Large Majorities of Canadians Endorse Poutine, Pineapple on Pizza

Fewer than a third of residents would consume prairie oysters, shark fin soup, cod tongues and scrunchions.

Vancouver, BC [August 23, 2019] – Two delicacies perfected in Quebec and Ontario are attractive choices for a large majority of Canadians, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, practically four-in-five Canadians (79%) said they would “definitely” or “probably” eat poutine.

Poutine is particularly popular among Quebecers (84%) and Canadians aged 35-to-54 (87%).

About two thirds of Canadians (66%) said they would “definitely” or “probably” eat pizza with pineapple, while three-in-five (60%) would eat a plant-based hamburger patty.

“More than two thirds of women (69%) and three quarters of British Columbians (76%) would eat a pizza with pineapple,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The dish is not as popular among Quebecers (57%).”

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to say they would consume a plant-based hamburger patty (67%) than those aged 35-to-54 (62%) and those aged 55 and over (52%).

Canadians are evenly divided on whether they would eat a steak with ketchup, with 48% acknowledging they would try it and 48% saying they would not.

Men (54%) are significantly more likely than women (41%) to say they would eat a steak with ketchup.

Other culinary creations were less accepted across the country. Just 26% of Canadians would “definitely” or “probably” eat prairie oysters, while one-in-five (20%) would consume shark fin soup.

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians would try two Atlantic delicacies: cod tongues (18%) and scrunchions (16%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from July 15 to July 17, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Back Opt-Out System for Organ and Tissue Donation

Support for change is highest in British Columbia, Alberta and Quebec.

Vancouver, BC [August 21, 2019] – A majority of Canadians would welcome a modification in the way the registries of organ and tissue donors are compiled across the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than three-in-five Canadians (63%) think their province should “definitely” or “probably” implement an “Active Donor Registration” system for organ and tissue donation after death.

Some jurisdictions around the world have established “Active Donor Registration” systems for organ and tissue donation. Under these systems, every person over the age of 18 is considered an organ and tissue donor after death unless they specifically opt-out of a registry.

Across the country, 25% of Canadians are opposed to their province implementing an opt-out system for organ and tissue donation and 13% are undecided.

Earlier this year, Nova Scotia’s House of Assembly unanimously passed the “Human Organ and Tissue Act”. The law makes every single person who has resided in the province for at least a year a potential organ and tissue donor after death. Nova Scotians who do not wish to be donors are able to opt-out of the system.

 “Support for enacting an opt-out system for organ and tissue donation reaches 66% in British Columbia, Alberta and Quebec,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “A majority of residents of Manitoba and Saskatchewan (63%), Atlantic Canada (59%) and Ontario (57%) would also welcome the change.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 12 to August 14, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views on Crime in British Columbia Vary by Generation

In the past four years, one-in-five residents of the province have reported a crime to the police.

Vancouver, BC [August 16, 2019] – The perceptions of British Columbians on crime and public safety go through sizeable fluctuations according to age, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, two-in-five of the province’s residents (40%) say they fear becoming a victim of a crime in their community “a great deal” or “a fair amount.”

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (48%) are significantly more likely to fear becoming victims of crime than those aged 35-to-54 (40%) and those aged 55 and over (33%).

On a regional basis, the area where most British Columbians fear becoming victims of a crime is Metro Vancouver (43%), followed by Southern BC (40%), the Fraser Valley (39%), Northern BC (37%) and Vancouver Island (30%).

“There is a deep generational divide when it comes to perceptions of public safety in British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Millennials are more likely to fear becoming victims and Baby Boomers are more likely to say that crime is on the rise in their community.”

While two thirds of British Columbians (68%) acknowledge that they would feel “very safe” or “moderately safe” walking alone in their own neighbourhood after dark, 31% say they would feel  “moderately unsafe” or “very unsafe.”

Women (41%) and British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (39%) are more likely to report that they would feel “unsafe” walking alone in their own neighbourhood after dark.

Almost two-in-five British Columbians (41%, +3 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2018) think the level of criminal activity in their community has increased in the past four years.

Most residents of Southern BC (56%) and the Fraser Valley (54%) believe crime has increased in their communities, compared to 41% for Northern BC, 38% for Vancouver Island and 37% for Metro Vancouver.

Across the province, one-in-five British Columbians (20%) say they have been the victims of a crime over the past few years where the police was called in (such as an assault or a car break-in) in their community—including 26% of those aged 18-to-34.

When asked how much specific factors are to blame “a great deal” for the current situation regarding crime and public safety in their community, more than two-in-five British Columbians (45%) point to “addiction and mental health issues” while one third (32%) select “gangs and the illegal drug trade.”

Fewer residents of the province blame an “inadequate court system” (24%), “poverty and inequality” (23%), “lack of values and the improper education of youth” (17%), “bad economy and unemployment” (14%), “insufficient policing and lack of resources to combat crime” (13%) and “immigrants and minorities” (9%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 7 to August 10, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Call for Holistic Approach to Deal with Drug Use

More than half prefer to focus on treatment that does not rely on opioid replacement therapy and aims for abstinence.

Vancouver, BC [August 14, 2019] – A majority of Canadians express support for policies to deal with drug use in the country that focus on information, “harm reduction” and the goal of abstinence, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than four-in-five Canadians (83%) support education and prevention campaigns to deal with drug use in Canada.

About three-in-five Canadians are also in favour of supervised injection sites (59%) and needle-exchange programs (58%).

“Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (77%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (64%) in the last federal election are supportive of supervised injection sites,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However, only 48% of Conservative Party voters in the 2015 ballot concur.”

A majority of Canadians (57%) support treatment that does not rely on opioid replacement therapy and aims for abstinence.

Conversely, fewer than half of Canadians are in favour of treatment that does not aim for abstinence and relies on opioid replacement therapy (48%).

More than half of Canadians (52%) approve of having a supervised injection site located “anywhere in their municipality.” However, only 38% would consent to a facility of this nature located “anywhere in their neighbourhood” and just 33% would approve of one “a block away from their home.”

Residents of Atlantic Canada and Quebec are more likely to accept a supervised injection site located “a block away from their home” (40% and 39% respectively) than those who live in British Columbia (31%), Manitoba and Saskatchewan (28%), Ontario (24%) and Alberta (22%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from July 15 to July 17, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians and Americans Praise Leaders for Job Creation

On this file, Conservative voters in Canada are more critical of Justin Trudeau than Democrats are of Donald Trump.

Vancouver, BC [August 9, 2019] – Most Canadians and Americans believe their current heads of government should be lauded for job creation, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 60% of Canadians think Prime Minister Justin Trudeau deserves “all of the credit” (12%) or “some of the credit” (48%) for the country’s low unemployment rate.

On a regional basis, Canadians who reside in Quebec (65%), British Columbia (63%) and Ontario (61%) are more likely to believe that Trudeau deserves “all” or “some” of the credit for Canada’s unemployment rate, followed by Atlantic Canada (56%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (55%) and Alberta (42%).

In the United States, 57% of Americans believe President Donald Trump deserves “all of the credit” (12%) or “some of the credit” (45%) for the country’s low unemployment rate.

In the United States, residents of the Midwest (63%) are more likely to believe that Trump deserves “all” or “some” of the credit for the country’s unemployment rate, followed by those in the Northeast (58%), the South (56%) and the West (55%).

“In Canada, only 37% of respondents who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2015 federal election are willing to praise Trudeau for the current employment situation,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the United States, the proportion of Democrats who feel the same way about Trump reaches 50%.”

The proportion of residents who believe the head of government deserves “none of the credit” for the low unemployment rate is significantly higher in the United States (26%) than in Canada (16%).

Methodology:

Results are based on online studies conducted from July 2 to July 5, 2019, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our full data set for Canada here, full data set for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca