Canadians Blame Parents for Perceived Decline of Civility

More than half of residents (52%) think people in Canada have become less polite than five years ago.

Vancouver, BC [April 25, 2019] – A majority of Canadians believe residents have become cruder over the past five years, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Canadians think people in Canada have become “less polite” than they were five years ago.

Only 8% of Canadians think people are “more polite” than in 2014, while 33% say the situation is “about the same” as it was five years ago.

More than four-in-five Canadians (84%) think “parents failing to teach their children proper behaviour” are “definitely” or “probably” responsible for the current state of civility in the country.

Other negative factors mentioned by Canadians include “the influence of television and movies” (77%), “technology that enables people to talk face-to-face less often” (also 77%), “poor examples from celebrities, athletes and other public figures” (74%), “politicians engaging in personal attacks” (69%), “people being too busy with their lives” (66%) and “teachers and schools failing to teach students proper behaviour” (59%).

Three-in-ten Canadians (31%) say they deal with someone being rude and/or impolite when using social media “a few times a week.”

“Almost half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (46%) say they experience impoliteness on social media a few times a week,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 12% of Canada’s Millennials say they only face rudeness on social media less often than a few times a year.”

Other instances in which Canadians experience someone being rude and/or impolite “a few times a week” include driving a car or riding in a car (25%), shopping at a store (16%), at the workplace (15%), walking on the street (14%) or using public transit (13%). 

One third of Canadians (33%) think the people they deal with on a daily basis in Canada say “please” and “thank you” less often than five years ago—a proportion that includes 40% of those aged 55 and over and 43% of Albertans.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 4 to April 7, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two-in-Five Canadians Always Alter Their Words to Avoid Swearing

Across the country, almost half (48%) admit to changing the way they speak sometimes, while 14% never do.

Vancouver, BC [April 11, 2019] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians admit to being cautious about how they speak in public, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 38% of Canadians say they always alter the way they speak to make sure they do not swear in public. 

Almost half of Canadians (48%) admit to sometimes altering the way they speak so as not to swear in front of certain people, while 14% claim to never alter the way they speak and do not worry about it if a curse word comes out.

Women (40%), residents aged 55 and over (42%) and Quebecers (43%) are more likely to say they always alter how they speak to prevent swearing.

Two thirds of Canadians (68%) say they hear swearing “frequently” or “occasionally” when they are talking with friends. More than half also report hearing curse words in conversations with strangers (55%), relatives (53%) and co-workers (52%).

“There are some differences across the country when it comes to listening to co-workers swear,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Ontarians are the most likely to report hearing curse words in the workplace (52%), while Albertans are at the bottom of this list (44%).” 

When asked about the times they use curse words themselves, more than half of Canadians (52%) say they swear “frequently” or “occasionally” when they are having a conversation with friends.

Significantly smaller proportions of Canadians say they rely on curse words when they are speaking with relatives (40%), co-workers (34%) and strangers (23%). 

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to acknowledge that they swear when having conversations with friends (73%), relatives (55%), co-workers (47%) and strangers (33%) than those aged 35-to-54 and those aged 55 and over.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 4 to April 7, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Swearing is, By Far, The Biggest Etiquette Faux Pas in Canada

More than half of Canadians say they saw children misbehaving in public while their parents looked the other way.

Vancouver, BC [March 28, 2019] – Canadians report several different incidents involving improper manners over the past month, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 64% of Canadians say they witnessed someone swearing in public—a proportion that climbs to 71% in Alberta.

“It would seem that the language of Canadians is getting more colourful,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than two thirds of women and residents aged 55 and over report hearing someone swearing in public over the past month.”

More than half of Canadians (56%) say they witnessed children behaving badly in public while their parents looked the other way, while just under half saw someone littering or leaving trash behind in a public place (49%), someone interrupting or talking over them while they were speaking (48%) or someone cutting them off the road while they were driving (47%).

Other behaviours reported by Canadians include a person checking their phone or texting during a meeting or social event (45%, including 50% among those aged 55 and over), someone spitting in public (43%, including 50% in British Columbia) and experiencing rude customer service at a store (also 43%, including 47% in Ontario).

Fewer Canadians reported seeing chewing with their mouth open (39%, and 44% in Alberta), someone cutting the line at a store or counter (also 39%, and 47% in Atlantic Canada), someone using a cell phone during a performance or movie (34%, and 44% in Atlantic Canada), or someone making an obscene gesture (33%, including 43% in Alberta), 

The two lowest ranked items on the list of behaviours are someone delivering important information via text or e-mail instead of face-to-face (31%) and someone ignoring, or not responding to an invitation (19%).

There were two positive behaviours that were included in the survey. More than three-in-five Canadians (63%, and 79% in Atlantic Canada) witnessed someone holding the door open for a stranger. Just over one-in-four (27%, and 32% in British Columbia) saw someone giving up their seat for a person who was disabled, pregnant or elderly.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 22 to March 24, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Radio Still the Top Source Among Canadian Music Listeners

Half of Canadians think that, in this day and age, music creators are being fairly compensated for their work.

Vancouver, BC [March 21, 2019] – A sizeable majority of Canadians are relying on their radios for music, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 69% of Canadians say they listened to music on a regular radio over the past week.

One third of Canadians (32%) report listening to music on streaming services over the past week, while a similar proportion (31%) listened to music files stored in a device, such as a computer or phone.

One-in-five Canadians (21%) listened to LP records, cassettes or CDs in the past week, while 15% listened to music on satellite radio.

Across the country, 19% of Canadians say they paid to access a music streaming service in the last month, including 36% of those aged 18-to-34. 

Smaller proportions of Canadians paid for and downloaded a song online (12%) or bought a compact disc or LP record (9%).

On a regional basis, Atlantic Canadians are the undisputed leaders when it comes to paying to access music streaming services (35%), followed by residents of Alberta (25%), Ontario (19%), British Columbia (17%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (15%) and Quebec (11%).

“While radio is the top choice for music listeners of all ages in Canada, Millennials are definitely more likely to be embracing streaming services than their older counterparts,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The country’s youngest adults are also more likely to already be spending money on streaming services or downloaded songs.”

When asked if they think that, in this day and age, music creators are being fairly compensated for their work, half of Canadians (51%) believe that they “definitely” or “probably” are, while one third (33%) assert that they are not.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 21 to February 24, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Say Reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples is Possible

But almost half think the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls has been a failure so far.

Vancouver, BC [March 14, 2019] – A majority of Canadians are hopeful about renewing the country’s relationship with Indigenous peoples, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Canadians think a renewed nation-to-nation relationship with First Nations peoples can be achieved in the country.

“Perceptions about attaining a true reconciliation vary widely according to age,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 63% of Canadians aged 18-to-34 think the nation-to-nation goal is achievable, the proportion of believers drops to 54% among those aged 35-to-54 and 44% among those aged 55 and over.”

The Government of Canada launched the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in September 2016. 

Across the country, 47% of Canadians say they have followed stories related to the inquiry “very closely” or “moderately closely”, including 59% in British Columbia, 52% in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and 51% in Quebec.

Almost half of Canadians (46%) consider the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls to be “a failure” so far, while 27% believe it has been “a success.”

Residents of Alberta (51%), Manitoba and Saskatchewan (49%) and British Columbia (48%) are more likely to brand the inquiry as “a failure” so far.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 21 to February 24, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Archkris 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca