Metro Vancouver Fared Poorly After Last Year’s Snowstorms

Illegal behaviours—such as not shoveling a sidewalk or driving in an improperly cleared vehicle—are reported by half of residents.

Vancouver, BC [February 8, 2023] – Most residents of Metro Vancouver are disappointed with the way last year’s snowstorms were managed by their municipal administrations, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative Metro Vancouver sample, just over three-in-five respondents (61%) think their municipality was “unprepared” for the snowstorms that affected the region in November and December.

More than half of Metro Vancouverites voice dissatisfaction with two specific issues: snow clearing on sidewalks (58%) and snow clearing on roads (57%). Fewer residents are upset about the timeliness of alerts from their municipality (30%) or the responsiveness to requests on social media (31%).

The snowstorms impacted the way certain services operated in November and December. Majorities of Metro Vancouver residents say they experienced an interruption in recycling pickup (63%), non-organic or “garbage” pickup (also 63%), and organic or “green” waste pickup (66%).

About two-in-five residents of the City of Vancouver say three sanitation services were disrupted more than once in the last two months of 2022: garbage pickup (40%), green pickup (42%) and recycling pickup (43%). In Surrey and other municipalities, fewer than a quarter of residents experienced repeated interruptions.

The snowstorms also affected the behaviour of residents. Three-in-ten Metro Vancouverites (30%) say themselves or someone in their household worked from home on account of the snowstorms, and almost half (49%) chose not to drive their own vehicle.

At least half of Metro Vancouverites report witnessing two illegal behaviours in November and December: 54% saw neighbours who did not shovel snow on their sidewalk and 50% saw a vehicle with snow on the top circulating in their municipality.

“Practically three-in-five residents of the City of Surrey (59%) remember a neighbour choosing not to take care of snow on the sidewalk,” says Mario Canseco. President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower in the City of Vancouver (54%) and in the remaining Metro Vancouver municipalities (49%).”

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on January 14 to January 16, 2023, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Back LNG Expansion, Split on Nuclear Power

The possibility of rising energy costs for households is a prevalent concern for half of the province’s residents.

Vancouver, BC [February 3, 2022] – A majority of British Columbians endorse the expansion of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) sector in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 55% of British Columbians support the provincial government allowing for further development of the LNG industry, while 29% are opposed and 17% are undecided.

Support for the expansion of LNG development is highest in Southern BC (67%), followed by the Fraser Valley (56%), Metro Vancouver (also 56%), Northern BC (55%) and Vancouver Island (41%).

Two other ideas related to energy are more contentious. While 43% of British Columbians are in favour of allowing nuclear power (small modular reactors) for electricity generation, 40% disagree.

The notion of the provincial government banning the use of natural gas (on stoves and/or heaters) in new buildings is supported by 39% of British Columbians and opposed by 45%.

Half of British Columbians (50%) say they are “very concerned” about energy costs for households becoming too expensive.

Fewer residents are particularly worried about the effects of climate change in the world (48%), the effects of climate change in Canada (45%), energy shortages leading to measures such as rationing and rolling blackouts (31%) and energy costs for businesses becoming too expensive (28%).

The provincial government will require all car and passenger truck sales to be zero-emission by 2035. Seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%) support this goal, while 21% oppose it and 8% are not sure.

“There are some regional differences in British Columbia on the impending move to electric vehicles,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. ”Opposition to the goal is highest in Southern BC (37%), followed by Northern BC (30%), the Fraser Valley (22%), Metro Vancouver (20%) and Vancouver Island (15%).”

Among those who support the zero-emission goal established by the provincial government, 32% believe it is achievable and 38% think it is not achievable.

British Columbians are split on the current pace of the move to electric vehicles, with 26% saying the change is being implemented too quickly, 38% thinking it is happening at the right pace and 23% thinking it is taking place too slowly.

Methodology:Results are based on an online study conducted on January 9 to January 11, 2023, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Criticism Towards Trudeau Increases in Western Canada

The proportion of Albertans who think the province would be better off as its own country fell to 26%.

Vancouver, BC [February 1, 2023] – Just over half of Canadians think their province would benefit from a change in the federal government, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Canadians think their province would be better off with a different Prime Minister in Ottawa, up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2022.

Majorities of Canadians who reside in Alberta (66%, +2), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (65%, +5), British Columbia (57%, +4)  and Ontario (52%, +4) believe their provinces would be better off with someone other than Justin Trudeau in charge. The proportions are lower in Atlantic Canada (44%, -8) and Quebec (42%, -3).

“Canadians aged 35-to-54 (56%) are more likely to believe that a change in the federal government would be beneficial to their province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The rating is slightly lower among their counterparts aged 55 and over (51%) and aged 18-to-34 (50%)”

Just over half of Canadians (51%, unchanged) believe their province would be better off with a different premier in charge.

Compared to June 2022, animosity towards Ontario’s Doug Ford has risen from 43% to 57%, while it has dropped for Quebec’s François Legault from 48% to 45%. These two premiers earned majorities in provincial elections held in June and October respectively.

In British Columbia, there is little change in the results posted by John Horgan in June (41%) and David Eby this month (40%). In Alberta, 55% of respondents think the province would be better off with a premier other than Danielle Smith. In June, 65% of Albertans felt this way about Jason Kenney.

The proportion of Albertans who think their province would be better off as its own country fell to 26% this month, down seven points since June and well below the all-time high of 40% registered in December 2019.

Separatist sentiment also dropped in Quebec, from 32% in June to 29% this month.

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians (17%, =) believe their province would be better off joining the United States and becoming an American state—a proportion that rises to 21% in Alberta.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from January 20 to January 22, 2023, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Optimistic About New Housing Regulations

Almost half of the province’s residents think the actions will be effective in making housing more affordable.

Vancouver, BC [January 27, 2022] – Practically half of British Columbians think the housing measures recently announced by the provincial government will help residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 48% of British Columbians believe the actions will be effective in making housing more affordable, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2021.

Just over two-in-five British Columbians (41%, -2) believe the actions of the provincial government will be ineffective, while 11% (-5) are undecided.

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians agree with three policies related to housing recently outlined by the provincial government: building more modular supportive homes in areas where people are experiencing homelessness (78%), implementing a three-business-day protection period for financing and home inspections (71%) and capping rent increases in 2023 at 2% (also 71%).

Majorities of British Columbians are also in favour of two other recent measures: ending most strata age restrictions (64%) and removing strata rental restrictions (59%).

Support remains high for the policies implemented by the provincial government before 2022, such as increasing the foreign buyers tax from 15% to 20% (77%, +2), expanding the foreign buyers tax to areas located outside of Metro Vancouver (75%, =) and introducing a “speculation tax” in specific urban areas targeting foreign and domestic homeowners who pay little or no income tax in BC, and those who own second properties that aren’t long-term rentals (72%, +2).

Most British Columbians also continue to agree with the introduction of a tax of 0.2% on the value of homes between $3 million and $4 million, and a tax rate of 0.4% on the portion of a home’s value that exceeds $4 million (68%, -1) and with the decision to increase the property transfer tax from 3% to 5% for homes valued at more than $3 million. The 5% portion only applies to the value greater than $3 million (65%, -2).

Just over seven-in-ten British Columbians (71%) support the federal government’s decision to ban non-Canadians (with exclusions for international students and temporary residents) from purchasing residential properties in Canada for the next two years.

More than three-in-five British Columbians (61%) think the federal government should tie immigration numbers to affordable housing targets and new housing starts.

“There is no political divide in British Columbia on the idea that housing and immigration should go hand-in-hand,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Sizeable majorities of residents who voted for the BC Liberals (63%), the BC Green Party (62%) and the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (59%) in the 2020 provincial election want the federal government to do its part.”

A majority of British Columbians (57%) call on the provincial government to implement a $400 renters’ rebate for households earning up to $80,000 a year. This proposed measure is particularly popular among those who currently rent (72%).

Only 30% of British Columbians would consent to the cancellation of the home owner grant, which reduces the amount of property tax people pay for their principal residence. Among respondents who own their primary residence, support for this policy stands at 23%.

Three-in-five British Columbians (60%) agree that municipal governments should immediately dismantle any encampment or “tent city” located within their municipality—a proportion that rises to 66% among those aged 55 and over.

Almost half of British Columbians (49%, -6 since a Research Co. survey conducted in December 2021) trust the provincial government under the BC NDP to deliver affordable housing in British Columbia. The rating is lower for prospective provincial administrations headed by the BC Greens (39%, +6) or the BC Liberals (33%, -3).

At the federal level, confidence on affordable housing is highest for a potential federal government headed by the NDP (40%, -11) than administrations assembled by the Liberal Party (37%, -2) or the Conservative Party (31%, -1).

Trust in municipal governments to deliver affordable housing stands at 46% in British Columbia this month (-1). Confidence remains higher for not-for-profit developers (49%, =) than for for-profit developers (21%, +2).

Methodology:Results are based on an online study conducted on January 9 to January 11, 2023, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Single-Use Plastics Ban Welcomed by Most British Columbians

The proportion of residents who rely on re-usable bags when they go grocery shopping has increased since December 2021.

Vancouver, BC [January 25, 2023] – The recently implemented federal ban on the manufacture and import of single-use plastics in Canada is endorsed by four-in-five British Columbians, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 80% of British Columbians support the federal government’s decision.

The federal government has banned the manufacture and import of single-use plastics, including grocery checkout bags, straws, stir sticks, six-pack rings, plastic cutlery and food takeout containers made from hard-to-recycle plastics.

Several municipalities in British Columbia have already implemented their own guidelines for specific items, such as grocery checkout bags.

“The highest level of support for the federal ban on single-use plastics is observed on Vancouver Island (84%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The prohibition is also supported by majorities of residents in Metro Vancouver (81%), the Fraser Valley (also 81%), Northern BC (77%) and Southern BC (73%).”

More than four-in-five British Columbians (85%, +9 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2021) say that they transport groceries out of a store after purchasing them using their own re-usable bag. Only 13% say they rely on bags provided or purchased at the store.

A sizeable proportion of British Columbians aged 55 and over (96%, +8) are relying on their own re-usable bag when they go grocery shopping. The numbers are lower among those aged 35-to-54 (85%, +12) and those aged 18-to-34 (69%, +7).

About half of British Columbians (49%, -2) claim to go out of their way to recycle “all of the time”, such as holding on to bottles and cans until they can be placed into a proper recycling bin.

Fewer British Columbians are actively partaking on other behaviours “all of the time”, such as limiting hot water usage in their home by taking shorter showers or running washing machines or dishwashers with full loads only (19%, -1), unplugging electrical devices in their home—such as TVs, computers and cell phone chargers—when they are not in use (12%, =), buying biodegradable products (9%, +4) or eating organic or home-grown foods (5%, =).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on January 2 to January 4, 2023, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Grow Pessimistic on Economy and Personal Finances

More than four-in-five Canadians expect to pay more for a week’s worth of groceries.

Vancouver, BC [January 20, 2023] – The perceptions of Canadians on the financial status of both the country and their household have worsened over the past six months, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 62% of Canadians say the economic conditions in Canada right now are “bad” or “very bad”, up five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in July 2022.

Just over a third of Canadians (35%, -5) deem the country’s economic standing as “very good” or “good”.

Fewer than a third of residents of Alberta (27%, -5), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (28%, -2) and Atlantic Canada (29%, -7) hold positive views on the Canadian economy at this point. The rating is higher in Ontario (37%, +3), British Columbia (35%, -2) and Quebec (41%, -14).

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%, +4) expect the national economy to decline over the next six months, while 38% (-2) foresee no changes and only 13% (=) predict an improvement.

“Most Canadians aged 55 and over (51%) think an economic recovery in the next six months is unattainable,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (43%) and aged 18-to-34 (38%).”

Just over half of Canadians (51%, -6) rate their own personal finances today as “very good” or “good”, while 47% (+6) define them as “poor” or “very poor.”

Majorities of Canadians think certain items will be more expensive over the next six months, including a week’s worth of groceries (85%, +4), gasoline (67%, +6), a new car (65%, -3) and a new television set (54%, -3). In addition, 43% (-1) think the price of real estate will be higher.

There is little change in the level of confidence on the Prime Minister. This month, 42% of Canadians (+1) trust Justin Trudeau to do the right thing to help the economy. The ratings are lower for Governor of the Bank of Canada Tiff Macklem (34%, -3) and federal Leader of the Opposition Pierre Poilievre (33%).

Just over half of Canadians acknowledge having worried “frequently” or “occasionally” about two financial matters in the past couple of months: the value of their investments (52%, +2) and the safety of their savings (also 52%, +2).

Fewer Canadians have been concerned “frequently” or “occasionally” about unemployment affecting their household (37%, +3), being able to pay their mortgage or rent (34%, =) or their employer running into serious financial trouble (29%, +5).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on January 13 to January 15, 2023, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Russia and North Korea Thoroughly Disliked by Canadians

At least seven-in-ten Canadians hold positive views on the United Kingdom, Italy, Japan and France. 

Vancouver, BC [January 17, 2023] – Two nations are clearly at the bottom when Canadians are asked to voice their feelings about 15 different countries, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, only 11% of Canadians have a positive opinion of Russia and North Korea.

“More than nine-in-ten Canadians aged 55 and over (93%) currently have a negative view of the Russian Federation,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of Canadians aged 35-to-54 (78%) and aged 18-to-34 (68%) feel the same way.”

Fewer than one-in-four Canadians have a positive opinion of Saudi Arabia (23%, -1 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2022), China (18%, -2) and Iran (13%, -3).

About one-in-four Atlantic Canadians (24%) hold positive views on China. The proportions are lower in Ontario (21%), Alberta (18%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (16%), British Columbia (also 16%) and Quebec (13%).

The perceptions of Canadians remain favourable for most fellow members of the G7, including the United Kingdom (74%, +1), Italy (71%, -2), Japan (70%, +1), France (also 70%, +1) and Germany (69%, -1).

Almost three-in-five Canadians (57%, -2) hold positive views on South Korea. The numbers are lower for Mexico (49%, -1), India (41%, +4) and Venezuela (30%, -1).

More than half of Canadians (54%, -2) have a positive view of the United States, while just under two-in-five (39%, +4) hold negative feelings.

Favourable opinions on the United States are highest in three Canadian regions: Quebec (55%, +1), Atlantic Canada (also 55%, +2) and Ontario (55%, -4), followed by British Columbia (52%, +4), Alberta (50%, -7) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (48%, -12).

Only 45% of Canadians (+2) who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) in 2021 hold positive views on the United States. The proportions are higher among their counterparts who supported the Liberal Party (61%, -5) or the Conservative Party (58%, -12) in the last federal election.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on January 2 to January 4, 2023, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Financial Recovery Elusive for Two-in-Five British Columbians

More than four-in-five British Columbians say the price of groceries is now higher than before the COVID-19 pandemic.

Vancouver, BC [January 10, 2023] – A significant proportion of British Columbians acknowledge that their economic status is not as good as it was three years ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 45% of British Columbians say their household’s financial situation is worse now than before the COVID-19 pandemic, up 12 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March 2022.

“Two-in-five British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (40%) say their household’s finances are not at the level they were in February 2020,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are higher among those aged 35-to-54 (47%) and aged 55 and over (46%).”

Almost half of British Columbians (48%, +5) say it is currently difficult to pay for necessities or “make ends meet”—a proportion that rises to 54% among women and 58% among residents of the Fraser Valley.

The increases are more pronounced on two other categories, with more than seven-in-ten British Columbians (71%, +7) saying they are finding it difficult to save money for retirement or a “rainy day” and two thirds (66%, +10) saying it is currently difficult to have money for leisure, such as dining out and entertainment.

Sizeable majorities of British Columbians report that two household expenses are higher now than before the COVID-19 pandemic: groceries (83%, +8) and transportation (73%, +19).

About half of British Columbians are also paying more than in February 2019 for housing (such as rent or mortgage) (49%, +5) and electronic entertainment (48%, +2).

Fewer British Columbians say they are paying more now for books (21%, +2), newspapers and magazines (16%, +1) and board games (13%, -3).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on December 27 to December 29, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here, and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca  

Little Consensus as Canadians Ponder Where and How Much to Tip

One third of Canadians think food servers deserve a tip in all circumstances even if service was bad.

Vancouver, BC [December 30, 2022] – The performance of servers and the busyness of restaurants play a role in the gratuities that Canadians are willing to provide to food servers, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample asked Canadians what they think is an acceptable tip for service at a sit-down restaurant in nine different circumstances.

About a third of Canadians would leave a gratuity in the range of 15%-to-19% if they receive exceptional service in a restaurant that is not busy (37%), busy (34%) or exceptionally busy (32%).

Some Canadians are willing to offer a tip of 20% or higher if they receive exceptional service at a restaurant that is busy (34%) or exceptionally busy (36%).

The results are similar when Canadians are asked to ponder good (but not exceptional) service. Gratuities are in the range of 15%-to-19% if the restaurant is not busy (34%), busy (41%) or exceptionally busy (37%).

Fewer Canadians would consider a tip of 20% or higher for good service at a venue that is busy (19%) or exceptionally busy (25%).

When it comes to average service in any environment, about two-in-five Canadians (41%) would leave a gratuity in the 10%-to-14% range, while 28% would move into the 15%-to-19% range.

More than a third of Canadians (36%) would leave a tip in the 10%-to-14% range for below average service when the server is clearly working in an understaffed environment.

Finally, just over three-in-ten Canadians (31%) say they would not leave a gratuity at all if they receive below average service at a sit-down restaurant when their server is clearly not busy.

“Two-in-five Canadians aged 55 and over (40%) would walk away from a sit-down restaurant without leaving a tip if they perceive that their server was idle and aloof,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (29%) and aged 18-to-34 (24%).”

Just over one-in-ten Canadians (11%) think it is acceptable to forego a tip for food delivery to their homes or offices. Two-in-five Canadians (40%) think the acceptable gratuity range in this circumstance is 10%-to-14%.

A majority of Canadians (54%) do not think a tip is necessary when they pick up food to go.

More than half of Canadians (53%) say they never tip when they visit a snack restaurant where they take their food to go, and more than two-in-five also never leave a gratuity when they visit a cafeteria-style restaurant (49%), a restaurant where they order to go and pick the food up themselves (48%) or a coffee shop (43%).

A third of Canadians (33%) think food servers deserve a tip in all circumstances even if service was bad—a proportion that rises to 41% among those aged 18-to-34.

Two thirds of Canadians (67%) believe food servers nowadays simply expect a tip, but don’t work hard to earn it.

About seven-in-ten Canadians agree on two other statements: “Food servers cannot get by on their salaries alone—it is important to tip them” (70%) and “If the salaries of food servers were better, there would be no need to tip servers” (69%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on December 10 to December 12, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Call for Action to Revamp the Justice System

Fewer than one-in-five of the province’s residents give the justice system high grades.

Vancouver, BC [December 28, 2022] – Residents of British Columbia are not particularly satisfied with the justice system, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, only 19% of British Columbians rate the justice system with a grade of 8, 9 or 10, while a larger proportion (25%) rate it as a 1, 2 or 3.

Half of the province’s residents (50%) provide grades ranging from 4 to 7 to the justice system.

“More than one-in-ten British Columbians (13%) give the lowest grade available to the justice system,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This includes 17% of British Columbians aged 55 and over and 23% of residents of Indigenous descent.”

More than four-in-five British Columbians (82%) think the justice system needs more resources because it takes too long to get cases dealt with.

Sizeable majorities of British Columbians who voted for the BC Liberals (88%), the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (85%) and the BC Green Party (73%) in the 2020 provincial election agree on calling for additional resources for the justice system.

Just under four-in-five British Columbians (79%) say the outcome of cases depends heavily on how good your lawyer is.

For almost three-in-four British Columbians (74%), the justice system is too soft on offenders when it comes to criminal cases—a proportion that jumps to 85% among those aged 55 and over.

Most British Columbians (58%) agree that the justice system has not done enough to address bias against Indigenous Canadians. Majorities of residents of Indigenous (72%), South Asian (61%), East Asian (60%) and European ancestry (51%) agree on this question.

Just under half of British Columbians (47%) have interacted with the justice system. One-in-ten (10%) went to small claims court, while more dealt with cases related to proceedings of criminal (17%), family (20%) or traffic and bylaw (22%) natures.

Majorities of British Columbians say the resolution during their last interaction with three components of the justice system was fair: traffic and bylaw (59%), small claims (53%) and family (also 53%).

British Columbians who interacted with the criminal justice system are split in their assessment of their last experience, with 46% calling the resolution fair and 45% deeming it unfair.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 16 to December 18, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca
 
Photo Credit: Wpcpey

Majority of Canadians Expect to Eventually Vote for Senators

One third would prefer to reform the Senate to allow for elections, while fewer favour abolishment or keeping the status quo.

Vancouver, BC [December 23, 2022] – While Canadians do not reach consensus about the best way to proceed with the upper house, more than half think voters will one day be able to choose the members of the Red Chamber, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 56% of Canadians (+2 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in February 2020) expect to one day be able to directly elect their senators, while 28% (-1) disagree and 17% (=) are not sure.

“Expectations of an elected Senate of Canada are highest in Alberta (64%), British Columbia (60%) and Ontario (59%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents of Atlantic Canada (52%), Quebec (49%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (49%) are more skeptical.”

One-in-four Canadians (24%, -3) think Canada does not need a Senate and want all legislation to be reviewed and authorized by the House of Commons—a proportion that reaches 35% among those aged 55 and over.

Just under one-in-ten Canadians (9%, =) believe Canada needs a Senate and the current guidelines that call for appointed senators should not be modified.

Fewer than half of Canadians (45%, =) think Canada needs a Senate, but Canadians should be allowed to take part in the process to choose senators.

When asked to consider specific options for the Red Chamber, only 6% of Canadians support allowing the Prime Minister to appoint senators, while 17% favour having a selection committee that would appoint non-partisan senators.

One third of Canadians (33%) would reform the Senate to allow Canadians to directly elect the members of the upper house, while 14% would abolish the Red Chamber altogether.

Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the last federal election are significantly more likely to support Senate reform (50%) than those who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (38%) and the Liberal Party (28%) in 2021.

Since 2015, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has only named senators that were recommended by an arm’s-length advisory body and not directly appointed by him.

Fewer than three-in-ten Canadians (28%, -9) think the changes implemented by Trudeau have made the Senate of Canada better than it was before he took office, while 31% (-1) see no change and 20% (+4) believe the situation is now worse.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on December 10 to December 12, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Pick “Merry Christmas” as Preferred Greeting

For the first time since 2018, more than half of the country’s residents foresee a holiday season with more fun than stress.

Vancouver, BC [December 20, 2022] – While the proportion of Canadians who are fond of saying “Happy Holidays” has risen since 2018, most of the country’s residents continue to rely on “Merry Christmas”, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 64% of Canadians say “Merry Christmas” is their preferred greeting for the season, up two points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in December 2021.

Just over one-in-five Canadians (21%, +1) say they prefer using “Happy Holidays”, while 15% (-3) are not sure or do not care either way.

Since 2018, the proportion of Canadians who prefer “Merry Christmas” has fallen by 10 points, while the number of those who rely on “Happy Holidays” has increased by seven points.

“Only 14% of Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in 2021 prefer to say Happy Holidays,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are higher among Canadians who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP) (22%) or the Liberal Party (24%).”

More than half of Canadians (52%, +3) say they expect the current holiday season to be “more fun than stressful”, while three-in-ten (29%, +2) think it will be “more stressful than fun.”

Four groups are more likely to predict a stressful holiday season in 2022: women (31%), Canadians aged 35-to-54 (33%), Atlantic Canadians (40%) and NDP voters in 2021 (35%).

At least three-in-five Canadians say they like three staples of holiday meals: turkey (84%, =), cranberry sauce (64%, =) and Brussels sprouts (60%, -2).

A majority of Canadians enjoy fruit cake (55%, -1) and egg nog (also 55%, +1), while fewer like mince pies (48%, -2), plum pudding (42%, -1) and mulled wine (36%, +2).

Egg nog is equally popular in Alberta (60%), British Columbia (59%), Atlantic Canada (also 59%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (58%) and Ontario (also 58%), but drops to 43% in Quebec.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on December 10 to December 12, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Think We Have Seen the Worst of COVID-19

Satisfaction with provincial governments remains higher in British Columbia and Quebec than in Ontario and Alberta.

Vancouver, BC [December 16, 2022] – Fewer than one-in-five Canadians are currently concerned about the possibility of declining conditions on account of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-four Canadians (75%) say the worst of the pandemic is “behind us”, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2022.

Only 17% of Canadians (-3) think the worst of COVID-19 is ahead of us, while 9% (-3) are not sure.

For seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) COVID-19 remains a real threat—a proportion that rises to 78% among those aged 55 and over and to 82% among those who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2021 federal election.

“We continue to see cautious optimism when Canadians think about COVID-19,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Significant majorities of Canadians are both convinced that the situation will not worsen but still consider the virus a real threat.”

Almost three-in-five Canadians (59%, +4) are satisfied with the way the federal government has dealt with COVID-19, while 58% (-1) feel the same way about their municipal government.

Most Canadians (58%, +5) are satisfied with how their provincial government has managed the pandemic. Among the four most populous provinces, the rating is highest in British Columbia (68%, +6), followed by Quebec (62%, +4), Ontario (54%, +6) and Alberta (46%, +7).

Since May 2022, satisfaction with the way federal chief public health officer Theresa Tam has managed the pandemic dropped from 66% to 60%. The average rating is similar for the country’s provincial health officers or chief medical officers (61%, -5).

In two provinces, the satisfaction rating for top doctors fell since May: Luc Boileau in Quebec (60%, -6) and Kieran Moore in Ontario (59%, -8). Two thirds of British Columbians (66%, +3) are satisfied with the work of Bonnie Henry.

In Alberta, the rating for Deena Hinshaw stood at 65% in May. This month, 53% of Albertans are satisfied with the way recently appointed chief medical officer of heath Mike Joffe is managing the pandemic.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on December 10 to December 12, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Interest in Men’s Soccer Team Grows for One-in-Four Canadians

More than a third of Canadians tuned in to at least some of the FIFA World Cup matches against Belgium and Croatia.

Vancouver, BC [December 13, 2022] – While only about one-in-six Canadians acknowledge being “true soccer fans”, interest in the Men’s National Team has increased since the start of the FIFA World Cup in Qatar, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 15% of Canadians describe themselves as soccer fans, who truly enjoy watching the game, while 17% say they watch soccer as much as they can, but do not follow it all the time.

More than a quarter of Canadians (27%) will watch a soccer match now and then, but it’s not their favourite sport, while 41% say they do not really care for soccer—including 50% of women, 50% of those aged 55 and over and 57% of Atlantic Canadians.

Just under two-in-five Canadians (38%) say they have followed the Qatar 2022 FIFA World Cup “very closely” or “moderately closely”—a proportion that rises to 49% among Canadians aged 18-to-34, 48% among men and 52% among Ontarians.

More than a third of Canadians (35%) watched the whole match or some parts of the FIFA World Cup match between Canada and Belgium on November 23.

“One-in-four men (24%) saw Canada’s entire match against Belgium during Qatar 2022,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “On a regional basis, Ontario (24%) was ahead of all regions on following the entire contest.”

Canada’s second contest, against Croatia on November 27, was also watched completely or partially by 35% of Canadians. The numbers were lower (29%) for the third and final match against Morocco on December 1.

Across the country, 24% of Canadians say they are more interested in Canada’s national team than before its participation in the Qatar 2022 FIFA World Cup—including 29% of men and 26% of Canadians aged 18-to-34.

Half of Canadians (51%) say their interest in the Men’s National Team has not changed as a result of the World Cup, while 9% are less interested now than before.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on December 6 and December 7, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Age Still Defines Preferred Shopping Habits in British Columbia

Compared to last year, more residents are purchasing groceries, items for the family and gifts in person.

Vancouver, BC [December 9, 2022] – Over the past year, there has been little movement in the preferences of British Columbians when it comes to shopping, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, more than half of British Columbians (55%) say they prefer buying things in person than online, up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2021.

Two-in-five British Columbians (40%, -1) say they prefer buying things online than in person.

“Practically three-in-five British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (59%) prefer online shopping,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, more than seven-in-ten British Columbians aged 55 and over (73%) prefer buying things in person.”

Some of the usual purchasing habits of British Columbians have returned to pre-pandemic levels. Majorities of the province’s residents say they are visiting stores just as often as they did before COVID-19 to purchase groceries (66%, +4), items for the home or family (57%, +5) and gifts (55%, +7).

More than one-in-five British Columbians (22%, =) are ordering groceries for home delivery more often than before the pandemic, while at least a third are relying more often on e-commerce to purchase gifts (33%, -3) and items for the home or family (36%, -2).

About two-in-five British Columbians say they are going to sit-down restaurants just as often as they did before COVID-19 for breakfast (40%, +10), lunch (43%, +15) or dinner (39%, +12).

More than half of British Columbians (52%, +7) are buying beverages or snacks to go at coffee shops as often as they did before the pandemic.

Slightly smaller proportions of the province’s residents are also partaking on two other activities in the same way they did three years ago: having a beverage or snack inside a coffee shop (43%, +12) and having a drink at a bar or pub (36%, +13).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 14 to November 16, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Spirituality Rises in Canada and Drops in the United States

Americans are more likely to say that religion is “very important” for them personally (38%) than Canadians (25%).

Vancouver, BC [December 6, 2022] – The perceptions of Canadians and Americans on religion have changed slightly over the past couple of years, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, one-in-four Canadians (25%) say religion is “very important” to them personally, up three points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2021.

Fewer than two-in-five Americans (38%) say religion is “very important” to them personally, down 10 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November 2020.

In Canada, only affluence (14%, +3) is ranked lower than religion among six different components of life. The rating is considerably higher for career (36%, +7), country (47%, +3), friends (60%, +6) and family (81%, +3).

In the United States, two items are ranked lower than religion: affluence (12%, -9) and career (31%, -9). The numbers are higher for country (51%, -11), friends (55%, +1) and family (77%, -2).

“On religion, there is a pronounced generational gap in the United States,” says Mario Canseco. “Only 28% of Americans aged 18-to-34 acknowledge that religion is very important to them, compared to 40% of those aged 35-to-45 and 42% of those aged 55 and over.”

In Canada, fewer than three-in-ten Canadians aged 18-to-34 (27%), aged 35-to-54 (25%) and aged 55 and over (22%) say religion is “very important” for them personally.

Two thirds of Americans (66%, -7) consider themselves as “very spiritual” or “moderately spiritual”. In Canada, 53% of respondents (+4) feel the same way.

Compared to 2021, there is a slight drop in the proportion of Canadians who describe their religion as Christian (48%, -2) and an increase in those who say they are atheist, agnostic or profess no religion (37%, +3).

In the United States, the proportion of self-described Christians fell by seven points since 2020 (from 70% to 63%), while the number of respondents who are atheist, agnostic or have no religion increased by six points (from 19% to 25%).

About a third of Canadians (32%, -1) never attend religious gatherings, while two-in-five (40%, +4) only do so for special events, such as weddings, funerals or baptisms. Only 15% of Canadians (-1) attend a church, temple or synagogue at least once a week.

About a quarter of Americans (23%, -15) attend a religious gathering at least once a week. There are sizeable increases in the proportions of Americans who never go to church (27%, +7) or who only do so in special occasions (29%, +8).

Methodology: Results are based on online studies conducted from November 26 to November 28, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

A Third of Canadians Would Remove All Statues of Sir John

More than half of the country’s residents think the removal of statues of colonial figures is an attack on Canadian history.

Vancouver, BC [December 2, 2022] – Most Canadians are not particularly satisfied with the idea of withdrawing existing monuments from public view, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 54% of Canadians believe the removal of statues of colonial figures is an attack on Canadian history, while 21% disagree and 14% are undecided.

Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to feel that removing statues of colonial figures is an attack on the country’s history (61%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (54%) and aged 18-to-34 (48%).

Some municipalities—including Charlottetown, Kingston, Regina and Victoria—have removed statues of Sir John A. Macdonald, Canada’s first prime minister.

While just under a third of Canadians (32%) think all statues of Macdonald should be withdrawn from public view, almost half (47%) disagree and 20% are not sure.

Support for keeping statues of Macdonald in place is highest in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (55%), followed by Alberta (51%), Ontario (also 51%), Atlantic Canada (50%), British Columbia (48%) and Quebec (38%).

“Two thirds of Conservative Party voters in the 2021 federal election (65%) are against the removal of all monuments depicting Sir John A. Macdonald,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Two-in-five Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (41%) or the New Democratic Party (NDP) (40%) in the last election feel the same way.”

Across the country, 45% of Canadians have a favourable opinion of Sir John A. Macdonald, while 22% hold unfavourable views.

Positive opinions on Macdonald reach 51% in Ontario, but are lower in Alberta (45%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (44%), Atlantic Canada (43%), Quebec (42%) and British Columbia (36%).

Macdonald holds a higher favourability rating than five other former prime ministers included in the survey: John Diefenbaker (42%), Wilfrid Laurier (41%), William Lyon Mackenzie King (38%), Louis St. Laurent (33%) and Robert Borden (29%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 26, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca
 
Photo Credit: Nhl4hamilton (Rick Cordeiro)

Most British Columbians Eager to Experience Holiday Travel

Willingness to embark on a trip in 10 different ways is significantly higher this year than in 2021.

Vancouver, BC [November 26, 2021] – Residents of British Columbia are more likely to be planning to spend time away from their homes during the holiday season than last year, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 51% of British Columbians plan to take a holiday—or spend at least one night away from their current location—in the next three months, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2021.

“More than three-in-five British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (64%) are considering a holiday trip,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower among British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (50%) and aged 55 and over (43%).”

More than half of British Columbians say they are willing to travel in two ways right now: on a ferry (56%, +10) and taking an airplane flight to another province (54%, +18).

More than two-in-five British Columbians are ready to travel using four other forms of transportation: a trip by car to the United States (48%, +21), an airplane flight within British Columbia (46%, +14), an airplane flight to a different continent (45%, +23) and an airplane flight to the United States (44%, +23).

Fewer British Columbians are willing to take a railway trip (37%, +14), a bus trip shorter than 3 hours (33%, +8), a trip on a cruise ship (26%, +15) or a bus trip longer than 3 hours (23%, +7).

Just over three-in-four British Columbians (76%, -1) say they are “very concerned” or “moderately concerned” about losing money due to cancelations.

More than three-in-five British Columbians (63%) are worried about getting infected with COVID-19 during their trip, down 12 points since late 2021.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 14 to November 16, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Canadians Are Losing Sleep Over Financial Concerns

A third say worrying about relationships and health made it harder for them to fall asleep in the past month. 

Vancouver, BC [November 25, 2022] – Most Canadians are unable to match Health Canada’s recommended sleep guidelines, and half are finding it harder to rest every night because of financial anxiety, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 50% of Canadians acknowledge that worrying about money made it harder for them to fall asleep at night over the past month, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2021.

One third of Canadians say concerns about relationships and family (33%, +1) and health (also 33%, -3) make it more difficult for them to fall asleep at night. Fewer Canadians lost sleep over work (28%, +4), Canadian politics and issues (10%, =) and international politics and issues (10%, +1) over the past four weeks.

“Two-in-five Canadians aged 18-to-34 (40%) are losing sleep because of employment concerns,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer Canadians aged 35-to-54 (33%) and aged 55 and over (14%) share the same experience.”

Health Canada guidelines recommend sleeping from 7 to 9 hours a night. Almost two thirds of Canadians (64%, +4) are sleeping fewer than seven hours on a typical weekday or workday.

Only 35% of Canadians (-3) say they are sleeping anywhere from 7 to 9 hours on a typical weekday or workday. On a regional basis, Quebec is first (40%), followed by Atlantic Canada (39%), Alberta (36%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (31%), Ontario (also 31%) and British Columbia (28%).

Across the country, 43% of Canadians (-3) are sleeping anywhere from 7 to 9 hours on a typical weekend or non-workday, while 50% (-1) are spending less time in bed.

Almost seven-in-ten Canadians (69%, -1) are “well rested” after a typical night’s sleep on a weekday or workday, while 76% (+1) feel the same way after a typical night’s sleep on a weekend or non-workday.

One-in-four Canadians (25%) claim to “never” find it hard to fall asleep at night on an average week—a proportion that rises to 31% among men and 33% among those aged 55 and over and 29 per cent of Quebecers.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 18 to November 20, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty. 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians OK with Abandoning Winter Olympic Bid

Agreement with the FIFA World Cup coming to Vancouver in 2026 has increased since June.

Vancouver, BC [November 21, 2022] – Most British Columbians think the provincial government made the right call in refusing to back a proposed bid to host the Winter Olympics again, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 57% of British Columbians agree with the provincial government’s decision to not support the 2030 Winter Olympics bid that was being explored by Four Host First Nations—Musqueam, Squamish, Tsleil-Waututh, and Lilwat—and the municipal governments of Vancouver and Whistler.

Vancouver hosted the XXI Olympic Winter Games, from February 12 to February 28, 2010.

Only 29% of British Columbians disagree with the provincial government’s decision to abandon the proposed 2030 bid—a proportion that rises to 48% among respondents of First Nation or Indigenous descent.

“British Columbians of all political stripes believe this is not the best moment to consider hosting the Winter Games again,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of residents who voted in 2020 for the BC Liberals (66%), the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (63%) and the BC Green Party (58%) are in agreement.”

In previous surveys, support for exploring the possibility of holding the 2030 Winter Olympics in Vancouver fluctuated from 60% in January 2020 to 43% in October 2021 and to 54% in June 2022,

The notion of Vancouver hosting the Summer Olympics in 2036 remains contentious, with 42% of British Columbians (-6) thinking a bid should be launched and 45% (+5) disagreeing with this idea.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more eager to entertain a Summer Olympics bid for 2036 (51%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (46%) and aged 55 and over (33%).

More than three-in-five British Columbians (62%, +7) agree with Vancouver being a host city during the FIFA (Soccer) 2026 Men’s World Cup, while one-in-four (24%, -10) disagree and 14% are undecided.

Satisfaction with the 2026 Men’s World Cup coming to Vancouver is particularly high in the Fraser Valley (65%), Southern BC (64%) and Metro Vancouver (63%).

Just over two-in-five British Columbians (41%, -6) hold positive views on the International Olympic Committee (IOC), while a smaller proportion (38%) feel the same way about FIFA.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 6 to November 8, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca