Canadians Call for Real Action on Reconciliation with First Nations

More than half (53%) think a renewed nation-to-nation relationship with First Nations peoples can be achieved in Canada.
 
Vancouver, BC [October 14, 2021] – Significant majorities of Canadians believe the federal government should be taking specific steps to achieve reconciliation with the country’s Indigenous peoples, a new Research Co. poll has found.
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 89% of Canadians consider it “very important” or “moderately important” to end long-term drinking water advisories in First Nations communities.
 
More than four-in-five Canadians also think it is important to release all government records related to the residential school system (88%), take steps to end bias against Indigenous Canadians in the justice system (86%) and investigate all unmarked gravesites located near former residential schools (84%).
 
Just under four-in-five Canadians (79%) consider it important to demand an apology from the head of the Catholic Church for its role in the residential school system.
 
“A holistic approach to reconciliation with First Nations peoples is clearly favoured in Canada right now,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Most Canadians believe it is equally important to repair the mistakes of the past and to deal with the problems of the present.”
 
Across the country, 45% of Canadians say they followed news stories related to the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. Just under one-in-four Canadians (23%) consider the inquiry “a success”, down four points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in February 2019.
 
In December 2015, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau stated: “It is time for a renewed, nation-to-nation relationship with First Nations peoples, one that understands that the constitutionally guaranteed rights of First Nations in Canada are not an inconvenience but rather a sacred obligation.”
 
More than half of Canadians (53%, +1) think a renewed nation-to-nation relationship with First Nations peoples can be achieved in Canada, while 30% (-4) do not and 17% (+3) are undecided.
 
Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party and the New Democratic Party (NDP) in last month’s federal election are more likely to believe that a renewed nation-to-nation relationship can be attained (65% and 55% respectively) than those who cast ballots for the Conservative Party (38%).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 4 to October 6, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Canadians Reject Health Care Cuts, Question Private Involvement

A shortage of doctors and nurses is the biggest problem facing the health care system for one third of Canadians.  
 
Vancouver, BC [October 11, 2021] – A majority of Canadians are skeptical about the effect that the private sector would have on the country’s delivery of health care services, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 56% of Canadians disagree with the notion that health care in Canada would be better than it is now if it were run by the private sector, up five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2020.  
 
In addition, more than four-in-five Canadians (82%, +7) disagree with the federal government making cuts to health care funding in order to reduce government debt.  
 
Across the country, more than three-in-four Canadians (77%, +1) feel “very confident” or “moderately confident” that the country’s health care system would be there to provide help and assistance if they had to face an unexpected medical condition.  
 
The lowest levels of confidence on this question are observed in Quebec and Atlantic Canada (65% and 66% respectively). More than seven-in-ten residents of Alberta (73%), British Columbia (78%), Ontario (79%), and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (80%) think the health care system will be there if and when they need it.  
 
Practically three-in-five Canadians (59%, +4) think there are some good things in Canada’s health care system, but many changes are required. One-in-four respondents (25%, -5) believe the system works well and only minor changes are needed to make it work better, while 12% (+3) say health care has so much wrong with it that we need to completely rebuild it.  
 
“One-in-four Atlantic Canadians (25%) believe it is time to completely rebuild Canada’s health care system,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion reaches double digits in three other provinces: Quebec (15%), Alberta (11%) and British Columbia (10%).”  
 
One third of Canadians (32%, +6) identify a shortage of doctors and nurses as the biggest problem facing the health care system right now—including 66% of Atlantic Canadians and 36% of British Columbians.  
 
More than a quarter of Canadians (27%. -4) say long wait times are the biggest hindrance in the health care system—including 39% of those in Saskatchewan and Manitoba and 31% of those in Ontario.  
 
Other problems with the health care system outlined by Canadians are bureaucracy and poor management (14%, +1), inadequate resources and facilities (8%, =), little focus on preventive care (6%, =), lack of a wider range of services for patients (5%, -1) and insufficient standards of hygiene (2%, -1).  
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 4 to October 6, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 

Lukewarm Support for Pipeline Expansion in British Columbia

A proposal to reconsider the shelved Enbridge Northern Gateway project is endorsed by 41% of British Columbians.  
 
Vancouver, BC [October 7, 2021] – Public backing for the expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline has dropped in British Columbia over the past year, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 45% of British Columbians agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the project, down seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in October 2020.  
 
Opposition to the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion stands at 34% this month, up five points since 2020 and on par with the numbers reported by Research Co. in December 2019 (35%).  
 
“Most residents of Northern BC (60%) and Southern BC (54%) agree with the federal government’s decision to carry on with the pipeline expansion,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The level of support is currently lower in Metro Vancouver (42%), the Fraser Valley (41%) and Vancouver Island (41%).”  
 
Across the province, practically two thirds of British Columbians (65%, -3) believe the pipeline project will create hundreds of jobs for residents, while more than half (55%, -1) say they are disappointed with the way the federal government has managed this file.  
 
Almost half of British Columbians (47%, +3) think the pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of residents and just over two-in-five (41%, +1) want the provincial government to do whatever is necessary to ensure that the pipeline expansion does not happen.  
 
In November 2016, the federal government rejected a proposal—known as the Enbridge Northern Gateway—to build a new pipeline from Alberta to British Columbia’s north coast, to export oil on tankers to Asian markets.  
 
Just over two-in-five British Columbians (41%) agree with reconsidering the Enbridge Northern Gateway proposal, while one third (34%) disagree and one-in-four (25%) are undecided.  
 
The idea of reviving the Enridge Northern Gateway is more popular among British Columbians who voted for the BC Liberals in the 2020 provincial election (57%) than among those who cast ballots for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (38%) or the BC Green Party (36%).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 1 to October 3, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Support for Vaccine Passports Increases Markedly Across Canada

Most Canadians who voted for the People’s Party in the federal election (66%) say they will not get inoculated against COVID-19.  
 
Vancouver, BC [October 4, 2021] – More Canadians are in favour of the concept of “vaccine passports” than five months ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 68% of Canadians think it is a “good idea” to rely on “Proof of Vaccination” certificates for people who have been inoculated against COVID-19 in order to be able to go live concerts as spectators, up 11 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May.  
 
More than three-in-five Canadians also endorse the use of “vaccine passports” to visit a gym or fitness facility (67%, +13), to go to the theatre or cinema (66%, +11), to go to live sporting events as spectators (also 66%, +9) and to work at an office (63%, +11).  
 
Support for the use of the “Proof of Vaccination” certificates is also higher for travel to other countries (73%, +9), for travel to other Canadian provinces (68%, +9) and for travel inside the same province (62%, +8).  
 
Majorities of Canadians continue to voice satisfaction with three specific aspects of the COVID-19 vaccine rollout in Canada: the vaccination plans and phases outlined by their province (71%, -2 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in July), the pace of vaccination efforts in their province (70%, -2) and the procurement of COVID-19 vaccine doses from the federal government (69%, -3).  
 
As was the case in July, practically nine-in-ten Canadians (88%, =) say they have already been inoculated against COVID-19, or plan to do so.
 
 “In late September, only 9% of Canadians readily acknowledge that they will definitely or probably not get vaccinated against COVID-19,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This proportion includes 66% of Canadians who voted for People’s Party candidates in the most recent federal election.”  
 
Practically seven-in-ten Canadians (69%, -1) say that they wear a mask every time they go out—a proportion that rises to 75% among women and to 71% among Canadians aged 35-to-54.  
 
More than one-in-five Canadians say they are overeating or eating more than usual at home (23%, -4) and cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection (21%, -3).  
 
Fewer Canadians admit to losing their temper more than usual at home (15%, -1), not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection (14%, -2), having a bath or shower less often (12%, -2), drinking more alcohol than usual at home (13%, -1) and brushing their teeth less often than before the pandemic (7%, -2).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 25 to September 27, 2021, among 1,000 Canadian adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 

Party Platforms Were Most Influential with Canadian Voters

Almost two-in-five voters say the most important factor behind their selection is a party’s ideas and policies.  

Vancouver, BC [October 1, 2021] – Canadians who cast a ballot in the 44th federal election say that the party platforms were particularly important in helping them choose which candidate to support, a new Research Co. “exit poll” has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample of Canadians who voted in this year’s federal election, 59% say that party platforms were “very influential” or “moderately influential” in their decision to support a party.  

Practically three-in-four Canadians who voted for the People’s Party in this month’s federal election (74%) cite the platform as a major influence. Sizeable majorities of Canadians who supported the Conservative Party (67%), the Liberal Party (64%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (also 64%) feel the same way, along with 39% of Green Party supporters and 19% of Bloc Québécois supporters.  

More than two-in-five Canadian voters believe discussions with family (42%) and discussions with friends (also 42%) influenced their vote in the last election, while 35% mention campaign ads on radio and television.  

While interaction with candidates on social media was an influencer for 30% of Canadian voters, the proportion rises to 43% among those aged 18-to-34. A similar scenario ensues on the issue of interactions with other people on social media. One-in-four Canadian voters (26%)—and 44% of those aged 18-to-34—say these exchanges influenced their vote.  

The survey also asked Canadian voters about the effect of seven different endorsements. More than one-in-four (27%) say they were influenced by the endorsement of U.S. President Barack Obama, including 42% of Liberal Party supporters.  

The level of influence was lower for all other endorsements, including those originating from non-governmental organizations (25%), newspapers (24%), trade associations (23%), unions (21%) former U.S. Secretary of State Hilary Clinton (18%, and 27% for Liberal voters) and current U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders (17%, and 25% for NDP voters).  

When Canadians are asked about their main motivation for supporting a party, almost two-in-five (39%) mention its ideas and policies, while one-in-four (26%) say it is the party leader.  

Fewer Canadians are primarily moved by a desire for change (12%), the party’s candidate in the riding (10%), a desire for stability (9%) or disgust with other candidates (7%).  

“More than three-in-ten Canadians who voted for the Liberals and the Bloc (32% and 31% respectively) say the most important factor behind their choice was the party leaders,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among those who cast ballots for the Conservatives (25%), the New Democrats (also 25%), the People’s Party (21%) and the Greens (10%).”  

Canadians who voted for the People’s Party were more likely to say that their main motivation was disgust with other candidates (14%).  

When asked to ponder what this federal election would have looked like with different leaders, just under three-in-ten Canadians (29%) admit they would have voted for the Conservative Party with Peter MacKay as leader or for the Liberal Party with Chrystia Freeland as leader. Fewer Canadian voters (22%) would have supported the Liberals with Mark Carney as leader.  

In the “exit poll”, a majority of Canadians (52%) say they would be “very upset” if the Liberal Party forms the government again in Canada. A slightly lower proportion (48%) would feel the same way if the Conservative Party forms the government.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 18 to September 21, 2021, among 1,900 adults in Canada who voted in the 2021 federal election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.3 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Fewer Canadians Are Happy with Liberal Minority than in 2019

The NDP ran a “positive” campaign for 54% of Canadian voters, but only 24% feel the same way about the People’s Party.  

Vancouver, BC [September 27, 2021] – Canadians who cast a ballot in the 44th federal election are not as enthused about the plausible formation of the government as they were two years ago, a new Research Co. “exit poll” has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample of Canadians who voted in this year’s federal election, 42% say they would be happy with a minority government led by the Liberal Party, while 49% would be upset.  

In the Research Co. “exit poll” released after the 2019 federal election, 49% of Canadian voters were happy with a Liberal minority mandate, while 45% were upset.  

Canadian voters are divided when assessing the prospect of a formal governing agreement between the Liberal Party and the New Democratic Party (NDP). Across the country, 44% say they would be happy if this scenario ultimately materializes, while 45% would be upset.  

“Compared to 2019, there is a significant shift in the way Canadian voters look at formal cooperation between the Liberals and New Democrats,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Two years ago, more than half of voters (56%) welcomed such a deal, but the proportion has fallen by 12 points after the most recent federal election.”  

Almost half of Canadian voters (48%) say they made up their minds about which party to support in the federal election before the campaign began—a proportion that rises to 55% among those aged 55 and over, 55% in Atlantic Canada and 52% in Ontario.  

Across the country, 14% of Canadian voters say they decided which party to support on the final week of the campaign. This finding is fairly consistent across most contending parties, from a high of 17% among those who voted for the Greens to a low of 10% among those who cast ballots for the Conservatives.  

More than half of Canadian voters (54%) describe the NDP’s electoral campaign as “very positive” or “moderately positive.”  The results on this question are lower for the Liberal Party (44%), the Conservative Party (43%), the Green Party (31%) and the People’s Party (24%).  

While only 21% of Canadian voters feel the campaign of the Bloc Québécois was positive, the proportion rises to 42% in Quebec.   Practically half of Canadian voters (49%) say they voted for the candidate in their riding who had the best chance of defeating a party they disliked, even if the candidate they voted for was not their first preference.  

“Strategic voting” was more prevalent among Canadian voters aged 18-to-34 (66%) than among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (49%) and aged 55 and over (40%).  

More than half of Canadians who voted for the Bloc Québécois (56%) and the Conservatives (53%) say they cast their ballots strategically. The numbers are lower among those who supported the Liberals (49%), the Greens (48%), the People’s Party (also 48%) and the New Democrats (38%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 18 to September 21, 2021, among 1,900 adults in Canada who voted in the 2021 federal election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.3 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Fewer Canadians Believe the Worst of COVID-19 is Behind Us

Only 26% of Albertans are satisfied with how their provincial government is handling the pandemic.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 23, 2021] – The proportion of Canadians who envision a quick end to the COVID-19 pandemic has reduced drastically since the middle of the summer, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, just under half of Canadians (48%) believe the worst of the pandemic is behind us, down 24 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in July.  
 
Conversely, more than a third of Canadians (36%, +21) think that the worst of COVID-19 is ahead of us.
 
“Almost two thirds of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (64%) believe that the COVID-19 situation will not worsen,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Significantly smaller proportions of Canadians aged 35-to-54 (50%) and aged 55 and over (39%) hold the same view.”
 

 
More than four-in-five Canadians (84%) consider the COVID-19 pandemic as a real threat, while 12% disagree and 4% are undecided.  
 
Fewer than one-in-five Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (5%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (6%) and the Conservative Party (16%) in this month’s federal election suggest that COVID-19 is not a real threat.  
 
The proportion of “pandemic skeptics” reaches 22% among Canadians who cast ballots for the Green Party and 58% among those who supported the People’s Party.  
 
More than half of Canadians (55%, -6) are satisfied with the way the federal government in Ottawa has dealt with COVID-19—including majorities of those who reside in Atlantic Canada (60%), Quebec (60%), Ontario (56%) and British Columbia (51%).  
 
Satisfaction is slightly lower this month for the way in which municipal governments (60%, -3) and provincial governments (56%, -6) have performed during the pandemic.  
 
At least two thirds of residents of Quebec (67%, -4) and British Columbia (66%, -5) are satisfied with the way their provincial administrations have managed COVID-19, along with half of those in Ontario (50%, -1).  
 
The situation is extremely different in Alberta, where only 26% of residents are satisfied with the provincial administration on this file. This represents a 20-point decrease since July and the lowest level recorded for a government of any level since Research Co. started asking this question in March 2020.  
 
Seven-in-ten Canadians (71%) agree with allowing K-12 students to go back to in-class learning in their province. Support for this measure is highest in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (79%), followed by Ontario (72%), Quebec (71%), British Columbia (69%), Atlantic Canada (65%) and Alberta (61%).  
 
More than four-in-five Canadians (84%) are in favour of requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on September 18 and September 19, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Dave Doe

British Columbians Tired of Government Inaction on Mobile Costs

Seven-in-ten of the province’s cell phone users say their current plan is “expensive”, unchanged since 2019.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 20, 2021] – More than two years after the federal Liberal Party promised to reduce the cost of mobile phones and internet bills for Canadians, few British Columbians expect this pledge to ultimately be fulfilled, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, only 25% of British Columbians think the federal government will “definitely” or “probably” achieve this promise, down six points from a similar Research Co. survey conducted in December 2019.  
 
British Columbians are also not particularly hopeful about their provincial administration, which appointed MLA Bob D’Eith to work with the federal government to explore more affordable and transparent mobile phone options.  
 
Across the province, only 32% of British Columbians expect the provincial government’s push to be successful, down three points since December 2019.  
 
“British Columbians aged 55 and over are more likely to be skeptical about a future where mobile service is more affordable,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 22% of the province’s oldest adults think the provincial government will be effective in its efforts and just 16% think the federal government will fulfil the promise made in the previous electoral campaign.”  
 
Across the province, seven-in-ten mobile phone users (70%) describe the cost of their mobile phone plan as “very expensive” or “moderately expensive”, unchanged since December 2019.  
 
Women (70%) and British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (74%) are more likely to believe that they pay too much for their cell phone every month.  
 
A monthly plan for a mobile phone in Canada with two gigabytes of data costs about $75.  
 
About a third of British Columbians think a similar plan would be less expensive if they lived in Australia (33%) or Italy (34%), while more than half (57%) think they would pay less to access the same services in the United States.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on September 5 and September 6, 2021, among 700 adults who work in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

All Tied Up as Canadians Prepare to Vote in the Federal Election

Support for both the Liberal Party and the Conservative Party is 32%, while approval of their two leaders is also identical (42%).  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 19, 2021] – Voters in Canada head to tomorrow’s federal election with the two main contending parties enjoying the same level of voter support across the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 32% of decided voters (-2 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted earlier this month) would cast a ballot for the candidate of the Liberal Party in their constituency, while 32% (+2) would support the contender of the Conservative Party.  
 
The New Democratic Party (NDP) is in third place with 19% (-1), followed by the Bloc Québécois with 7% (=), the People’s Party with 6% (+1) and the Green Party with 4% (+1). In addition, 1% of decided voters in the country would vote for a different political party or an independent candidate.  
 

On a regional basis, the Liberals are in first place in Atlantic Canada (42%, with the Conservatives at 27%), Quebec (34%, with the Bloc at 31%) and Ontario (37%, with the Conservatives at 30%).  
 
Conversely, the Conservatives dominate in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (43%, with the NDP at 23%) and Alberta (50%, with the NDP at 21%). In British Columbia, the Conservatives are slightly ahead of the New Democrats (33% to 31%), with the Liberals at 25%.  
 
The Green Party gets its best result in British Columbia (6%, but reaching 14% in its stronghold of Vancouver Island). The People’s Party is particularly prevalent in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (10%) and Alberta (8%).  
 
As the campaign draws to a close, the approval rating for the two main contenders is exactly the same. Just over two-in-five Canadians (42%) approve of the way both Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau and Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole have performed in their jobs. The disapproval rating is higher for Trudeau (53%) than it is for O’Toole (47%).  
 
NDP leader Jagmeet Singh has the highest approval rating (51%, +2), while the numbers are significantly lower for Green Party leader Annamie Paul (24%, +1) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (20%, +5). Since the start of the campaign, one-in-four Canadians report having an improved opinion of both Singh (26%) and O’Toole (25%). The proportions are significantly lower for Trudeau (16%), Paul (10%) and Bernier (also 10%).  
 
Trudeau remains ahead when Canadians are asked which of the five leaders running nationwide campaigns would make the best Prime Minister (31%, -2), followed by O’Toole (27%, +1), Singh (19%, +1), Bernier (7%, +2) and Paul (2%, =).  
 
More than a quarter of Canadians (27%, +4) think health care is the most important issue facing the country. The economy and jobs is second on the list with 22% (=), followed by housing, homelessness and poverty (15%, -1) and the environment (10%, -2).  
 
The COVID-19 pandemic is the most important issue for 8% of Canadians—a proportion that rises to 16% in Alberta.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on September 18 and September 19, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada, and 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for the survey of Canadians and +/- 3.5 percentage points for the survey of British Columbians, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Iouri Goussev

Liberals Regain Lead, Conservatives and NDP Drop in Canada

One-in-ten Conservative Party voters from 2019 say they will cast a ballot for the People’s Party in this month’s election.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 14, 2021] – As Canada heads to the final week of campaigning in the 2021 federal election, the governing Liberal Party is ahead of its competitors, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 34% of decided voters in Canada would support the Liberal candidate in their constituency, up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in late August.  
 
The Conservative Party is second with 30% (-2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (-2), the Bloc Québécois with 7% (+1), the People’s Party with 5% (+2) and the Green Party with 3% (-1). In addition, 1% of decided voters in the country would back a different party or an independent candidate.  
 
The Conservatives remain ahead of the Liberals among male voters (36% to 31%) and voters aged 55 and over (35% to 31%). The Liberals hold the upper hand over the Conservatives among female voters (38% to 25%) and voters aged 35-to-54 (39% to 30%). The Liberals are also in first place among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (37%, with the NDP at 27% and the Conservatives at 18%).  
 
In Atlantic Canada, the Liberals remain the most favoured option for voters (40%, with the Conservatives at 34%). In Quebec, the governing party holds an eight-point lead over the Bloc (37% to 29%).  
 
Half of decided voters in Alberta (50%) would support the Conservative candidate in their constituency, along with more than two-in-five (43%) of those who reside in Saskatchewan and Manitoba.  
 
The race remains closely contested in Ontario, where the Liberals are slightly ahead of the Conservatives (37% to 34%) and in British Columbia, where the three main federal parties are virtually tied (30% for the Conservatives, 29% for the New Democrats and 28% for the Liberals).  
 
The People’s Party is benefiting from a higher level of support in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (9%), Alberta (7%) and Ontario (6%). In fact, 10% of Canadians who supported the Conservatives in the 2019 federal election say they will be voting for the People’s Party in 2021.  
 
Almost one-in-four Canadians (23%, -3) think health care is the most important issue facing the country today, followed by the economy and jobs (22%, +2), housing, homelessness and poverty (16%, +1) and the environment (12%, -1).  
 
Across Canada, the NDP’s Jagmeet Singh continues to post the highest approval rating among the five leaders who are running nationwide campaigns (49%, -2), followed by Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau (43%, -2), Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole (40%, -1), Annamie Paul of the Green Party (23%, +2) and Maxime Bernier of the People’s Party (15%, =).  
 
Singh also remains ahead on personal momentum, with 27% of Canadians saying their opinion of him has improved since the start of the campaign. The numbers on this indicator are lower for O’Toole (22%), Trudeau (15%), Paul (12%) and Bernier (8%).  
 
On the “Best Prime Minister” question, Trudeau remains in first place with 33% (+1), followed by O’Toole (26%, =), Singh (18%, -2), Bernier (5%, +2) and Paul (2%, +1).  
 
“A third of Canadian women (33%) feel Justin Trudeau is the best person to manage the federal government, while only one-in-five (19%) select Erin O’Toole,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The race is significantly tighter among male voters on this same question, with Trudeau at 34% and O’Toole at 33%.”
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 13, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Dave Doe
 

Many British Columbians in the Dark About Return to Office

Almost half of those who worked from home during the COVID-19 pandemic expect to be able to do so at least three times a week.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 13, 2021] – Sizeable proportions of British Columbians who worked from home during the COVID-19 pandemic have not been adequately informed about an eventual return to the workplace, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative sample, only 45% of employed British Columbians who have worked from home during the pandemic say their company has outlined a plan for employees to return to the office after the pandemic is over.  
 
In addition, only 40% of British Columbians who worked from home during the pandemic say their company has outlined a plan for how they will be able to work from home in the future.  
 
Across the province, 55% of employed British Columbians say they laboured from home instead of at their usual workplace during the COVID-19 pandemic, including 59% of women, 59% of those aged 18-to-34 and 73% of those whose duties are primarily related to office work.  
 
Just under half of employed British Columbians who have worked from home during the pandemic (47%) say they expect to be able to continue doing so at least three times a week, up nine points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in March.  
 
“The past six months have not provided clarity for many employed British Columbians on what their work arrangements will look like,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The expectations of a future where the home office plays a prominent role on weekdays have increased markedly, particularly in the Fraser Valley and Vancouver Island.”  
 
More than half of British Columbians who worked from home (56%) say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to seek a different job if their current company does not allow them to work from home as often as they want, up seven points since March.  
 
Almost two thirds of employed British Columbians who have worked from home (64%) say they would consider switching to a different job that can be performed from home for a company located in their own metropolitan area. More than half (55%) would consider a similar arrangement reporting to a company headquartered in their own province, while more than two-in-five (44%) would entertain an offer from a company in another province.  
 
There is some change when it comes to some of the current features of office life. Compared to March, fewer employed British Columbians expect an increase in virtual communications between offices (43%, -3), virtual staff meetings (43%, -7) and virtual business development (41%, -6).  
 
The proportions are also lower on the expectations of fewer in-person staff meetings (42%, -5), less business travel (37%, -7) and a reduction of in-person business development meetings (38%, -5) once the pandemic ends.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on September 5 and September 6, 2021, among 700 adults who work in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Canadians Hold Mixed Views on Which Leader is Best on Issues

Just under one-in-five Canadians (17%) say they intend to vote by mail in this year’s federal election.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 6, 2021] – As the federal election campaign continues, the three main federal party leaders are connecting in different ways with Canadians on the most important issues facing the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, just under a third of Canadians (32%) think Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is the best person to handle crime and public safety.  
 
Trudeau is also the preferred choice of Canadians to manage immigration (30%), health care (29%) and the environment (28%).  
 
Official opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole is the top option for Canadians to handle the economy and jobs (34%), energy and pipelines (32%), and accountability and leadership (27%). O’Toole and Trudeau are tied, with 30% each, when Canadians are asked about the best leader to manage foreign affairs (30%).  
 
New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Jagmeet Singh is the most popular leader to deal with housing, homelessness and poverty (27%), with Trudeau and O’Toole tied at 24%.  
 
Health care is identified as the most important issue facing Canada for 26% of respondents, followed by the economy and jobs with 20%, housing, homelessness and poverty with 15% and the environment with 13%.  
 
The survey also asked Canadians about other characteristics and topics related to the three main federal party leaders. Trudeau emerged as the most popular option to be the Prime Minister in the event of another Quebec referendum (31%) and to represent Canada at the next round of climate change talks (30%).  
 
The incumbent prime minister is also ahead on four personality traits: having a drink with you at the local bar (28%), being on your sports team (also 28%), babysitting your kids or a relative’s kids (25%) and being part of your trivia quiz team (23%, with Singh close behind at 21%).  
 
Singh is practically tied with Trudeau on two of the items tested: having a coffee or tea with you at the local coffee shop (27%, with Trudeau at 26%) and giving you a good recommendation on a book to read (22%, with Trudeau at 21%).  
 
More than three-in-ten Canadians express a preference for O’Toole on three separate matters: negotiating with U.S. President Joe Biden on trade and security issues (34%), being the Prime Minister in the event of a terrorist attack (32%) and negotiating with Russia over Arctic sovereignty (31%).  
 
“There is a theme developing when it comes to the perceptions of Canadians on the three main party leaders,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While Trudeau and Singh score highly on some of the personality traits, like hanging around at a bar or coffee shop, O’Toole has a decisive advantage on foreign policy items.”  
 
This week, there will be two televised debates organized by the Leaders’ Debate Commission. More than two-in-five Canadians (42%) agree with the Commission’s decision to not extend an invitation to these debates to People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier, while 33% disagree and 25% are undecided.  
 
The results are similar when Canadians are asked about the presence of Maverick Party leader Jay Hill on the televised meetings, with 44% agreeing with the decision to leave him out, 27% disagreeing and 29% saying they are not sure.  
 
Almost half of Quebecers (49%) are in favour of the Commission’s decision to leave both Bernier and Hill off the stage.  
 
Across the country, 17% of Canadians say they plan to vote by mail this year—a proportion that includes 30% of British Columbians and 21% of Albertans.  
 
While more than one-in-four Canadians (26%) plan to cast their ballot during Advance Voting from September 10 to September 13, more than two-in-five (44%) intend to vote on Election Day (September 20).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Conservatives Close Gap in Canada as Liberal Lead Disappears

Justin Trudeau’s approval rating fell to 45% (-5 since June), but he is still ahead of Erin O’Toole in the “Preferred PM” question.
 
Vancouver, BC [August 31, 2021] – The federal election in Canada is currently a dead heat between the two most prominent parties in the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 33% of Canadian decided voters would cast a ballot for the candidate of the Liberal Party in their riding, down five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June.
 
The Conservative Party remains in second place with 32% (+2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 22% (+2), the Bloc Québécois with 6% (+1), the Green Party with 4% (-1) and the People’s Party with 3% (+2). Fewer than 1% of decided voters would vote for the Maverick Party, for another party or for an independent candidate.
 
In June, the Liberals were ahead of the Conservatives by 15 points among female decided voters in Canada. This month, the advantage has narrowed to just eight points (36% to 28%). The Tories are now in first place among male decided voters (36% to 31%).
 
The Liberals are still popular among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (34%, followed by the NDP with 29%) and among decided voters aged 35-to-54 (38%, with the Conservatives at 32%). The Tories hold a seven-point advantage over the Liberals among decided voters aged 55 and over (37% to 30%).
 
The Liberals are in first place among decided voters in Atlantic Canada (40%) and Quebec (also 40%). The Conservatives have outright leads in Alberta (49%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (46%).
 
There are close races developing in two Canadian provinces. In Ontario, the Conservatives and the Liberals are essentially tied (36% and 35% respectively). In British Columbia, the Liberals—who were leading in a Research Co. survey conducted in early August—have fallen to third place (28%), with both the Conservatives and the New Democrats at 32%.
 
There is some movement when Canadians are asked about the most important issue facing the country. Health care is first with 26% (-3), followed by the economy and jobs with 20% (-3) and housing, homelessness and poverty with 15% (+1). The environment is fourth on the list with 13% (+6).
 
“While health care remains the dominant issue for Atlantic Canadians and Quebecers, financial matters are crucial for those who reside in Alberta,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “One-in-five Ontarians and British Columbians are worried about housing, but the issue that has seen the biggest gains since June is the environment.”
 
The approval rating for Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau stands at 45% at the end of the month. This is higher than the numbers posted by Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole (41%, +7) and lower than NDP leader Jagmeet Singh (51%, +1).
 
Just over one-in-five Canadians (21%, -11) approve of the way Green Party leader Annamie Paul is handling her duties, while there was no significant movement for People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (15%, +1).
 
When Canadians are asked which one of the five leaders who are running nationwide campaigns would make the best head of government, the incumbent prime minister also lost some ground. Trudeau is in first place with 32% (-5), followed by O’Toole (26%, +11), Singh (20%, +4), Bernier (3%, =) and Paul (1%, -1).
 
Since the start of the campaign, Trudeau posts a negative momentum score (-24, with 39% of Canadians saying their opinion of him has worsened). Paul and Bernier are also in negative territory (-18 and -19 respectively), while O’Toole is even and Singh is at +10 (with 27% of Canadians reporting a better assessment of the current NDP leader).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Province’s Name is Fine for Most Residents of British Columbia

Just under one-in-five residents are upset by the absence of an acknowledgment to Indigenous peoples in British Columbia.

Vancouver, BC [August 30, 2021] – A majority of British Columbians believe the time is not right to consider a change in the province’s name or flag, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 60% of British Columbians disagree with changing the name of the province to acknowledge its Indigenous heritage, while 26% agree and 14% are undecided.

“The debate over British Columbia’s name finds very different positions from a generational standpoint,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While more than a third of residents aged 18-to-34 (37%) would welcome a change, the proportion falls to 30% among those aged 35-to-54 and to just 14% among those aged 55 and over.”

The proposal does not find a significant variation by political allegiance, with 30% of BC Green Party voters in the 2020 provincial election supporting a name change, along with 29% of those who cast ballots for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) and 26% of those who supported the BC Liberals.

The notion of changing the provincial flag to remove the Union Jack resonates with 30% of British Columbians, but practically half (49%) are opposed and 20% are not sure.

British Columbians aged 35-to-54 are more likely to be in favour of this change in the provincial flag (37%) than their counterparts aged 18-to-34 (33%) and aged 55 and over (23%).

Two thirds of British Columbians (67%) say that nothing upsets them about the name of the province. Just under one-in-five (18%) say they are bothered by the absence of an acknowledgement to Indigenous peoples, while fewer are upset at the “British” (15%) and “Columbia” (8%) components of the name.

Residents of Northern BC are significantly more likely to be upset with the absence of an acknowledgement to Indigenous peoples in the province’s name (26%) and with the “Columbia” component (16%) than their counterparts in other regions.

The Queen Charlotte Islands were renamed as Haida Gwaii in 2010. More than half of British Columbians (56%) agree with this decision, while 20% disagree and 24% are undecided.

More than three-in-five residents of Vancouver Island (64%) and the Fraser Valley (63%) agree with the decision to rename the islands as Haida Gwaii, along with majorities of those who live in Southern BC (55%), Metro Vancouver (53%) and Northern BC (52%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 7 to August 9, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

 
Photo Credit: CPG1100

 

Support for “Vaccine Passports” Rises in British Columbia

Only 21% of the province’s residents would be willing to attend a live sporting event as spectators right now.  
 
Vancouver, BC [August 26, 2021] – Favourable views on the idea of a “Vaccine Passport” have increased in British Columbia over the past five months, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 67% of British Columbians think it is a good idea to rely on a “Vaccine Passport” to be able to go to live sporting events as spectators, up five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March 2021.  
 
“Vaccine Passports” would essentially amount to “Proof of Vaccination” certificates for people who have been inoculated against COVID-19.  
 
Two thirds of British Columbians (66%, +4) are supportive of a “Vaccine Passport” to be able to go to live concerts—including 74% of respondents aged 55 and over.  
 
More than three in five British Columbians endorse the concept of a “Vaccine Passport” to be able to visit a gym or fitness facility (63%, +1), to be able to work at an office (also 63%, +5) and to be able to go to the theatre or cinema (62%, +6).  
 
While 61% of British Columbians (+1) are in favour of relying on a “Vaccine Passport” for travel inside their own province, support for the idea is higher for travel to other Canadian provinces (69%, +5) and for travel to other countries (77%, +4).  
 
British Columbians are not particularly eager to embark on a wide range of activities as the COVID-19 pandemic continues. Fewer than three-in-ten of the province’s residents say they are willing to visit a gym or fitness facility (28%), a music venue (23%) or a live sporting event (20%) in their municipality right now.  
 
“In spite of the high vaccination rates in British Columbia, residents of the province are not particularly prepared to attend crowded spaces,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 29% of those aged 18-to-34 are willing to go to a concert or dance right now.”  
 
Just over a third of British Columbians would be willing to ride on the bus (37%), ride on SkyTrain (also 37%) or visit a Community Centre (34%) at this stage.  
 
More than half of British Columbians are currently willing to visit a library (53%), a barbershop or salon (54%), a restaurant, pub or bar where they can only eat indoors (56%) or a restaurant, pub or bar where they can eat outside (like a patio) (70%).
 
Methodology: Results are based on an online survey conducted from August 19 to August 21, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 

Most British Columbians Proud of Province, Intend to Stay Put

Just under three-in-five residents of British Columbia express sympathy towards their counterparts in Seattle and Portland.  
 
Vancouver, BC [August 24, 2021] – A significant proportion of British Columbians believe they will have a chance to live out their days in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 75% of British Columbians believe they will stay in the province for the rest of their lives, while 12% disagree and 12% are undecided.  
 
While 90% of British Columbians aged 55 and over foresee remaining in the province, the proportion drops to 72% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 61% among those aged 18-to-34.  
 
Across British Columbia, 84% of residents say they are very proud of the province that they live in, up three points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2020.  
 
While 90% of British Columbians who live in the Fraser Valley are very proud of their province, the numbers are lower in Metro Vancouver (84%), Southern BC (82%), Vancouver Island (78%) and Northern BC (also 78%).  
 
A majority of British Columbians (57%, -7) say their views are different from the rest of the country, and a slightly larger proportion (59%, +1) think they have more in common with the people of Seattle and Portland than with those in Toronto or Montreal.  
 
Fewer than one-in-five British Columbians (18%, -9) believe British Columbia would be better off as its own country.   Just over three-in-five respondents (61%, -2) say they consider themselves “Canadians first, and British Columbians second”, while 22% (-3) say they are “British Columbians first, and Canadians second.”  
 
“Three-in-ten residents of the province who voted for the BC Greens in the 2020 provincial election (30%) consider themselves British Columbians first,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are lower among those who supported the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (25%) and the BC Liberals (21%) in last year’s ballot.”  
 
Just under three-in-ten British Columbians (29%, +7) think John Horgan has been the province’s best head of government since 1986, followed by Christy Clark (9%, =), Mike Harcourt (6%, -1), Gordon Campbell (also 6%, -1) and Bill Vander Zalm (5%, -9).
 
One-in-five British Columbians (21%, +6) regard Christy Clark as the worst recent premier, followed by Campbell (11%, =), Glen Clark (9%, +1) and Horgan (8%, +3).
 
Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 7 to August 9, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Separatist Feelings Drop in Quebec, Remain Stagnant in Alberta

Most Albertans and Ontarians believe their provinces would be better off with a different premier in charge.  
 
Vancouver, BC [August 20, 2021] – While almost half of Canadians believe their province would benefit from having a different prime minister, fewer residents of Quebec are expressing sympathy towards secession, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 25% of Quebecers believe their province would be better off as its own country, down 11 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2020.  
 
Only Alberta has a larger proportion of residents who believe they would be better off as a nation (28%, unchanged since May 2020, and lower than the 40% observed in December 2019).  
 
Almost half of Canadians (47%) think their province would be better off with a different Prime Minister in Ottawa, up nine points since May 2020.  
 
More than half of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (58%) yearn for someone other than Justin Trudeau to have responsibility over the federal government. The proportion is lower in Alberta (50%), Ontario (48%), British Columbia (46%), Atlantic Canada (38%) and Quebec (37%).  
 
When asked is their province would be better off with a different premier in charge, 47% of Canadians agreed, while just over a third (37%) disagreed.   Two thirds of Albertans (68%) and a majority of Ontarians (54%) think their provinces would be better off with a different head of government.  
 
“Since May 2020, the numbers for the premiers of Alberta and Ontario have worsened on this question,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There is an increase in negative perceptions of eight points for Jason Kenney in Alberta and of 16 points for Doug Ford in Ontario.”  
 
The proportion of residents who are not particularly pleased with their premiers is lower in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (50%), Quebec (38%), Atlantic Canada (37%) and British Columbia (36%).
 
Across Canada, only 13% of respondents believe their province would be better off joining the United States and becoming an American state, down four points since May 2020. This feeling is more prevalent among residents of Alberta and Quebec (each at 17%).
 
Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 12 to August 14, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Feel Trudeau is Better for Province Than Harper

Roughly the same proportion of the province’s residents would be “very upset” with a win for the Liberals or the Conservatives.
 
Vancouver, BC [August 17, 2021] – Most residents of British Columbia believe the tenure of Justin Trudeau as Prime Minister of Canada has been beneficial for the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 54% of British Columbians think the province has been treated “very well” or “well” by Trudeau, while one third (34%) believe it has been treated “poorly” or “very poorly.
 
Respondents are almost evenly split when assessing the effect of the federal government headed by Stephen Harper on British Columbia, with 38% saying he treated the province “very well” or “well” and 42% believing he behaved “poorly” or “very poorly.”
 
“Almost half of British Columbians aged 55 and over (48%) hold a favourable view on the way the current federal government is treating the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Just over a third (35%) feel the same way about the previous federal administration.”
 
Across British Columbia, just over half of residents (51%) say they would be “very upset” if the Conservative Party forms the government again in Ottawa. Animosity towards a Tory administration rises to 53% among Green Party voters in 2019, 68% among Liberal voters and 72% among New Democratic Party (NDP) voters.
 
Just under half of British Columbians (48%) say they would be “very upset” if the Liberals win the next election and remain in power, including 85% of Conservative voters, 61% of Green voters and 54% of NDP voters.
 
Only 35% of British Columbians would be “very upset” if the NDP forms the government for the first time in Ottawa after the next federal election. This includes two thirds of Conservative voters (66%), but significantly lower proportions of those who voted for the Liberals (43%) or the Greens (32%) in 2019.
 
Four of the current ministers in the federal government represent constituencies located in British Columbia and are seeking re-election this year as candidates for the Liberal Party.
 
Minister of National Defence Harjit Sajjan has the best approval rating of the four BC-based federal ministers (37%), followed by Minister of Environment and Climate Change Jonathan Wilkinson (31%), Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion Carla Qualtrough (29%) and Minister of Digital Government Joyce Murray (27%).
 
Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 7 to August 9, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca
 

Liberals Ahead of NDP as British Columbians Ponder Federal Ballot

A majority of British Columbians approve of the way Justin Trudeau and Jagmeet Singh are handling their duties.
 
Vancouver, BC [August 11, 2021] – The governing Liberal Party is currently the most popular federal political organization in British Columbia, a new Research Co. poll has found.
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 37% of decided voters in British Columbia say they would cast a ballot for the Liberal candidate in their constituency if a federal election were held tomorrow.
 
The New Democratic Party (NDP) is second with 29%, followed by the Conservative Party with 23%, the Green Party with 8% and the People’s Party with 2%. Fewer than 1% of decided voters would support the Maverick Party or vote for another party or an independent candidate.
 
The Liberals are in first place in Metro Vancouver (40%) and Southern BC (32%). The races are tighter in the Fraser Valley (Liberals 34%, NDP 32%) and on Vancouver Island (Liberals 33%, NDP 32%).
 
“There is a significant gender gap when British Columbians assess Canada’s main opposition party,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 27% of male decided voters in the province would back the Conservatives, only 19% of female decided voters share the same view.”
 
Just over half of British Columbians (51%) approve of the way Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau has performed in his job. The rating is slightly higher for NDP leader Jagmeet Singh (53%) and significantly lower for Conservative leader Erin O’Toole (29%), Green Party leader Annamie Paul (24%), People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (13%) and Maverick Party leader Jay Hill (9%).
 
A third of British Columbians (33%) believe Trudeau would make the best Prime Minister of Canada. Singh has a six-point edge over O’Toole (22% to 16%), with Paul and Bernier in the low single digits (3% and 2% respectively).
 
Housing, homelessness and poverty is the most important issue facing Canada for 26% of British Columbians, followed by the economy and jobs (20%), health care (19%) and the environment (13%).
 
Trudeau is regarded as the best party leader to manage foreign affairs (32%), the economy and jobs (31%), immigration (28%), crime and public safety (25%), the environment (also 25%) and accountability and leadership (also 25%).
 
Singh is seen as the best person to handle housing, homelessness and poverty (29%, with Trudeau at 21%).
 
Trudeau is virtually tied with O’Toole on energy and pipelines (23% to 21%) and with Singh on health care (26% to 28%).
 
Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 7 to August 9, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca
 
Photo Credit: Dllu

Most British Columbians Doing Poorly on Emergency Preparedness

The number of residents who have an emergency kit, a plan and a meeting place is down markedly since 2019.
 
Vancouver, BC [August 10, 2021] – The proportion of British Columbians who have taken steps to prepare for an emergency has fallen over the past two years, a new Research Co. poll has found.
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 38% of British Columbians say they have purchased or prepared an emergency kit with supplies they might need in case of an emergency, down eight points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2019.
 
Only 28% of British Columbians (-11) have prepared an emergency plan that includes how to get in touch with family or friends in case of an emergency and just 22% (-13) have established a meeting place with family or friends in case of an emergency.
 
“Fewer than half of British Columbians across all regions have purchased or prepared an emergency kit,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is highest on Vancouver Island (45%), but drops in the Fraser Valley (41%), Metro Vancouver (39%), Southern BC (30%) and Northern BC (29%).”
 
British Columbians aged 18 to 34 are more likely to have both prepared an emergency plan (31%) and established a meeting place (27%) than their counterparts aged 55 and over (26% and 17% respectively).
 
Majorities of British Columbians have confidence in the ability of their provincial government (66%), their municipal government (63%) and the federal government (59%) to successfully deal with an emergency (such as a natural disaster, a serious accident, or incident caused by human error).
 
Three-in-four British Columbians (75%, -1) think it is likely that an earthquake strong enough to damage buildings will occur in British Columbia in the next 50 years.
 
When asked about their level of concern about being personally affected by 10 different emergencies, majorities of British Columbians are worried about facing a fire (80%), an earthquake (72%), high winds (58%), intense rainfall (53%) or a flood (51%).
 
Fewer of the province’s residents are preoccupied with encountering a toxic spill (47%), heavy snowfall (also 47%), a terrorist attack (46%), a tsunami (42%) or a landslide (39%).
 
 

Methodology:Results are based on an online study conducted from July 31 to August 3, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca