COVID-19 Impacts Dining Behaviours Across British Columbia

Millennials and Metro Vancouverites are more likely to be relying on apps to have food delivered to their homes.

Vancouver, BC [February 9, 2021] – British Columbians are not ordering food delivered to their homes as often as they did a year ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 32% of British Columbians say they order food that is delivered to their homes once every two weeks or more often, down 14 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in February 2020.

More than half of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (54%) are having food delivered to their homes at least once every fortnight, compared to 37% among those aged 35-to-54 and 10% among those aged 55 and over.

In a poll conducted by Research Co. in January 2021, 21% of Canadians—and 19% of British Columbians—said they are not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection from COVID-19.

Just under half of British Columbians (45%, -1) order food that they pick up themselves from a restaurant at least once every fortnight. 

Three-in-ten British Columbians (30%) dine out at a restaurant at least once every two weeks, down from 55% in 2020.

While 27% of British Columbians say they are ordering food delivered to their home more often than last year, a similar proportion (28%) is partaking on this option less than before.

“The momentum for the food delivery business in British Columbia is being driven primarily by Millennials,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 42% of residents aged 18-to-34 say they are ordering food for their homes more often, only 31% of those aged 35-to-54 and 13% of those aged 55 and over are joining them.”

One third of Metro Vancouverites (34%) are ordering food for their homes more often than last year. The Fraser Valley is a close second on this indicator (29%), followed by Vancouver Island (18%), Northern BC (15%) and Southern BC (13%).

Over the past year, more than a third of British Columbians relied on three different methods to have food delivered to their home: a phone call to a specific restaurant (39%, -4 since February 2020), online through the website of a restaurant or chain (37%, -1) and using an app on their phone, such as DoorDash, Uber Eats or Skip The Dishes (36%, +4).

While two thirds of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 have used an app to order food in the past year (65%), the proportion drops to 39% among those aged 35-to-54 and 13% among those aged 55 and over.

On a regional basis, Metro Vancouverites relied primarily on apps to order food over the past year (47%). In the other four regions, the most favoured method is a phone call to a specific restaurant: 58% in Northern BC, 45% in the Fraser Valley, 39% in Southern BC and 37% in Vancouver Island.

More than half of British Columbians (54%) say they always leave a tip for the delivery person or courier who brings food to their home, including 57% of women, 58% of British Columbians aged 35-to-54 and 66% of Vancouver Islanders.

Only 28% of British Columbians say they always leave a tip or donation for the restaurant—an option that can be accessed in some applications at the time deliveries are finalized—while 34% never do this.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from February 1 to February 3, 2021, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Life Getting Noisier for More Than a Quarter of Canadians

Three-in-ten respondents say they were bothered at home by unnecessary noise from vehicles over the past year.

Vancouver, BC [February 2, 2021] – More than one-in-four Canadians believe their surroundings are noisier now than they were a year ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 27% of Canadians say their city or town has become noisier over the past year.

Similar proportions of Canadians believe their home (28%) and their street (23%) are noisier now than they were a year ago.

Women (28%), Canadians aged 18-to-34 (33%), British Columbians (31%) and respondents of South Asian descent (36%) are more likely to feel that the city or town where they live is noisier now than in early 2020.

When asked about specific sounds that have bothered them at home over the past year, at least one-in-five Canadians mention unnecessary noise from vehicles (such as motorcycles and cars revving up) (30%), dogs barking (24%), loud people outside their home (20%) and car alarms (also 20%).

Fewer Canadians report being disturbed by 10 other noises at home: yard work (such as lawnmowers and leaf blowers) (19%), yelling or screaming at a nearby home (18%), loud music playing inside a vehicle (also 18%), power tools (such as electric saws and sanders) (also 18%), loud music at a nearby home (17%), fireworks (16%), a loud gathering or party at a nearby home (15%), drivers honking the horn excessively (12%), home alarms (9%) and cats meowing (5%).

“More than three-in-four Canadians aged 18-to-34 (78%) say that they were bothered by outside noises when they were at home,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion drops to 65% among those aged 35-to-54 and 60% among those aged 55 and over.”

Over the past year, more than one-in-ten Canadians (12%) wore earplugs or earmuffs to mitigate noise while inside their home—including 19% of those aged 18-to-34 and 14% of Ontarians.

Smaller proportions of Canadians acquired hardware to mitigate noise while inside their home (such as noise cancelling headphones or earphones) (7%), reported noise concerns to the police (5%) or moved away from their previous home because of noise (4%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from January 24 to January 26, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Streaming Options Gain Ground Among Canadian Music Listeners

The proportion of Canadians who listen to music on a streaming service grew from 32% in 2019 to 40% in 2021.

Vancouver, BC [January 19, 2021] – While radio remains the most favoured choice for Canadians who want to listen to music, streaming platforms have gained prominence across the country over the past two years, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 66% of Canadians say they listened to music on a regular radio over the past week, down three points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March 2019.

Two-in-five Canadians (40%, +8 since 2019) listened to music on a streaming service over the past seven days, while three-in-ten (30%, -1) listened to music stored in a computer or a phone.

Fewer Canadians listened to music on an LP record, cassette or CD (16%, -5) or on satellite radio (12%, -3) over the past week.

“Canadians aged 55 and over prefer to listen to music on the radio (70%) than on a streaming service (28%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, those aged 18-to-34 are more likely to stream (64%) than to listen to the radio (53%).”

While one-in-five Canadians (20%) paid to access a music streaming service in the last month, the proportion rises to 40% among those aged 18-to-34.

Fewer Canadians paid for and downloaded a song online (11%) or bought a compact disc or LP record (10%) in the last month.

When asked if they think that, in this day and age, music creators are being fairly compensated for their work, Canadians are almost evenly split. While 40% believe they are (-11 since 2019), (41%, +8) believe they are not.

A majority of Canadians aged 18-to-34 think music creators are being fairly compensated right now (54%), compared to 42% among those aged 35 to 54 and 32% among those aged 55 and over.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from January 9 to January 11, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views on Political Correctness Are Similar in Canada and the U.S.

Majorities in the two countries agree with adding disclaimers to programs that may contain “outdated cultural depictions.”

Vancouver, BC [January 1, 2021] – Most Canadians and Americans share analogous views on “political correctness” but would stop short of modifying books or movies by removing words that are considered offensive, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 50% of Canadians and 53% of Americans support the use of “political correctness” in their respective countries.

Conversely, 33% of Canadians and 32% of Americans are opposed to “political correctness.”

The term “political correctness” has been used to describe language and/or behaviour that seeks to minimize possible offenses to racial, cultural and gender identity groups, among others. 

Support for the use of “political correctness” is particularly high among Canadians and Americans aged 18-to-34 (55% and 59% respectively).

A third of Canadians (32%) and 36% of Americans say they always act “politically correct” because it’s the right thing to do—including 43% of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election and 45% of Democrats in the United States.

Two-in-five Canadians (40%) and 37% of Americans say they sometimes act “politically correct” because it’s the safe thing to do.

Only 11% of Canadians and 15% of Americans do not act “politically correct” because it’s the wrong thing to do—including 17% of Conservative voters in Canada and 22% of Republicans in the United States.

Significant majorities of Canadians and Americans believe three specific groups in society should act in a “politically correct” manner “always” or “most of the time”: teachers (74% in Canada and 71% in the U.S.), politicians (73% in Canada and 66% in the U.S.) and journalists (66% in Canada and 64% in the U.S.). 

Only 38% of Canadians and 35% of Americans think comedians should act in a “politically correct” manner “always” or “most of the time”.

More than three-in-five Canadians (65%) and Americans (62%) agree with adding a disclaimer to explain that programs or movies are presented “as originally created” and “may contain outdated cultural depictions.”

Canadians and Americans disagree with two other measures: printing new editions of books that remove words that may be deemed offensive to a specific race or ethnicity (61% in Canada and 59% in the U.S.) and re-dubbing movies to remove words that may be deemed offensive to a specific race or ethnicity (62% in Canada and 57% in the U.S.).

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted from December 3 to December 5, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Endorse Tougher Penalties for Distracted Driving

Seven-in-ten residents of the province agree with seizing the electronic devices of repeat offenders.

Vancouver, BC [December 25, 2020] – A large proportion of residents of British Columbia report seeing distracted drivers on the road, and sizeable majorities are supportive of implementing new measures to curb the illegal practice, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, more than half of British Columbians (55%) say they witnessed a driver talking on a hand-held cell phone or texting while driving over the past month.

Residents of Southern BC (64%) and Vancouver Island (also 64%) are more likely to have recently seen a driver texting or chatting on a cell phone, compared to 61% in both Northern BC and the Fraser Valley and 49% in Metro Vancouver.

Drivers caught emailing, texting, or using an electronic device while driving in British Columbia face a fine of $368 and four penalty points (equivalent to $252) in their insurance penalty point premium. This means a total of $620 for a first-time infraction. 

Just over half of British Columbians (52%) believe the current fine for distracted driving is “about right”, while 30% consider it “too low” and 14% deem it “too high.”

Only 18% of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 believe the current fine for distracted driving in British Columbia is “too low”, compared to 29% among those aged 35-to-54 and 38% among those aged 55 and over.

When asked about other possible penalties for drivers caught emailing, texting, or using an electronic device in British Columbia, more than half of residents (54%) agree with suspending the driver for one year.

Support is higher for two other penalties: doubling the current fine to $1,240 (59%) and seizing the electronic devices of repeat offenders (70%).

“British Columbians who voted for each of the province’s major parties in the last election are in favour of tougher legislation to curtail distracted driving,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 50% of BC Liberal voters endorse doubling the current fine, the proportion rises to 57% among those who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) and 66% among those who cast ballots for BC Green Party candidates.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 14 to December 16, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Many Canadians Willing to Avoid Office Life When Pandemic Ends

Four-in-five “provisional home workers” (80%)  say that working from home has been easier than they originally thought.

Vancouver, BC [December 11, 2020] – A vast majority of Canadians who are currently working from home instead of at their regular workplace say they would like to continue to explore this possibility after the COVID-19 pandemic has disappeared, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 80% of Canadian “provisional home workers” say they hope to be able to work from home more often after the COVID-19 outbreak has passed, up 15 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in April.

Almost nine-in-ten Canadian “provisional home workers” (89%, +9) feel their company trusts they are carrying on with their duties from home, and 78% (+9) think their company is perfectly equipped for them to do their work from home.

Four-in-five “provisional home workers” (80%, +18) acknowledge that working from home has been easier than they originally thought—including 87% of those aged 55 and over and 83% of Quebecers.

“Back in April, the notion of working from home was definitely intimidating for some Canadians,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Eight months later, most say they have all they need in order to fulfil their duties away from the office and acknowledge that the experience has been positive.”

Almost half of “provisional home workers” (46%, =) say they are having a difficult time working due to distractions at home.

There is a sizeable generational gap when it comes to focusing on the tasks at hand while at home. While only 25% of those aged 55 and over claim to have a tough time with distractions, the proportion rises to 45% among those aged 35-to-54 and 54% among those aged 18-to-34.

Two thirds of “provisional home workers” in Canada (68%, +1) say they miss interacting with other people at their regular office, including 73% of men, 73% of those aged 18-to-34 and 86% of British Columbians.

Almost half of “provisional home workers” (47%, +3) say they miss commuting to their regular office or workplace. Those aged 18-to-34 are more likely to yearn for their daily commute (54%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (43%) and aged 55 and over (44%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 2 to December 6, 2020, among 803 Canadian adults who are currently working from home instead of at their regular office. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half in BC, Three-in-Four in Alberta Agree with Pipeline Expansion

Majorities of Albertans and British Columbians are disappointed with the way the federal government has handled this issue.

Vancouver, BC [November 10, 2020] – Just over half of British Columbians and practically three-in-four Albertans want to carry on with the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative provincial samples, 52% of British Columbians and 74% of Albertans agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the project.

“There is a higher level of support for the pipeline’s expansion from residents aged 55 and over in both British Columbia (60%) and Alberta (83%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Agreement with the federal government’s decision is lower among those aged 18-to-34 In each province (44% in BC, 68% in Alberta).”

In British Columbia, agreement with the pipeline expansion has dropped by four points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in December 2019

Opposition to the project fell by six points in British Columbia (from 35% to 29%) , while the proportion of undecided respondents increased from 10% last year to 18% now.

More than half of residents of each Canadian province (59% in Alberta and 54% in British Columbia) are disappointed with the way the federal government has handled the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion. These groups include 66% of Green Party voters in British Columbia and 70% of United Conservative Party voters in Alberta.

While two-in-five British Columbians (40%) want the provincial government to do anything necessary to ensure that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion does not happen, the proportion of Albertans who feel the same way about the actions of their own provincial administration stands at 22%.

Only 17% of Albertans believe the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of the province’s residents. The proportion is significantly higher in British Columbia (44%).

Two thirds of British Columbians (68%) and four-in-five Albertans (79%) believe the Trans Mountain Pipeline will create hundreds of jobs for residents of each province.

More than a third of Albertans (34%) and British Columbians (38%) believe gas prices will be lower now that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion has been re-approved.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 29 to October 31, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia, and an online study conducted from November 2 to November 4, 2020, among 700 adults in Alberta. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia and Alberta. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for British Columbia and +/- 3.4 percentage points for Alberta, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables for British Columbia here, our data tables for Alberta here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Majority of British Columbians Support Ride-Hailing

While 15% of residents have used the services in the province, the proportion rises to 26% among those aged 18-to-34.

Vancouver, BC [October 30, 2020] – Most residents of British Columbia are satisfied with the presence of ride-hailing services in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 72% of British Columbians support allowing ride-hailing services to operate, while 20% are opposed and 8% are undecided.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be in favour of ride-hailing in the province (78%) than those aged 35-to-54 (74%) and those aged 55 and over (65%).

On a regional basis, support for ride-hailing operations is highest in the Fraser Valley (79%), followed by Metro Vancouver (76%), Northern BC (68%), Vancouver Island (66%) and Southern BC (62%).

Three-in-four residents of the province who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (76%) and the BC Liberals (also 76%) in last month’s provincial election hold positive views on ride-hailing companies having a presence in British Columbia, along with 66% of those who cast a ballot for BC Green Party candidates.

Across the province, 15% of British Columbians have used ride-hailing services since they became available earlier this year, including 26% of those aged 18-to-34, 18% of men and 19% of Metro Vancouverites.

More than half of British Columbians who have relied on ride-hailing services in the province say they rate them more favourably than taxis on two features: overall cost (55%) and payment options (55%).

Half of the province’s residents who ride-hailed were also satisfied with the cleanliness of the vehicles (50%) and with how long they waited for the vehicle to pick them up (also 50%).

The rating is lower on three other issues. Just over two-in-five British Columbians who used ride-hailing services consider them better than taxis on accountability (44%) and transparency (41%), while slightly fewer feel the same way about the safety of passengers (39%).

“Few British Columbians aged 55 and over (4%) have actually experienced ride-hailing in the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However. they are more likely to be satisfied than their younger counterparts on issues such as price (72%) and wait times (73%).”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 22 to October 25, 2020, among 832 adult British Columbians who voted in the 2020 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Support Strict Regulations for Smoking and Vaping

More than half of Canadians say they would not consider dating a person who used electronic cigarettes.

Vancouver, BC [October 27, 2020] – Many Canadians are in favour of existing federal legislation that seeks to make electronic cigarettes less appealing to the country’s youth, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 86% of Canadians agree with prohibiting the sale of vaping products to minors.

The federal government passed Bill S-5, which is an overhaul of the Tobacco Act. Other components of this legislation are supported by large majorities of Canadians.

More than seven-in-ten Canadians agree with the federal government’s decision to restrict any reference to e-cigarettes as healthier than standard tobacco products (77%, +4 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in October 2019) and to restrict the use of testimonials and “lifestyle” advertising for vaping products (75%).

Almost four-in-five Canadians (79%, +6) believe there should be a ban on the use of e-cigarettes in public places where smoking is currently prohibited, and a larger proportion (86%, +1) want vaping products that contain nicotine to display a warning, similar to the one used for tobacco products.

More than two thirds of Canadians (69%) agree with banning certain flavours of vaping products, such as cannabis and “confectionery.”

Across the country, one-in-ten Canadians (10%, -1) say they vaped in the past year, a proportion that rises to 19% among those aged 18-to-34 and 14% in British Columbia. 

“A majority of Canadians (56%, -4) say they would not consider dating a person who used electronic cigarettes,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This group includes 57% of women and 62% of Ontarians.”

Almost three-in-four Canadians (73%, +4 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in January 2019) agree with giving Health Canada the power to implement plain and standardized tobacco packaging. 

More than four-in-five Canadians continue to endorse two regulations related to tobacco consumption that have been in place for years: banning smoking in indoor public spaces, public transit facilities and workplaces (including restaurants, bars and casinos) (87%, -2%) and banning smoking in private vehicles occupied by children (85%, +9).

Almost seven-in-ten of Canadians (69, -3%) support banning smoking (tobacco and marijuana) in multi-family buildings, while 20% (-5) are opposed to this course of action.

Support for a regulation that would ban smoking in multi-family dwellings is highest in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (85%), followed by Ontario (72%), British Columbia (68%), Atlantic Canada (67%), Alberta (62%) and Quebec (60%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 18 to September 20, 2020, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Report Fewer Blunders from Drivers Than Last Year

The proportion of Canadians who say drivers are “worse” than five years ago dropped from 47% in 2019 to 39% this year.

Vancouver, BC [October 16, 2020] – Canadians are expressing a higher level of satisfaction with drivers, and there is a decline on the incidence of specific negative behaviours on the country’s roads, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 39% of Canadians think drivers in their city or town are “worse” than five years ago, down eight points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2019.

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%, +4) say the quality of drivers has not changed, while 7% (=) believe they are “better” than five years ago.

“Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to have a pessimistic view of drivers, with 50% believing they are worse now,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer Canadians aged 35-to-54 (43%) and aged 18-to-34 (20%) share this point of view.”

The survey, which tracks the incidence of six specific behaviours, shows significant drops in some categories. 

More than half of Canadians (54%, -7 since 2019) saw a driver not signaling before a turn in the past month, and more than two-in-five (44%, -3) witnessed a car taking up two or more spots in a parking lot.

More than a third of Canadians (36%, -8) saw a driver not stopping at an intersection over the past month. Fewer respondents witnessed “lane tracking” or vehicles turning right or left from an incorrect lane (33%, -1) or experienced a “close call” on the road, such as slamming the breaks or having to steer violently to avoid a collision (26%, -9).

On a regional basis, British Columbia had the largest proportion of respondents who observed drivers not signaling before a turn (61%) or failing to stop at intersections (48%) in the past month. 

The proportion of respondents who saw vehicles taking up two or more spots in a parking lot was highest in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (53%) and Alberta (50%).

As was the case last year, 56% of Canadians believe that there are specific groups or people in their city or town who are worse drivers than others. 

More than two-in-five respondents who blamed a specific group for bad driving (43%) mentioned “young”, while 25% wrote “elderly.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 18 to September 20, 2020, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most British Columbians Would Welcome Online Voting Option

More than three-in-five likely voters think Elections BC should consider this possibility before the next provincial ballot.

Vancouver, BC [October 12, 2020] – A sizeable proportion of likely voters in British Columbia would like to explore the option of participating in the democratic process through the internet, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 63% of likely voters in British Columbia think Elections BC—the non-partisan office of the legislature responsible for conducting provincial and local elections—should “definitely” or “probably” consider allowing voters to cast their ballots online in the next provincial election.

The possibility of online voting is backed by majorities of likely voters who supported the BC Green Party (54%), the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (60%) and the BC Liberals (70%) in the 2017 election.

Across the province, 43% of likely voters say they intend to vote in this year’s election by mail, up 14 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in late September. In addition, 25% (-3) will cast a ballot in person on Election Day and 23% (-4) plan to do so during Advance Voting.

Practically one-in-five mail voters (19%) have already sent their ballot back to Elections BC. More than a third (35%) have requested a ballot but have not received it, 18% possess a ballot but have not voted yet, and 28% intend to request one.

More than nine-in-ten likely voters in British Columbia (93%, +3) express confidence in Elections BC being able to oversee the entire voting process this year. Confidence increased on Elections BC’s ability to ensure that there is no fraudulent activity with mailed ballots (87%, +5) and to enforce social distancing at polling stations (86%, +12).

When likely voters are asked what influences their choice in this election, more than two thirds (69%) mention party platforms. Slightly lower proportions of likely voters say discussions with family (52%) and friends (46%) are also persuasive.

Fewer than a third of likely voters in the province are swayed by interactions with candidates on social media (30%), endorsements from non-governmental organizations (also 30%), campaign ads on radio and television (29%), interactions with other people on social media (27%), or endorsements from unions (26%), trade associations (25%) and newspapers (23%).

This week’s televised debate will feature the leaders of the BC New Democratic Party (NDP), the BC Liberals and the BC Green Party. Fewer than half of likely voters believe other parties should be included in this debate.

While 41% of likely voters want to hear from the BC Conservative Party during the televised debate, fewer would extend an invitation to the BC Libertarian Party (35%), the Rural BC Party (22%), BC Vision (19%), the Christian Heritage Party (also 19%), the Communist Party (16%) and Wexit BC (also 16%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 5 to October 7, 2020, among 750 likely voters in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.6 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by James Wheeler

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two-in-Five Canadians Visit Video-Sharing Websites Every Day

Music videos and scenes from television shows are among the preferred online entertainment offerings for Canadians.

Vancouver, BC [August 21, 2020] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians are turning to YouTube and Dailymotion for entertainment, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 40% of Canadians say they visit video-sharing websites daily, while 14% access them five or six times a week.

Only 15% of Canadians say they never visit video-sharing websites, including 28% of those aged 55 and over.

When asked about the type of content they focus on when they visit video-sharing websites, half of Canadians (50%) say they watch music videos from pop and rock groups, both old and recent.

Canadians aged 18-to-34 and 35-to-54 are more likely to be watching music videos on video-sharing websites (58% and 56% respectively) than those aged 55 and over (38%).

One third of Canadians (34%) rely on video-sharing websites to watch scenes from television shows, both old and recent—a proportion that climbs to 40% among those aged 35-to-54.

Just under one-in-four Canadians (23%) look for highlights from professional sporting events on video-sharing websites, including 30% of men and 29% of those aged 18-to-34.

About one-in-five Canadians go to video sharing websites to watch conferences (19%) and TV ads (18%), while 8% observe instructional or educational videos.

“There is plenty of appetite for user-generated content on video-sharing websites,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Practically half of Canadians (49%) say they watch videos posted by users when they go to YouTube or Dailymotion.”

Half of Canadians (50%) have forwarded a video link to a co-worker, friend or relative, while 52% have received one.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 7 to August 9, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Endorse Speed-on-Green Cameras on Roads

Three other types of automated speed enforcement are also backed by a majority of the province’s residents.

Vancouver, BC [June 30, 2020] – For the third year in a row, most British Columbians are in favour of relying on red light cameras to capture speeding vehicles, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 70% of British Columbians approve of the use of speed-on-green intersection cameras, while 24% disapprove and 5% are undecided.

Support for speed-on-green cameras is highest among women (74%), British Columbians aged 55 and over (77%) and residents of Vancouver Island (74%). Most voters who supported the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (76%), the BC Liberals (74%) and the BC Green Party (65%) in the last provincial election are also in agreement.

Speed-on-green cameras are red light cameras that also capture vehicles that are speeding through intersections. Public backing for the use of this specific type of automated speed enforcement stood at 70% in a Research Co. survey conducted in 2018 and 68% in a poll conducted in 2019.

“British Columbians have been consistent in their overall analysis of automated speed enforcement,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the specific case of speed-on-green cameras, there is little difference between drivers (70%) and non-drivers (71%).”

Automated speed enforcement works by using cameras or sensors to pick up a vehicle speeding. A ticket is then issued to the owner of the vehicle. Driver’s license points are not issued as the driver of the vehicle cannot be identified.

More than two thirds of British Columbians also approve of the use of two other types of automated speed enforcement: fixed speed cameras, or cameras that stay in one location and measure speed as a vehicle passes (71%, +2 since 2019) and mobile speed cameras, which can be moved from place to place and measure speed as a vehicle passes (68%, +5 since 2019).

Almost three-in-five British Columbians (58%, +6 since 2019) are in favour of point-to-point speed enforcement, which uses cameras at two or more distant points on a road. The average speed of vehicles that pass between points is calculated and tickets are issued to vehicles whose average speed over the distance was excessive.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 13 to June 15, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

COVID-19 Significantly Affects Exercise Routines in Canada

The proportion of Canadians who meet the recommended guidelines for physical activity fell to 29% during the pandemic.

Vancouver, BC [June 16, 2020] – Half of Canadians are having a tougher time exercising due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians say their physical activity routines were affected by the lockdown and they had to avoid specific actions.

A third of Canadians (33%) say they had to stop going to a gym or community centre since the start of the pandemic, while one-in-five (21%) had to stop going to a pool for swimming.

More than one-in-ten Canadians say they had to stop participating in an organized sports league (15%), had to stop going to a yoga studio (13%) or had to stop participating in pick-up sports that are not part of a league (12%).

“More than half of men in Canada (53%) say their exercise routine had to be modified because of the lockdown,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of Canadians who live in Ontario (56%), British Columbia (54%) and Alberta (51%) were affected.”

Just over two-in-five Canadians (42%) took action in order to exercise differently during the COVID-19 pandemic—including 45% of women, 48% of Ontarians and 70% of those aged 18-to-34.

One-in-four Canadians (25%) say they followed workouts or routines online, while 17% took up a sport that does not require equipment, such as running or jogging.

Smaller proportions of Canadians acquired weightlifting equipment (12%) or cardio machines (9%) for their home.

The poll also asked Canadians about their exercise routines before and after the COVID-19 pandemic.

Across the country, 36% of Canadians acknowledged meeting the Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines—accumulating at least two and a half hours of moderate- to vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity per week—every week before the pandemic started.

The proportion of Canadians who were able to meet the guidelines was higher among Canadians aged 18-to-34 (38%), Canadians aged 35-to-54 (also 38%), Ontarians (also 38%), Albertans (37%) and British Columbians (36%).

When asked about their physical activity after the pandemic began, only 29% of Canadians acknowledged that they have met the guidelines every week.

The proportion of Canadians who are able to currently meet the exercise guidelines dropped in Ontario (from 38% to 30%), Alberta (from 37% to 31%), British Columbia (from 36% to 29%) and Quebec (from 33% to 24%).

More than one-in-four Canadians (27%) say they never meet the recommended guidelines for physical activity. up from 23% before the lockdown.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 8 to June 10, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Four Canadians Reject Huawei in 5G Mobile Networks

Almost four-in-five think Canada should not work to establish closer ties with China, up 10 points since January.

Vancouver, BC [May 27, 2020] – The proportion of Canadians who disagree with the notion of allowing a telecommunications company from the People’s Republic of China to take part in the development of Canada’s 5G network has reached a new high, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The federal government is currently reviewing the guidelines for 5G (or “Fifth Generation”) mobile networks, which are expected to provide Canadians with larger data capacity and faster connections.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-four Canadians (75%) believe Ottawa should not allow Huawei to participate in Canada’s 5G spectrum.

This month’s survey marks the highest level of rejection for Huawei’s involvement in the 5G network. Majorities of Canadians had expressed this feeling in surveys conducted by Research Co. in February 2019 (57%), July 2019 (68%) and January 2020 (66%).

Today, B.C. Supreme Court associate justice Heather Holmes ruled that the extradition hearing process for Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou will continue. Meng was detained in December 2018, has remained under house arrest in Vancouver, and faces charges in the United States, including bank fraud and obstruction of justice.

Following Meng’s arrest, China detained two Canadians—Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor—on espionage allegations, and banned exports of Canadian canola, pork and beef.

“In four rounds of nationwide polling, most Canadians have never regarded Huawei as a welcome addition to Canada’s 5G network,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Now, with the COVID-19 pandemic in the background and as the court decision on Meng’s extradition was about to be rendered, this view has hardened considerably.”

Three-in-four Canadians (75%, +8 since January 2020) agree with the way Canadian authorities have acted in the Meng case. Sizeable proportions of Canadians who voted last year for the Liberal Party (91%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (75%) and the Conservative Party (59%) feel this way.

Almost four-in-five Canadians (78%, up 10 points since January) think Canada should not work to establish closer ties with China, including 90% of Canadians aged 55 and over and 82% of women.

Photo Credit: Jeff Hitchcock

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on May 26 and May 27, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca