Tiny Proportion of British Columbians Can Identify a Senator

In spite of the low level of awareness about the Red Chamber, most residents would like to vote to choose the next senator.

Vancouver, BC [January 24, 2022] – Fewer than one-in-twenty British Columbians are able to name one of the five people that currently represent the province in the Senate of Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, only 4% of British Columbians are able to correctly identify Larry Campbell, Bev Busson, Yonah Martin, Yuen Pau Woo and/or Mobina Jaffer as the province’s current senators.

Most British Columbians are also oblivious of the actual number of seats that the province has in the Red Chamber. Only 3% of respondents to the survey know that the correct number is six.

There is a British Columbia vacancy in the Canadian Senate, following the mandatory retirement of Richard Neufeld in November 2019.

A majority of British Columbians (58%, down six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March 2019) agree with holding a non-binding election, similar to the ones that have taken place in Alberta, to choose a nominee for appointment to the Senate.

Support for a non-binding Senate ballot reaches 61% among men, 65% among British Columbians aged 18-to-34 and 69% among residents of Northern BC.

A third of British Columbians (32%) say they would prefer to reform the Senate to allow Canadians to elect their senators, down four points since March 2019.

Fewer British Columbians are supportive of other ideas, such as abolishing the Senate of Canada altogether (16%, -1), having a selection committee that would appoint non-partisan Senators (13%, -1) or having the sitting prime minister appoint members of the upper house (7%, -1).

The proportion of British Columbians who do not select any of these four options when pondering the Red Chamber increased by seven points to 32%.

“When thinking about the Senate of Canada, British Columbians are more likely to endorse the concepts of reform or abolition, in spite of the complexities either option would entail,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The current status quo of the upper house, where a selection committee ultimately appoints members, is only more popular than giving the prime minister ultimate authority over who becomes a senator.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 21 to December 23, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Scam and Foreign Language Calls Increase in British Columbia

Half of mobile phone users have been targeted by calls and messages where an individual speaks Cantonese or Mandarin.  
 
Vancouver, BC [January 21, 2022] – The incidence of phone calls and messages from people pretending to represent a government agency has risen dramatically in British Columbia over the past two years, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, 50% of mobile phone users say they have been targeted by these phone calls and messages in the past two months, up 15 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September 2019.  
 
Phone calls and/or phone messages from an individual purporting to represent a government agency (such as the Canada Revenue Agency) are more prevalent among men (52%) and British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (also 52%).  
 
“Almost three-in-five mobile phone users in Vancouver Island (58%) report getting these scam calls recently,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than half of those who reside in Northern BC (54%) and Metro Vancouver (51%) also had to deal with these unwanted communications.”  
 
Just over half of mobile phone users in British Columbia (51%) say they have received phone calls and/or phone messages where an individual speaks Cantonese or Mandarin in the past two months, up 20 points since September 2019.  
 
More than three-in-five mobile phone users in Metro Vancouver (61%) have been exposed to calls or messages in Cantonese or Mandarin.  
 
British Columbians of South Asian descent are more likely to report being targeted by these communications in a foreign language (70%) than their counterparts of East Asian (61%) and European (47%) origins.  
 
Only 18% of mobile phone users in British Columbia received a text message asking if they support a specific party or policy from an individual they do not know in the past two months, down 19 points since 2019.  
 
Across the province, only 28% of mobile phone users (+1) say they did not receive any of these types of messages in the past two months.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 21 to December 23, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Canadians, Hockey Fans Agree on Banning Head Shots

Two thirds of Canadians and three-in-four hockey fans believe the game would be “better off” if this regulation is implemented.  

Vancouver, BC [January 14, 2022] – A significant proportion of Canadians and hockey fans are ready to take a significant step to make the professional game safer, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 80% of Canadians—and 89% of self-described “hockey fans”—support banning heads shots in professional hockey.  

“At least four-in-five residents of British Columbia (83%), Ontario (81%), Quebec (also 81%) and Atlantic Canada (80%) are in favour of a head shot ban in professional hockey,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “They are joined by 75% of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba and 68% of Albertans.”  

When asked about a ban on fighting in professional hockey, Canadians favour the idea by a 2-to-1 margin (60% to 29%). Hockey fans are divided, with 49% opposing this course of action and 46% supporting it.  

The idea of banning fights in professional hockey is particularly popular in Quebec (69%). Majorities in Ontario (59%), British Columbia (57%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 57%), Atlantic Canada (55%) and Alberta (51%) are also supportive.  

Two thirds of Canadians (66%) and three-in-four hockey fans (74%) believe hockey would be better off if heads shots are banned from the professional game.  

The numbers are lower for a ban on fighting, with 43% of Canadians and 28% of hockey fans thinking this regulation would be beneficial.  

More than half of Canadians (52%) rate the efforts of the National Hockey League (NHL) in looking after the safety of its players as “very good” or “good”—a proportion that rises to 76% among fans.  

More than a quarter of Canadians (27%) think professional hockey has become a more violent sport over the past five years. Women (29%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (31%) are more likely to believe that the sport is now more violent.  

One-in-five Canadians (20%) say they would encourage their kids to avoid playing hockey as a result of recent violent incidents in the sport. The same proportion (20%) would refrain from buying products from companies that sponsor professional hockey, while one-in-four (25%) would watch fewer hockey games than they currently do.  

Methodology:  Results are based on an online study conducted from December 15 to December 17, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and here, and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Ponder Who Can Deliver Affordable Housing

The provincial government has the highest level of trust from residents, while for-profit developers are at the bottom.  

Vancouver, BC [January 11, 2021] – The current provincial administration outranks the federal government when British Columbians are asked who they have confidence in to deal with affordable housing, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 55% of British Columbians say they trust the provincial government under the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) to deliver affordable housing in the province.  

The numbers are significantly lower when residents are asked to consider the actions of a provincial government headed by the BC Liberal Party (36%) or headed by the BC Green Party (33%).  

“As expected, a sizeable majority of BC NDP voters in the 2020 election (73%) express confidence in the current provincial government to manage affordable housing ,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than two-in-five of those who cast ballots for the BC Liberals (47%) and the BC Greens (45%) in 2020 also trust the current provincial administration on this file.”  

Fewer than two-in-five British Columbians (39%) have confidence in the federal government under the Liberal Party to deliver affordable housing. The numbers are significantly higher when the province’s residents assess what things would look like with the federal NDP in charge (51%) and lower for a federal government assembled by the Conservative Party (32%).  

Women (40%) and British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (46%) are more likely to express confidence in the actions of the federal government under the Liberal Party to deliver affordable housing than men (37%), residents aged 35-to-54 (38%) and residents aged 55 and over (35%).  

Almost half of British Columbians (47%) trust their own provincial administration to deliver affordable housing. The rating is slightly higher for not-for-profit developers (49%) and substantially lower for for-profit developers (19%).  

In a December 2021 poll conducted by Research Co. in Metro Vancouver, 31% of respondents identified housing as the most important issue facing their municipality.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 21 to December 23, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Positive Perceptions on China Remain Low Across Canada

Only Iran and North Korea post a lower favourability ranking among the 15 nations included in the semi-annual survey.  

Vancouver, BC [January 7, 2022] – As has been the case for the past year, only one-in-five Canadians hold favourable views on the People’s Republic of China, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 20% of Canadians have a positive opinion of China. The results are similar to the ones reported by Research Co. after nationwide polls conducted in July 2021 (21%) and December 2020 (19%).  

“Just a few weeks before Beijing hosts the Winter Olympics, two thirds of Canadians (68%) say their perception of China is negative,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion rises to 71% in British Columbia and to 77% among Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2021 federal election.”

Half of Canadians (50%, =) hold a positive opinion of the United States, while 41% (+1) express negative views.  

The favourability rating for the United States on this question is highest in Alberta (58%), followed by Quebec (56%), Ontario (51%), Atlantic Canada (44%), British Columbia (43%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (36%).  

Canadians who voted for the Conservatives and the Liberal Party last year are more likely to express positive views on the United States (59% and 55% respectively) than those who cast ballots for New Democratic Party (NDP) candidates (31%).  

Sizeable majorities of Canadians continue to hold favourable perceptions on the five other countries that—along with the United States and Canada—are part of the G7: the United Kingdom (71%, -2), Germany (69%, =), Japan (69%, +1), Italy (69%, -4) and France (68%, -5).  

A majority of Canadians (55%, -2) have a positive opinion of South Korea. The rating dropped markedly for two other nations: Mexico (45%, -4) and India (37%, -4).  

Fewer than three-in-ten Canadians hold favourable views on Venezuela (28%, -1), Russia (24%, -4), Saudi Arabia (23%, =), Iran (16%, -1) and North Korea (14%, -1).  

While just over three-in-ten Canadians aged 18-to-34 (31%) express positive opinions on Russia, the proportion drops to 26% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 16% among those aged 55 and over.  

Methodology:  Results are based on an online study conducted from December 15 to December 17, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Belief in Astrology and Other Concepts Falls in Canada

Only 14% of Canadians say they currently pay attention to astrology, while 58% claim to have never followed it.  
 
Vancouver, BC [January 4, 2022] – Fewer Canadians believe in astrology than two years ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 32% of Canadians believe in the concept of studying the movements and relative positions of celestial objects to make observations about human affairs and terrestrial events, down four points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2019.  
 
Two-in-five Albertans (40%, +13) say they believe in astrology, along with 34% of British Columbians (+3) and 31% of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (+3). The numbers are lower in Ontario (38%, -4), Atlantic Canada (30%, -7) and Quebec (22%, -14).  
 
“While belief in astrology is down at the national level, there is significant growth among Canada’s youngest adults,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (55%, +6) believe in the concept, compared to 36% among those aged 25-to-54 (-1) and 23% among those aged 55 and over (-4).”  
 
When asked about their behaviour, 14% of Canadians (-6) say they currently pay attention to astrology—a proportion that includes 26% of those aged 18-to-34, 18% of Ontarians and 16% of women.  
 
Larger proportions of Canadians say they used to pay attention to astrology at some point in their lives (28%, +1) or claim to have never paid attention to it (58%, +4).  
 
The proportion of Canadians who believe in three other concepts is also lower than it was in 2019. Just under one third of the country’s residents (32%, -1) believe in haunted houses, or buildings being inhabited by spirits of dead people.  
 
Belief in haunted houses is highest in British Columbia (38%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (37%) and Alberta (36%), and lower in Ontario (32%), Atlantic Canada (30%) and Quebec (24%).  
 
Fewer than three-in-ten Canadians (28%, -3) believe in clairvoyance, or the ability to gain information about an object, person, location or physical event through extrasensory perception.  
 
Women are more likely to believe in clairvoyance (35%) than men (21%).  
 
More than one-in-four Canadians (26%, -5) believe in mediumship, or mediating communication between living human beings and spirits of dead people.  
 
While almost half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 believe in mediumship (48%), the proportion drops to 30% among those aged 35-to-54 and 16% among those aged 55 and over.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 15 to December 17, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

British Columbians Still Back Proposed Ban on Single-Use Plastics

Three-in-four of the province’s residents say they rely on their own re-usable bags to transport groceries out of a store.  
 
Vancouver, BC [December 31, 2021] – Public support remains high in British Columbia for the federal government’s plan to reduce plastic use across Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 82% of British Columbians are in favour of banning single-use plastics, unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2021.
 
The federal government’s proposed regulation focuses on items such as grocery checkout bags, straws, stir sticks, six-pack rings, plastic cutlery and food takeout containers made from hard-to-recycle plastics. Several municipalities in British Columbia have already implemented their own guidelines for specific items, such as grocery checkout bags.  
 
Just over three-in-four British Columbians (76%, -1) acknowledge relying on their own reusable bag to transport groceries out of a store after purchasing them. Significantly smaller proportions of the province’s residents use bags provided by the store, either made out of paper (11%) or plastic (9%).  
 
“There is a generational gap in the adoption of reusable bags in British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Practically nine-in-ten residents aged 55 and over (88%) are already using their own bags at grocery stores, compared to 73% among those aged 35-to-54 and 62% among those aged 18-to-34.”  
 
Just over half of British Columbians (51%, -3) say they go out of their way to recycle “all of the time”, such as holding on to bottles and cans until they can be placed into a proper recycling bin. Once again, this behaviour is more common among the province’s residents aged 55 and over (66%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (50%) and aged 18-to-34 (32%).  
 
More than three-in-five residents of Vancouver Island (65%) and Northern BC (63%) claim to go out of their way to recycle “all of the time.” The proportion is lower in Southern BC (58%), the Fraser Valley (57%) and Metro Vancouver (44%).  
 
One-in-five British Columbians (20%, -6) acknowledge limiting hot water usage in their home “all the time” by taking shorter showers or running washing machines or dishwashers with full loads only.  
 
Fewer British Columbians say they unplug electrical devices in their home—such as TVs, computers and cell phone chargers—when they are not in use (12%, -1), buy biodegradable products (5%, -2) or eat organic or home-grown foods (also 5%, -2) “all of the time.”
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 21 to December 23, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Majorities in Alberta and Ontario Would Prefer a Different Premier

Since August, the proportion of Albertans who feel they would be “better off” as a country increased by 10 points to 38%.  

Vancouver, BC [December 28, 2021] – As the year draws to an end, residents of Alberta and Ontario are particularly dissatisfied with their premiers, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 51% of Canadians think their province would be better off with a different head of government in charge.  

Majorities of Albertans (73%, +5 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2021) and Ontarians (57%, +3) suggest that the state of affairs would be more satisfactory under a different premier. The proportion is lower in Quebec (42%, +4) and British Columbia (35%, +1).  

Practically half of Canadians (49%, +2) believe their province would be better off with a different Prime Minister in Ottawa, while 36% disagree and 15% are undecided.  

Criticism of the current prime minister is strongest in Alberta (65%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (56%) and British Columbia (53%), followed by Ontario (49%), Quebec (42%) and Atlantic Canada (38%).  

Just under one-in-five Canadians (18%) believe their province would be better off joining the United States and becoming an American state—a proportion that rises to 25% in Alberta and 24% in Quebec.  

Almost two-in-five Albertans (38%, +10) and three-in-ten Quebecers (30%, +5) believe their province would be better off as its own country.  

“Separatist sentiment in Alberta is currently near the levels observed in December 2019 (40%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Across the province, 16% of residents strongly agree with the idea that they would be better off as an independent nation.”  

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 15 to December 17, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Metro Vancouverites Ponder Guidelines for Municipal Votes

More than half are against “corporate votes”, non-resident electors and allowing residents aged 16 and 17 to cast ballots.  
 
Vancouver, BC [December 23, 2021] – More than three-in-five residents of Metro Vancouver believe it is time to end the regulation that allows people who do not reside in a municipality to vote in local elections if they own property there, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 63% of residents agree with eliminating non-residency property electors and only letting residents of a city vote in municipal elections.  
 
Majorities of Metro Vancouverites disagree with the notion of allowing “corporate voting” by giving businesses the ability to vote in municipal elections (56%) and with letting Canadians aged 16 and 17 cast ballots in municipal elections (51%).  
 
The idea of allowing adult Permanent Residents of Canada to vote in municipal elections is endorsed by more than seven-in-ten Metro Vancouverites (71%), while only 22% disagree and 7% are undecided.  
 
Three-in-ten Metro Vancouverites (31%) identify housing as the most important issue facing their municipality right now, followed by COVID-19 (24%), property taxes (10%), climate change (7%), drug overdoses (6%) and crime (5%).
 
“While concerns about housing are particularly high in Burnaby (45%), this is also the main preoccupation for residents of Vancouver (31%) and Surrey (24%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Drug overdoses are a salient issue in Vancouver (9%) while crime is a significant worry in Surrey (12%).”  
 
The approval rating for Vancouver Mayor Kennedy Stewart stands at 57%, up six points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in January 2020. The numbers are stable for Burnaby Mayor Mike Hurley (51%, =), while Surrey Mayor Doug McCallum has seen his rating drop from 50% at the start of 2020 to 30% in the last month of 2021.  
 
Across Metro Vancouver, 42% of residents believe their current mayor deserves re-election, while 37% disagree and 20% are undecided.  
 
Almost half of residents of Burnaby (48%) and Vancouver (47%) are currently willing to re-elect Hurley and Stewart respectively. In Surrey, only 28% think McCallum deserves a new term in office while 59% disagree.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 8 to December 10, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Half of Canadians Expect Fun, Not Stressful, Holiday Season

“Merry Christmas” is still the preferred greeting, but “Happy Holidays” is gaining ground among the youngest adults.  

Vancouver, BC [December 21, 2021] – Compared to last year, more Canadians think the holiday season will be a time of joy and excitement, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians say they expect this time of the year to be “more fun than stressful”, up 19 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2020.  

Only 27% of Canadians (-10) believe this holiday season will be “more stressful than fun”, while 24% (+9) are undecided.  

“Majorities of Quebecers (53%) and Ontarians (51%) expect the current holiday season to be more fun than stressful,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower in Alberta (46%) and British Columbia (41%).”  

More than three-in-five Canadians (62%, -6) state that “Merry Christmas” is their preferred greeting for the season, while 20% (+6) say “Happy Holidays” is their favourite.  

Significant majorities of Canadians of all age groups favour “Merry Christmas“ as a greeting. “Happy Holidays” is more popular with Canadians aged 18-to-34 (24%) than among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (21%) and 55 and over (14%).  

When Canadians are asked about six components of their lives, majorities say that “family” (78%, -2) and “friends” (54%, =) are “very important” to them personally.  

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%) say “country” is “very important” to them, down 10 points since 2020. Fewer of the country’s residents feel the same way about  “career” (29%, =), “religion” (22%, -2) and “affluence” (11%, =).  

Practically half of Canadians (49%, -3) say they are “very” or “moderately” spiritual—a proportion that rises to 52% among women, 53% among those aged 55 and over and 53% among Albertans.  

Across Canada, almost one-in-five residents (18%) say they are “atheist” or “agnostic”, including 23% of Ontarians and 24% of British Columbians. Half of Canadians (50%, -6) describe themselves as Christian.  

One third of Canadians (33%, +3) say they never attend religious services. The proportion rises to 35% in Quebec and 38% in British Columbia.  

When asked about specific delicacies that are usually enjoyed during the holiday season, at least half of Canadians say they like turkey (84%), cranberry sauce (64%), Brussels sprouts (62%), fruit cake (56%), egg nog (54%) and mince pies (50%). Fewer Canadians express a preference for plum pudding (43%) and mulled wine (34%).  

There is a marked gender gap when Canadians ponder egg nog, with 60% of men saying they like the beverage compared to only 48% of women. In fact, Canadian women are more likely to “definitely dislike” egg nog (32%) than to “definitely like” it (27%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 8 to December 10, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Views on Pandemic Worsen Considerably Across Canada

Only 47% of Canadians think the worst of COVID-19 is “behind us”, down 18 points since November.  

Vancouver, BC [December 17, 2021] – Fewer than half of Canadians are optimistic about the future ramifications of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 47% of Canadians say that the worst of the pandemic is “behind us”, down 18 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November.  

A third of Canadians (33%, +12) believe the worst of COVID-19 is “ahead of us”, while 20% (+5) are not sure.  

“More than half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (55%) and aged 35-to-54 (52%) believe that the pandemic will not worsen,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 37% of those aged 55 and over feel the same way.”  

Across the country, 85% of Canadians (=) consider COVID-19 as a real threat.

There is little movement in the level of satisfaction that Canadians express when asked to rate the way their municipal (64%, +1), federal (63%, +1) and provincial governments (62%, +3) have dealt with the pandemic.  

More than two thirds of residents of Quebec (72%, -4) and British Columbia (68%, +6) believe that their provincial administrations have handled COVID-19 well. The rating is stagnant in Ontario (56%, =). Alberta continues to hold the lowest numbers among the four most populous provinces, but saw its standing improve markedly, from 29% in December to 42% this month.  

More than four-in-five Canadians (83%, +2) are in favour of requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside. Just over three-in-four Canadians (76%, +6) say they wear a mask every time they go out.  

The notion of allowing K-12 students to go back to in-class learning is supported by 69% of Canadians (-5).  

Sizeable proportions of Canadians continue to support the use of a “vaccine passport” for specific endeavours, including travel to other countries (73%, -1 since November), to go to the theatre or cinema (72%, +3), to go to live concerts (also 71%, +1), to go to live sporting events (also 71%, +1), to visit a gym or fitness facility (also 71%, +1), for travel to other Canadian provinces (also 71%, +1), to be able to work at an office (68%, +1) and for travel inside the same province (66%, +1).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 8 to December 10, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Metro Vancouver Drivers Reject Paying to Park on the Street

Seven-in-ten drivers say it is harder to find a parking spot in their municipality when they need one.  
 
Vancouver, BC [December 14, 2021] – A sizeable majority of drivers in Metro Vancouver reject the notion of having to pay to park their cars on residential streets overnight, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative sample, almost two thirds of drivers in Metro Vancouver (64%) think it is a “bad idea” to charge a fee to vehicle owners who park their cars on residential streets overnight.  
 
“More than three-in-five drivers in Surrey (62%) and Vancouver (61%) are not in favour of an overnight residential parking fee,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the rest of the Metro Vancouver region, 67% of drivers are opposed.”  
 
A majority of drivers in Metro Vancouver (51%) say they have a garage and park their vehicle there, while 22% rely on a shared parkade. Just over one-in-ten (13%) say they have a garage, but do not park their vehicle inside it—including 16% of men and 15% of those who reside in Surrey.  
 
Seven-in-ten drivers in Metro Vancouver (70%) say it is harder now to find a parking spot in their municipality when they need one, down 11 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2018.  
 
Over the past two years, 27% of drivers in Metro Vancouver acknowledge having received a parking ticket. Similar proportions of citations have been issued by municipalities (17%, -1) and by parking management companies (15%, -5).  
 
Drivers in Vancouver are significantly more likely to report getting a parking ticket of any kind (40%, +12) than their counterparts in Surrey (22%, -11) and in other Metro Vancouver municipalities (20%, -13).  
 
When asked how they dealt with the last parking ticket they were issued by a municipality, two thirds of offending drivers (68%, -8) say they paid quickly to get a discount, while 26% (+15) covered the full amount days later and 6% (-7) never paid it.  
 
The situation is similar for tickets issued by a parking management company, with a majority of offending drivers (56%, +5) paying quickly, three-in-ten (30%,+15) covering the full amount later and 15% (-19) admitting to never paying the fine.  
 
Drivers aged 55 and over who receive a parking ticket are significantly more likely to pay the fine early, whether the citation was issued by a municipality (86%) or by a parking management company (65%).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 27 to November 29, 2021, among 521 adults in Metro Vancouver who drive to school or work on weekdays. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.3 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Canadians Continue to Back Boycott of Beijing 2022 Winter Games

Two thirds of Canadians (68%) say they refrain from buying products made in China at least some of the time.  

Vancouver, BC [December 9, 2021] – More than half of Canadians think the country’s athletes should avoid taking part in the next edition of the Winter Olympics, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 56% of Canadians think Canada should boycott the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing over China’s human rights record.  

The level of support for a boycott of the 2022 Winter Olympics is exactly the same as it was in a survey conducted by Research Co. in August 2021.  

“The idea of a Canadian boycott of the Beijing Winter Olympics is more attractive in Ontario (60%), British Columbia (59%) and Quebec (56%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are lower in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (51%), Atlantic Canada (50%) and Alberta (49%).”  

Similar proportions of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (61%), the Conservative Party (59%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (58%) in this year’s federal election are in favour of a boycott of the 2022 Winter Olympics.  

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) are worried about the health and safety of Canadian athletes who participate in the Beijing Winter Olympics, and 45% say they will make a conscious effort to refrain from watching the games.  

Almost three-in-four Canadians (74%) believe athletes who want to protest China’s human rights record during the 2022 Winter Olympics should be able to do so, and a slightly smaller proportion (71%) think the International Olympic Committee (IOC) should not punish those who actually speak out.  

Across the country, 52% of Canadians claim to check labels “all the time” or “most of the time” to see where the products they buy for the home or family were manufactured.  

More than three-in-five Canadians say they never refrain from buying products made in Europe (68%), the United States (62%) and Mexico (56%), while just under half follow the same course of action for goods manufactured in Russia (49%) and India (48%).  

Only 32% of Canadians say they never refrain from buying products manufactured in China, with two thirds of residents (68%) saying they avoid purchasing Chinese goods “all the time” (15%), “most of the time” (20%) or “some of the time” (33%).  

Women (70%), British Columbians (71%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (75%) are more likely to avoid acquiring products manufactured in China at least “some of the time.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 4 to December 6, 2021, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Canadians Are More Interested in Super Bowl Than Grey Cup

More than half of Canadians (55%) say they are fans of the National Hockey League (NHL).  
 
Vancouver, BC [December 7, 2021] – Canadians are more likely to say that they plan to watch the final game of the National Football League (NFL) season than its equivalent for the Canadian Football League (CFL), a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 40% of Canadians say they will “definitely” or “probably” watch the Grey Cup on December 12, while a slight majority (52%) will not.  
 
When Canadians are asked about the Super Bowl—which will take place on February 13, 2022—half (50%) say they intend to tune in while 44% say they will not.  
 
“Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to say they will watch the Grey Cup (45%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (36%) and aged 18-to-34 (39%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The country’s youngest adults are more likely to say they will tune in to the Super Bowl (53%) than those who are middle aged (47%) or older (49%).”  
 
In Saskatchewan and Manitoba, a majority of residents (55%) intend to watch the Grey Cup this Sunday. The proportion is lower in Alberta (43%), Quebec (41%), British Columbia (40%), Ontario (39%) and Atlantic Canada (26%).  
 
A majority of Canadians (55%) say they consider themselves fans of the National Hockey League (NHL), up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September 2020.  
 
More than a third of Canadians (36%, +5) are fans of the NFL. The numbers are lower for the CFL (32%, -1), the National Basketball Association (NBA) (31%, -6), Major League Baseball (MLB) (31%, -2) and Major League Soccer (22%, +1).  
 
Over the past two years, about one-in-five Canadians (19%) say their interest in the NHL has increased. Fewer of the country’s residents report paying more attention to the NBA (12%), the NFL (10%), MLB (8%), the CFL (also 8%) and MLS (also 8%).  
 
The Edmonton CFL franchise changed its name this year from Eskimos to Elks. Just under half of Canadians (46%) agree with this decision, while 28% disagree.  
 
In Alberta, almost half of residents (47%) disagree with changing the name of Edmonton’s CFL franchise, while 40% agree with this modification.  
 
In a survey conducted by Research Co. in September 2019, 60% of Canadians and 71% of Albertans thought the Edmonton Eskimos name was “acceptable” for the CFL franchise.  
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 20 to November 22, 2021, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20..
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Shopping Habits of British Columbians Altered by Pandemic

A majority of the province’s residents aged 18-to-34 acknowledge that they prefer to buy things online instead of in person.  

Vancouver, BC [December 3, 2021] – British Columbians are not visiting restaurants and coffee shops as much as they did before the COVID-19 pandemic, and more than a third are relying on online platforms more often to acquire items and gifts, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, at least three-in-five British Columbians say they are visiting a sit-down restaurant less often than before the pandemic for breakfast (60%), lunch (62%) or dinner (65%).  

Almost two thirds of British Columbians (64%) also acknowledge that they are having a drink at a pub or bar less often than they did two years ago.  

Significant proportions of British Columbians also report visiting coffee shops less often to purchase beverages or snacks to go (40%) or to be enjoyed inside the venue (59%).  

Seven-in-ten British Columbians of East Asian descent (70%) say they are dining out less often than they did before the pandemic. Two thirds of the province’s residents of European (66%) and First Nations origins (also 66%) are also not visiting restaurants for dinner as often as they used to.  

Across the province, 27% of British Columbians say they are buying groceries in person less often now than two years ago. About two-in-five of the province’s residents also say they are going to stores less often than before the pandemic to purchase items for the home or family (38%) or to buy gifts (42%).  

Conversely, 22% of British Columbians say they are purchasing groceries online for home delivery more often than two years ago. More than a third are also relying on online platforms more often now to acquire gifts (36%) or items for the home or family (38%).  

When asked if they prefer buying things online or in person, a majority of British Columbians (54%) express a predilection for in store purchases, while two-in-five (41%) say they would rather use the internet.  

“There are some clear generational differences when British Columbians are asked about how they like to buy things,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Most of the province’s residents aged 18-to-34 (56%) prefer online platforms, those aged 55 and over are fonder of buying things in person (71%) and those aged 35-to-54 are evenly split.”  

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 15 to November 17, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Confidence in Local Drivers Improving Across Canada

The proportion of Canadians who say drivers are “worse” than five years ago has fallen from 50% in 2018 to 39% this year.  
 
Vancouver, BC [November 30, 2021] – The proportion of Canadians who believe drivers in their city or town are getting worse has reached the lowest level recorded over the past four years, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 30% of Canadians say drivers in their city or town are worse now than five years ago, while half (50%) report no change and 10% believe they are better.  
 
“When we first asked this question in 2018, half of Canadians (50%) felt that drivers were worse than in the past,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion has fallen each year, to 47% in 2019, then to 39% in 2020 and now to 30% in 2021.”  
 
At least a third of Canadians who reside in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (35%, -7), British Columbia (34%, -6) and Alberta (33%, -9) believe drivers in their city or town are worse now than five years ago. The proportion is lower among Canadians who live in Ontario (30%, -13), Atlantic Canada (25%, -14) and Quebec (24%, -8).  
 
Canadians aged 55 and over are more critical of drivers in their city or town, with 36% believing that the situation is worse now than five years ago, compared to 32% among those aged 35-to-54 and 21% among those aged 18-to-34.  
 
The survey also tracks the incidence of six specific occurrences on the country’s roads. A majority of Canadians (55%, +1) report seeing a driver not signalling before a turn over the past month, a proportion that climbs to 62% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.  
 
Almost two-in-five Canadians (38%, +2) witnessed a driver not stopping at an intersection and a third (32%, -1) saw a driver turning right or left from an incorrect lane, including 37% of British Columbians.
 
Fewer than three-in-ten Canadians (28%, +2) experienced a close call, or having to slam the brakes or steer violently to avoid a collision. In addition, 41% of Canadians (+3) say they saw a car taking up two or more stops at a parking lot, including a majority of Albertans (51%).  
 
Just over half of Canadians (51%, -5) say that there are specific groups or people in their city or town who are worse drivers than others.  
 
The top four responses among Canadians who blamed a specific group for bad driving behaviours are “young” (32%, -11), “elderly” (21%, -4), “Asian (16%, -1) and “immigrant” (6%, +1).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 20 to November 22, 2021, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20..
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Most British Columbians Will Avoid Travel During Holiday Season

More than four-in-five of the province’s residents are concerned about travellers not following COVID-19 protocols.  

Vancouver, BC [November 26, 2021] – Many residents of British Columbia acknowledge that they are not going to go on a trip in the next few weeks, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 56% of British Columbians say they do not plan to take a holiday—or spend at least one night away from their current location—in the next three months.  

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to say that they intend to travel during this holiday season (56%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (45%) and aged 55 and over (34%).  

Significant proportions of British Columbians are uneasy about relying on specific forms of transportation at this point. Fewer than half of the province’s residents (46%) say they are willing to travel on a ferry right now—a proportion that rises to 58% among residents of Vancouver Island.  

At least one-in-four British Columbians are willing to take an airplane flight to another province (36%), an airplane flight within British Columbia (32%), a trip by car to the United States (27%) or a bus trip shorter than 3 hours (25%).  

Fewer British Columbians are willing to take a railway trip (23%), an airplane fight to a different continent (22%), an airplane flight to the United States (21%), a bus trip longer than 3 hours (16%) or a trip on a cruise ship (11%).  

“More than a third of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (35%) say they would have no problem taking a trip by car to the United States,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion drops to 26% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 22% among those among those aged 55 and over.”  

When asked about possible problems that may arise during travel, more than four-in-five British Columbians (83%) say they are “very concerned” or “moderately concerned” about travellers not following COVID-19 protocols.  

At least three-in-four British Columbians say they are worried about three other issues: facing delays due to COVID-19 restrictions (78%), losing money due to cancellations (77%) and getting infected with COVID-19 during a trip (75%).  

Concerns about travellers not following COVID-19 protocols and getting infected with COVID-19 during a trip are higher among British Columbians who have a child under the age of 12 in their household (85% and 79% respectively).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 15 to November 17, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Two Thirds of Canadians Endorse Vaccine Passports in Offices

Only 9% of Canadians say they do not plan to get vaccinated against COVID-19, unchanged since September.  

Vancouver, BC [November 19, 2021] – More Canadians are in favour of implementing “vaccine passports” in order to allow employees to return to the country’s workplaces, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 67% of Canadians think it is a “good idea” to rely on COVID-19 “Proof of Vaccination” certificates for people to be able to work at an office.  

“In May 2021, when we first asked about COVID-19 vaccine certificates, just over half of Canadians (52%) were in favour of their use in offices,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support grew to 63% in September 2021 and once again this month to 67%.”  

Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to welcome “vaccine passports” in the workplace (77%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (66%) and aged 18-to-34 (59%).  

Support for the use of COVID-19 “Proof of Vaccination” certificates is highest in Quebec (73%), followed by British Columbia (70%), Ontario (68%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 68%), Alberta (64%) and Atlantic Canada (58%).  

Just over four-in-five Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in this year’s federal election (81%) are in favour of using “vaccine passports” in offices, along with 73% of those who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP), 64% of those who supported the Conservative Party and 58% of those who supported the Green Party. Only 19% of Canadians who voted for the People’s Party agree with this course of action.  

More than two thirds of Canadians continue to endorse the use of “vaccine passports” for people to go to live concerts as spectators (70%, +2), to go to live sporting events as spectators (also 70%, +4), to visit a gym or fitness facility (also 70%, +3) and to go to the theatre or cinema (69%, +3).  

Sizeable proportions of Canadians are also in favour of relying on  “Proof of Vaccination” certificates for travel to other countries (74%, +1), for travel to other Canadian provinces (70%, +2) and for travel inside the same province (65%, +3).  

Across the country, seven-in-ten Canadians (70%, -1) say they wear a mask every time the leave their home. As has been the case throughout the pandemic, women (74%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (81%) are more likely to be observing this guideline.  

There is little movement on some of the habits that Canadians may have developed as a result of the pandemic. More than one-in-ten Canadians say they are losing their temper more than usual at home (15%, =), having a bath or shower less often (14%, +2), drinking more alcohol than usual at home (13%, =), not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection (12%, -2) or brushing their teeth less often than before the pandemic (6%, -1).  

More than one-in-five Canadians continue to clean the groceries they buy to prevent infection (23%, +2) and admit to overeating or eating more than usual at home (22%, -1).  

Only 9% of Canadians (unchanged since September) say they do not plan to get inoculated against COVID-19, while 89% (+1) have already done so or intend to do so.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 8 to November 10, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

COVID-19 Ratings Improve for Most Governments in Canada

Almost two thirds of Canadians believe the worst of the pandemic is now behind us.
 
Vancouver, BC [November 15, 2021] – The views of Canadians on the way various levels of government have managed the COVID-19 pandemic are better now than they were two months ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 62% of Canadians say they are satisfied with the way the federal government has dealt with the pandemic, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September 2021.  
 
“More than three-in-five of residents of Quebec (70%), Atlantic Canada (68%) and Ontario (64%) are happy with the performance of the federal government on COVID-19,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are lower in British Columbia (58%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (54%) and Alberta (43%).”  
 
The satisfaction rating for municipal governments stands at 63% (+3) and rises to 70% among Canadians aged 55 and over.  
 
Almost three-in-five Canadians (59%, +3) are satisfied with how their provincial government is managing COVID-19. Among the four most populous provinces, Quebec has the highest rating this month (76%, +9), followed by British Columbia (62%, -4), Ontario (56%, +6) and Alberta (29%, +3).
 

Across the country, 65% of Canadians think the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic is behind us, up 17 points since September 2021.  
 
Residents of Quebec are the most likely to believe that the pandemic will not worsen (72%), followed by those who live in Ontario (68%), Alberta (62%), Atlantic Canada (60%), British Columbia (57%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 57%).  
 
As was the case two months ago, more than four-in-five Canadians (85%, +1) believe COVID-19 is a real threat, while 13% (+1) disagree with this assessment.  
 
Sizeable proportions of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (93%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (92%), the Green Party (86%) and the Conservative Party (75%) in the last federal election consider COVID-19 as a real threat. Only 27% of those who cast ballots for the People’s Party concur.  
 
Almost three-in-four Canadians (74%, +3) are in favour of allowing K-12 students to go back to in-class learning in their province.  
 
Just over four-in-five Canadians (81%, -3) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside.  
 
Only 32% of People’s Party voters endorse the mask mandate, compared to 72% of Green voters, 76% of Conservative voters, 80% of NDP voters and 89% of Liberal voters.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 8 to November 10, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Canadians Hearing and Uttering Fewer Swear Words Than in 2019

Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely than their younger counterparts to say that they never alter the way they speak.  

Vancouver, BC [November 11, 2021] – Compared to two years ago, fewer adults in Canada say they are having conversations with people who swear, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 64% of Canadians say they hear their friends swear “frequently” or “occasionally” when they are engaged in conversation, down four points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in April 2019.  

About half of Canadians say they listen to swear words “frequently” or “occasionally” when talking to strangers (50%, -5), relatives (49%, -5) and co-workers (48%, -4).  

When asked about their own use of swear words, almost half of Canadians (49%, -3) say they rely on this kind of language “frequently” or “occasionally” when they are conversing with friends.  

Fewer Canadians say they swear “frequently” or “occasionally” when chatting with relatives (36%, -4), co-workers (31%, -3) and strangers (17%, -6).  

Just over two-in-five residents of British Columbia (41%) say they “never” swear during conversations with relatives. The proportion is lower in Alberta (37%), Ontario (33%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (30%), Quebec (27%) and Atlantic Canada (26%).  

Ontario is home to the highest proportion of residents who “never” utter swear words around co-workers (45%), followed by Alberta (44%), British Columbia (41%), Quebec (40%), Atlantic Canada (39%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (38%).  

“More than half of Canadians who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP) and the Conservative Party in the last federal election (52% and 51% respectively) say they swear frequently or occasionally when chatting with friends,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion drops to 46% among those who voted for the Liberal Party.”  

Across the country, more than a third of Canadians (36%, -2) claim to always alter the way they speak to make sure they do not swear in public—including 39% of women.  

Practically half of Canadians (49%, +1) acknowledge that they sometimes alter the way they speak so as not to swear in front of certain people—a proportion that reaches 62% among those aged 18-to-34.

Only 14% of Canadians say they never alter the way they speak and do not worry if a curse word comes out—including 18% of Atlantic Canadians, 18% of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba and 17% of Canadians aged 55 and over.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 1 to November 3, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490