Consumption of Frozen Treats Jumps in British Columbia Heat

More than four-in-five Millennials say they are spending more on ice cream, popsicles and freezies than they did last year.

Vancouver, BC [August 16, 2018] – In a summer when several temperature records have been broken in the province, British Columbians are opening their wallets in an effort to keep cool, a new Research Co. survey has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, more than seven-in-ten residents (72%) say they are spending more on frozen desserts—such as ice cream, popsicles and freezies—than they did last summer.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are leading the way in frozen treat consumption, with 85% of them saying they are spending more on these items than they did last year.

More than two-in-five British Columbians (42%) acknowledge that they are dining out more often this summer than in 2017, including 49% of Metro Vancouverites and 47% of Millennials.

Across the province, 15% of residents say they have spent more on appliances—such as fans and air conditioners—this summer than last, a proportion that climbs to 26% in the Fraser Valley.

In addition, 40% of British Columbians say they are spending more on cold beverages—including beer, cider and pop—than they did a year ago. In this category, residents of Vancouver Island (48%) and those aged 55 and over (43%) are the biggest consumers.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 13 to August 14, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Welcome Automated Speed Enforcement

The use of red light cameras to capture speeding vehicles is endorsed by seven-in-ten residents. 

Vancouver, BC [August 13, 2018] – Most British Columbians support the use of technology to enforce speed limits in the province’s roads, a new Research Co. survey has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, seven-in-ten residents (70%) approve of the use of speed-on-green cameras, or red light cameras that also capture vehicles that are speeding through intersections.

Automated speed enforcement works by using cameras or sensors to pick up a vehicle speeding. A ticket is then issued to the owner of the vehicle. Driver’s license points are not issued as the driver of the vehicle cannot be identified.

The provincial government announced last fall that red light cameras located at 140 intersections would record 24 hours a day. In the fall, the provincial government is expected to announce the number and locations of cameras that would be used to identify speeding vehicles.

In addition to the speed-on-green cameras, most British Columbians also endorsed three other types of automated speed enforcement.

Across the province, 71% of residents approve of using fixed speed cameras, or cameras that stay in one location and measure speed as a vehicle passes. These cameras can be placed in school zones or on other roads.

In addition, almost two thirds of British Columbians (65%) approve of using mobile speed cameras, which can be moved from place to place and measure speed as a vehicle passes.

A majority of residents (55%) also approved of point-to-point enforcement, which uses cameras at two or more distant points on a road. The average speed of vehicles that pass between points is calculated and tickets are issued to vehicles whose average speed over the distance was excessive.

“There is high support for all four types of automated speed enforcement across the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Point-to-point enforcement is the most contentious of all four, with more than a third of residents disapproving of its use.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 2 to August 5, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most British Columbians Support Community Benefits Agreements

Seven-in-ten support building publicly funded projects through Community Benefits Agreements.

Vancouver, BC [August 9, 2018] – British Columbians are taking note of Community Benefits Agreements (CBAs) and a sizeable majority endorses them for publicly funded projects, a new Research Co. survey has found.

A CBA prioritizes jobs to local residents, ensures employment opportunities for apprentices, Indigenous workers and women, and provides union wages and benefits.

In an online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, seven-in-ten residents (70%) either “strongly” (26%) or “moderately” (44%) support building publicly funded projects with CBAs, while 16% are opposed and 13% are undecided.

“Support for relying on CBAs for publicly funded projects is highest among Women (75%) and residents aged 18-34 (also 75%)”, says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support was also highest among those who live in Southern BC (86%), where the first two projects—the Pattullo Bridge replacement and Hwy 1—have been announced.”

Two thirds of British Columbians (68%) either “strongly” (23%) or “moderately” (45%) support the Community Benefits policy of dedicating 25% of the workforce on public projects to apprentices, while 14% are opposed and 18% are undecided.

When asked how familiar the public is with CBAs, one-in-four residents (22%) said they are “very familiar” (4%) or “moderately familiar” (18%) with them. Men (30%), residents aged 18-34 (25%) and those who live in Northern BC (28%) are more likely to be familiar with CBAs.

This survey was commissioned by the BC Building Trades Council.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 2 to August 5, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Proud of Province and Fond of Cascadia

Three-in-four British Columbians believe they will stay in the province for the rest of their lives.

Vancouver, BC [August 6, 2018] – More British Columbians are expressing affection for their fellow cascadians, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, two thirds of residents (66%) think they have more in common with the people of Seattle and Portland than with those in Toronto or Montreal. This represents an eight-point increase since a similar survey conducted in 2016.

“When it comes to the way British Columbians feel about the residents of Washington State and Oregon, Millennials are the driving force behind positive perceptions,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Among residents aged 18-to-34, this sentiment reaches 72%, compared to 65% for those aged 35-to-54 and 64% for those aged 55 and over.”

Across the province, three-in-four residents (77%) believe they will stay in British Columbia for the rest of their lives, and 87% say they are very proud of the province they live in.

Three-in-five residents (61%) think the views of British Columbians are different from the rest of the country. Still, only 17% of residents believe the province would be better off as its own country—a proportion that rises to 22% among residents aged 35-to-54.

When asked who the best premier of the past three decades has been, almost two-in-five British Columbians (38%) cannot pick a single person. Mike Harcourt is in first place with 15%, followed by Gordon Campbell and John Horgan with 12% each, and Christy Clark with 11%.

BC Liberal voters in the last provincial election regard Clark (26%) and Campbell (22%) as the best recent provincial heads of government. Conversely, those who supported the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in last year’s ballot select Horgan (28%) and Harcourt (26%).

Three-in-ten British Columbians (31%) pick Clark as the worst premier of the past three decades—a proportion that includes 42% of women and 43% of those aged 18-to-34. Horgan is second with 17%, followed by Bill Vander Zalm with 11%.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 27 to June 29, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Few Canadians Willing to Pay as News Content Shifts Online

Almost half say they do not visit any news sources that charge for online access.

Vancouver, BC [August 2, 2018] – Canadians have not embraced the concept of paying for news and information online, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, only 9% of Canadians say they are currently paying subscribers of at least one online news source that they find interesting—a proportion that rises to 14% among those aged 18-to-34.

Three-in-ten Canadians (31%) say they stop going to an online news source if there’s a limit on free articles and/or a paywall—including 39% of those aged 35-to-54.

“Content is increasingly moving online, but almost half of Canadians (47%) are not paying for any of it right now,” says Mario Canseco, President at Research Co. “Those over the age of 55 are more likely to say they do not visit any news sources that charge for online access (56%) than those aged 18-to-34 (41%) and those aged 35-to-54 (41%).”

More than half of Ontarians (52%) say they do not visit any news sources that charge for online access. The proportion of non-subscribers drops to 49% in British Columbia, 47% in Alberta, 46% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, 44% in Atlantic Canada and 36% in Quebec.

Only 13% of Canadians say they get news and information from a hard copy of a local newspaper on a daily basis, and fewer access a hard copy of a national paper (9%) or a hard copy of a magazine (5%).

When it comes to radio and television, 41% of Canadians say they get their news and information from local television newscasts and news channels. A slightly smaller proportion (37%) watch national television newscasts and news channels every day. One-in-five (26%) listen to local radio newscasts daily, and 11% listen to national radio newscasts every day.

Almost a third of Canadians (32%) say they get news and information from Facebook on a daily basis. This is a substantially higher proportion than other sources, including websites from television news providers (20%), Twitter (18%), websites from national and local newspapers (14% each), websites from independent online news providers (8%), websites from radio stations (7%), websites of magazines (6%) and blogs (also 6%).

More than half of Canadians (56%) support the federal government’s proposal to invest $50 million over five years to support independent, non-governmental organizations that are expected to focus on delivering local journalism in communities.

Majorities of Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (65%), the Liberal Party (61%) and the Conservative Party (52%) in the 2015 federal election endorse the proposal.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from May 7 to May 11, 2018, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Credit: Liis Saar