Seven-in-Ten Vancouverites Happy with Separated Bike Lanes

Men and residents aged 55 and over are more likely to believe that the city currently has too many separated bike lanes.

Vancouver, BC [December 13, 2019] – More than two thirds of City of Vancouver residents appear satisfied with bike infrastructure, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative municipal sample, practically seven-in-ten Vancouverites (69%) support having separated bike lanes in the city, while 25% are opposed and 5% are undecided.

“It is not surprising to see 90% of Vancouverites who commute to school or work on a bike express support for this type of infrastructure,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “We also see that majorities of Vancouverites who commute by taking public transit (79%) and driving (69%) are also in favour of having separated bike lanes.”

Across the city, 40% of residents believe Vancouver currently has the right number of separated bike lanes. In addition, 30% of Vancouverites think there are too many separated bike lanes and some should be removed, and 21% feel there are not enough separated bike lanes and more should be added.

About a third of Vancouverites aged 55 and over (33%) and aged 35-to-54 (32%) believe that the city has too many separated bike lanes at this stage. The proportion is significantly lower among residents aged 18-to-34 (24%).

Men are also more likely to believe that some separated bike lanes should be removed than women (36% and 24% respectively).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 12 to November 15, 2019, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Gas Prices Stirring New Behaviours in British Columbia Drivers

Just under one-in-five drivers in the province have gone to the United States with the sole purpose of purchasing cheaper fuel.

Vancouver, BC [December 11, 2019] – A significant proportion of drivers in British Columbia are taking steps to deal with the cost of fuel in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, half of drivers in British Columbia (51%) say they have purchased gas for their vehicle in their community even if the tank was not near empty because prices were suddenly lower.

Drivers in Vancouver Island (56%) are more likely to have purchased gas after they noticed a drop in prices.

Two-in-five drivers in the province (39%) say they have purchased less gas for their vehicle in their community—or did not fill up the entire tank—because prices were suddenly higher.

Almost half of drivers in the Fraser Valley (47%) have chosen not to completely fill up because of inflated gas prices.

Just under one-in-five drivers in British Columbia (18%) say they have driven to the United States with the sole purpose of purchasing cheaper gas for their vehicle.

“Two-in-five drivers who reside in the Fraser Valley (40%) say they have visited the United States only to get gas in the past year” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “They have been joined by one-in-five (21%) drivers in Metro Vancouver.”

The Government of British Columbia recently introduced legislation to compel oil and gas companies to disclose supply and pricing data. More than four-in-five British Columbians (85%) support this legislation, including 90% of residents aged 55 and over.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 27 to November 29, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Happy Without Penny, Not Ready to Abandon Nickel

More than half of residents disagree with taking the five-cent coin out of circulation in Canada.

Vancouver, BC [December 6, 2019] – After almost seven years of life without the penny, most Canadians appear satisfied with the decree to abolish the one-cent coin, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-four Canadians (75%) agree with the federal government’s decision to take the penny out of circulation in February 2013.

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to welcome the decision to abolish the penny (81%) than those aged 35-to-54 (74%) and those aged 55 and over (72%).

“On a regional basis, one-in-five residents of Atlantic Canada (21%), British Columbia (20%) and Ontario (also 20%) seem more nostalgic about the penny,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (18%), Alberta (15%) and Quebec (14%).”

The notion of taking the nickel out of circulation is definitely not as popular. Across the country, more than a third of Canadians (36%) agree with abandoning the five-cent coin, while more than half (55%) disagree.

Once again, the views on this issue vary by age. Canadians aged 18-to-34 are slightly more likely to suggest that the nickel should be abandoned (41%) than those aged 35-to-54 (39%) and those aged 55 and over (29%).

The regions with the highest level of rejection for the idea of not having a five-cent coin in Canada are Saskatchewan and Manitoba (63%), Atlantic Canada (59%), Ontario (58%) and British Columbia (55%). The proportion is lower in Alberta (50%) and Quebec (47%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 25 to November 27, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Believe Human Beings on Earth Evolved

There is a deep divide on whether creationism should be part of the school curriculum across the provinces.

Vancouver, BC [December 3, 2019] – A majority of Canadians continue to point to evolution as the reason for the development of human beings on earth, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-five Canadians (61%) believe human beings “definitely” or “probably” evolved from less advanced life forms over millions of years, down five points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2018.

Conversely, almost one-in-four Canadians (23%, +2 since 2018) believe God created human beings in their present form within the last 10,000 years. Fewer than one-in-five Canadians (17%, +5) are undecided on this question.

British Columbia is home to the largest proportion of residents who side with evolution to explain the origin and development of human beings on the planet (67%), followed by Quebec (64%), Ontario (60%), Alberta (59%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (57%) and Atlantic Canada (54%).

When asked whether creationism—the belief that the universe and life originated from specific acts of divine creation—should be part of the school curriculum in their province, Canadians are deeply divided.

While 38% of Canadians think creationism should be taught in their province’s classrooms (unchanged since 2018), 39% think that it should not (-7) and 23% (=7) are undecided.

Fewer than two-in-five residents of Ontario (37%), Atlantic Canada (36%), Quebec (36%) and British Columbia (35%) are in favour of teaching creationism in schools. The proportion is slightly higher in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (43%) and Alberta (45%).

“Religious affiliation plays a role in how Canadians feel about discussing creationism in the classroom,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Canadians who identify themselves as Catholics or Protestants are significantly more likely to endorse the teaching of creationism in schools (48% each) than those who have no religion (22%) or identify as Atheists (20%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 4 to November 6, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Would Ban Mobile Phones in K-12 Classrooms

Public support for the measure that was implemented in Ontario earlier this year is high among parents and non-parents alike.

Vancouver, BC [November 29, 2019] – The notion of forbidding students from using their mobile phones in classrooms unreservedly is very popular in British Columbia, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 88% of British Columbians think the province should implement a ban on the use of mobile phones during instructional time in K-12 classrooms.

Earlier this year, the Province of Ontario restricted the use of mobile phones in K-12 classrooms, unless the devices are required for health or medical purposes, or to support educational needs as decided by an instructor.

In British Columbia, residents aged 55 and over are more likely to express support for a prohibition (85%) than those aged 35-to-54 (80%) and those aged 18-to-34 (68%).

At least four-in-five residents of Vancouver Island (86%), the Fraser Valley (83%) and Metro Vancouver (80%) are in favour of banning mobile phones during instructional time in K-12 classrooms. Support is lower, but still high, in Northern BC (75%) and Southern BC (62%).

“More than four-in-five British Columbians who have a child currently enrolled in K-12 are supportive of a classroom mobile phone ban (81%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is similar (77%) for those who have no children in school at this point.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 6 to November 8, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca