Conscience Rights on Physician-Assisted Death Split Canadians

About two-in-five Canadians would allow health care professionals to object to providing abortion services.

Vancouver, BC [February 26, 2020] – While practically half of Canadians are not in favour of legislative action that would entrench conscience rights for health care workers, the country is evenly divided when assessing cases of physician-assisted death, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 44% of Canadians agree that health care professionals should have the ability to object to providing services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to physician-assisted death. A similar proportion of Canadians (42%) disagree with this stipulation.

Alberta—where public debate over Bill 207 intensified late last year—has the lowest proportion of residents who would agree to entrench conscience rights in cases of physician-assisted death (38%).

The level of support for a caveat for health care professionals on physician-assisted suicide cases is highest in British Columbia (48%), followed by Quebec (47%), Atlantic Canada (46%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (46%) and Ontario (41%).

When asked about conscience rights on two other instances, Canadians are not as divided. Practically half (49%) disagree with health care professionals objecting to provide services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to abortion, while 39% agree.

A majority of Canadians (58%) disagree with health care professionals objecting to provide services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to serving lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, gender diverse, queer and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2+) people, while 31% agree.

“Canadians who profess a religion are more likely to extend the ability for health care professionals to have moral or faith-based objections in cases of physician-assisted suicide (52%), abortion (46%) and serving LGBT people (37%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The level of support is considerably lower among Canadians who have no religious affiliation (28%, 24% and 18% respectively).”

Across the country, 49% of Canadians say that they would oppose a bill that sought to allow health care professionals the ability to have a moral or faith-based objection to providing services, while 39% would support this provincial legislation.

Opposition to this type of bill is highest in Alberta (59%), followed by Atlantic Canada (53%), British Columbia (51%), Ontario (49%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (45%) and Quebec (42%).  

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 14 to February 17, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Snowstorm Made British Columbians Drive Less, Work From Home

Three in ten residents say their municipality is “getting better” when it comes to dealing with snow.

Vancouver, BC [February 19, 2019] – The snowstorm that affected most of British Columbia last month had an effect on the daily lives of residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two-in-five British Columbians (39%) say they chose not to drive their own vehicle on account of the snowstorm.

“A majority of residents of the Fraser Valley (51%) avoided getting behind the wheel with snow on the roads,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Vancouver Island was a close second on this question at 49%.”

In addition, three-in-ten British Columbians (31%) acknowledge that they, or somebody in their household, worked from home on account of the snowstorm.

Practically half of British Columbians report having witnessed two negative behaviours, with 49% saying that they saw neighbours who did not shovel snow on their sidewalk and 48% witnessing a vehicle with snow on the top circulating in their municipality.

Across the province, two thirds of British Columbians (68%) say they are satisfied with how their municipality dealt with the timeliness of alerts, such as school closures, and 61% feel the same way about snow clearing on roads.

The satisfaction rating is lower for snow clearing on sidewalks (54%) and responsiveness to requests on social media (51%, with 30% undecided).

Three-in-ten British Columbians (29%) say that, compared to five years ago, their municipality is “getting better” when it comes to dealing with snow. Half of the province’s residents (49%) see no change, and 16% believe the situation has “worsened” over the past five years.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are significantly more likely to believe that their municipality is now better equipped to deal with snow (40%) than their older counterparts (22% among those aged 35-to-54 and those aged 55 and over).

A majority of residents of Northern BC (57%) believe their municipality is handling snow better than it did in 2015. The numbers are lower in all other regions of the province, including Vancouver Island (30%), Metro Vancouver (29%), Southern BC (20%) and the Fraser Valley (18%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 21 to January 24, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Parents in British Columbia Stressed by Work and Finance

The proportion of Metro Vancouver parents who expect their kids to relocate increased by 24 points since 2019.

Vancouver, BC [February 18, 2020] – A majority of parents across British Columbia are experiencing tension on account of specific issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample of parents, 58% say they experience work-related stress “frequently” or “occasionally.”

Majorities of parents in the province say they have also “frequently” or “occasionally” experienced financial stress (57%), family-related stress (53%) and housing-related stress (51%).

Across British Columbia, two-in-five parents (40%) say it is currently “moderately difficult” or “very difficult” for them to make ends meet. 

The proportion of parents who are having a hard time getting by financially is highest in Northern BC (60%), followed by Vancouver Island (45%), the Fraser Valley (40%), Metro Vancouver (39%) and Southern BC (28%).

Almost three-in-five parents in British Columbia (58%) say it is currently “very difficult” or “moderately difficult” for them to save money in a bank account. 

Other tasks that are currently tough for about two-in-five parents in the province are paying for day to day expenses (44%), paying for child care (42%) and paying for transportation (39%).

“Majorities of parents who reside in the Fraser Valley (62%), Metro Vancouver (59%), Vancouver Island (55%) and Southern BC (52%) acknowledge that saving for the future has become more complicated,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Transportation is a bigger issue for parents in Southern BC (47%), while day to day expenses are more of a problem in Northern BC (48%) and Vancouver Island (47%).”

Across the province, 65% of parents say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that their child (or any one of their children) will have to move away from the municipality where they currently live due to the high cost of living.

The proportion of parents in Metro Vancouver who expect their children to move away on account of financial constraints stands at 66%, up 24 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in 2019.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 4 to February 7, 2020, among 623 adult parents of children aged 0 to 18 in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians and Americans Agree on Vaccinations for Children

Majorities in both countries believe individuals should decide if they want to get immunized against seasonal diseases.

Vancouver, BC [February 14, 2020] – While four-in-five Canadians endorse the concept of mandatory inoculations for children, the proportion of Americans who feel the same way is smaller, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 81% of Canadians—up three points since a similar study conducted in 2018—believe that vaccinations for children should “definitely” or “probably” be mandatory in their province.

The proportion of Americans who think immunizations for children should “definitely” or “probably” be mandatory in their state is lower (68%).

“More than one-in-four Americans (27%) believe decisions on childhood vaccinations should be made by parents,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion of Canadians who would follow this course of action is decidedly lower (12%).”

In Canada, Quebec has the highest proportion of residents (17%) who believe parents should choose whether their children should be vaccinated. In the United States, 30% of residents of the South and the West feel the same way.

When asked about inoculations and seasonal diseases (such as the flu), slim majorities of Canadians and Americans (51% in each country) believe each person should “definitely” or “probably” be allowed to decide whether they want to get vaccinated or not.

Just over two-in-five respondents in each country (44% in Canada and 43% in the United States) feel the flu vaccine should be mandatory for everybody in their province or state.

In the late 1990s, a study published in the weekly medical journal The Lancet—which has since been discredited and retracted—attempted to link childhood vaccination and autism.

In Canada, 26% of respondents to this survey think there is a connection between the childhood vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella and autism. The proportion of Americans who believe this is slightly higher, at 30%.

Respondents aged 18-to-34 in both countries (36% in Canada and 43% in the United States) are more likely to believe in the debunked connection between childhood immunization and autism than their older counterparts.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 7 to February 9, 2020, among 1,000 Canadian adults, and an online study conducted from February 6 to February 8, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each study, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full Canadian dataset here, our full American dataset here and download the press release here.

Photo Credit: John Keith

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Vancouver 2010 Was Worth It for Most British Columbians

Three-in-five of the province’s residents would welcome a bid for Vancouver to become the host of the Summer Olympics.

Vancouver, BC [February 12, 2020] – A decade after Vancouver hosted the Winter Olympics, most British Columbians appear content with the event and its legacy, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two thirds of British Columbians (68%) think holding the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver was worth it.

“Only 24% of British Columbians currently have second thoughts about the decision to host the Winter Olympics in 2010,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of residents in all five regions of the province say organizing the games was worth it, including 71% in Metro Vancouver and 73% in the Fraser Valley.”

At least two thirds of British Columbians believe the 2010 Winter Olympics had a positive impact on the City of Vancouver (70%), the entire Metro Vancouver region (67%), the Province of British Columbia (69%) and Canada (74%).

Four-in-five British Columbians (82%) are satisfied with the infrastructure projects of the 2010 Winter Olympics, such as the Canada Line SkyTrain and improvements to the Sea-to-Sky Highway.

More than seven-in-ten of the province’s residents (72%) are satisfied with the legacy projects of the 2010 Winter Olympics, such as the Richmond Oval and the Hillcrest Community Centre.

When asked if Vancouver should launch a bid to host the Summer Olympics, British Columbians support the idea by a 2-to-1 margin (62% to 31%).

The level of excitement about a Vancouver Summer Olympics bid is highest among British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (67%), but also includes majorities of those aged 35-to-54 (61%) and those aged 55 and over (52%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 21 to January 24, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca