Most Canadians Would Exclude Huawei from Future 5G Networks

A majority agrees with the way Canadian authorities have acted in the Meng Wanzhou case.

Vancouver, BC [February 12, 2019] – Many Canadians are concerned about the possible involvement of Chinese telecommunications firm Huawei in the development of the country’s 5G (or “Fifth Generation”) mobile networks, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 57% of Canadians think the federal government should not allow Huawei to participate in 5G.

On a regional basis, British Columbia has the highest level of rejection for Huawei’s involvement in 5G (73%), followed by Ontario (62%) and Alberta (57%).

The federal government is currently reviewing the guidelines for the development of 5G mobile networks, which are expected to provide Canadians with larger data capacity and faster connections.

In December, Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou was arrested in Vancouver. Meng faces charges in the United States—including bank fraud and obstruction of justice—and the U.S. has formally requested her extradition. 

Across Canada, 43% of respondents say they have been following media stories related to Meng’s arrest “very closely” or “moderately closely.”

More than three-in-five Canadians (63%) say they agree with the way Canadian authorities have acted in this case, while 25% disagree and 12% are undecided.

Support for Canada’s actions is highest among women (67%), residents aged 55 and over (73%) and Liberal Party voters in the 2015 federal election (76%).

“Most Canadians approve of the decisions that the federal government has taken on this file,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Most are also wary of enabling Huawei to play a role in Canada’s future telecommunications networks.”

More than half of Canadians (57%) think Canada should not work to establish closer ties with China—a proportion that includes majorities of those who voted for the Conservative Party (62%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (55%) in the last federal ballot.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 2 to February 5, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Raysonho

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Express Lukewarm Support for Multiculturalism

Two-in-five Canadians think that racism has become a more significant problem in Canada over the past two years.

Vancouver, BC [February 8, 2019] – Many Canadians are tepid supporters of the concept of multiculturalism and a sizeable proportion is expressing concerns about racism, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 62% of Canadians think multiculturalism has been “very good” or “good” for Canada, while 33% believe the policy has been “bad” or “very bad”.

 “Strong endorsement for multiculturalism stands at roughly the same level as strong rejection (13% and 14% respectively),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Most Canadians feel the policy has been positive, but few of them are willing to say it has been overwhelmingly beneficial.”

Across the country, 41% of Canadians believe racism has become a more significant problem over the past two years. 

Residents of Manitoba and Saskatchewan are the most likely to believe racism is on the rise (55%), while only 37% of Quebecers concur with this assessment.

When asked to select between two different policies, almost half of Canadians (49%) say that Canada should be a “melting pot” and want immigrants to assimilate and blend into Canadian society. 

A smaller proportion of respondents (42%) think that Canada should be a “mosaic” and say cultural differences within Canadian society are valuable and should be preserved.

Men (53%), Quebecers (also 53%), respondents aged 55 and over (61%) and Conservative Party voters in the 2015 federal election (62%) are more likely to express a preference for the “melting pot”.

Conversely, Canadians aged 18-to-34 (60%), British Columbians (52%) and those who voted for the Liberal Party (59%) or the New Democratic Party (NDP) (56%) in the last federal ballot endorse the concept of the “mosaic.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 14 to January 17, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Drfunko

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Hold Mixed Views on the Benefits of Immigration

Two-in-five Canadians aged 35-to-54 would reduce the number of legal immigrants who are allowed to relocate in Canada.

Vancouver, BC [February 5, 2019] – A plurality of Canadians regard immigration in a positive light, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, almost half of Canadians (46%) think immigration is having a mostly positive effect in Canada, including more than half of Quebecers (52%) and Atlantic Canadians (51%).

Conversely, 36% of Canadians believe immigration is having a mostly negative effect in the country, including 42% of Albertans.

“The way in which Canadians currently feel about immigration is related to age,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While sizeable proportions of residents aged 18-to-34 (55%) and 55 and over (46%) hold positive views, the proportion drops among those aged 35-to-54 (39%).”

While one-in-five Canadians (20%) would increase the number of legal immigrants who are allowed to relocate in Canada, 35% would keep the same levels and 36% call for a decrease.

Canadians aged 35-to-54 are the most likely to urge for a reduction in the number of legal immigrants to Canada (40%) and the least likely to believe an increase is warranted (15%).

A majority of Canadians (55%) believe the hard work and talent of immigrants makes Canada better, while two-in-five (39%) disagree—including 46% of British Columbians.

Half of Canadians (50%) believe immigrants should only be allowed in Canada if they adopt Canadian values—a proportion that rises significantly among Albertans (61%) and residents aged 55 and over (62%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 14 to January 17, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Wait Times, Red Tape Are Main Health Care Snags for Canadians

Four-in-five Canadians are confident that medical services will be there if they were to need them unexpectedly.

Vancouver, BC [January 30, 2019] – More than half of Canadians identify two issues as the main glitches facing the country’s health care system, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, a third of Canadians (33%) identify long wait times as the biggest problem facing the health care system, while one-in-four (24%) mention bureaucracy and poor management.

A shortage of doctors and nurses is third on the list with 18%, followed by little focus on preventive care (9%), inadequate resources and facilities (5%), lack of a wider range of services for patients (3%) and insufficient standards of hygiene (also 3%).

“There are some significant regional differences when it comes to the perceptions of Canadians on what needs to be fixed about the health care system,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Albertans and Quebecers are decidedly more critical on management, while Atlantic Canadians are more concerned about a lack of physicians.”

Across the country, four-in-five Canadians (79%) say they are “very confident” (25%) or “moderately confident” (54%) that Canada’s health care system would be there to provide the help and assistance they would need if they faced an unexpected medical condition or disease.

Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to express confidence in the health care system (86%) than those aged 18-to-34 (79%) and those aged 35-to-54 (75%).

One-in-four Canadians (25%) think the health care system works well and only minor changes are needed to make it work better, while three-in-five (60%) believe there are some good things in Canada’s health care system, but many changes are required.

Just over one-in-seven Canadians (13%) believe the health care system has so much wrong with it that it needs to be completely rebuilt—a proportion that reaches 20% in Quebec and 16% in Alberta.

Three-in-four Canadians (74%) are opposed to the notion of the federal government making cuts to health care funding in order to reduce government debt. 

When asked if health care in Canada would be better than it is now if it were run by the private sector, a majority of Canadians (57%) disagree with the idea, while two-in-five (39%) are in agreement.

On a regional basis, two thirds of Quebecers (66%) assert that the private sector would do a better job delivering health care in Canada. In no other region of the country does this idea garner the backing of more than 40% of residents.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 14 to January 17, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Citobun

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Urge for New Guidelines After Plecas Report

Two thirds want all expenses related to the Legislative Assembly to be available for public scrutiny in a searchable website.

Vancouver, BC [January 28, 2019] – The release of a report from Speaker Darryl Plecas has prompted British Columbians to call for changes in the Legislative Assembly, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, three-in-four British Columbians (74%) agree with ensuring that all questionable spending outlined in the Plecas Report is re-paid, and seven-in-ten (70%) would subject the Legislative Assembly to public scrutiny under the Freedom of Information and Privacy Protection Act (FOIPPA).

Two thirds of British Columbians (68%) would make all expenses from every person who works for the Legislative Assembly available for public scrutiny in a searchable website, and three-in-five (59%) would establish an outside entity to review and oversee all future expenses related to the Legislative Assembly.

The Plecas Report—released on January 21—looks into allegations of misconduct by senior officers of the British Columbia Legislative Assembly. More than three-in-five residents of the province (63%) say they have followed the Plecas Report “very closely” or “moderately closely.”

Across the province, 57% of British Columbians agree with the way the Speaker acted, while 21% disagree and 22% are not sure.

Majorities of voters who supported the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (61%), the BC Green Party (60%) and the BC Liberals (55%) in the 2017 provincial election agree with the way Plecas chose to act.

When asked who is more responsible for the situation uncovered by the Plecas Report, 59% of British Columbians point the finger at the previous BC Liberal government, while 29% blame the current BC NDP government. 

“Voters from the three main provincial parties are in agreement about specific changes they would like to see in light of the issues addressed in the Plecas Report,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But when it comes to laying blame, there is an evident polarization, with most NDP and Green voters blaming the previous administration and most BC Liberal voters saying the current one is more responsible.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 25 to January 27, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca