2) say they wear a mask every time they go out, a proportion thar rises to 82% among women and 80% among Canadians aged 55 and over.  

Sizeable proportions of Canadians continue to endorse specific measures to deal with COVID-19, including keeping the border with the United States closed to non-essential travel (80%, -3) and placing all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period (79%, -3). In addition, 74% (=) would prohibit non-essential travel from one province to another and 67% (-1) would prohibit non-essential travel inside provinces.  

Just under a third of Canadians say they are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection (30%, +1) and acknowledge they are overeating or eating more than usual at home (29%, +4).  

Fewer Canadians admit to losing their temper more than usual at home (20%, including 28% of those aged 18-to-34), having a bath or shower less often than before the pandemic (16%, -1), not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection (15%, -4), drinking more alcohol than usual at home (13%, -1) and brushing their teeth less often than before the pandemic (11%, but rising to 21% among Albertans).  

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 17 to May 19, 2021, among 1,000 Canadian adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Views on Governments Falter as Canadians See Pandemic’s End

Ontarians and Albertans are the least likely to express confidence in the measures implemented by their provincial administrations.

Vancouver, BC [May 25, 2021] – For the first time since the start of the pandemic, a majority of Canadians believe the most vicious moments of COVID-19 have passed, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 55% of Canadians think the worst of the COVID-19 outbreak is behind us, up eight points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in March.

Conversely, 27% of Canadians think the worst of the pandemic is ahead of us, down six points in two months.

Just over half of Canadians (51%) are satisfied with how the federal government has managed the pandemic, unchanged since March. The numbers are similar for provincial governments (52%, -1) and municipal governments (55%, +1).

Among the four most populous provinces, the satisfaction rating remains below the 50% threshold in Ontario (42%, -3) and Alberta (34%, -3). More than three-in-five residents of British Columbia (62%, -3) and Quebec (61%, +3) are content with how their governments have managed COVID-19.

Almost half of Canadians (46%) think the measures that are currently in place in their province to deal with COVID-19 are correct for the situation. While three-in-ten (29%) believe the measures do not go far enough, one-in-five (19%) claim they go too far.

“Residents of Ontario and Alberta are more likely to be dissatisfied with the measures implemented to deal with COVID-19,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Just over a third of residents in each jurisdiction endorse the course of action outlined by their provincial governments.”

Canadians were also asked about the level of confidence they have in their provincial government to handle specific tasks.

Majorities of respondents trust their provincial administration to release accurate (61%) and complete (56%) information about COVID-19 cases and hospitalization rates to the media and the public.

Most Canadians also trust their provincial administrations to respond to a natural disaster (60%), establish public health guidelines and restrictions (58%) and ensure the sustainability of the health care system (55%). Fewer respondents (43%) express confidence in their provincial government to spend tax dollars wisely.

On the matter of establishing public health guidelines, the level of confidence is highest in British Columbia (66%), followed by Quebec (63%), Atlantic Canada (also 63%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (58%), Ontario (52%) and Alberta (45%).

Across the country, 84% of Canadians believe that COVID-19 is “definitely” or “probably” a real threat, while 12% disagree with this assessment.

Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election are more likely to be skeptical of the threat posed by COVID-19 (20%) than those who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP) (11%) or the Liberal Party (8%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 17 to May 19, 2021, among 1,000 Canadian adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca