Little Momentum as British Columbia Drivers Ponder Electric Cars

Residents of Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley are more likely to say that their next vehicle will be electric.

Vancouver, BC [June 1, 2021] – Over the past two years, there has been a negligible increase in the proportion of drivers in British Columbia who acknowledge that their next car will probably be electric, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 53% of British Columbians who drive their own cars say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that the next vehicle they acquire for themselves or their household will be electric, up two points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2019.

Male drivers are more likely to lean towards acquiring an electric vehicle (56%) than their female counterparts (51%). Three-in-five drivers aged 35-to-54 (60%) are likely to buy an electric vehicle, along with 57% of those aged 18-to-34 and 47% of those aged 55 and over.

Drivers who voted for the BC Green Party in last year’s provincial election are more likely to be seriously considering an electric vehicle (66%) than those who cast ballots for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (56%) or the BC Liberals (51%).

“There are some major regional differences when it comes to the appetite of drivers in British Columbia for electric vehicles,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 59% of those who reside in Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley foresee their next vehicle being electric, fewer feel the same way in Southern BC (42%), Vancouver Island (also 42%) and Northern BC (41%).”

More than a quarter of drivers in British Columbia say they are less likely to purchase an electric vehicle because they are too expensive when compared to non-electric options (27%, +3) and because they fear becoming stranded if they cannot find a charging station (also 27%, +3).

More than one-in-five drivers are also worried about not having enough places to charge the vehicle in the areas where they usually drive (23%, -2) and not having a place to charge the vehicle where they currently live (22%, +2). Only 6% of drivers (-1) are deterred by the “feel” of the vehicle compared with a non-electric option.

While only 22% of drivers who reside in the Fraser Valley say that a perceived lack of charging stations would make them less likely to purchase an electric vehicle in the future, the proportion rises to 24% in Metro Vancouver, 25% in Vancouver Island, 28% in Southern BC and 35% in Northern BC.

The Government of British Columbia has passed legislation to ensure that, by the year 2040, all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province will be “zero emission.” As was the case in 2019, 70% of residents are in favour of this decision.

A majority of British Columbians (51%, +2) think the goal established by the provincial government on the issue of “zero emission” vehicles is “achievable”, while 36% (-6) believe it is “not achievable.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 23 to May 25, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 
Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 
 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Six Communities Endorse South Fraser Community Rail Project

Almost four-in-five residents say they are likely to rely on the service for work or leisure, including 81% of those who drive a vehicle.

Vancouver, BC [May 20, 2021] – A proposal to reactivate a rail corridor for daily passenger service using hydrogen powered trains is very popular among residents of six British Columbia municipalities, a new Research Co. poll conducted on behalf of the South Fraser Community Rail Society has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of residents of six provincial communities, 88% of respondents say they support the South Fraser Community Rail project.

At least three-in-four respondents in each community are in favour of the project, including 93% in Abbotsford, 89% in Chilliwack, 85% in North Delta, 83% in North Surrey, 82% in the Township of Langley and 76% in the City of Langley.

The South Fraser Community Rail project would rely on a publicly owned 99 km operating corridor (known as the Interurban Corridor) available with passenger rights saved and protected by a previous provincial government at no cost for its use between the Pattullo Bridge SkyTrain Station and the City of Chilliwack.

The South Fraser Community Rail project would connect 16 cities and communities, eight First Nations communities, 14 post-secondary Institutions, Industrial Parks and the Abbotsford International Airport.

Almost four-in-five respondents in the six communities (78%) say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to rely on the service once it becomes operational—including 88% of those who commute using public transit and 81% of those who drive to school or work.

In the survey, only 32% of respondents think the Express Bus being used on the Highway 1 corridor from Chilliwack to the Carvolth Exchange in Langley fits the needs of the community and no other public transit alternative is required at this time.

Nine-in-ten respondents who have taken the Express Bus on Highway 1 (90%) support the South Fraser Community Rail project.

More than half of respondents say they are more likely to support the project because it will be good for the environment since it relies on a Hydrogen propulsion system, with zero greenhouse gas emissions (56%) and because it would allow for a commute time of 90 minutes from Chilliwack to the Pattulo Bridge—a significantly quicker commute time than the 135 minutes plus transfer time to cover the same distance with existing transit services (53%).

Practically half of respondents say they are more likely to support the project because one South Fraser Community Rail train would potentially remove 160 vehicles from Highway 1 (49%) and because the project will take three years to implement—a significantly quicker delivery timeframe than any other potential option (also 49%).

More than two-in-five respondents (44%) say they are more likely to support the project because it will cost an estimated $1.38 billion for 99 km —significantly less expensive than any other Inter-regional transit option.

Almost nine-in-ten respondents (87%) believe there must be a reactivated environmentally friendly Interurban passenger rail transit option while Highway 1 is currently being widened in stages.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 5 to May 8, 2021, among a representative sample of 800 adults in North Delta, North Surrey, City of Langley, Township of Langley, Abbotsford and Chilliwack. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Comfortable Banking and Shopping Online

More than half of the province’s residents have been targeted by “phishing” and scam emails.

Vancouver, BC [May 4, 2021] – While most British Columbians are having little trouble taking part in specific activities online, practically half are worried about the possibility of their devices being hacked, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 87% of British Columbians claim to be “very” or “moderately” comfortable shopping and accessing banking information online.

Fewer of the province’s residents express the same level of comfort when making charitable donations online (73%) or commenting on an online forum that requires their email address (54%).

More than three-in-four British Columbians are accessing banking information (88%), visiting websites or blogs (87%), looking for deals on websites (79%) and using an instant messaging service (77%) at least a few times per month.

Fewer of the province’s residents are also looking for directions and/or maps to get to a destination (69%), purchasing goods from a website (60%), using the Internet to place telephone calls (60%) posting on social media (59%) or uploading pictures or videos to the Internet (50%) at least a few times per month.

More than half of British Columbians (53%) have worried “frequently” or “occasionally” over the past couple of months about having their personal information stolen over the Internet (53%). Similar proportions of residents are concerned about computers and technology being used to invade their privacy (52%) and somebody hacking into their own computer or smartphone (49%).

Fewer than one-in-four British Columbians (23%) say they have only one email address, while 41% have two and 35% have three or more. 

Three in five British Columbians (61%) say they have received “phishing” emails, where somebody attempts to acquire personal information by masquerading as a trustworthy entity. More than half (54%) received an email offering them money for their help and assistance, in what is usually referred to as the “Nigerian scam.” 

Fewer of the province’s residents acknowledge that their computer became infected with a virus while they were browsing the Internet (31%) or had their email address or social media platform hacked (15% each).

Across the province, 62% of British Columbians say they have typed their name on Google to see what has been posted about them on the Internet—including 65% of women and 72% of Vancouver Islanders.

More than half of British Columbians who Googled themselves (55%) claim that the information they found was accurate, while 13% say it was inaccurate (13%). One third (32%) did not find any information about themselves.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from April 20 to April 22, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Fake News and Racism Prevalent in Canada’s Social Media Feeds

More than one-in-four users say they posted something on social media that they deleted after thinking it over twice.

Vancouver, BC [April 23, 2021] – The past two years have not brought a significant change in the amount of offensive content Canadians encounter on their social media feeds, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of social media users, 27% of Canadian respondents say they found racist content or comments on their feed in the past year, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September 2019.

Slightly smaller proportions of Canadian social media users found content or comments offensive to people with disabilities (20%, =) or homophobic content (19%, -2) on their feed over the past 12 months.

“Only 17% of Canadian social media users aged 55 and over say they were exposed to racist content in the past year,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The problem is more prevalent among those aged 35-to-54 (24%) and those aged 18-to-34 (39%).” 

More than a quarter of Canadian social media users (27%, +6) say they posted something on social media over the past year that they deleted after thinking it over twice—including 30% of women and 38% of British Columbians.

While 23% of Canadian social media users reported someone for offensive content or comments, the proportion rises to 34% among those aged 18-to34.

Almost two-in-five Canadians (39%) say they found links to stories on current affairs that were obviously false (sometimes referred to as “Fake News”) on their feed in the past 12 months.

Social media users in Ontario are more likely to report being exposed to “Fake News” (47%) than their counterparts in British Columbia (39%), Atlantic Canada (36%), Alberta (33%), Quebec (also 33%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (32%).

Seven-in-ten Canadian social media users (71%, +1) claim is difficult to discern which accounts are real and which ones are fake, including 78% of those aged 55 and over.

Majorities of Canadian social media users are also in favour of banning “anonymous” accounts to only allow people to comment and post if they use their real name and likeness (69%, +1) and bringing an end to “creeping” by always allowing users to see who has viewed their profiles, photos and posts (65%, +5).

Three-in-five social media users (60%, -3) think politicians who have a social media account should not be able to block users from engaging with them.

Support for the notion of politicians not blocking social media users is highest in British Columbia (62%), followed by Alberta (61%), Ontario (also 61%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (60%), Atlantic Canada (also 60%) and Quebec (56%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from April 16 to April 18, 2021, among 845 adult social media users in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.4 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Inching Closer to a True Work-Life Balance

More than a third of employed residents of the province (35%, -7 since 2019) say work has put a strain on their relationships.

Vancouver, BC [April 16, 2021] – The number of employed British Columbians who feel they are doing a good job managing their jobs and their leisure time has increased over the past two years, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 41% of employed British Columbians claim to have achieved a perfect balance between work and lifestyle, up eight points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in April 2019.

Conversely, 45% of employed British Columbians (-8) think work has become more important than lifestyle, while only 10% (-2) believe lifestyle is taking precedence over work.

“While the province-wide numbers may point to an improvement for the workforce of British Columbia, some generational differences prevail,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 32% of those aged 55 and over are putting their careers ahead of everything else, compared to 47% among those aged 35-to-54 and 50% among those aged 18-to-34.”

Almost two-in-five employed British Columbians (39%, -2) believe it is harder for them to achieve a work-life balance than it was for their parents, while 16% (-3) think this task is now easier.

More than a third of employed British Columbians (35%, -12) say they had to stay late after work in the past six months, while just under three-in-ten (28%, +3) had to take a work-related call on their mobile phone while they were with family or friends.

One in four employed British Columbians were compelled to reply to a work-related e-mail while they were with family or friends (24%, -4) or had to work from home on a weekend (24%, =). 

Slightly fewer employed British Columbians had to work from home at night (22%, +1) or missed a “lifestyle” engagement (like a virtual or live family gathering or leisure activity) because they had to work (17%, -12).

Across the province, 35% of British Columbians acknowledge that their work has put a strain on their relationships with family and friends, down seven points since April 2019.

Employed British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are significantly more likely to admit that their relationships are suffering because of their jobs (48%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (37%) and aged 55 and over (15%). 

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from April 3 to April 6, 2021, among 650 adults in British Columbia who are employed full time or part time. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Than Half of British Columbians Using Apps to File Their Taxes

Almost three-in-five residents (57%) say they dislike having to pay the Provincial Sales Tax (PST).

Vancouver, BC [April 13, 2021] – Most British Columbians will file their taxes by themselves, but with the help of software or apps, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 52% of British Columbians intend to use this method during this fiscal year.

Just over one-in-five British Columbians (21%) will file their taxes through an accountant or firm, while 13% plan to rely on a tax preparation company and 11% will file by themselves, but without requiring any software or apps.

“The pandemic has not changed the way British Columbians file their taxes,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There are minimal fluctuations when we compare this year’s methods to what respondents did in 2020.”

Half of British Columbians (50%) think the provincial income tax they pay is too high, while 41% consider it adequate. 

Women (58%), British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (63%) and residents of Northern BC (66%) are more likely to feel that the provincial income tax is too high.

A higher proportion of the province’s residents think three other taxes are currently too high: the Goods and Services Tax (GST) (51%), the federal income tax (55%) and the Provincial Sales Tax (57%).

Almost three-in-five British Columbians (57%) say they dislike having to pay the PST, while 37% do not mind and 5% are not sure.

The level of animosity from British Columbians is lower for paying the GST (56%), the provincial income tax (48%) and the federal income tax (46%).

While only 41% of British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in last year’s provincial election dislike having to pay the provincial income tax, the proportion rises to 46% among those who voted for the BC Greens and 49% among those who voted for the BC Liberals.

Almost two thirds of British Columbians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election (65%) say they dislike paying the federal income tax. The proportion falls to 44% among federal NDP voters and to 40% among Liberal voters.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from March 19 to March 21, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

A Third of British Columbians Endure COVID-19 Financial Struggles

More than half of the province’s residents (54%) say they are spending more on groceries than they did a year ago.

Vancouver, BC [March 15, 2021] – One third of British Columbians acknowledge that the financial situation of their household has not returned to the level it had before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 33% of British Columbians say that their household’s financial standing is worse now than prior to the pandemic.

While almost half of British Columbians (48%) report no change in their financial situation over the past year, 17% say they are better off now.

“There are specific groups of British Columbians who are more likely to have been negatively impacted by the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than a third of women (36%) and practically half of residents of Northern BC (49%) say their household’s finances have suffered on account of COVID-19.”

About a third of British Columbians of European and East Asian origins (32% and 33% respectively) say their household’s financial situation has worsened because of the pandemic, along with 38% of the province’s residents of First Nation and South Asian descent.

When asked about specific things they pay for, a majority of British Columbians (54%) say their household expenditures on groceries are higher now than they were before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. This proportion climbs to 63% among women, British Columbians aged 55 and over and residents of the Fraser Valley.

Another area of increased spending for British Columbians is electronic entertainment, such as cable television and streaming services. While 6% of the province’s residents say they are paying less for these items than they did a year ago, almost three-in-ten (29%) are allocating more money to them.

Conversely, while 18% of British Columbians say they are spending more on transportation—such as fuel for vehicles, transit passes and taxis—more than a third (37%) say their costs are lower now than before COVID-19.

Significantly fewer residents of the province say they are spending more on four other categories than they did before the start of the pandemic: books (15%), housing (14%), board games (13%) and newspapers and magazines (9%). 

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from March 1 to March 3, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here, and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Live TV and Streaming Services See Jump Among Canadians

Almost three-in-four Canadian TV watchers (73%) have “binge watched” a show or series over the past year.

Vancouver, BC [March 12, 2021] – The proportion of Canadians who watch television recorded on a digital device has dropped significantly in the past year, while more time is being spent enjoying live content or streaming shows, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample asked Canadians to describe how they watch television.

More than a third of the time is spent by Canadians watching live television on a TV set (35%), up 10 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2020.

Streaming on an online site—such as Netflix, Apple TV, Amazon Prime, Disney+ or CraveTV—to a television, computer, tablet or mobile phone is second on the list of entertainment sources with 29%, followed by watching television on a TV set via a digital recording device (13%, -19), streaming online from another type of site (9%, +3), watching content downloaded from the Internet (7%, -1) and streaming on a TV network website (6%, =).

“Canadians aged 35-to-54 appear to have struck a balance between live television (34%) and streaming services (30%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Canadians aged 18-to-34 gravitate towards streaming (44%) while those aged 55 and over devote most of their television time to watching broadcasts as they happen (54%).”

In a typical week, Canadians who watch TV spend 19 hours and 35 minutes enjoying content in all possible formats (over-the-air and cable television, as well as streaming on the Internet and mobile devices).

Across the country, Canadians aged 55 and over spend the most time watching television (25 hours and 56 minutes each week), followed by those aged 35-to-54 (18 hours and 20 minutes) and those aged 18-to-34 (13 hours and 8 minutes).

Residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba and Alberta spend more than 20 hours a week watching television, while the proportion is lower in all other regions of Canada.

Just under one-in-five Canadian television watchers (18%) say they paid to watch a new motion picture that was not shown in movie theaters because of the COVID-19 pandemic—a proportion that rises to 26% among those aged 18-to-34.

Two-in-five Canadian TV watchers (40%) observed a presidential of vice-presidential debate in the United States last year, and a slightly higher proportion (42%) watched the inauguration of U.S. President Joe Biden in January, including 57% of those aged 55 and over.

Almost three-in-four Canadian TV watchers (73%) admit to “binge watching”, or watching two or more episodes of a specific series in the same sitting.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from March 4 to March 6, 2021, among 910 adults in Canada who watch television at home. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.3 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: KoolShooters

Adults 55+ Most Satisfied with Digital Health Tools During Pandemic

Over the past year, 51 per cent of British Columbians essentially “migrated” to virtual care.

Vancouver, BC [March 3, 2021] – Despite typical narratives about older adults’ reluctance to adopt technology, a poll released today by Research Co. and Digital Health Circle found that, during the COVID-19 pandemic, British Columbians 55 and over have been the most satisfied with digital health tools of any age group (86 per cent were very satisfied or moderately satisfied versus 75 per cent and 80 per cent for ages 18- 34 and 35-54 respectively).

The COVID-19 pandemic has spurred both the innovation and adoption of more and more digital health solutions as healthcare providers and consumers were forced to pivot, and virtual care and wellness activities became necessary. Digital Health Circle partnered with Research Co. to better understand how British Columbians, especially older adults, have been using digital health products during the pandemic, in order to help local businesses and healthcare providers better address their consumers’ needs.

“As Digital Health Circle’s work focuses on assisting tech companies to develop products that meet consumers’ needs, we wanted to learn if and how people were using these tools, if they were satisfied and what the barriers or gaps might be,” said Dr. Sylvain Moreno, Chief Executive Officer and Scientific Director, Digital Health Circle. “We learned that as the silver tsunami continues, clearly those older adults have an appetite and an urgent need for digital health tools, which means there is a real opportunity to help improve health outcomes, as well as for product and job creation in B.C.”

Today’s poll is a follow up to the one Research Co. did pre-pandemic, September 18, 2018 to understand how British Columbians were using digital tools for health care.

“The data in our poll refutes the stereotype that older adults, including baby boomers, are averse to technology adoption and avoid using digital health solutions,” said Mario Canseco, President, Research Co. “The high uptake amongst older adults may be in part due to concerns about exposure to COVID-19 in the community, making this group more likely to avoid going to the doctor in person or seeking traditional health care. Older adults also have higher healthcare needs and less transportation access, making digital health solutions very convenient.”page1image63486976page1image63474112

The data also provides two distinct learnings to inform the Provincial Government’s health policy development:

  • Government should continue to build on the digital capacity the health sector gained during the COVID-19 pandemic—the data tells us that use of digital health solutions holds a promise to satisfy older adults’ care needs.
  • It is now up to Government, including health authorities, to keep their feet on the gas and continue to make these products available in the health care system or incur the frustrations of this cohort, which includes baby boomers.“This data will help DHC as we assist small tech companies increase their chance of developing the best possible digital health solutions for British Columbians,” said Dr. Moreno. “The survey suggests that older adults want digital health solutions and products to be developed for them at least at the same rate as the general public.”

Other findings included:

  • During the pandemic, 51 per cent of British Columbians essentially “migrated” to virtual care. It was even higher for older adults (55+) at 54 per cent.
  • Vancouver Islanders are most divided on whether they will keep using digital solutions post pandemic, with 50 per cent saying they will continue to use them, 16 per cent saying they won’t and 34 per cent unsure.
  • Higher income residents say they will rely on these tools more post-pandemic: 64 per cent of those earning over $100,000/year versus 42 per cent of those earning under $50,000/year. However, the lowest income group had a higher satisfaction level that higher earners. Digital Health Circle plans to further explore the issue of access in the coming year.
  • More than two-in-five British Columbians are relying on digital health solutions, but the way they come into contact with them is different. The 55+ group is more likely to be getting recommendations from their physicians. Word of mouth and ads resonate with Millennials and Generation X.
  • There is generally similar use and perspectives on digital health products across ethnic groups and regions, with similar levels of satisfaction. One of the main differences is observed with tools for mental well-being, where adoption is highest among British Columbians of First Nations descent (23 per cent) but drops among those of South Asian (13 per cent), East Asian (8 per cent) and European heritage (7 per cent). Further investigation would be needed to understand if this is due to need, willingness to adopt technologies or another reason.
  • The most popular digital health care tools were in the following categories: physical activity and exercise (38 per cent), sleep tracking (14 per cent), nutrition (12 per cent), heart health/blood pressure (11 per cent) and mental well-being (9 per cent). This may be due to availability of apps, so this might not correlate to interest or willingness.

This comprehensive poll of 800 adults in British Columbia was undertaken as an online survey conducted from February 22 and February 23, 2021. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Laura Cropper, Coast Communications and Public Affairs
778.323.382790
[e] laura@coastcomms.ca

COVID-19 Impacts Dining Behaviours Across British Columbia

Millennials and Metro Vancouverites are more likely to be relying on apps to have food delivered to their homes.

Vancouver, BC [February 9, 2021] – British Columbians are not ordering food delivered to their homes as often as they did a year ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 32% of British Columbians say they order food that is delivered to their homes once every two weeks or more often, down 14 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in February 2020.

More than half of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (54%) are having food delivered to their homes at least once every fortnight, compared to 37% among those aged 35-to-54 and 10% among those aged 55 and over.

In a poll conducted by Research Co. in January 2021, 21% of Canadians—and 19% of British Columbians—said they are not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection from COVID-19.

Just under half of British Columbians (45%, -1) order food that they pick up themselves from a restaurant at least once every fortnight. 

Three-in-ten British Columbians (30%) dine out at a restaurant at least once every two weeks, down from 55% in 2020.

While 27% of British Columbians say they are ordering food delivered to their home more often than last year, a similar proportion (28%) is partaking on this option less than before.

“The momentum for the food delivery business in British Columbia is being driven primarily by Millennials,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 42% of residents aged 18-to-34 say they are ordering food for their homes more often, only 31% of those aged 35-to-54 and 13% of those aged 55 and over are joining them.”

One third of Metro Vancouverites (34%) are ordering food for their homes more often than last year. The Fraser Valley is a close second on this indicator (29%), followed by Vancouver Island (18%), Northern BC (15%) and Southern BC (13%).

Over the past year, more than a third of British Columbians relied on three different methods to have food delivered to their home: a phone call to a specific restaurant (39%, -4 since February 2020), online through the website of a restaurant or chain (37%, -1) and using an app on their phone, such as DoorDash, Uber Eats or Skip The Dishes (36%, +4).

While two thirds of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 have used an app to order food in the past year (65%), the proportion drops to 39% among those aged 35-to-54 and 13% among those aged 55 and over.

On a regional basis, Metro Vancouverites relied primarily on apps to order food over the past year (47%). In the other four regions, the most favoured method is a phone call to a specific restaurant: 58% in Northern BC, 45% in the Fraser Valley, 39% in Southern BC and 37% in Vancouver Island.

More than half of British Columbians (54%) say they always leave a tip for the delivery person or courier who brings food to their home, including 57% of women, 58% of British Columbians aged 35-to-54 and 66% of Vancouver Islanders.

Only 28% of British Columbians say they always leave a tip or donation for the restaurant—an option that can be accessed in some applications at the time deliveries are finalized—while 34% never do this.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from February 1 to February 3, 2021, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Life Getting Noisier for More Than a Quarter of Canadians

Three-in-ten respondents say they were bothered at home by unnecessary noise from vehicles over the past year.

Vancouver, BC [February 2, 2021] – More than one-in-four Canadians believe their surroundings are noisier now than they were a year ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 27% of Canadians say their city or town has become noisier over the past year.

Similar proportions of Canadians believe their home (28%) and their street (23%) are noisier now than they were a year ago.

Women (28%), Canadians aged 18-to-34 (33%), British Columbians (31%) and respondents of South Asian descent (36%) are more likely to feel that the city or town where they live is noisier now than in early 2020.

When asked about specific sounds that have bothered them at home over the past year, at least one-in-five Canadians mention unnecessary noise from vehicles (such as motorcycles and cars revving up) (30%), dogs barking (24%), loud people outside their home (20%) and car alarms (also 20%).

Fewer Canadians report being disturbed by 10 other noises at home: yard work (such as lawnmowers and leaf blowers) (19%), yelling or screaming at a nearby home (18%), loud music playing inside a vehicle (also 18%), power tools (such as electric saws and sanders) (also 18%), loud music at a nearby home (17%), fireworks (16%), a loud gathering or party at a nearby home (15%), drivers honking the horn excessively (12%), home alarms (9%) and cats meowing (5%).

“More than three-in-four Canadians aged 18-to-34 (78%) say that they were bothered by outside noises when they were at home,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion drops to 65% among those aged 35-to-54 and 60% among those aged 55 and over.”

Over the past year, more than one-in-ten Canadians (12%) wore earplugs or earmuffs to mitigate noise while inside their home—including 19% of those aged 18-to-34 and 14% of Ontarians.

Smaller proportions of Canadians acquired hardware to mitigate noise while inside their home (such as noise cancelling headphones or earphones) (7%), reported noise concerns to the police (5%) or moved away from their previous home because of noise (4%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from January 24 to January 26, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Streaming Options Gain Ground Among Canadian Music Listeners

The proportion of Canadians who listen to music on a streaming service grew from 32% in 2019 to 40% in 2021.

Vancouver, BC [January 19, 2021] – While radio remains the most favoured choice for Canadians who want to listen to music, streaming platforms have gained prominence across the country over the past two years, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 66% of Canadians say they listened to music on a regular radio over the past week, down three points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March 2019.

Two-in-five Canadians (40%, +8 since 2019) listened to music on a streaming service over the past seven days, while three-in-ten (30%, -1) listened to music stored in a computer or a phone.

Fewer Canadians listened to music on an LP record, cassette or CD (16%, -5) or on satellite radio (12%, -3) over the past week.

“Canadians aged 55 and over prefer to listen to music on the radio (70%) than on a streaming service (28%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, those aged 18-to-34 are more likely to stream (64%) than to listen to the radio (53%).”

While one-in-five Canadians (20%) paid to access a music streaming service in the last month, the proportion rises to 40% among those aged 18-to-34.

Fewer Canadians paid for and downloaded a song online (11%) or bought a compact disc or LP record (10%) in the last month.

When asked if they think that, in this day and age, music creators are being fairly compensated for their work, Canadians are almost evenly split. While 40% believe they are (-11 since 2019), (41%, +8) believe they are not.

A majority of Canadians aged 18-to-34 think music creators are being fairly compensated right now (54%), compared to 42% among those aged 35 to 54 and 32% among those aged 55 and over.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from January 9 to January 11, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views on Political Correctness Are Similar in Canada and the U.S.

Majorities in the two countries agree with adding disclaimers to programs that may contain “outdated cultural depictions.”

Vancouver, BC [January 1, 2021] – Most Canadians and Americans share analogous views on “political correctness” but would stop short of modifying books or movies by removing words that are considered offensive, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 50% of Canadians and 53% of Americans support the use of “political correctness” in their respective countries.

Conversely, 33% of Canadians and 32% of Americans are opposed to “political correctness.”

The term “political correctness” has been used to describe language and/or behaviour that seeks to minimize possible offenses to racial, cultural and gender identity groups, among others. 

Support for the use of “political correctness” is particularly high among Canadians and Americans aged 18-to-34 (55% and 59% respectively).

A third of Canadians (32%) and 36% of Americans say they always act “politically correct” because it’s the right thing to do—including 43% of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election and 45% of Democrats in the United States.

Two-in-five Canadians (40%) and 37% of Americans say they sometimes act “politically correct” because it’s the safe thing to do.

Only 11% of Canadians and 15% of Americans do not act “politically correct” because it’s the wrong thing to do—including 17% of Conservative voters in Canada and 22% of Republicans in the United States.

Significant majorities of Canadians and Americans believe three specific groups in society should act in a “politically correct” manner “always” or “most of the time”: teachers (74% in Canada and 71% in the U.S.), politicians (73% in Canada and 66% in the U.S.) and journalists (66% in Canada and 64% in the U.S.). 

Only 38% of Canadians and 35% of Americans think comedians should act in a “politically correct” manner “always” or “most of the time”.

More than three-in-five Canadians (65%) and Americans (62%) agree with adding a disclaimer to explain that programs or movies are presented “as originally created” and “may contain outdated cultural depictions.”

Canadians and Americans disagree with two other measures: printing new editions of books that remove words that may be deemed offensive to a specific race or ethnicity (61% in Canada and 59% in the U.S.) and re-dubbing movies to remove words that may be deemed offensive to a specific race or ethnicity (62% in Canada and 57% in the U.S.).

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted from December 3 to December 5, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Endorse Tougher Penalties for Distracted Driving

Seven-in-ten residents of the province agree with seizing the electronic devices of repeat offenders.

Vancouver, BC [December 25, 2020] – A large proportion of residents of British Columbia report seeing distracted drivers on the road, and sizeable majorities are supportive of implementing new measures to curb the illegal practice, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, more than half of British Columbians (55%) say they witnessed a driver talking on a hand-held cell phone or texting while driving over the past month.

Residents of Southern BC (64%) and Vancouver Island (also 64%) are more likely to have recently seen a driver texting or chatting on a cell phone, compared to 61% in both Northern BC and the Fraser Valley and 49% in Metro Vancouver.

Drivers caught emailing, texting, or using an electronic device while driving in British Columbia face a fine of $368 and four penalty points (equivalent to $252) in their insurance penalty point premium. This means a total of $620 for a first-time infraction. 

Just over half of British Columbians (52%) believe the current fine for distracted driving is “about right”, while 30% consider it “too low” and 14% deem it “too high.”

Only 18% of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 believe the current fine for distracted driving in British Columbia is “too low”, compared to 29% among those aged 35-to-54 and 38% among those aged 55 and over.

When asked about other possible penalties for drivers caught emailing, texting, or using an electronic device in British Columbia, more than half of residents (54%) agree with suspending the driver for one year.

Support is higher for two other penalties: doubling the current fine to $1,240 (59%) and seizing the electronic devices of repeat offenders (70%).

“British Columbians who voted for each of the province’s major parties in the last election are in favour of tougher legislation to curtail distracted driving,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 50% of BC Liberal voters endorse doubling the current fine, the proportion rises to 57% among those who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) and 66% among those who cast ballots for BC Green Party candidates.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 14 to December 16, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Many Canadians Willing to Avoid Office Life When Pandemic Ends

Four-in-five “provisional home workers” (80%)  say that working from home has been easier than they originally thought.

Vancouver, BC [December 11, 2020] – A vast majority of Canadians who are currently working from home instead of at their regular workplace say they would like to continue to explore this possibility after the COVID-19 pandemic has disappeared, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 80% of Canadian “provisional home workers” say they hope to be able to work from home more often after the COVID-19 outbreak has passed, up 15 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in April.

Almost nine-in-ten Canadian “provisional home workers” (89%, +9) feel their company trusts they are carrying on with their duties from home, and 78% (+9) think their company is perfectly equipped for them to do their work from home.

Four-in-five “provisional home workers” (80%, +18) acknowledge that working from home has been easier than they originally thought—including 87% of those aged 55 and over and 83% of Quebecers.

“Back in April, the notion of working from home was definitely intimidating for some Canadians,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Eight months later, most say they have all they need in order to fulfil their duties away from the office and acknowledge that the experience has been positive.”

Almost half of “provisional home workers” (46%, =) say they are having a difficult time working due to distractions at home.

There is a sizeable generational gap when it comes to focusing on the tasks at hand while at home. While only 25% of those aged 55 and over claim to have a tough time with distractions, the proportion rises to 45% among those aged 35-to-54 and 54% among those aged 18-to-34.

Two thirds of “provisional home workers” in Canada (68%, +1) say they miss interacting with other people at their regular office, including 73% of men, 73% of those aged 18-to-34 and 86% of British Columbians.

Almost half of “provisional home workers” (47%, +3) say they miss commuting to their regular office or workplace. Those aged 18-to-34 are more likely to yearn for their daily commute (54%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (43%) and aged 55 and over (44%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 2 to December 6, 2020, among 803 Canadian adults who are currently working from home instead of at their regular office. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half in BC, Three-in-Four in Alberta Agree with Pipeline Expansion

Majorities of Albertans and British Columbians are disappointed with the way the federal government has handled this issue.

Vancouver, BC [November 10, 2020] – Just over half of British Columbians and practically three-in-four Albertans want to carry on with the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative provincial samples, 52% of British Columbians and 74% of Albertans agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the project.

“There is a higher level of support for the pipeline’s expansion from residents aged 55 and over in both British Columbia (60%) and Alberta (83%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Agreement with the federal government’s decision is lower among those aged 18-to-34 In each province (44% in BC, 68% in Alberta).”

In British Columbia, agreement with the pipeline expansion has dropped by four points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in December 2019

Opposition to the project fell by six points in British Columbia (from 35% to 29%) , while the proportion of undecided respondents increased from 10% last year to 18% now.

More than half of residents of each Canadian province (59% in Alberta and 54% in British Columbia) are disappointed with the way the federal government has handled the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion. These groups include 66% of Green Party voters in British Columbia and 70% of United Conservative Party voters in Alberta.

While two-in-five British Columbians (40%) want the provincial government to do anything necessary to ensure that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion does not happen, the proportion of Albertans who feel the same way about the actions of their own provincial administration stands at 22%.

Only 17% of Albertans believe the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of the province’s residents. The proportion is significantly higher in British Columbia (44%).

Two thirds of British Columbians (68%) and four-in-five Albertans (79%) believe the Trans Mountain Pipeline will create hundreds of jobs for residents of each province.

More than a third of Albertans (34%) and British Columbians (38%) believe gas prices will be lower now that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion has been re-approved.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 29 to October 31, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia, and an online study conducted from November 2 to November 4, 2020, among 700 adults in Alberta. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia and Alberta. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for British Columbia and +/- 3.4 percentage points for Alberta, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables for British Columbia here, our data tables for Alberta here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Majority of British Columbians Support Ride-Hailing

While 15% of residents have used the services in the province, the proportion rises to 26% among those aged 18-to-34.

Vancouver, BC [October 30, 2020] – Most residents of British Columbia are satisfied with the presence of ride-hailing services in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 72% of British Columbians support allowing ride-hailing services to operate, while 20% are opposed and 8% are undecided.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be in favour of ride-hailing in the province (78%) than those aged 35-to-54 (74%) and those aged 55 and over (65%).

On a regional basis, support for ride-hailing operations is highest in the Fraser Valley (79%), followed by Metro Vancouver (76%), Northern BC (68%), Vancouver Island (66%) and Southern BC (62%).

Three-in-four residents of the province who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (76%) and the BC Liberals (also 76%) in last month’s provincial election hold positive views on ride-hailing companies having a presence in British Columbia, along with 66% of those who cast a ballot for BC Green Party candidates.

Across the province, 15% of British Columbians have used ride-hailing services since they became available earlier this year, including 26% of those aged 18-to-34, 18% of men and 19% of Metro Vancouverites.

More than half of British Columbians who have relied on ride-hailing services in the province say they rate them more favourably than taxis on two features: overall cost (55%) and payment options (55%).

Half of the province’s residents who ride-hailed were also satisfied with the cleanliness of the vehicles (50%) and with how long they waited for the vehicle to pick them up (also 50%).

The rating is lower on three other issues. Just over two-in-five British Columbians who used ride-hailing services consider them better than taxis on accountability (44%) and transparency (41%), while slightly fewer feel the same way about the safety of passengers (39%).

“Few British Columbians aged 55 and over (4%) have actually experienced ride-hailing in the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However. they are more likely to be satisfied than their younger counterparts on issues such as price (72%) and wait times (73%).”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 22 to October 25, 2020, among 832 adult British Columbians who voted in the 2020 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Support Strict Regulations for Smoking and Vaping

More than half of Canadians say they would not consider dating a person who used electronic cigarettes.

Vancouver, BC [October 27, 2020] – Many Canadians are in favour of existing federal legislation that seeks to make electronic cigarettes less appealing to the country’s youth, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 86% of Canadians agree with prohibiting the sale of vaping products to minors.

The federal government passed Bill S-5, which is an overhaul of the Tobacco Act. Other components of this legislation are supported by large majorities of Canadians.

More than seven-in-ten Canadians agree with the federal government’s decision to restrict any reference to e-cigarettes as healthier than standard tobacco products (77%, +4 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in October 2019) and to restrict the use of testimonials and “lifestyle” advertising for vaping products (75%).

Almost four-in-five Canadians (79%, +6) believe there should be a ban on the use of e-cigarettes in public places where smoking is currently prohibited, and a larger proportion (86%, +1) want vaping products that contain nicotine to display a warning, similar to the one used for tobacco products.

More than two thirds of Canadians (69%) agree with banning certain flavours of vaping products, such as cannabis and “confectionery.”

Across the country, one-in-ten Canadians (10%, -1) say they vaped in the past year, a proportion that rises to 19% among those aged 18-to-34 and 14% in British Columbia. 

“A majority of Canadians (56%, -4) say they would not consider dating a person who used electronic cigarettes,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This group includes 57% of women and 62% of Ontarians.”

Almost three-in-four Canadians (73%, +4 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in January 2019) agree with giving Health Canada the power to implement plain and standardized tobacco packaging. 

More than four-in-five Canadians continue to endorse two regulations related to tobacco consumption that have been in place for years: banning smoking in indoor public spaces, public transit facilities and workplaces (including restaurants, bars and casinos) (87%, -2%) and banning smoking in private vehicles occupied by children (85%, +9).

Almost seven-in-ten of Canadians (69, -3%) support banning smoking (tobacco and marijuana) in multi-family buildings, while 20% (-5) are opposed to this course of action.

Support for a regulation that would ban smoking in multi-family dwellings is highest in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (85%), followed by Ontario (72%), British Columbia (68%), Atlantic Canada (67%), Alberta (62%) and Quebec (60%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 18 to September 20, 2020, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Report Fewer Blunders from Drivers Than Last Year

The proportion of Canadians who say drivers are “worse” than five years ago dropped from 47% in 2019 to 39% this year.

Vancouver, BC [October 16, 2020] – Canadians are expressing a higher level of satisfaction with drivers, and there is a decline on the incidence of specific negative behaviours on the country’s roads, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 39% of Canadians think drivers in their city or town are “worse” than five years ago, down eight points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2019.

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%, +4) say the quality of drivers has not changed, while 7% (=) believe they are “better” than five years ago.

“Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to have a pessimistic view of drivers, with 50% believing they are worse now,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer Canadians aged 35-to-54 (43%) and aged 18-to-34 (20%) share this point of view.”

The survey, which tracks the incidence of six specific behaviours, shows significant drops in some categories. 

More than half of Canadians (54%, -7 since 2019) saw a driver not signaling before a turn in the past month, and more than two-in-five (44%, -3) witnessed a car taking up two or more spots in a parking lot.

More than a third of Canadians (36%, -8) saw a driver not stopping at an intersection over the past month. Fewer respondents witnessed “lane tracking” or vehicles turning right or left from an incorrect lane (33%, -1) or experienced a “close call” on the road, such as slamming the breaks or having to steer violently to avoid a collision (26%, -9).

On a regional basis, British Columbia had the largest proportion of respondents who observed drivers not signaling before a turn (61%) or failing to stop at intersections (48%) in the past month. 

The proportion of respondents who saw vehicles taking up two or more spots in a parking lot was highest in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (53%) and Alberta (50%).

As was the case last year, 56% of Canadians believe that there are specific groups or people in their city or town who are worse drivers than others. 

More than two-in-five respondents who blamed a specific group for bad driving (43%) mentioned “young”, while 25% wrote “elderly.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 18 to September 20, 2020, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most British Columbians Would Welcome Online Voting Option

More than three-in-five likely voters think Elections BC should consider this possibility before the next provincial ballot.

Vancouver, BC [October 12, 2020] – A sizeable proportion of likely voters in British Columbia would like to explore the option of participating in the democratic process through the internet, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 63% of likely voters in British Columbia think Elections BC—the non-partisan office of the legislature responsible for conducting provincial and local elections—should “definitely” or “probably” consider allowing voters to cast their ballots online in the next provincial election.

The possibility of online voting is backed by majorities of likely voters who supported the BC Green Party (54%), the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (60%) and the BC Liberals (70%) in the 2017 election.

Across the province, 43% of likely voters say they intend to vote in this year’s election by mail, up 14 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in late September. In addition, 25% (-3) will cast a ballot in person on Election Day and 23% (-4) plan to do so during Advance Voting.

Practically one-in-five mail voters (19%) have already sent their ballot back to Elections BC. More than a third (35%) have requested a ballot but have not received it, 18% possess a ballot but have not voted yet, and 28% intend to request one.

More than nine-in-ten likely voters in British Columbia (93%, +3) express confidence in Elections BC being able to oversee the entire voting process this year. Confidence increased on Elections BC’s ability to ensure that there is no fraudulent activity with mailed ballots (87%, +5) and to enforce social distancing at polling stations (86%, +12).

When likely voters are asked what influences their choice in this election, more than two thirds (69%) mention party platforms. Slightly lower proportions of likely voters say discussions with family (52%) and friends (46%) are also persuasive.

Fewer than a third of likely voters in the province are swayed by interactions with candidates on social media (30%), endorsements from non-governmental organizations (also 30%), campaign ads on radio and television (29%), interactions with other people on social media (27%), or endorsements from unions (26%), trade associations (25%) and newspapers (23%).

This week’s televised debate will feature the leaders of the BC New Democratic Party (NDP), the BC Liberals and the BC Green Party. Fewer than half of likely voters believe other parties should be included in this debate.

While 41% of likely voters want to hear from the BC Conservative Party during the televised debate, fewer would extend an invitation to the BC Libertarian Party (35%), the Rural BC Party (22%), BC Vision (19%), the Christian Heritage Party (also 19%), the Communist Party (16%) and Wexit BC (also 16%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 5 to October 7, 2020, among 750 likely voters in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.6 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by James Wheeler

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca