Criticism Towards Trudeau Increases in Western Canada

The proportion of Albertans who think the province would be better off as its own country fell to 26%.

Vancouver, BC [February 1, 2023] – Just over half of Canadians think their province would benefit from a change in the federal government, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Canadians think their province would be better off with a different Prime Minister in Ottawa, up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2022.

Majorities of Canadians who reside in Alberta (66%, +2), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (65%, +5), British Columbia (57%, +4)  and Ontario (52%, +4) believe their provinces would be better off with someone other than Justin Trudeau in charge. The proportions are lower in Atlantic Canada (44%, -8) and Quebec (42%, -3).

“Canadians aged 35-to-54 (56%) are more likely to believe that a change in the federal government would be beneficial to their province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The rating is slightly lower among their counterparts aged 55 and over (51%) and aged 18-to-34 (50%)”

Just over half of Canadians (51%, unchanged) believe their province would be better off with a different premier in charge.

Compared to June 2022, animosity towards Ontario’s Doug Ford has risen from 43% to 57%, while it has dropped for Quebec’s François Legault from 48% to 45%. These two premiers earned majorities in provincial elections held in June and October respectively.

In British Columbia, there is little change in the results posted by John Horgan in June (41%) and David Eby this month (40%). In Alberta, 55% of respondents think the province would be better off with a premier other than Danielle Smith. In June, 65% of Albertans felt this way about Jason Kenney.

The proportion of Albertans who think their province would be better off as its own country fell to 26% this month, down seven points since June and well below the all-time high of 40% registered in December 2019.

Separatist sentiment also dropped in Quebec, from 32% in June to 29% this month.

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians (17%, =) believe their province would be better off joining the United States and becoming an American state—a proportion that rises to 21% in Alberta.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from January 20 to January 22, 2023, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Grow Pessimistic on Economy and Personal Finances

More than four-in-five Canadians expect to pay more for a week’s worth of groceries.

Vancouver, BC [January 20, 2023] – The perceptions of Canadians on the financial status of both the country and their household have worsened over the past six months, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 62% of Canadians say the economic conditions in Canada right now are “bad” or “very bad”, up five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in July 2022.

Just over a third of Canadians (35%, -5) deem the country’s economic standing as “very good” or “good”.

Fewer than a third of residents of Alberta (27%, -5), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (28%, -2) and Atlantic Canada (29%, -7) hold positive views on the Canadian economy at this point. The rating is higher in Ontario (37%, +3), British Columbia (35%, -2) and Quebec (41%, -14).

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%, +4) expect the national economy to decline over the next six months, while 38% (-2) foresee no changes and only 13% (=) predict an improvement.

“Most Canadians aged 55 and over (51%) think an economic recovery in the next six months is unattainable,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (43%) and aged 18-to-34 (38%).”

Just over half of Canadians (51%, -6) rate their own personal finances today as “very good” or “good”, while 47% (+6) define them as “poor” or “very poor.”

Majorities of Canadians think certain items will be more expensive over the next six months, including a week’s worth of groceries (85%, +4), gasoline (67%, +6), a new car (65%, -3) and a new television set (54%, -3). In addition, 43% (-1) think the price of real estate will be higher.

There is little change in the level of confidence on the Prime Minister. This month, 42% of Canadians (+1) trust Justin Trudeau to do the right thing to help the economy. The ratings are lower for Governor of the Bank of Canada Tiff Macklem (34%, -3) and federal Leader of the Opposition Pierre Poilievre (33%).

Just over half of Canadians acknowledge having worried “frequently” or “occasionally” about two financial matters in the past couple of months: the value of their investments (52%, +2) and the safety of their savings (also 52%, +2).

Fewer Canadians have been concerned “frequently” or “occasionally” about unemployment affecting their household (37%, +3), being able to pay their mortgage or rent (34%, =) or their employer running into serious financial trouble (29%, +5).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on January 13 to January 15, 2023, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Russia and North Korea Thoroughly Disliked by Canadians

At least seven-in-ten Canadians hold positive views on the United Kingdom, Italy, Japan and France. 

Vancouver, BC [January 17, 2023] – Two nations are clearly at the bottom when Canadians are asked to voice their feelings about 15 different countries, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, only 11% of Canadians have a positive opinion of Russia and North Korea.

“More than nine-in-ten Canadians aged 55 and over (93%) currently have a negative view of the Russian Federation,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of Canadians aged 35-to-54 (78%) and aged 18-to-34 (68%) feel the same way.”

Fewer than one-in-four Canadians have a positive opinion of Saudi Arabia (23%, -1 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2022), China (18%, -2) and Iran (13%, -3).

About one-in-four Atlantic Canadians (24%) hold positive views on China. The proportions are lower in Ontario (21%), Alberta (18%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (16%), British Columbia (also 16%) and Quebec (13%).

The perceptions of Canadians remain favourable for most fellow members of the G7, including the United Kingdom (74%, +1), Italy (71%, -2), Japan (70%, +1), France (also 70%, +1) and Germany (69%, -1).

Almost three-in-five Canadians (57%, -2) hold positive views on South Korea. The numbers are lower for Mexico (49%, -1), India (41%, +4) and Venezuela (30%, -1).

More than half of Canadians (54%, -2) have a positive view of the United States, while just under two-in-five (39%, +4) hold negative feelings.

Favourable opinions on the United States are highest in three Canadian regions: Quebec (55%, +1), Atlantic Canada (also 55%, +2) and Ontario (55%, -4), followed by British Columbia (52%, +4), Alberta (50%, -7) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (48%, -12).

Only 45% of Canadians (+2) who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) in 2021 hold positive views on the United States. The proportions are higher among their counterparts who supported the Liberal Party (61%, -5) or the Conservative Party (58%, -12) in the last federal election.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on January 2 to January 4, 2023, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Little Consensus as Canadians Ponder Where and How Much to Tip

One third of Canadians think food servers deserve a tip in all circumstances even if service was bad.

Vancouver, BC [December 30, 2022] – The performance of servers and the busyness of restaurants play a role in the gratuities that Canadians are willing to provide to food servers, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample asked Canadians what they think is an acceptable tip for service at a sit-down restaurant in nine different circumstances.

About a third of Canadians would leave a gratuity in the range of 15%-to-19% if they receive exceptional service in a restaurant that is not busy (37%), busy (34%) or exceptionally busy (32%).

Some Canadians are willing to offer a tip of 20% or higher if they receive exceptional service at a restaurant that is busy (34%) or exceptionally busy (36%).

The results are similar when Canadians are asked to ponder good (but not exceptional) service. Gratuities are in the range of 15%-to-19% if the restaurant is not busy (34%), busy (41%) or exceptionally busy (37%).

Fewer Canadians would consider a tip of 20% or higher for good service at a venue that is busy (19%) or exceptionally busy (25%).

When it comes to average service in any environment, about two-in-five Canadians (41%) would leave a gratuity in the 10%-to-14% range, while 28% would move into the 15%-to-19% range.

More than a third of Canadians (36%) would leave a tip in the 10%-to-14% range for below average service when the server is clearly working in an understaffed environment.

Finally, just over three-in-ten Canadians (31%) say they would not leave a gratuity at all if they receive below average service at a sit-down restaurant when their server is clearly not busy.

“Two-in-five Canadians aged 55 and over (40%) would walk away from a sit-down restaurant without leaving a tip if they perceive that their server was idle and aloof,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (29%) and aged 18-to-34 (24%).”

Just over one-in-ten Canadians (11%) think it is acceptable to forego a tip for food delivery to their homes or offices. Two-in-five Canadians (40%) think the acceptable gratuity range in this circumstance is 10%-to-14%.

A majority of Canadians (54%) do not think a tip is necessary when they pick up food to go.

More than half of Canadians (53%) say they never tip when they visit a snack restaurant where they take their food to go, and more than two-in-five also never leave a gratuity when they visit a cafeteria-style restaurant (49%), a restaurant where they order to go and pick the food up themselves (48%) or a coffee shop (43%).

A third of Canadians (33%) think food servers deserve a tip in all circumstances even if service was bad—a proportion that rises to 41% among those aged 18-to-34.

Two thirds of Canadians (67%) believe food servers nowadays simply expect a tip, but don’t work hard to earn it.

About seven-in-ten Canadians agree on two other statements: “Food servers cannot get by on their salaries alone—it is important to tip them” (70%) and “If the salaries of food servers were better, there would be no need to tip servers” (69%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on December 10 to December 12, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Majority of Canadians Expect to Eventually Vote for Senators

One third would prefer to reform the Senate to allow for elections, while fewer favour abolishment or keeping the status quo.

Vancouver, BC [December 23, 2022] – While Canadians do not reach consensus about the best way to proceed with the upper house, more than half think voters will one day be able to choose the members of the Red Chamber, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 56% of Canadians (+2 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in February 2020) expect to one day be able to directly elect their senators, while 28% (-1) disagree and 17% (=) are not sure.

“Expectations of an elected Senate of Canada are highest in Alberta (64%), British Columbia (60%) and Ontario (59%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents of Atlantic Canada (52%), Quebec (49%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (49%) are more skeptical.”

One-in-four Canadians (24%, -3) think Canada does not need a Senate and want all legislation to be reviewed and authorized by the House of Commons—a proportion that reaches 35% among those aged 55 and over.

Just under one-in-ten Canadians (9%, =) believe Canada needs a Senate and the current guidelines that call for appointed senators should not be modified.

Fewer than half of Canadians (45%, =) think Canada needs a Senate, but Canadians should be allowed to take part in the process to choose senators.

When asked to consider specific options for the Red Chamber, only 6% of Canadians support allowing the Prime Minister to appoint senators, while 17% favour having a selection committee that would appoint non-partisan senators.

One third of Canadians (33%) would reform the Senate to allow Canadians to directly elect the members of the upper house, while 14% would abolish the Red Chamber altogether.

Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the last federal election are significantly more likely to support Senate reform (50%) than those who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (38%) and the Liberal Party (28%) in 2021.

Since 2015, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has only named senators that were recommended by an arm’s-length advisory body and not directly appointed by him.

Fewer than three-in-ten Canadians (28%, -9) think the changes implemented by Trudeau have made the Senate of Canada better than it was before he took office, while 31% (-1) see no change and 20% (+4) believe the situation is now worse.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on December 10 to December 12, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Pick “Merry Christmas” as Preferred Greeting

For the first time since 2018, more than half of the country’s residents foresee a holiday season with more fun than stress.

Vancouver, BC [December 20, 2022] – While the proportion of Canadians who are fond of saying “Happy Holidays” has risen since 2018, most of the country’s residents continue to rely on “Merry Christmas”, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 64% of Canadians say “Merry Christmas” is their preferred greeting for the season, up two points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in December 2021.

Just over one-in-five Canadians (21%, +1) say they prefer using “Happy Holidays”, while 15% (-3) are not sure or do not care either way.

Since 2018, the proportion of Canadians who prefer “Merry Christmas” has fallen by 10 points, while the number of those who rely on “Happy Holidays” has increased by seven points.

“Only 14% of Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in 2021 prefer to say Happy Holidays,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are higher among Canadians who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP) (22%) or the Liberal Party (24%).”

More than half of Canadians (52%, +3) say they expect the current holiday season to be “more fun than stressful”, while three-in-ten (29%, +2) think it will be “more stressful than fun.”

Four groups are more likely to predict a stressful holiday season in 2022: women (31%), Canadians aged 35-to-54 (33%), Atlantic Canadians (40%) and NDP voters in 2021 (35%).

At least three-in-five Canadians say they like three staples of holiday meals: turkey (84%, =), cranberry sauce (64%, =) and Brussels sprouts (60%, -2).

A majority of Canadians enjoy fruit cake (55%, -1) and egg nog (also 55%, +1), while fewer like mince pies (48%, -2), plum pudding (42%, -1) and mulled wine (36%, +2).

Egg nog is equally popular in Alberta (60%), British Columbia (59%), Atlantic Canada (also 59%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (58%) and Ontario (also 58%), but drops to 43% in Quebec.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on December 10 to December 12, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Think We Have Seen the Worst of COVID-19

Satisfaction with provincial governments remains higher in British Columbia and Quebec than in Ontario and Alberta.

Vancouver, BC [December 16, 2022] – Fewer than one-in-five Canadians are currently concerned about the possibility of declining conditions on account of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-four Canadians (75%) say the worst of the pandemic is “behind us”, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2022.

Only 17% of Canadians (-3) think the worst of COVID-19 is ahead of us, while 9% (-3) are not sure.

For seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) COVID-19 remains a real threat—a proportion that rises to 78% among those aged 55 and over and to 82% among those who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2021 federal election.

“We continue to see cautious optimism when Canadians think about COVID-19,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Significant majorities of Canadians are both convinced that the situation will not worsen but still consider the virus a real threat.”

Almost three-in-five Canadians (59%, +4) are satisfied with the way the federal government has dealt with COVID-19, while 58% (-1) feel the same way about their municipal government.

Most Canadians (58%, +5) are satisfied with how their provincial government has managed the pandemic. Among the four most populous provinces, the rating is highest in British Columbia (68%, +6), followed by Quebec (62%, +4), Ontario (54%, +6) and Alberta (46%, +7).

Since May 2022, satisfaction with the way federal chief public health officer Theresa Tam has managed the pandemic dropped from 66% to 60%. The average rating is similar for the country’s provincial health officers or chief medical officers (61%, -5).

In two provinces, the satisfaction rating for top doctors fell since May: Luc Boileau in Quebec (60%, -6) and Kieran Moore in Ontario (59%, -8). Two thirds of British Columbians (66%, +3) are satisfied with the work of Bonnie Henry.

In Alberta, the rating for Deena Hinshaw stood at 65% in May. This month, 53% of Albertans are satisfied with the way recently appointed chief medical officer of heath Mike Joffe is managing the pandemic.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on December 10 to December 12, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Interest in Men’s Soccer Team Grows for One-in-Four Canadians

More than a third of Canadians tuned in to at least some of the FIFA World Cup matches against Belgium and Croatia.

Vancouver, BC [December 13, 2022] – While only about one-in-six Canadians acknowledge being “true soccer fans”, interest in the Men’s National Team has increased since the start of the FIFA World Cup in Qatar, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 15% of Canadians describe themselves as soccer fans, who truly enjoy watching the game, while 17% say they watch soccer as much as they can, but do not follow it all the time.

More than a quarter of Canadians (27%) will watch a soccer match now and then, but it’s not their favourite sport, while 41% say they do not really care for soccer—including 50% of women, 50% of those aged 55 and over and 57% of Atlantic Canadians.

Just under two-in-five Canadians (38%) say they have followed the Qatar 2022 FIFA World Cup “very closely” or “moderately closely”—a proportion that rises to 49% among Canadians aged 18-to-34, 48% among men and 52% among Ontarians.

More than a third of Canadians (35%) watched the whole match or some parts of the FIFA World Cup match between Canada and Belgium on November 23.

“One-in-four men (24%) saw Canada’s entire match against Belgium during Qatar 2022,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “On a regional basis, Ontario (24%) was ahead of all regions on following the entire contest.”

Canada’s second contest, against Croatia on November 27, was also watched completely or partially by 35% of Canadians. The numbers were lower (29%) for the third and final match against Morocco on December 1.

Across the country, 24% of Canadians say they are more interested in Canada’s national team than before its participation in the Qatar 2022 FIFA World Cup—including 29% of men and 26% of Canadians aged 18-to-34.

Half of Canadians (51%) say their interest in the Men’s National Team has not changed as a result of the World Cup, while 9% are less interested now than before.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on December 6 and December 7, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Age Still Defines Preferred Shopping Habits in British Columbia

Compared to last year, more residents are purchasing groceries, items for the family and gifts in person.

Vancouver, BC [December 9, 2022] – Over the past year, there has been little movement in the preferences of British Columbians when it comes to shopping, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, more than half of British Columbians (55%) say they prefer buying things in person than online, up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2021.

Two-in-five British Columbians (40%, -1) say they prefer buying things online than in person.

“Practically three-in-five British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (59%) prefer online shopping,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, more than seven-in-ten British Columbians aged 55 and over (73%) prefer buying things in person.”

Some of the usual purchasing habits of British Columbians have returned to pre-pandemic levels. Majorities of the province’s residents say they are visiting stores just as often as they did before COVID-19 to purchase groceries (66%, +4), items for the home or family (57%, +5) and gifts (55%, +7).

More than one-in-five British Columbians (22%, =) are ordering groceries for home delivery more often than before the pandemic, while at least a third are relying more often on e-commerce to purchase gifts (33%, -3) and items for the home or family (36%, -2).

About two-in-five British Columbians say they are going to sit-down restaurants just as often as they did before COVID-19 for breakfast (40%, +10), lunch (43%, +15) or dinner (39%, +12).

More than half of British Columbians (52%, +7) are buying beverages or snacks to go at coffee shops as often as they did before the pandemic.

Slightly smaller proportions of the province’s residents are also partaking on two other activities in the same way they did three years ago: having a beverage or snack inside a coffee shop (43%, +12) and having a drink at a bar or pub (36%, +13).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 14 to November 16, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Spirituality Rises in Canada and Drops in the United States

Americans are more likely to say that religion is “very important” for them personally (38%) than Canadians (25%).

Vancouver, BC [December 6, 2022] – The perceptions of Canadians and Americans on religion have changed slightly over the past couple of years, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, one-in-four Canadians (25%) say religion is “very important” to them personally, up three points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2021.

Fewer than two-in-five Americans (38%) say religion is “very important” to them personally, down 10 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November 2020.

In Canada, only affluence (14%, +3) is ranked lower than religion among six different components of life. The rating is considerably higher for career (36%, +7), country (47%, +3), friends (60%, +6) and family (81%, +3).

In the United States, two items are ranked lower than religion: affluence (12%, -9) and career (31%, -9). The numbers are higher for country (51%, -11), friends (55%, +1) and family (77%, -2).

“On religion, there is a pronounced generational gap in the United States,” says Mario Canseco. “Only 28% of Americans aged 18-to-34 acknowledge that religion is very important to them, compared to 40% of those aged 35-to-45 and 42% of those aged 55 and over.”

In Canada, fewer than three-in-ten Canadians aged 18-to-34 (27%), aged 35-to-54 (25%) and aged 55 and over (22%) say religion is “very important” for them personally.

Two thirds of Americans (66%, -7) consider themselves as “very spiritual” or “moderately spiritual”. In Canada, 53% of respondents (+4) feel the same way.

Compared to 2021, there is a slight drop in the proportion of Canadians who describe their religion as Christian (48%, -2) and an increase in those who say they are atheist, agnostic or profess no religion (37%, +3).

In the United States, the proportion of self-described Christians fell by seven points since 2020 (from 70% to 63%), while the number of respondents who are atheist, agnostic or have no religion increased by six points (from 19% to 25%).

About a third of Canadians (32%, -1) never attend religious gatherings, while two-in-five (40%, +4) only do so for special events, such as weddings, funerals or baptisms. Only 15% of Canadians (-1) attend a church, temple or synagogue at least once a week.

About a quarter of Americans (23%, -15) attend a religious gathering at least once a week. There are sizeable increases in the proportions of Americans who never go to church (27%, +7) or who only do so in special occasions (29%, +8).

Methodology: Results are based on online studies conducted from November 26 to November 28, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

A Third of Canadians Would Remove All Statues of Sir John

More than half of the country’s residents think the removal of statues of colonial figures is an attack on Canadian history.

Vancouver, BC [December 2, 2022] – Most Canadians are not particularly satisfied with the idea of withdrawing existing monuments from public view, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 54% of Canadians believe the removal of statues of colonial figures is an attack on Canadian history, while 21% disagree and 14% are undecided.

Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to feel that removing statues of colonial figures is an attack on the country’s history (61%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (54%) and aged 18-to-34 (48%).

Some municipalities—including Charlottetown, Kingston, Regina and Victoria—have removed statues of Sir John A. Macdonald, Canada’s first prime minister.

While just under a third of Canadians (32%) think all statues of Macdonald should be withdrawn from public view, almost half (47%) disagree and 20% are not sure.

Support for keeping statues of Macdonald in place is highest in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (55%), followed by Alberta (51%), Ontario (also 51%), Atlantic Canada (50%), British Columbia (48%) and Quebec (38%).

“Two thirds of Conservative Party voters in the 2021 federal election (65%) are against the removal of all monuments depicting Sir John A. Macdonald,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Two-in-five Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (41%) or the New Democratic Party (NDP) (40%) in the last election feel the same way.”

Across the country, 45% of Canadians have a favourable opinion of Sir John A. Macdonald, while 22% hold unfavourable views.

Positive opinions on Macdonald reach 51% in Ontario, but are lower in Alberta (45%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (44%), Atlantic Canada (43%), Quebec (42%) and British Columbia (36%).

Macdonald holds a higher favourability rating than five other former prime ministers included in the survey: John Diefenbaker (42%), Wilfrid Laurier (41%), William Lyon Mackenzie King (38%), Louis St. Laurent (33%) and Robert Borden (29%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 26, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca
 
Photo Credit: Nhl4hamilton (Rick Cordeiro)

Half of Canadians Are Losing Sleep Over Financial Concerns

A third say worrying about relationships and health made it harder for them to fall asleep in the past month. 

Vancouver, BC [November 25, 2022] – Most Canadians are unable to match Health Canada’s recommended sleep guidelines, and half are finding it harder to rest every night because of financial anxiety, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 50% of Canadians acknowledge that worrying about money made it harder for them to fall asleep at night over the past month, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2021.

One third of Canadians say concerns about relationships and family (33%, +1) and health (also 33%, -3) make it more difficult for them to fall asleep at night. Fewer Canadians lost sleep over work (28%, +4), Canadian politics and issues (10%, =) and international politics and issues (10%, +1) over the past four weeks.

“Two-in-five Canadians aged 18-to-34 (40%) are losing sleep because of employment concerns,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer Canadians aged 35-to-54 (33%) and aged 55 and over (14%) share the same experience.”

Health Canada guidelines recommend sleeping from 7 to 9 hours a night. Almost two thirds of Canadians (64%, +4) are sleeping fewer than seven hours on a typical weekday or workday.

Only 35% of Canadians (-3) say they are sleeping anywhere from 7 to 9 hours on a typical weekday or workday. On a regional basis, Quebec is first (40%), followed by Atlantic Canada (39%), Alberta (36%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (31%), Ontario (also 31%) and British Columbia (28%).

Across the country, 43% of Canadians (-3) are sleeping anywhere from 7 to 9 hours on a typical weekend or non-workday, while 50% (-1) are spending less time in bed.

Almost seven-in-ten Canadians (69%, -1) are “well rested” after a typical night’s sleep on a weekday or workday, while 76% (+1) feel the same way after a typical night’s sleep on a weekend or non-workday.

One-in-four Canadians (25%) claim to “never” find it hard to fall asleep at night on an average week—a proportion that rises to 31% among men and 33% among those aged 55 and over and 29 per cent of Quebecers.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 18 to November 20, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty. 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Move Away from Conscience Rights in Health Care

Compared to 2020, more Canadians believe practitioners should not be able to refuse services on account of moral beliefs.

Vancouver, BC [November 18, 2022] – Disapproval with the notion of provinces taking legislative action to entrench conscience rights for health care workers has grown in Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Canadians would oppose a bill that sought to allow health care professionals the ability to have a moral or faith-based objection to providing services, up three points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in February 2020.

“Opposition to the concept of conscience rights in health care delivery is strongest among Canadians aged 55 and over (56%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (50%) and aged 18-to-34 (48%).”

In 2019, Alberta considered the implementation of Bill 207 which was later abandoned. The proposed legislation sought to enable the province’s health care practitioners to abstain from providing services to an individual if they considered that their conscientious beliefs would be infringed upon.

Just over half of Canadians (51%, +9) disagree with health care professionals having the ability to object to providing services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to physician-assisted death.

Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (59%) and the Liberal Party (56%) in the 2021 federal election are more likely to disagree with conscience rights in physician-assisted death than those who backed the Conservative Party (40%).

A majority of Canadians (56%, +7) are against health care professionals being able to object to providing services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to abortion.

Opposition to conscience rights on abortion is highest in Quebec (63%), followed by Atlantic Canada (60%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (55%), British Columbia (54%), Alberta (also 54%) and Ontario (50%).

More than three-in-five Canadians (63%, +5) reject the notion of health care practitioners refusing to serve lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, gender diverse, queer and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2+) people because of a moral or faith-based objection—a proportion that rises to 69% among both Canadians aged 55 and over and Atlantic Canadians.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 12 to November 14, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Oblivious to Acts Proposed by Western Premiers

Half of residents (50%) agree with what Saskatchewan is trying to accomplish, while 39% feel the same way about Alberta’s actions.

Vancouver, BC [November 11, 2022] – Few Canadians are actively following stories related to the recent pronouncements issued by the premiers of Alberta and Saskatchewan, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 37% of Canadians say they are paying close attention to the Alberta Sovereignty Act.

Just over three-in-ten Canadians (31%) are following stories related to the Saskatchewan First Act “very closely” or “moderately closely”

The Alberta Sovereignty Act proposed by Premier Danielle Smith seeks to allow the province to refuse to follow specific federal laws if they are deemed not to be in Alberta’s best interests.

The Saskatchewan First Act proposed by Premier Scott Moe seeks to confirm Saskatchewan’s autonomy and exclusive jurisdiction over its natural resources.

“Half of Conservative Party voters in the last Canadian federal election (50%) are keeping an eye on news related to the Alberta Sovereignty Act,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower among Canadians who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (36%) or the Liberal Party (35%) in 2021.”

Just over half of Canadians (51%) are concerned about the Alberta Sovereignty Act, while 45% feel the same way about the Saskatchewan First Act.

Half of Canadians (50%) think the Government of Saskatchewan is right to confirm its autonomy and exclusive jurisdiction over its natural resources, while 27% disagree with this notion and 22% are undecided.

On a regional basis, residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (60%) and Alberta (57%) agree with the principle of the Saskatchewan First Act, along with 48% of those who live in Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia.

Only 34% of Canadians think the Government of Alberta is right to refuse to follow specific federal laws if they are deemed not to be in Alberta’s best interests, while 42% disagree with this assessment and 21% are not sure.

Just over half of Albertans (52%) agree with the ideals behind the Alberta Sovereignty Act. The numbers are lower in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (43%), British Columbia and Ontario (38% each), Atlantic Canada (34%) and Quebec (33 %).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from November 4 to November 6, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Concerns About Birth Tourism Drop Slightly in Canada

More than seven-in-ten Canadians still want the federal government to investigate the full extent of the practice.

Vancouver, BC [November 4, 2022] – Canadians are currently not paying as much attention to the issue of “birth tourism” as they did in 2020, but a sizeable majority believe the practice should still be scrutinized, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 28% of Canadians say they have followed media stories related to the issue of “birth tourism” in the past year “very closely” or “moderately closely”, down 13 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2020.

British Columbians and Quebecers are significantly more likely to be paying attention to news related to “birth tourism” (36% and 34% respectively) than their counterparts in other Canadian provinces.

“Birth tourism” is the practice of traveling to a specific country for the purpose of giving birth there and securing citizenship for the child in a country that has birthright citizenship. Canada allows expectant mothers who are foreign nationals to gain automatic citizenship for their children born in Canada.

Over the past few years, there have been reports of unregulated “for profit” businesses that have facilitated the practice of “birth tourism” in Canada. More than half of Canadians agree that “birth tourism” can displace Canadians from hospitals (54%, -2) and can degrade the value of Canadian citizenship (53%, -6).

More than three-in-five Canadians (64%, -7) believe “birth tourism” can be unfairly used to gain access to Canada’s education, health care and social programs—a point of view shared by 76% of British Columbians.

More than seven-in-ten Canadians (73%, -5) believe the federal government should establish a committee to investigate the full extent of “birth tourism” in Canada.

“A federal inquiry into the full scope of birth tourism would not represent a political liability for the federal government,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (82%), the Conservative Party (77%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (72%) in the last federal election are on board.”

Almost half of Canadians (48%, -6) think the country should ponder establishing new guidelines for birthright citizenship, while more than a third (37%, +3) would prefer to keep existing regulations.

Support for developing a new framework to birthright citizenship in Canada is highest in Ontario (50%), followed by Manitoba and Saskatchewan (49%), Quebec (48%) and Alberta, British Columbia and Atlantic Canada (each at 47%).

More than three-in-five Canadians (62%, -5) agree with the notion that birthright citizenship may have made sense at one point, but now people have taken advantage of existing rules.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 24 to October 26, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Conservatives Have Four-Point Lead Over Liberals in Canada

Canadians are evenly split when assessing the accomplishments of the Liberals and the NDP following their March 2022 agreement.

Vancouver, BC [October 31, 2022] – The opposition Conservative Party is ahead in Canada’s federal political scene, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 35% of decided voters would cast a ballot for the Conservative candidate in their constituency.

The governing Liberal Party is in second place with 31%, followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 19%, the Bloc Québécois with 8%, the Green Party with 4% and the People’s Party with 2%.

The Conservatives hold sizeable leads in their traditional strongholds of Alberta (51%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (47%) and are also first in Ontario (41%) and British Columbia (37%). The Liberals are leading in Quebec (38%, with the Bloc at 32%) and Atlantic Canada (38%).

“Among Canadian decided voters aged 55 and over, the Conservatives have a double-digit lead over the Liberals (41% to 30%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The race is much closer among younger voters.”

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%) approve of the performance of Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau while just over half (51%) disapprove.

The approval rating is higher this month for NDP leader Jagmeet Singh (46%, -5 since the last Research Co. survey conducted before the 2021 federal election).

More than a third of Canadians (37%) approve of the way Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Pierre Poilievre has handled his duties, while 44% disagree and 19% are undecided.

The numbers are lower for Green interim leader Amita Kuttner (22%), Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (20%, and 38% in Quebec) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (18%).

Practically three-in-ten Canadians (29%, +7 since September 2021) identify the economy and jobs as the most important issue facing Canada, followed by housing, homelessness and poverty (21%, +6), health care (also 21%, -6), the environment (7%, -3), accountability and leadership (5%, -1), immigration (4%, +1) and crime and public safety (also 4%, +1).

The economy and jobs is regarded as the most pressing federal concern for residents of Alberta (38%), Quebec (33%), Ontario (30%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 30%).

Health care is the prevalent issue for Atlantic Canadians (35%), while housing, homelessness and poverty is the most important matter in British Columbia (33%).

When asked which one of the six main party leaders would make the best prime minister of Canada, Trudeau holds a six-point advantage over Poilievre (30% to 24%), followed by Singh (17%), Blanchet (4%), Bernier (2%) and Kuttner (1%).

Residents of two provinces are almost evenly divided on whether Trudeau or Poilievre would be the best head of government for Canada right now. In Ontario, Poilievre is a point ahead of Trudeau (30% to 29%). In British Columbia, the current prime minister edges the opposition leader by the same margin (27% to 26%).

More than two-in-five Canadians (43%) say they are comfortable with Trudeau being charge of Canada’s economy, a proportion that rises to 45% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 52% in Quebec.

Just under two-in-five Canadians (39%) say they would be comfortable with Poilievre being charge of Canada’s economy, including 48% of Albertans and 43% of Ontarians.

There is no clear consensus on what the March 2022 supply and confidence agreement between the Liberals and the NDP has meant to Canada so far. Across the country, 44% are satisfied with the accomplishments of this deal, while the same proportion (44%) are dissatisfied.

Liberal voters in the 2021 federal election are significantly more likely to hold positive views on the March 2022 supply and confidence agreement (80%) than those who voted for the New Democrats (51%) or the Conservatives (13%).

The country is also divided on whether a federal election should be called in the next six months now that the Conservatives have a full time leader (Agree 44%, Disagree 41%).

Canadians who voted for the Conservatives in the last federal election are more convinced about the need to hold a fresh ballot now (73%) than their counterparts who supported the NDP (44%) or the Liberals (30%) in 2021.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 24 to October 26, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Support for Celebrating Halloween on Saturday Rises in Canada

Negative perceptions about specific types of costumes for adults and children also increased since 2019.

Vancouver, BC [October 28, 2022] – A plurality of Canadians believe it is time to observe Halloween on the last Saturday of October, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 44% of Canadians agree with this idea, while 39% disagree and 17% are undecided.

Compared to a Research Co. poll conducted in 2019, support for moving Halloween to the last Saturday of October—instead of having it every year on the same day (October 31)— is up by four points, while opposition is down by the same margin.

Residents of Ontario (48%) and Atlantic Canada (47%) are more likely to back the notion of celebrating Halloween on a Saturday every year. The proportions are lower in British Columbia (44%), Alberta (43%), Quebec (42%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (33%).

In 2022, Canadians are more likely to find fault with specific Halloween costumes for children. More than half of Canadians think that three types of costumes for kids are inappropriate: those that represent an ethnic stereotype (60%, +3), those that change the colour of the child’s skin (57%, +6) and those where a child carries toy or replica weapons (51%, +4).

At least two-in-five Canadians also believe two other types of costumes for kids are inappropriate: those that refer to a culture that is not the child’s own (43%, +5) and those that represent a social stereotype, such as a jailbird or vagabond (40%, +7).

The views are similar when Canadians are asked to ponder the suitability of certain Halloween costumes for adults. Three-in-five deem it inappropriate for an adult to wear Halloween costumes that depict ethnic stereotypes (60%, +1) or that change the colour of the adult’s skin (also 60%, +7).

Half of Canadians also find fault with adult Halloween costumes that feature toy or replica weapons (50%, +1) or that refer to a culture that is not the adult’s own, (also 50%, +6%). Two-in-five (41%, +5) also think adult costumes that represent a social stereotype are inappropriate.

“Canadians of all backgrounds appear dissatisfied with the existence of Halloween children’s costumes that feature ethnic stereotypes,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This includes Canadians whose ancestries are Indigenous (68%), South Asian (65%), East Asian (63%) and European (52%).”

A final question gauged views on some of the food and beverages that have become staples of the season. Two thirds of Canadians (66%) say they like pumpkin pie, and almost three-in-five (58%) enjoy pumpkin spice flavoured cakes.

Two other offerings are decidedly more contentious. Almost half of Canadians (47%) dislike pumpkin spice flavoured beverages, while 44% enjoy them.

A majority of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (53%) like pumpkin spice flavoured beverages. The numbers are lower among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (46%) and aged 55 and over (34%).

The nationwide results are similar for candy corn: 42% of Canadians enjoy this confectionery, while 48% do not.

There is a sizeable gender gap on candy corn, with 45% of Canadian men saying they like it, compared to 37% of Canadian women.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 22 to October 24, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Mixed Messages on Organ Donation After Death in Canada

While sizeable majorities of Canadians agree with the practice, significantly fewer have explicitly outlined their wishes.

Vancouver, BC [October 25, 2022] – While a vast majority of Canadians say they want to donate their human organs and tissue after death, few are actually registered to do so, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 84% of Canadians support the donation of human organs and tissue after death.

Canadians aged 55 and over are the most supportive of the practice (92%), followed by their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (84%) and aged 18-to-34 (78%).

Two thirds of Canadians (68%) say they would want their organs and tissue to be donated after their death, while 21% disagree and 11% are undecided.

On a regional basis, residents of Atlantic Canada are more likely to say that they would like to donate their organs and tissue after death (79%), followed by those who live in British Columbia and Alberta (each at 71%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (69%), Quebec (66%) and Ontario (64%).

Across the country, only 43% of Canadians say they have registered to be an organ and tissue donor after their death, an “explicit consent” usually expressed in a health card or driver’s licence.

“On the issue of organ and tissue donation after death, the thoughts and actions of Canadians differ greatly,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While two thirds want to go through with donations, fewer than half have actually registered to do so.”

Some jurisdictions around the world have established “Active Donor Registration” systems for organ and tissue donation. Under these systems, every person over the age of 18 is considered an organ and tissue donor after death unless they specifically opt-out of a registry.

In January 2021, Nova Scotia’s “Human Organ and Tissue Act” came into effect. The law makes every single person who has resided in the province for at least a year a potential organ and tissue donor after death. Nova Scotians who do not wish to be donors are able to opt-out of the system.

Almost two thirds of Canadians (65%, down five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2020) want their provincial government to “definitely” or “probably” implement an “Active Donor Registration” system for organ and tissue donation after death.

Support for the implementation of an “Active Donor Registration” system is highest among Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) in the 2021 federal election (74%), but also encompasses majorities of those who cast ballots for the Liberal Party (68%) and the Conservative Party (67%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from October 1 to October 3, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Concerns About Opioid Crisis Stagnant in Canada, Rise in U.S.

Just over a third of Canadians and Americans are satisfied with the way Justin Trudeau and Joe Biden are managing this issue.

Vancouver, BC [October 21, 2022] – Residents of Canada and the United States voice a high level of support for specific strategies to deal with the opioid crisis, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 45% of Canadians and 60% of Americans describe the current situation related to the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in their community as “a major problem”.

Grave concerns about the opioid crisis remain stagnant in Canada compared to a Research Co. poll conducted in October 2021, but have risen by seven points in the United States since September 2020.

Respondents to this survey were asked to consider six ideas related to opioids. More than four-in-five Canadians and Americans endorse two of them: launching more education and awareness campaigns about drug use (CAN 84%, USA 88%) and creating more spaces for drug rehabilitation (CAN 82%, USA 84%).

The concept of “safe supply” programs, where alternatives to opioids can be prescribed by health professionals, is supported by 74% of Canadians and 80% of Americans. In addition, three-in-four residents of each country (CAN 75%, USA 75%) believe it is time to reduce the prescription of opioids by medical professionals.

Two other proposals are more contentious. Majorities of Canadians and Americans (CAN 63%, USA 56%) agree with setting up more “harm reduction” strategies, such as legal supervised injection sites.

The notion of decriminalizing all drugs for personal use is endorsed by 40% of Canadians and 35% of Americans.

“Nationwide support for the decriminalization of all drugs for personal use increased in Canada from 33% in 2021 to 40% this year,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the United States, it dropped from 47% in 2020 to 35% in 2022.”

Canadians and Americans have similar opinions on the work of elected politicians to deal with the opioid crisis. More than a third consider the performance of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the Canadian federal government (36%) and President Joe Biden and the American federal government (34%) as satisfactory.

While 34% of Canadians think their own Member of Parliament is doing a “good job” managing the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in your community, only 23% of Americans feel the same way about the U.S. Congress.

The ratings are equivalent for Canadians premiers and provincial governments (36%) and American governors and state governments (also 36%).

Local governments fare slightly better, with 39% of Americans endorsing the work of their mayor and local government on the opioid crisis and 38% of Canadians feeling the same way about their mayor and council.

Methodology: Results are based on online studies conducted from October 15 to October 17, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Endorse Pardons for Simple Possession of Marijuana

Two thirds of Canadians agree with cannabis being legal in Canada, as reliance on licensed retailers increases.

Vancouver, BC [October 12, 2022] – More than three-in-five Canadians are in favour of a plan to pardon people convicted of simple possession of marijuana, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 64% of Canadians agree with the federal government providing expungement orders to people convicted of possession of cannabis for personal use with no intent to traffic.

In Canada, an expungement order compels police forces, federal departments or agencies to destroy or remove any judicial record of a conviction.

“The issue of pardons for simple possession of marijuana is not particularly divisive politically,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Sizeable majorities of Canadians who voted for the New Democrats (78%), the Liberals (70%) and the Conservatives (63%) in 2021 believe it is the right course of action.”

Two thirds of Canadians (66%, +2 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in April 2021) agree with cannabis being legal in Canada.

There are some significant differences among Canadians of different ethnic backgrounds when it comes to marijuana. Majorities of Canadians of Indigenous (80%), European (68%) and South Asian (57%) heritage agree with cannabis being legal in the country, compared to just 41% of those of East Asian descent.

While half of Canadians (50%) have never tried marijuana, about two-in-five (39%) used cannabis before it became legal in October 2018.

Just over one-in-ten Canadians (11%) consumed it only after legalization—a proportion that rises to 16% among those aged 18-to-34.

Almost half of Canadians who have used marijuana after legalization (48%) say they acquired “all” of their product at a licensed retailer, up 10 points since 2021.

There is also a reduction in the proportion of marijuana consumers who have not bought any cannabis from a licensed retailer, from 20% in April 2021 to 15% this month.

Few Canadians think it is time to make other substances legal in Canada, including ecstasy (10%, -4), powder cocaine (10%, -6), heroin (10%, -5), fentanyl (8%,-6), crack cocaine (8%, -5) and methamphetamine or “crystal meth” (8% -5).

Three-in-five Canadians (60%, -1) believe companies should be able to administer “drug tests” to any employee now that marijuana is legal in Canada, even if they do not operate machinery (such as pilots, truck drivers or crane operators).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from October 1 to October 3, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca