Most Canadians Would Make Federal Election Day a Holiday

A majority of respondents also want local candidates to participate in at least one debate in their constituency.

Vancouver, BC [October 10, 2019] – A significant proportion of Canadians would like to have an entire day to cast ballots in a federal election without having to show up for school or work, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, almost three-in-five Canadians (58%) agree with declaring election day a public holiday in Canada. 

A third of Canadians (32%) are not in favour of this idea, and 11% are undecided.

“Canadians aged 18-to-34 (72%) are significantly more likely to concur with the notion of making election day a holiday,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Canadians aged 35-to-54 (57%) and those over the age of 55 (48%) are not as enthusiastic.” 

Sizeable majorities of Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (70%), the Liberal Party (66%) and the Conservative Party (63%) would welcome this change.

A majority of Canadians (62%) believe voting should be mandatory in federal elections, while 29% disagree and 9% are undecided.

Residents aged 55 and over (68%) and Quebecers (67%) are more likely to be in favour of compulsory voting in elections to the House of Commons.

Almost seven-in-ten Canadians (69%) believe it should be mandatory for candidates to attend at least one public debate in their riding with the candidates from other parties, while 18% disagree and 13% are undecided.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 24 to September 26, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Want Ottawa to Do More on Environment

Air pollution, the pollution of rivers lakes and reservoirs, and global warming are the main concerns for residents.

Vancouver, BC [October 4, 2019] – A sizeable proportion of British Columbians is disappointed with the way the federal government has dealt with environmental issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, 45% of respondents believe that the federal government in Ottawa has not paid enough attention to the environment.

About three-in-ten British Columbians (29%) think Ottawa has paid the right amount of attention to the environment, while 17% believe it has focused too much on this issue.

“The level of criticism towards the federal government on environmental issues is decidedly higher among two groups of British Columbians,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of residents aged 55 and over (55%) and women (53%) think Ottawa should be paying more attention to the environment.”

The rating is slightly better for the two other levels of government, with 43% of British Columbians thinking their provincial and municipal administrations are not paying enough attention to the environment.

While more than half of residents of the Fraser Valley (52%) think their municipal governments have not done enough on the environmental front, the rating is lower in Metro Vancouver (44%), Vancouver Island (42%), Southern BC (39%) and Northern BC (36%).

When asked about their personal concerns about environmental problems, a majority of British Columbians mentioned air pollution (58%), the pollution of rivers, lakes and reservoirs (57%), global warming or climate change (55%) and the pollution of drinking water (55%).

Other issues that have British Columbians personally concerned are the contamination of soil and water by toxic waste (50%), deforestation and the clearance of naturally occurring forests (46%), the extinction of plant and animal species (45%), the depletion of fish stocks through overfishing (also 45%), the loss of tropical rain forests (44%) and the maintenance of the supply of fresh water for household needs (41%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 26 to September 29, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Liberals and Conservatives Gain in Canadian Federal Campaign

Justin Trudeau holds a nine-point advantage over Andrew Scheer in the “Best Prime Minister” question.

Vancouver, BC [September 28, 2019] – The two main federal parties in Canada increased their level of voter support over the past couple of months, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 36% of decided voters (+2 since a Research Co. survey conducted in July) would cast a ballot for the Liberal candidate in their riding in next month’s federal election.

The Conservative Party remains in second place with 33% (+2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 15% (-2), the Green Party with 9% (-1), the Bloc Québécois with 5% (+1) and the People’s Party with 2% (-1).

The two main parties hold the same level of support among male decided voters (36% for each), while the Liberals have a six-point lead over the Conservatives among women (36% to 30%).

Voters aged 18-to-34 currently prefer the Liberals (35%, with the Conservatives at 22% and the NDP at 20%). The Liberals are barely ahead among voters aged 35-to-54 (36% to 34%), while the Tories hold the same edge among voters aged 55 and over (38% to 36%).

“The Conservatives are keeping more than four-in-five decided voters (84%) who supported the party in 2015,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The retention rate is not as respectable at this point for the NDP (71%) and the Liberals (68%).”

The approval rating for Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau remains at 41%, with more than half of Canadians (54%, +4) disapproving of his performance.

NDP leader Jagmeet Singh improved his standing by seven points and is now at 42%. The approval rating is higher for Green Party leader Elizabeth May (44%, +2) and lower for Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Andrew Scheer (38%, +2). Maxime Bernier of the People’s Party dropped to 17% (-4).

Trudeau posted the lowest momentum score at -34, with 46% of Canadians saying their opinion of the incumbent prime minister has worsened since the start of the campaign. Bernier (-24) and Scheer (-17) also had negative numbers. Singh is the only leader with a positive momentum score (+3), while May is even.

On the “Best Prime Minister” question, Trudeau is first with 33%, followed by Scheer with 24%, Singh with 13% and May with 9%.

The environment is now the top issue facing Canada at 22% (+6), followed by the economy and jobs (21%, +2), health care (18%, -1) and housing, homelessness and poverty (17%, +4).

Health care is identified as the top issue in Atlantic Canada (33%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (23%), while the environment is top among Quebecers (33%). Housing, homelessness and poverty is the most important matter for British Columbians (24%), while the economy and jobs is first in Alberta (38%) and Ontario (23%).

Trudeau is the preferred leader to handle foreign affairs (32%)  health care (28%), and housing, homelessness and poverty (25%). May is clearly ahead on the environment (28%, with Trudeau at 21%)

The Liberal and Conservative leaders are tied or virtually even on four issues: crime and public safety (Scheer 26%, Trudeau 25%), economy and jobs (Trudeau 28%, Scheer 27%), energy and pipelines (Trudeau 25%, Scheer 25%) and accountability and leadership (Scheer 25%, Trudeau 24%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 24 to September 26, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Large Majorities of Canadians Endorse Poutine, Pineapple on Pizza

Fewer than a third of residents would consume prairie oysters, shark fin soup, cod tongues and scrunchions.

Vancouver, BC [August 23, 2019] – Two delicacies perfected in Quebec and Ontario are attractive choices for a large majority of Canadians, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, practically four-in-five Canadians (79%) said they would “definitely” or “probably” eat poutine.

Poutine is particularly popular among Quebecers (84%) and Canadians aged 35-to-54 (87%).

About two thirds of Canadians (66%) said they would “definitely” or “probably” eat pizza with pineapple, while three-in-five (60%) would eat a plant-based hamburger patty.

“More than two thirds of women (69%) and three quarters of British Columbians (76%) would eat a pizza with pineapple,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The dish is not as popular among Quebecers (57%).”

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to say they would consume a plant-based hamburger patty (67%) than those aged 35-to-54 (62%) and those aged 55 and over (52%).

Canadians are evenly divided on whether they would eat a steak with ketchup, with 48% acknowledging they would try it and 48% saying they would not.

Men (54%) are significantly more likely than women (41%) to say they would eat a steak with ketchup.

Other culinary creations were less accepted across the country. Just 26% of Canadians would “definitely” or “probably” eat prairie oysters, while one-in-five (20%) would consume shark fin soup.

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians would try two Atlantic delicacies: cod tongues (18%) and scrunchions (16%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from July 15 to July 17, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Back Opt-Out System for Organ and Tissue Donation

Support for change is highest in British Columbia, Alberta and Quebec.

Vancouver, BC [August 21, 2019] – A majority of Canadians would welcome a modification in the way the registries of organ and tissue donors are compiled across the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than three-in-five Canadians (63%) think their province should “definitely” or “probably” implement an “Active Donor Registration” system for organ and tissue donation after death.

Some jurisdictions around the world have established “Active Donor Registration” systems for organ and tissue donation. Under these systems, every person over the age of 18 is considered an organ and tissue donor after death unless they specifically opt-out of a registry.

Across the country, 25% of Canadians are opposed to their province implementing an opt-out system for organ and tissue donation and 13% are undecided.

Earlier this year, Nova Scotia’s House of Assembly unanimously passed the “Human Organ and Tissue Act”. The law makes every single person who has resided in the province for at least a year a potential organ and tissue donor after death. Nova Scotians who do not wish to be donors are able to opt-out of the system.

 “Support for enacting an opt-out system for organ and tissue donation reaches 66% in British Columbia, Alberta and Quebec,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “A majority of residents of Manitoba and Saskatchewan (63%), Atlantic Canada (59%) and Ontario (57%) would also welcome the change.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 12 to August 14, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca