Few Canadians Think Marital Infidelity is Morally Acceptable

Across Canada, the moral acceptability of gambling and physician assisted death dropped since 2021.

Vancouver, BC [May 17, 2022] – Only one-in-six Canadians have no moral qualms about the existence of infidelity in a marriage, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample asked Canadians whether they considered 21 different issues as “morally acceptable” or “morally wrong.”

Only 16% of Canadians think married men and/or women having an affair is morally acceptable, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in April 2021.

“Across Canada, more than one-in-five men (22%) think affairs involving married persons are morally acceptable,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 10% of Canadian women share the same view.”

More than two thirds of Canadians think four other issues are morally acceptable: contraception (75%, -1), divorce (73%, -4), sexual relations between an unmarried man and woman (69%, -3)  and having a baby outside of marriage (also 69%, =).

More than half of Canadians believe sexual relations between two people of the same sex (59%, -3), abortion (55%, -2) and medical research using stem cells obtained from human embryos (also 55%, =) are morally acceptable. The proportions are lower for four other issues: pornography (31%, =), prostitution (30%, -3), polygamy (19%, =), cloning humans (12%, =) and paedophilia (4%, -1).

On issues related to animals, more than a third of Canadians (36%, -2) say buying and wearing clothing made of animal fur is morally acceptable, while fewer feel the same way about medical testing on animals (25%, +1) and cloning animals (19%, =).

Two-in-five Canadians (40%, -1) believe the death penalty is morally acceptable. Significantly fewer hold similar views on using illegal drugs (18%, -2) and suicide (also 18%, =).

Just over three-in-five Canadians (61%, -4) consider physician-assisted death as morally acceptable. Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to feel this way (66%) than those aged 35-to-54 (58%) and aged 18-to-34 (57%).

Canadians of European descent are significantly more likely to say that physician-assisted death is morally acceptable (71%) than their counterparts whose origins are East Asian (49%) and South Asian (38%).

Just over half of Canadians (52%, -5) think gambling is morally acceptable.

Quebec is the only province where fewer than half of residents (48%) refer to gambling as morally acceptable. The proportions are higher in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (51%), Alberta and Ontario (each at 53%), Atlantic Canada (54%) and British Columbia (58%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 7 to May 9, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Canadians Are Having Dinner in Front of the Television Set

Practically three-in-five Canadians spend anywhere from 31 to 60 minutes preparing dinner on an average weekday.

Vancouver, BC [May 13, 2022] – Most of Canada’s evening meals occur in a setting that is not the dining room and with electronic entertainment, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, Canadians report that 45% of their dinners at home in the past month took place at the dining room with no television, down six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2019. A majority of dinners (55%, +6) happened at a different part of the home, with the television on.

In Quebec, 50% of dinners at home in the past month occurred away from the dining room and with the television on. The proportion rises to 53% in British Columbia, 54% in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, 56% in Ontario, 58% in Atlantic Canada and 62% in Alberta.

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are having fewer evening meals away from the dining room (51%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (56%) and aged 55 and over (57%).

Three-in-ten Canadians (30%, -6 since a Research Co. survey conducted in June 2020) say they spend less than 30 minutes preparing dinner for themselves and others in their household on an average weekday.

Almost three-in-five Canadians (59%, +3) say making dinner on an average weekday takes anywhere from 31 to 60 minutes, while 11% (+3) require more than one hour to prepare food.

“A third of Ontarians, Quebecers and Albertans (33% each) manage to make dinner in less than half an hour,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (30%), British Columbia (26%) and Atlantic Canada (23%) can consistently manage this feat.”

Across the country, 65% of Canadians (unchanged) say they are “very familiar” or “moderately familiar” with Canada’s Food Guide. Awareness is lowest among Canadians aged 55 and over (56%) and rises among those aged 18-to-34 (70%) and those aged 35-to-54 (71%).

Fewer than three-in-five residents of British Columbia (58%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (59%) are familiar with Canada’s Food Guide. The proportion is higher in Quebec (64%), Alberta (65%), Ontario (68%) and Atlantic Canada (71%).

Just over a third of Canadians (35%, -6) rely on the recommendations of Canada’s Food Guide “all the time” or “most of the time” when choosing what they eat in an average week.

Women are more likely to review the recommendations of Canada’s Food Guide when deciding what to prepare (40%) than men (32%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 7 to May 9, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Credit and Debit Cards Relied Upon for Most Payments in Canada

Most Canadians say that lack of cash compelled them to make a small purchase with their credit or debit card in the last month.

Vancouver, BC [May 6, 2022] – Canadians are currently using cash for transactions at a higher rate than during the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, but most payments continue to be made through alternative methods, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, Canadians relied on a credit card or a smartphone to finalize 46% of their purchases over the past month, down four points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2020.

One third of purchases from Canadians (33%, -2) were completed with a debit card or e-transfer, while 3% (-9) entailed the use of a cheque. Cash was used for the remaining 18% of transactions (+15).

“Credit cards are the main form of payment for residents of British Columbia (58%) and Quebec (50%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The debit card is the preferred option for residents of Ontario (47%) and Alberta (43%).”

More than three-in-five Canadians (63%) say that, over the course of the past month, there was a time when they did not have any paper money with them and had to make a small purchase (less than $10) with their credit or debit card.

While 50% of Canadians aged 55 and over were caught without paper money in the past month, the proportion rises to 64% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 77% among those aged 18-to-34.

Half of Canadians (50%, -8) expect people to rely on biometrics (such as iris scans, fingerprints or palm recognition) to complete purchases at some point within the next 10 years.

Albertans are more likely to predict the introduction of biometric payments in the next 10 years (60%). Belief in this vision becoming reality is lower in Ontario (52%), Quebec (50%), British Columbia (also 50%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (43%) and Atlantic Canada (37%).

Almost half of Canadians (49%, +14) say they would not like to see people utilizing biometrics to buy things in their lifetimes. Just under two-in-five (39%, -11) would welcome this development, and 12% (-3) are undecided.

Men (43%), Canadians aged 18-to-34 (49%), Albertans (also 49%) and Quebecers (44%) are more likely to wish for the opportunity to make payments through biometrics in the future.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 25 to April 27, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Fewer British Columbians Are Noticing Distracted Drivers on Roads

Almost two thirds of the province’s residents support seizing the electronic devices of repeat offenders.

Vancouver, BC [April 19, 2022] – While the proportion of British Columbians who are detecting distracted drivers has dropped since 2020, most of the province’s residents think it is time for tougher penalties to deal with this issue, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 46% of British Columbians say they witnessed a driver talking on a hand-held cell phone or texting while driving over the past four weeks, down nine points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2020.

Men (50%) and British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (52%) are more likely to say that they crossed paths with a distracted driver than women (43%) and British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (47%) and aged 55 and over (42%).

Drivers caught emailing, texting, or using an electronic device while driving in British Columbia face a fine of $368 and four penalty points (equivalent to $252) in their insurance penalty point premium. This means a total of $620 for a first-time infraction.

A majority of British Columbians (56%, +4) say the current fine for distracted driving in the province is “about right”, while 24% (-6) deem it “too low” and 15% (+1) consider it “too high.”

While one third of residents of Vancouver Island (33%) believe the current penalty for distracted driving is “too low”, the proportion is lower in Northern BC (29%), the Fraser Valley (22%), Southern BC (21%) and Metro Vancouver (also 21%).

More than half of British Columbians are in favour of three different penalties for drivers caught emailing, texting, or using an electronic device in the province, although the level of support for each one is lower in 2022 than in 2020.

Across the province, 52% of British Columbians (-2) support suspending drivers who break the law for a year, while 41% (+4) are opposed to this course of action.

“The notion of suspending distracted drivers for 12 months is contentious on a regional basis,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 54% of residents of Metro Vancouver, Southern BC and Vancouver Island like the idea, the proportion drops to 44% in Northern BC and to 42% in the Fraser Valley.”

More than half of the province’s residents (55%, -4) are in favour of doubling the current first-time fine to $1,240, while almost two thirds (64%, -6) support seizing the electronic devices of repeat offenders.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 1 to April 5, 2022, among 650 adults in British Columbia who are employed full time or part time. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Question Their Public Speaking Capabilities

A majority (51%) feel anxious when they have to make a phone call to a person they do not know.

Vancouver, BC [April 15, 2022] – Many Canadians are not particularly confident about their ability to address an audience publicly, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 44% of Canadians say they would have no problem giving a speech in front of other people. More than half (52%) disagree with this assessment.

Across the country, 51% of Canadians say they feel anxious when they have to make a phone call to a person they do not know—a proportion that rises to 57% among women and 61% among Canadians aged 18-to-34.

Canadians are divided when pondering text messages and emails, with 46% finding this form of communication impersonal and 47% disagreeing with this point of view.

“A majority of Canadians aged 55 and over (55%) brand electronic communications as impersonal,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (46%) and aged 18-to-34 (36%).”

The survey asked Canadians about their preferred mode of communication for various tasks. More than four-in-five Canadians (82%) say they would end a relationship with someone in person. Only 7% of Canadians would break up by sending a text message, including 11% of those aged 18-to-34.

Almost three-in-four Canadians (73%) say they would prefer to quit a job in person, but 15% would do so by sending an email, including 18% of women and 24% of Canadians aged 18-to-34.

Canadians are evenly divided on the best way to order food delivery to their home, with identical proportions choosing to make a phone call (39%) or use an app (also 39%).

While a majority of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (53%) would rely on an app to manage food delivery, the proportion drops slightly to 47% among those aged 35-to-54 and falls to 20% among those aged 55 and over.

Canadians who live in Alberta (50%) and Ontario (49%) are more likely to prefer to use an app to order food delivery than their counterparts in British Columbia (44%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (43%), Quebec (26%) and Atlantic Canada (18%).

More than a third of Canadians (37%) say they would make a phone call if they had to ask a question to their bank, while a smaller proportion (32%) would visit in person. Significantly fewer Canadians prefer an email (15%), an app (11%) or a text message (5%) for this particular task.

If Canadians had to ask a question to their municipality or City Hall, almost two-in-five (39%) would send an email, while one third (33%) would place a phone call and one-in-five (20%) would schedule a meeting in person.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 1 to April 3, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Would Take “Home Office” To New Employer

More than half of those who worked from home during the pandemic are willing to switch jobs to avoid commuting.  

Vancouver, BC [January 25, 2002] – Most British Columbians who have had to work from home during the COVID-19 pandemic are willing to explore opportunities that provide the flexibility to be away from an office setting, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative sample, 58% of employed British Columbians who have worked from home during the pandemic say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to seek a different job if their current company does not allow them to labour from home as often as they want, up two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September 2021.  

“British Columbians aged 18-to-34 have developed a deeper attachment to the home office, with 64% saying they would switch jobs if their new employer allows them to avoid commuting,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among those aged 35-to-54 (59%) and those aged 55 and over (45%).”  

Almost two thirds of British Columbia’s “home workers” (64%, =) would consider switching to a different job that can be performed from home for a company located in their own metropolitan area. A majority (57%, +2) would consider this course of action for a business located in the province, while 45% (+1) would be willing to enter an arrangement with a company headquartered in another province.  

More than half of employed British Columbians (54%) acknowledge working from home at some point during the COVID-19 pandemic—a proportion that rises to 65% among those aged 18-to-34.  

This month, only 34% of employed British Columbians who have worked from home during the pandemic say they expect to be able to remain in their home office at least three times a week when the pandemic ends, down 13 points since September 2021. Only 11% (-4) believe they will not be able to work from home at all when COVID-19 is over.  

Fewer than two-in-five “home workers” in British Columbia have been advised of a plan for employees to return to the usual office (37%, -8) or of a plan for how employees will be able to work from home after the pandemic is over (also 37%, -3).  

Employed British Columbians continue to expect certain features of their jobs to remain in place after COVID-19 is behind us. More than two-in-five foresee increases in virtual communications between offices (46%, +3), virtual staff meetings (45%, +2) and virtual business development (also 45%, +4).  

Conversely, sizeable proportions of employed British Columbians expect reductions for in-person staff meetings (43%, +1), business travel (39%, +2) and in-person business development meetings (38%, =) once the pandemic is over.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on January 6 and January 7, 2022, among 700 adults who work in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Scam and Foreign Language Calls Increase in British Columbia

Half of mobile phone users have been targeted by calls and messages where an individual speaks Cantonese or Mandarin.  
 
Vancouver, BC [January 21, 2022] – The incidence of phone calls and messages from people pretending to represent a government agency has risen dramatically in British Columbia over the past two years, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, 50% of mobile phone users say they have been targeted by these phone calls and messages in the past two months, up 15 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September 2019.  
 
Phone calls and/or phone messages from an individual purporting to represent a government agency (such as the Canada Revenue Agency) are more prevalent among men (52%) and British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (also 52%).  
 
“Almost three-in-five mobile phone users in Vancouver Island (58%) report getting these scam calls recently,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than half of those who reside in Northern BC (54%) and Metro Vancouver (51%) also had to deal with these unwanted communications.”  
 
Just over half of mobile phone users in British Columbia (51%) say they have received phone calls and/or phone messages where an individual speaks Cantonese or Mandarin in the past two months, up 20 points since September 2019.  
 
More than three-in-five mobile phone users in Metro Vancouver (61%) have been exposed to calls or messages in Cantonese or Mandarin.  
 
British Columbians of South Asian descent are more likely to report being targeted by these communications in a foreign language (70%) than their counterparts of East Asian (61%) and European (47%) origins.  
 
Only 18% of mobile phone users in British Columbia received a text message asking if they support a specific party or policy from an individual they do not know in the past two months, down 19 points since 2019.  
 
Across the province, only 28% of mobile phone users (+1) say they did not receive any of these types of messages in the past two months.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 21 to December 23, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

British Columbians Still Back Proposed Ban on Single-Use Plastics

Three-in-four of the province’s residents say they rely on their own re-usable bags to transport groceries out of a store.  
 
Vancouver, BC [December 31, 2021] – Public support remains high in British Columbia for the federal government’s plan to reduce plastic use across Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 82% of British Columbians are in favour of banning single-use plastics, unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2021.
 
The federal government’s proposed regulation focuses on items such as grocery checkout bags, straws, stir sticks, six-pack rings, plastic cutlery and food takeout containers made from hard-to-recycle plastics. Several municipalities in British Columbia have already implemented their own guidelines for specific items, such as grocery checkout bags.  
 
Just over three-in-four British Columbians (76%, -1) acknowledge relying on their own reusable bag to transport groceries out of a store after purchasing them. Significantly smaller proportions of the province’s residents use bags provided by the store, either made out of paper (11%) or plastic (9%).  
 
“There is a generational gap in the adoption of reusable bags in British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Practically nine-in-ten residents aged 55 and over (88%) are already using their own bags at grocery stores, compared to 73% among those aged 35-to-54 and 62% among those aged 18-to-34.”  
 
Just over half of British Columbians (51%, -3) say they go out of their way to recycle “all of the time”, such as holding on to bottles and cans until they can be placed into a proper recycling bin. Once again, this behaviour is more common among the province’s residents aged 55 and over (66%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (50%) and aged 18-to-34 (32%).  
 
More than three-in-five residents of Vancouver Island (65%) and Northern BC (63%) claim to go out of their way to recycle “all of the time.” The proportion is lower in Southern BC (58%), the Fraser Valley (57%) and Metro Vancouver (44%).  
 
One-in-five British Columbians (20%, -6) acknowledge limiting hot water usage in their home “all the time” by taking shorter showers or running washing machines or dishwashers with full loads only.  
 
Fewer British Columbians say they unplug electrical devices in their home—such as TVs, computers and cell phone chargers—when they are not in use (12%, -1), buy biodegradable products (5%, -2) or eat organic or home-grown foods (also 5%, -2) “all of the time.”
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 21 to December 23, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Metro Vancouver Drivers Reject Paying to Park on the Street

Seven-in-ten drivers say it is harder to find a parking spot in their municipality when they need one.  
 
Vancouver, BC [December 14, 2021] – A sizeable majority of drivers in Metro Vancouver reject the notion of having to pay to park their cars on residential streets overnight, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative sample, almost two thirds of drivers in Metro Vancouver (64%) think it is a “bad idea” to charge a fee to vehicle owners who park their cars on residential streets overnight.  
 
“More than three-in-five drivers in Surrey (62%) and Vancouver (61%) are not in favour of an overnight residential parking fee,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the rest of the Metro Vancouver region, 67% of drivers are opposed.”  
 
A majority of drivers in Metro Vancouver (51%) say they have a garage and park their vehicle there, while 22% rely on a shared parkade. Just over one-in-ten (13%) say they have a garage, but do not park their vehicle inside it—including 16% of men and 15% of those who reside in Surrey.  
 
Seven-in-ten drivers in Metro Vancouver (70%) say it is harder now to find a parking spot in their municipality when they need one, down 11 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2018.  
 
Over the past two years, 27% of drivers in Metro Vancouver acknowledge having received a parking ticket. Similar proportions of citations have been issued by municipalities (17%, -1) and by parking management companies (15%, -5).  
 
Drivers in Vancouver are significantly more likely to report getting a parking ticket of any kind (40%, +12) than their counterparts in Surrey (22%, -11) and in other Metro Vancouver municipalities (20%, -13).  
 
When asked how they dealt with the last parking ticket they were issued by a municipality, two thirds of offending drivers (68%, -8) say they paid quickly to get a discount, while 26% (+15) covered the full amount days later and 6% (-7) never paid it.  
 
The situation is similar for tickets issued by a parking management company, with a majority of offending drivers (56%, +5) paying quickly, three-in-ten (30%,+15) covering the full amount later and 15% (-19) admitting to never paying the fine.  
 
Drivers aged 55 and over who receive a parking ticket are significantly more likely to pay the fine early, whether the citation was issued by a municipality (86%) or by a parking management company (65%).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 27 to November 29, 2021, among 521 adults in Metro Vancouver who drive to school or work on weekdays. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.3 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Shopping Habits of British Columbians Altered by Pandemic

A majority of the province’s residents aged 18-to-34 acknowledge that they prefer to buy things online instead of in person.  

Vancouver, BC [December 3, 2021] – British Columbians are not visiting restaurants and coffee shops as much as they did before the COVID-19 pandemic, and more than a third are relying on online platforms more often to acquire items and gifts, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, at least three-in-five British Columbians say they are visiting a sit-down restaurant less often than before the pandemic for breakfast (60%), lunch (62%) or dinner (65%).  

Almost two thirds of British Columbians (64%) also acknowledge that they are having a drink at a pub or bar less often than they did two years ago.  

Significant proportions of British Columbians also report visiting coffee shops less often to purchase beverages or snacks to go (40%) or to be enjoyed inside the venue (59%).  

Seven-in-ten British Columbians of East Asian descent (70%) say they are dining out less often than they did before the pandemic. Two thirds of the province’s residents of European (66%) and First Nations origins (also 66%) are also not visiting restaurants for dinner as often as they used to.  

Across the province, 27% of British Columbians say they are buying groceries in person less often now than two years ago. About two-in-five of the province’s residents also say they are going to stores less often than before the pandemic to purchase items for the home or family (38%) or to buy gifts (42%).  

Conversely, 22% of British Columbians say they are purchasing groceries online for home delivery more often than two years ago. More than a third are also relying on online platforms more often now to acquire gifts (36%) or items for the home or family (38%).  

When asked if they prefer buying things online or in person, a majority of British Columbians (54%) express a predilection for in store purchases, while two-in-five (41%) say they would rather use the internet.  

“There are some clear generational differences when British Columbians are asked about how they like to buy things,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Most of the province’s residents aged 18-to-34 (56%) prefer online platforms, those aged 55 and over are fonder of buying things in person (71%) and those aged 35-to-54 are evenly split.”  

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 15 to November 17, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Confidence in Local Drivers Improving Across Canada

The proportion of Canadians who say drivers are “worse” than five years ago has fallen from 50% in 2018 to 39% this year.  
 
Vancouver, BC [November 30, 2021] – The proportion of Canadians who believe drivers in their city or town are getting worse has reached the lowest level recorded over the past four years, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 30% of Canadians say drivers in their city or town are worse now than five years ago, while half (50%) report no change and 10% believe they are better.  
 
“When we first asked this question in 2018, half of Canadians (50%) felt that drivers were worse than in the past,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion has fallen each year, to 47% in 2019, then to 39% in 2020 and now to 30% in 2021.”  
 
At least a third of Canadians who reside in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (35%, -7), British Columbia (34%, -6) and Alberta (33%, -9) believe drivers in their city or town are worse now than five years ago. The proportion is lower among Canadians who live in Ontario (30%, -13), Atlantic Canada (25%, -14) and Quebec (24%, -8).  
 
Canadians aged 55 and over are more critical of drivers in their city or town, with 36% believing that the situation is worse now than five years ago, compared to 32% among those aged 35-to-54 and 21% among those aged 18-to-34.  
 
The survey also tracks the incidence of six specific occurrences on the country’s roads. A majority of Canadians (55%, +1) report seeing a driver not signalling before a turn over the past month, a proportion that climbs to 62% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.  
 
Almost two-in-five Canadians (38%, +2) witnessed a driver not stopping at an intersection and a third (32%, -1) saw a driver turning right or left from an incorrect lane, including 37% of British Columbians.
 
Fewer than three-in-ten Canadians (28%, +2) experienced a close call, or having to slam the brakes or steer violently to avoid a collision. In addition, 41% of Canadians (+3) say they saw a car taking up two or more stops at a parking lot, including a majority of Albertans (51%).  
 
Just over half of Canadians (51%, -5) say that there are specific groups or people in their city or town who are worse drivers than others.  
 
The top four responses among Canadians who blamed a specific group for bad driving behaviours are “young” (32%, -11), “elderly” (21%, -4), “Asian (16%, -1) and “immigrant” (6%, +1).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 20 to November 22, 2021, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20..
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Perceptions of Public Safety Wobble in British Columbia

Compared to late 2020, fewer residents of the province say they would feel safe walking alone in their neighbourhood after dark.  
 
Vancouver, BC [November 9, 2021] – The views of British Columbians on specific indicators related to criminal activity have become more dire during 2021, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, almost half of British Columbians (48%) say they fear becoming victims of crime in their community “a great deal” or “a fair amount”, up six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2020.  
 
Fear of crime is highest in Metro Vancouver (54%), followed by Northern BC (49%), the Fraser Valley (41%), Vancouver Island (also 41%) and Southern BC (32%).  
 
Across the province, 63% of British Columbians say they would feel “very safe” or “moderately safe” walking alone in their own neighbourhood after dark, down five points since 2020.  
 
“Practically three-in-four men in British Columbia (74%) say they would feel safe strolling through their neighbourhood at night,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 53% of women share the same point of view.”  
 
More than two-in-five British Columbians (44%, up two points since November 2020) say the level of criminal activity in their community has increased in the past four years—a proportion that rises to 53% in Southern BC and 54% in Vancouver Island.  
 
Over the past four years, one-in-five British Columbians (20%, -1) have been victims of a crime involving the police (such as an assault or a car break-in) in their community.  
 
Almost half of British Columbians (48%, +3) believe addiction and mental health issues are to blame “a great deal” for the current situation regarding crime in their community, while almost two-in-five (38%, =) point the finger at gangs and the illegal drug trade.  
 
Fewer British Columbians place “most of the blame” for criminal activity on poverty and inequality (31%, +5), an inadequate court system (30%, +4), lack of values and improper education for youth (27%, +3), a bad economy and unemployment (20%, +1), insufficient policing and a lack of resources to combat crime (also 20%, +4) and immigrants and minorities (9%, =).  
 
Sizeable proportions of British Columbians remain supportive of enacting a ban on military-style assault weapons (84%, +2) and a ban on handguns (79%, -1) within the limits of their municipality.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 1 to November 3, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

British Columbians Tired of Government Inaction on Mobile Costs

Seven-in-ten of the province’s cell phone users say their current plan is “expensive”, unchanged since 2019.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 20, 2021] – More than two years after the federal Liberal Party promised to reduce the cost of mobile phones and internet bills for Canadians, few British Columbians expect this pledge to ultimately be fulfilled, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, only 25% of British Columbians think the federal government will “definitely” or “probably” achieve this promise, down six points from a similar Research Co. survey conducted in December 2019.  
 
British Columbians are also not particularly hopeful about their provincial administration, which appointed MLA Bob D’Eith to work with the federal government to explore more affordable and transparent mobile phone options.  
 
Across the province, only 32% of British Columbians expect the provincial government’s push to be successful, down three points since December 2019.  
 
“British Columbians aged 55 and over are more likely to be skeptical about a future where mobile service is more affordable,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 22% of the province’s oldest adults think the provincial government will be effective in its efforts and just 16% think the federal government will fulfil the promise made in the previous electoral campaign.”  
 
Across the province, seven-in-ten mobile phone users (70%) describe the cost of their mobile phone plan as “very expensive” or “moderately expensive”, unchanged since December 2019.  
 
Women (70%) and British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (74%) are more likely to believe that they pay too much for their cell phone every month.  
 
A monthly plan for a mobile phone in Canada with two gigabytes of data costs about $75.  
 
About a third of British Columbians think a similar plan would be less expensive if they lived in Australia (33%) or Italy (34%), while more than half (57%) think they would pay less to access the same services in the United States.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on September 5 and September 6, 2021, among 700 adults who work in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Many British Columbians in the Dark About Return to Office

Almost half of those who worked from home during the COVID-19 pandemic expect to be able to do so at least three times a week.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 13, 2021] – Sizeable proportions of British Columbians who worked from home during the COVID-19 pandemic have not been adequately informed about an eventual return to the workplace, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative sample, only 45% of employed British Columbians who have worked from home during the pandemic say their company has outlined a plan for employees to return to the office after the pandemic is over.  
 
In addition, only 40% of British Columbians who worked from home during the pandemic say their company has outlined a plan for how they will be able to work from home in the future.  
 
Across the province, 55% of employed British Columbians say they laboured from home instead of at their usual workplace during the COVID-19 pandemic, including 59% of women, 59% of those aged 18-to-34 and 73% of those whose duties are primarily related to office work.  
 
Just under half of employed British Columbians who have worked from home during the pandemic (47%) say they expect to be able to continue doing so at least three times a week, up nine points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in March.  
 
“The past six months have not provided clarity for many employed British Columbians on what their work arrangements will look like,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The expectations of a future where the home office plays a prominent role on weekdays have increased markedly, particularly in the Fraser Valley and Vancouver Island.”  
 
More than half of British Columbians who worked from home (56%) say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to seek a different job if their current company does not allow them to work from home as often as they want, up seven points since March.  
 
Almost two thirds of employed British Columbians who have worked from home (64%) say they would consider switching to a different job that can be performed from home for a company located in their own metropolitan area. More than half (55%) would consider a similar arrangement reporting to a company headquartered in their own province, while more than two-in-five (44%) would entertain an offer from a company in another province.  
 
There is some change when it comes to some of the current features of office life. Compared to March, fewer employed British Columbians expect an increase in virtual communications between offices (43%, -3), virtual staff meetings (43%, -7) and virtual business development (41%, -6).  
 
The proportions are also lower on the expectations of fewer in-person staff meetings (42%, -5), less business travel (37%, -7) and a reduction of in-person business development meetings (38%, -5) once the pandemic ends.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on September 5 and September 6, 2021, among 700 adults who work in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

British Columbians Feel Trudeau is Better for Province Than Harper

Roughly the same proportion of the province’s residents would be “very upset” with a win for the Liberals or the Conservatives.
 
Vancouver, BC [August 17, 2021] – Most residents of British Columbia believe the tenure of Justin Trudeau as Prime Minister of Canada has been beneficial for the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 54% of British Columbians think the province has been treated “very well” or “well” by Trudeau, while one third (34%) believe it has been treated “poorly” or “very poorly.
 
Respondents are almost evenly split when assessing the effect of the federal government headed by Stephen Harper on British Columbia, with 38% saying he treated the province “very well” or “well” and 42% believing he behaved “poorly” or “very poorly.”
 
“Almost half of British Columbians aged 55 and over (48%) hold a favourable view on the way the current federal government is treating the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Just over a third (35%) feel the same way about the previous federal administration.”
 
Across British Columbia, just over half of residents (51%) say they would be “very upset” if the Conservative Party forms the government again in Ottawa. Animosity towards a Tory administration rises to 53% among Green Party voters in 2019, 68% among Liberal voters and 72% among New Democratic Party (NDP) voters.
 
Just under half of British Columbians (48%) say they would be “very upset” if the Liberals win the next election and remain in power, including 85% of Conservative voters, 61% of Green voters and 54% of NDP voters.
 
Only 35% of British Columbians would be “very upset” if the NDP forms the government for the first time in Ottawa after the next federal election. This includes two thirds of Conservative voters (66%), but significantly lower proportions of those who voted for the Liberals (43%) or the Greens (32%) in 2019.
 
Four of the current ministers in the federal government represent constituencies located in British Columbia and are seeking re-election this year as candidates for the Liberal Party.
 
Minister of National Defence Harjit Sajjan has the best approval rating of the four BC-based federal ministers (37%), followed by Minister of Environment and Climate Change Jonathan Wilkinson (31%), Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion Carla Qualtrough (29%) and Minister of Digital Government Joyce Murray (27%).
 
Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 7 to August 9, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca
 

Most British Columbians Doing Poorly on Emergency Preparedness

The number of residents who have an emergency kit, a plan and a meeting place is down markedly since 2019.
 
Vancouver, BC [August 10, 2021] – The proportion of British Columbians who have taken steps to prepare for an emergency has fallen over the past two years, a new Research Co. poll has found.
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 38% of British Columbians say they have purchased or prepared an emergency kit with supplies they might need in case of an emergency, down eight points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2019.
 
Only 28% of British Columbians (-11) have prepared an emergency plan that includes how to get in touch with family or friends in case of an emergency and just 22% (-13) have established a meeting place with family or friends in case of an emergency.
 
“Fewer than half of British Columbians across all regions have purchased or prepared an emergency kit,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is highest on Vancouver Island (45%), but drops in the Fraser Valley (41%), Metro Vancouver (39%), Southern BC (30%) and Northern BC (29%).”
 
British Columbians aged 18 to 34 are more likely to have both prepared an emergency plan (31%) and established a meeting place (27%) than their counterparts aged 55 and over (26% and 17% respectively).
 
Majorities of British Columbians have confidence in the ability of their provincial government (66%), their municipal government (63%) and the federal government (59%) to successfully deal with an emergency (such as a natural disaster, a serious accident, or incident caused by human error).
 
Three-in-four British Columbians (75%, -1) think it is likely that an earthquake strong enough to damage buildings will occur in British Columbia in the next 50 years.
 
When asked about their level of concern about being personally affected by 10 different emergencies, majorities of British Columbians are worried about facing a fire (80%), an earthquake (72%), high winds (58%), intense rainfall (53%) or a flood (51%).
 
Fewer of the province’s residents are preoccupied with encountering a toxic spill (47%), heavy snowfall (also 47%), a terrorist attack (46%), a tsunami (42%) or a landslide (39%).
 
 

Methodology:Results are based on an online study conducted from July 31 to August 3, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Split on Banning Gas-Powered Leaf Blowers

Half of the province’s residents worry “a great deal” or “a fair amount” about noise pollution associated with landscaping.

Vancouver, BC [July 13, 2021] – There is no consensus when residents of British Columbia are asked if the time has come to prohibit the use of a specific type of landscaping equipment, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 38% of British Columbians support their municipality enacting a by-law that would ban the use of gas-powered leaf blowers, while 40% oppose this course of action.

Support for prohibiting gas-powered leaf blowers reaches 48% on Vancouver Island, but drops to 39% in Metro Vancouver, 37% in Northern BC, 32% in Southern BC and 29% in the Fraser Valley.

One third of British Columbians (34%) are in favour of a municipal ban on gas-powered lawn mowers, while more than two-in-five (44%) are opposed.

Opposition to prohibiting gas-powered lawn mowers is strongest among British Columbians aged 55 and over (53%) and drops to 43% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 33% among those aged 18-to-34.

Fewer British Columbians are supportive of prohibiting electric leaf blowers (31%, with 48% opposed) and electric lawn mowers (27%, with 53% opposed) in their municipality.

Half of British Columbians (50%) say they worry about noise pollution associated with the use of landscaping equipment “a great deal” or “a fair amount”, while 44% feel the same way about air pollution.

“More than half of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (54%) and aged 35-to-54 (51%) are concerned about noise pollution from landscaping equipment,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among their counterparts aged 55 and over (45%).”

Almost two-in-five British Columbians (38%) say that a gas-powered lawn mower has been used on their property, while fewer recall the operation of electric lawn mowers (30%), electric leaf blowers (27%), gas-powered leaf blowers (20%) and reel lawn mowers (10%).

Reliance on gas-powered lawn mowers is more prevalent in Northern BC (58%), Southern BC (52%) and Vancouver Island (50%) than in the Fraser Valley (42%) and Metro Vancouver (30%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 18 to June 20, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Steady Support for Automated Speed Enforcement in BC

More than two thirds of British Columbians have approved of the use of speed-on-green intersection cameras since 2018.

Vancouver, BC [June 29, 2021] – The concept of relying on red light cameras to capture vehicles that are speeding through intersections continues to be welcomed by a large proportion of British Columbians, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 71% of British Columbians are in favour of using speed-on-green intersection cameras in the province, while 20% disapprove and 8% are undecided.

More than two thirds of British Columbians have approved of this type of speed enforcement in Research Co. surveys conducted in 2018, 2019 and 2020.

“As was the case last year, support for the use of speed-on-green cameras is higher among women (74%) than men (69%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents aged 55 and over are also more likely to be in favour of this concept (78%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (68%) and aged 18-to-34 (67%).”

Sizeable majorities of residents who voted for the BC Green Party (78%), the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (76%) and the BC Liberals (70%) in the 2020 provincial election also back the use of speed-on-green cameras.

On a regional basis, support for the concept is highest in Northern BC (82%), followed by Vancouver Island (77%), the Fraser Valley (74%), Southern BC (73%) and Metro Vancouver (68%).

Automated speed enforcement works by using cameras or sensors to pick up a vehicle speeding. A ticket is then issued to the owner of the vehicle. Driver’s license points are not issued as the driver of the vehicle cannot be identified.

Majorities of British Columbians are also in favour of three other types of automated speed enforcement. More than seven-in-ten (72%, +1 since 2020) approve of the use of fixed speed cameras, or cameras that stay in one location and measure speed as a vehicle passes.

More than three-in-five British Columbians (64%, -4 since 2020) support the use of mobile speed cameras, which can be moved from place to place and measure speed as a vehicle passes.

A slim majority of British Columbians (53%, -5 since 2019) endorse the use of point-to-point speed enforcement, which relies on cameras placed at two or more distant points on a road. The average speed of vehicles that pass between points is calculated and tickets are issued to vehicles whose average speed over the distance was excessive.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 18 to June 20, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Little Momentum as British Columbia Drivers Ponder Electric Cars

Residents of Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley are more likely to say that their next vehicle will be electric.

Vancouver, BC [June 1, 2021] – Over the past two years, there has been a negligible increase in the proportion of drivers in British Columbia who acknowledge that their next car will probably be electric, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 53% of British Columbians who drive their own cars say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that the next vehicle they acquire for themselves or their household will be electric, up two points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2019.

Male drivers are more likely to lean towards acquiring an electric vehicle (56%) than their female counterparts (51%). Three-in-five drivers aged 35-to-54 (60%) are likely to buy an electric vehicle, along with 57% of those aged 18-to-34 and 47% of those aged 55 and over.

Drivers who voted for the BC Green Party in last year’s provincial election are more likely to be seriously considering an electric vehicle (66%) than those who cast ballots for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (56%) or the BC Liberals (51%).

“There are some major regional differences when it comes to the appetite of drivers in British Columbia for electric vehicles,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 59% of those who reside in Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley foresee their next vehicle being electric, fewer feel the same way in Southern BC (42%), Vancouver Island (also 42%) and Northern BC (41%).”

More than a quarter of drivers in British Columbia say they are less likely to purchase an electric vehicle because they are too expensive when compared to non-electric options (27%, +3) and because they fear becoming stranded if they cannot find a charging station (also 27%, +3).

More than one-in-five drivers are also worried about not having enough places to charge the vehicle in the areas where they usually drive (23%, -2) and not having a place to charge the vehicle where they currently live (22%, +2). Only 6% of drivers (-1) are deterred by the “feel” of the vehicle compared with a non-electric option.

While only 22% of drivers who reside in the Fraser Valley say that a perceived lack of charging stations would make them less likely to purchase an electric vehicle in the future, the proportion rises to 24% in Metro Vancouver, 25% in Vancouver Island, 28% in Southern BC and 35% in Northern BC.

The Government of British Columbia has passed legislation to ensure that, by the year 2040, all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province will be “zero emission.” As was the case in 2019, 70% of residents are in favour of this decision.

A majority of British Columbians (51%, +2) think the goal established by the provincial government on the issue of “zero emission” vehicles is “achievable”, while 36% (-6) believe it is “not achievable.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 23 to May 25, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 
Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 
 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Six Communities Endorse South Fraser Community Rail Project

Almost four-in-five residents say they are likely to rely on the service for work or leisure, including 81% of those who drive a vehicle.

Vancouver, BC [May 20, 2021] – A proposal to reactivate a rail corridor for daily passenger service using hydrogen powered trains is very popular among residents of six British Columbia municipalities, a new Research Co. poll conducted on behalf of the South Fraser Community Rail Society has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of residents of six provincial communities, 88% of respondents say they support the South Fraser Community Rail project.

At least three-in-four respondents in each community are in favour of the project, including 93% in Abbotsford, 89% in Chilliwack, 85% in North Delta, 83% in North Surrey, 82% in the Township of Langley and 76% in the City of Langley.

The South Fraser Community Rail project would rely on a publicly owned 99 km operating corridor (known as the Interurban Corridor) available with passenger rights saved and protected by a previous provincial government at no cost for its use between the Pattullo Bridge SkyTrain Station and the City of Chilliwack.

The South Fraser Community Rail project would connect 16 cities and communities, eight First Nations communities, 14 post-secondary Institutions, Industrial Parks and the Abbotsford International Airport.

Almost four-in-five respondents in the six communities (78%) say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to rely on the service once it becomes operational—including 88% of those who commute using public transit and 81% of those who drive to school or work.

In the survey, only 32% of respondents think the Express Bus being used on the Highway 1 corridor from Chilliwack to the Carvolth Exchange in Langley fits the needs of the community and no other public transit alternative is required at this time.

Nine-in-ten respondents who have taken the Express Bus on Highway 1 (90%) support the South Fraser Community Rail project.

More than half of respondents say they are more likely to support the project because it will be good for the environment since it relies on a Hydrogen propulsion system, with zero greenhouse gas emissions (56%) and because it would allow for a commute time of 90 minutes from Chilliwack to the Pattulo Bridge—a significantly quicker commute time than the 135 minutes plus transfer time to cover the same distance with existing transit services (53%).

Practically half of respondents say they are more likely to support the project because one South Fraser Community Rail train would potentially remove 160 vehicles from Highway 1 (49%) and because the project will take three years to implement—a significantly quicker delivery timeframe than any other potential option (also 49%).

More than two-in-five respondents (44%) say they are more likely to support the project because it will cost an estimated $1.38 billion for 99 km —significantly less expensive than any other Inter-regional transit option.

Almost nine-in-ten respondents (87%) believe there must be a reactivated environmentally friendly Interurban passenger rail transit option while Highway 1 is currently being widened in stages.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 5 to May 8, 2021, among a representative sample of 800 adults in North Delta, North Surrey, City of Langley, Township of Langley, Abbotsford and Chilliwack. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca