Most British Columbians Will Avoid Travel During Holiday Season

More than four-in-five of the province’s residents are concerned about travellers not following COVID-19 protocols.  

Vancouver, BC [November 26, 2021] – Many residents of British Columbia acknowledge that they are not going to go on a trip in the next few weeks, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 56% of British Columbians say they do not plan to take a holiday—or spend at least one night away from their current location—in the next three months.  

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to say that they intend to travel during this holiday season (56%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (45%) and aged 55 and over (34%).  

Significant proportions of British Columbians are uneasy about relying on specific forms of transportation at this point. Fewer than half of the province’s residents (46%) say they are willing to travel on a ferry right now—a proportion that rises to 58% among residents of Vancouver Island.  

At least one-in-four British Columbians are willing to take an airplane flight to another province (36%), an airplane flight within British Columbia (32%), a trip by car to the United States (27%) or a bus trip shorter than 3 hours (25%).  

Fewer British Columbians are willing to take a railway trip (23%), an airplane fight to a different continent (22%), an airplane flight to the United States (21%), a bus trip longer than 3 hours (16%) or a trip on a cruise ship (11%).  

“More than a third of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (35%) say they would have no problem taking a trip by car to the United States,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion drops to 26% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 22% among those among those aged 55 and over.”  

When asked about possible problems that may arise during travel, more than four-in-five British Columbians (83%) say they are “very concerned” or “moderately concerned” about travellers not following COVID-19 protocols.  

At least three-in-four British Columbians say they are worried about three other issues: facing delays due to COVID-19 restrictions (78%), losing money due to cancellations (77%) and getting infected with COVID-19 during a trip (75%).  

Concerns about travellers not following COVID-19 protocols and getting infected with COVID-19 during a trip are higher among British Columbians who have a child under the age of 12 in their household (85% and 79% respectively).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 15 to November 17, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Two Thirds of Canadians Endorse Vaccine Passports in Offices

Only 9% of Canadians say they do not plan to get vaccinated against COVID-19, unchanged since September.  

Vancouver, BC [November 19, 2021] – More Canadians are in favour of implementing “vaccine passports” in order to allow employees to return to the country’s workplaces, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 67% of Canadians think it is a “good idea” to rely on COVID-19 “Proof of Vaccination” certificates for people to be able to work at an office.  

“In May 2021, when we first asked about COVID-19 vaccine certificates, just over half of Canadians (52%) were in favour of their use in offices,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support grew to 63% in September 2021 and once again this month to 67%.”  

Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to welcome “vaccine passports” in the workplace (77%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (66%) and aged 18-to-34 (59%).  

Support for the use of COVID-19 “Proof of Vaccination” certificates is highest in Quebec (73%), followed by British Columbia (70%), Ontario (68%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 68%), Alberta (64%) and Atlantic Canada (58%).  

Just over four-in-five Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in this year’s federal election (81%) are in favour of using “vaccine passports” in offices, along with 73% of those who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP), 64% of those who supported the Conservative Party and 58% of those who supported the Green Party. Only 19% of Canadians who voted for the People’s Party agree with this course of action.  

More than two thirds of Canadians continue to endorse the use of “vaccine passports” for people to go to live concerts as spectators (70%, +2), to go to live sporting events as spectators (also 70%, +4), to visit a gym or fitness facility (also 70%, +3) and to go to the theatre or cinema (69%, +3).  

Sizeable proportions of Canadians are also in favour of relying on  “Proof of Vaccination” certificates for travel to other countries (74%, +1), for travel to other Canadian provinces (70%, +2) and for travel inside the same province (65%, +3).  

Across the country, seven-in-ten Canadians (70%, -1) say they wear a mask every time the leave their home. As has been the case throughout the pandemic, women (74%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (81%) are more likely to be observing this guideline.  

There is little movement on some of the habits that Canadians may have developed as a result of the pandemic. More than one-in-ten Canadians say they are losing their temper more than usual at home (15%, =), having a bath or shower less often (14%, +2), drinking more alcohol than usual at home (13%, =), not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection (12%, -2) or brushing their teeth less often than before the pandemic (6%, -1).  

More than one-in-five Canadians continue to clean the groceries they buy to prevent infection (23%, +2) and admit to overeating or eating more than usual at home (22%, -1).  

Only 9% of Canadians (unchanged since September) say they do not plan to get inoculated against COVID-19, while 89% (+1) have already done so or intend to do so.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 8 to November 10, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

COVID-19 Ratings Improve for Most Governments in Canada

Almost two thirds of Canadians believe the worst of the pandemic is now behind us.
 
Vancouver, BC [November 15, 2021] – The views of Canadians on the way various levels of government have managed the COVID-19 pandemic are better now than they were two months ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 62% of Canadians say they are satisfied with the way the federal government has dealt with the pandemic, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September 2021.  
 
“More than three-in-five of residents of Quebec (70%), Atlantic Canada (68%) and Ontario (64%) are happy with the performance of the federal government on COVID-19,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are lower in British Columbia (58%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (54%) and Alberta (43%).”  
 
The satisfaction rating for municipal governments stands at 63% (+3) and rises to 70% among Canadians aged 55 and over.  
 
Almost three-in-five Canadians (59%, +3) are satisfied with how their provincial government is managing COVID-19. Among the four most populous provinces, Quebec has the highest rating this month (76%, +9), followed by British Columbia (62%, -4), Ontario (56%, +6) and Alberta (29%, +3).
 

Across the country, 65% of Canadians think the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic is behind us, up 17 points since September 2021.  
 
Residents of Quebec are the most likely to believe that the pandemic will not worsen (72%), followed by those who live in Ontario (68%), Alberta (62%), Atlantic Canada (60%), British Columbia (57%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 57%).  
 
As was the case two months ago, more than four-in-five Canadians (85%, +1) believe COVID-19 is a real threat, while 13% (+1) disagree with this assessment.  
 
Sizeable proportions of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (93%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (92%), the Green Party (86%) and the Conservative Party (75%) in the last federal election consider COVID-19 as a real threat. Only 27% of those who cast ballots for the People’s Party concur.  
 
Almost three-in-four Canadians (74%, +3) are in favour of allowing K-12 students to go back to in-class learning in their province.  
 
Just over four-in-five Canadians (81%, -3) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside.  
 
Only 32% of People’s Party voters endorse the mask mandate, compared to 72% of Green voters, 76% of Conservative voters, 80% of NDP voters and 89% of Liberal voters.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 8 to November 10, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Perceptions of Public Safety Wobble in British Columbia

Compared to late 2020, fewer residents of the province say they would feel safe walking alone in their neighbourhood after dark.  
 
Vancouver, BC [November 9, 2021] – The views of British Columbians on specific indicators related to criminal activity have become more dire during 2021, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, almost half of British Columbians (48%) say they fear becoming victims of crime in their community “a great deal” or “a fair amount”, up six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2020.  
 
Fear of crime is highest in Metro Vancouver (54%), followed by Northern BC (49%), the Fraser Valley (41%), Vancouver Island (also 41%) and Southern BC (32%).  
 
Across the province, 63% of British Columbians say they would feel “very safe” or “moderately safe” walking alone in their own neighbourhood after dark, down five points since 2020.  
 
“Practically three-in-four men in British Columbia (74%) say they would feel safe strolling through their neighbourhood at night,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 53% of women share the same point of view.”  
 
More than two-in-five British Columbians (44%, up two points since November 2020) say the level of criminal activity in their community has increased in the past four years—a proportion that rises to 53% in Southern BC and 54% in Vancouver Island.  
 
Over the past four years, one-in-five British Columbians (20%, -1) have been victims of a crime involving the police (such as an assault or a car break-in) in their community.  
 
Almost half of British Columbians (48%, +3) believe addiction and mental health issues are to blame “a great deal” for the current situation regarding crime in their community, while almost two-in-five (38%, =) point the finger at gangs and the illegal drug trade.  
 
Fewer British Columbians place “most of the blame” for criminal activity on poverty and inequality (31%, +5), an inadequate court system (30%, +4), lack of values and improper education for youth (27%, +3), a bad economy and unemployment (20%, +1), insufficient policing and a lack of resources to combat crime (also 20%, +4) and immigrants and minorities (9%, =).  
 
Sizeable proportions of British Columbians remain supportive of enacting a ban on military-style assault weapons (84%, +2) and a ban on handguns (79%, -1) within the limits of their municipality.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 1 to November 3, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

The Opioid Crisis is a Major Problem for Almost Half of Canadians

More than three-in-four Canadians believe more action is needed on education and awareness, as well as drug rehabilitation.  

Vancouver, BC [November 5, 2021] – The level of concern expressed by Canadians about the opioid crisis has increased over the past year, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 45% of Canadians describe the current situation related to the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in their community as “a major problem”, up six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September 2020.  

More than half of British Columbians (58%) and Albertans (55%) refer to the current state of affairs as ”a major problem.”  

Canadians are not overly satisfied with the actions of elected politicians on this file. Just over a third of Canadians (34%, -1) believe Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the federal government are doing a “very good” or “good” coming up with solutions to deal with the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs.  

Premiers and provincial governments have a slightly better rating on this question (39%, -4), with a higher level of satisfaction reported in British Columbia (43%, +7) than in Ontario (35%, -6), Quebec (34%, -10) and Alberta (28%, -19).  

Fewer Canadians are satisfied with the job their mayors and councils (37%, -3), their own Member of Parliament (33%, -5) and their own members of provincial legislatures (33%, -6) are doing to come up with solutions to deal with the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs.  

“The preoccupation of Canadians with the opioid crisis has grown, particularly in Western Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “At the same time, the level of satisfaction with the work of elected officials is stagnant or in a downward trend.”  

More than three-in-four Canadians agree with launching more education and awareness campaigns about drug use (77%, -7) and creating more spaces for drug rehabilitation (76%, -2).  

A majority of Canadians are also in favour of three other ideas: reducing the prescription of opioids by medical professionals (69%, -4), establishing “safe supply” programs where alternatives to opioids can be prescribed by health professionals (61%, -9) and setting up more “harm reduction” strategies, such as legal supervised injection sites (56%, -3).  

A proposal to decriminalize all drugs for personal use remains decidedly more contentious, with 33% of Canadians (-1) saying they favour this idea and 54% (+1) voicing disagreement.  

Support for the decriminalization of all drugs for personal use is highest in Ontario (37%), followed by British Columbia (33%), Atlantic Canada (also 33%), Quebec (31%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (30%) and Alberta (26%).  

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 25 to October 27, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Most British Columbians Think Cullen Commission Was Worth It

Seven-in-ten residents believe the province should establish an Office of the Anti-Corruption Commissioner, like Quebec.  

Vancouver, BC [November 2, 2021] – A majority of residents of British Columbia believe instituting the Commission of Inquiry into Money Laundering in the province was the correct call, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 57% of British Columbians think the provincial government made the right decision in establishing the Cullen Commission.  

More than half of British Columbians (53%) believe we have learned more about why money laundering became a problem in British Columbia due to the Cullen Commission, and a slightly smaller proportion (49%) think have learned more about what to do in the future to curb money laundering in the province.  

The provincial government announced its intention to establish the Commission of Inquiry into Money Laundering in British Columbia in May 2019. The Cullen Commission’s hearings ended in September 2021. A final report is expected to be released in December 2021.  

Just under two-in-five British Columbians (39%) followed the developments of the Cullen Commission “very closely” or “moderately closely”, including 43% of men and 41% of Metro Vancouverites.  

“The activities of the Cullen Commission were not followed intently by a majority of British Columbians,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Still, fewer than one-in-ten of the province’s residents disagree with its establishment.”  

Almost two-in-five British Columbians (39%) believe the previous government headed by the BC Liberals deserves “all of the blame” or “most of the blame” for the current situation related to money laundering in the province, unchanged since a Research Co. poll conducted in August 2018.  

Fewer British Columbians point the finger at other entities for the current situation related to money laundering, including the British Columbia Lottery Corporation (BCLC) (36%, -12), the current federal government headed by the Liberal Party (20%), the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) (19%), the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) (17%, -4) and the current provincial government headed by the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (also 17%, -6).  

The Province of Quebec has established the Office of Anti-Corruption Commissioner “to ensure the coordination of actions to prevent and fight corruption in the public sector, including in contractual matters.”  

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (71%) believe their province should establish an office similar to the one that is currently in place in Quebec. Sizeable majorities of residents who voted for the BC Green Party (85%), the BC NDP (78%) and the BC Liberals (75%) in the 2020 provincial election favour this course of action.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 18 to October 20, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 

Support for New Winter Olympic Bid Drops in British Columbia

Most residents believe it is impossible for Vancouver to host the 2030 Winter Games without any public or government funds.  

Vancouver, BC [October 25, 2021] – Residents of British Columbia are no longer convinced that an attempt to host the Olympics again should be actively entertained at this point, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 43% of British Columbians think Vancouver should launch a bid to host the Winter Olympics in 2030, down 17 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2020.  

The notion of Vancouver launching a bid to host the Summer Olympics in 2036 is endorsed by 38% of British Columbians, down from 62% in January 2020.  

In January 2020, significant majorities of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (67%) and aged 35-to-54 (59%) were in favour of a new Winter Olympic bid from Vancouver. This month, the proportions have dropped to 52% among those aged 18-to-34 and to 40% among those aged 35-to-54.  

Vancouver hosted the XXI Olympic Winter Games, from February 12 to February 28, 2010.  

“The events of the past couple of years, including the COVID-19 pandemic and the recent experience of Tokyo as a host city, appear to have made British Columbians more skeptical about a new Olympic bid,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Our survey shows that 17% of the province’s residents went from supporters to opponents when asked if Vancouver should host the Winter Olympics again.”  

More than half of British Columbians (53%) think it is impossible for Vancouver to host the 2030 Winter Olympics without any public or government funds. This proportion includes majorities of residents of the province who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (58%), the BC Liberals (53%) and the BC Greens (52%) in last year’s provincial election.  

British Columbians are divided on whether the International Olympic Committee (IOC) made the right decision in staging the Summer Games in Tokyo earlier this year. Similar proportions of respondents agree (45%) or disagree (43%) with the course of action taken by the IOC.  

Almost half of British Columbians (48%) have a positive opinion of the IOC, while more than a third (36%) hold negative views and 17% are not sure.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 18 to October 20, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Andy Liang

Ethnic Divide Clouds Marijuana Legalization in British Columbia

Residents of European descent are more likely to support legalization than their East Asian and South Asian counterparts.  
 
Vancouver, BC [October 19, 2021] – A majority of British Columbians remain in favour of the legalization of marijuana three years after it was first implemented across Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 62% of British Columbians agree with marijuana being legal in Canada, down eight points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in April 2020.  
 
While more than seven-in-ten British Columbians of European ancestry (72%) favour the legal status of marijuana in Canada, the proportion of supporters drops to 44% among residents of South Asian descent and 41% among residents of East Asian origins.  
 
Fewer than one-in-seven British Columbians are in favour of legalizing other substances, such as ecstasy (15%), heroin (14%), powder cocaine (13%), crack cocaine (11%), methamphetamine or “crystal meth” (11%) and fentanyl (10%).  
 
“The proportion of new marijuana consumers in British Columbia continues to grow,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Across the province, 18% of residents say they tried cannabis for the first time only after it became legal, up from 6% when we asked this question in April 2019.”  
 
Almost two-in-five cannabis users in British Columbia (39%) acknowledge that “all” of their product was obtained at a licensed retailer. British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to say that they are acquiring “all” of their marijuana at a licensed retailer (49%) than those aged 35-to-54 (33%) and those aged 55 and over (36%).  
 
Significant majorities of British Columbians believe the provincial government made the right decision in establishing three guidelines when cannabis became legal in Canada: prohibiting the use of marijuana on school properties and in vehicles (83%, +2), restricting marijuana smoking to areas where tobacco smoking is allowed (71%, -3) and setting 19 years as the legal age to purchase, sell or consume marijuana in British Columbia (72%, -1).  
 
Public support is slightly lower for authorizing adults to grow up to four cannabis plants per household under specific conditions (61%, +1) and for establishing the Liquor Distribution Branch (LDB) as the wholesale distributor of non-medical marijuana in the province (55%, -1).   Across the province, three-in-five British Columbians (60%, -1) believe that companies should be able to administer “drug tests” to employees now that marijuana is legal.  
 
British Columbians of South Asian ancestry are more likely to be in favour of “drug tests” to employees (74%) than their counterparts of East Asian descent (61%) and of European origins (57%).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 10 to October 12, 2021, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Canadians Call for Real Action on Reconciliation with First Nations

More than half (53%) think a renewed nation-to-nation relationship with First Nations peoples can be achieved in Canada.
 
Vancouver, BC [October 14, 2021] – Significant majorities of Canadians believe the federal government should be taking specific steps to achieve reconciliation with the country’s Indigenous peoples, a new Research Co. poll has found.
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 89% of Canadians consider it “very important” or “moderately important” to end long-term drinking water advisories in First Nations communities.
 
More than four-in-five Canadians also think it is important to release all government records related to the residential school system (88%), take steps to end bias against Indigenous Canadians in the justice system (86%) and investigate all unmarked gravesites located near former residential schools (84%).
 
Just under four-in-five Canadians (79%) consider it important to demand an apology from the head of the Catholic Church for its role in the residential school system.
 
“A holistic approach to reconciliation with First Nations peoples is clearly favoured in Canada right now,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Most Canadians believe it is equally important to repair the mistakes of the past and to deal with the problems of the present.”
 
Across the country, 45% of Canadians say they followed news stories related to the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. Just under one-in-four Canadians (23%) consider the inquiry “a success”, down four points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in February 2019.
 
In December 2015, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau stated: “It is time for a renewed, nation-to-nation relationship with First Nations peoples, one that understands that the constitutionally guaranteed rights of First Nations in Canada are not an inconvenience but rather a sacred obligation.”
 
More than half of Canadians (53%, +1) think a renewed nation-to-nation relationship with First Nations peoples can be achieved in Canada, while 30% (-4) do not and 17% (+3) are undecided.
 
Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party and the New Democratic Party (NDP) in last month’s federal election are more likely to believe that a renewed nation-to-nation relationship can be attained (65% and 55% respectively) than those who cast ballots for the Conservative Party (38%).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 4 to October 6, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Canadians Reject Health Care Cuts, Question Private Involvement

A shortage of doctors and nurses is the biggest problem facing the health care system for one third of Canadians.  
 
Vancouver, BC [October 11, 2021] – A majority of Canadians are skeptical about the effect that the private sector would have on the country’s delivery of health care services, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 56% of Canadians disagree with the notion that health care in Canada would be better than it is now if it were run by the private sector, up five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2020.  
 
In addition, more than four-in-five Canadians (82%, +7) disagree with the federal government making cuts to health care funding in order to reduce government debt.  
 
Across the country, more than three-in-four Canadians (77%, +1) feel “very confident” or “moderately confident” that the country’s health care system would be there to provide help and assistance if they had to face an unexpected medical condition.  
 
The lowest levels of confidence on this question are observed in Quebec and Atlantic Canada (65% and 66% respectively). More than seven-in-ten residents of Alberta (73%), British Columbia (78%), Ontario (79%), and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (80%) think the health care system will be there if and when they need it.  
 
Practically three-in-five Canadians (59%, +4) think there are some good things in Canada’s health care system, but many changes are required. One-in-four respondents (25%, -5) believe the system works well and only minor changes are needed to make it work better, while 12% (+3) say health care has so much wrong with it that we need to completely rebuild it.  
 
“One-in-four Atlantic Canadians (25%) believe it is time to completely rebuild Canada’s health care system,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion reaches double digits in three other provinces: Quebec (15%), Alberta (11%) and British Columbia (10%).”  
 
One third of Canadians (32%, +6) identify a shortage of doctors and nurses as the biggest problem facing the health care system right now—including 66% of Atlantic Canadians and 36% of British Columbians.  
 
More than a quarter of Canadians (27%. -4) say long wait times are the biggest hindrance in the health care system—including 39% of those in Saskatchewan and Manitoba and 31% of those in Ontario.  
 
Other problems with the health care system outlined by Canadians are bureaucracy and poor management (14%, +1), inadequate resources and facilities (8%, =), little focus on preventive care (6%, =), lack of a wider range of services for patients (5%, -1) and insufficient standards of hygiene (2%, -1).  
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 4 to October 6, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 

Lukewarm Support for Pipeline Expansion in British Columbia

A proposal to reconsider the shelved Enbridge Northern Gateway project is endorsed by 41% of British Columbians.  
 
Vancouver, BC [October 7, 2021] – Public backing for the expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline has dropped in British Columbia over the past year, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 45% of British Columbians agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the project, down seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in October 2020.  
 
Opposition to the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion stands at 34% this month, up five points since 2020 and on par with the numbers reported by Research Co. in December 2019 (35%).  
 
“Most residents of Northern BC (60%) and Southern BC (54%) agree with the federal government’s decision to carry on with the pipeline expansion,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The level of support is currently lower in Metro Vancouver (42%), the Fraser Valley (41%) and Vancouver Island (41%).”  
 
Across the province, practically two thirds of British Columbians (65%, -3) believe the pipeline project will create hundreds of jobs for residents, while more than half (55%, -1) say they are disappointed with the way the federal government has managed this file.  
 
Almost half of British Columbians (47%, +3) think the pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of residents and just over two-in-five (41%, +1) want the provincial government to do whatever is necessary to ensure that the pipeline expansion does not happen.  
 
In November 2016, the federal government rejected a proposal—known as the Enbridge Northern Gateway—to build a new pipeline from Alberta to British Columbia’s north coast, to export oil on tankers to Asian markets.  
 
Just over two-in-five British Columbians (41%) agree with reconsidering the Enbridge Northern Gateway proposal, while one third (34%) disagree and one-in-four (25%) are undecided.  
 
The idea of reviving the Enridge Northern Gateway is more popular among British Columbians who voted for the BC Liberals in the 2020 provincial election (57%) than among those who cast ballots for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (38%) or the BC Green Party (36%).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 1 to October 3, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Support for Vaccine Passports Increases Markedly Across Canada

Most Canadians who voted for the People’s Party in the federal election (66%) say they will not get inoculated against COVID-19.  
 
Vancouver, BC [October 4, 2021] – More Canadians are in favour of the concept of “vaccine passports” than five months ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 68% of Canadians think it is a “good idea” to rely on “Proof of Vaccination” certificates for people who have been inoculated against COVID-19 in order to be able to go live concerts as spectators, up 11 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May.  
 
More than three-in-five Canadians also endorse the use of “vaccine passports” to visit a gym or fitness facility (67%, +13), to go to the theatre or cinema (66%, +11), to go to live sporting events as spectators (also 66%, +9) and to work at an office (63%, +11).  
 
Support for the use of the “Proof of Vaccination” certificates is also higher for travel to other countries (73%, +9), for travel to other Canadian provinces (68%, +9) and for travel inside the same province (62%, +8).  
 
Majorities of Canadians continue to voice satisfaction with three specific aspects of the COVID-19 vaccine rollout in Canada: the vaccination plans and phases outlined by their province (71%, -2 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in July), the pace of vaccination efforts in their province (70%, -2) and the procurement of COVID-19 vaccine doses from the federal government (69%, -3).  
 
As was the case in July, practically nine-in-ten Canadians (88%, =) say they have already been inoculated against COVID-19, or plan to do so.
 
 “In late September, only 9% of Canadians readily acknowledge that they will definitely or probably not get vaccinated against COVID-19,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This proportion includes 66% of Canadians who voted for People’s Party candidates in the most recent federal election.”  
 
Practically seven-in-ten Canadians (69%, -1) say that they wear a mask every time they go out—a proportion that rises to 75% among women and to 71% among Canadians aged 35-to-54.  
 
More than one-in-five Canadians say they are overeating or eating more than usual at home (23%, -4) and cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection (21%, -3).  
 
Fewer Canadians admit to losing their temper more than usual at home (15%, -1), not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection (14%, -2), having a bath or shower less often (12%, -2), drinking more alcohol than usual at home (13%, -1) and brushing their teeth less often than before the pandemic (7%, -2).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 25 to September 27, 2021, among 1,000 Canadian adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 

Party Platforms Were Most Influential with Canadian Voters

Almost two-in-five voters say the most important factor behind their selection is a party’s ideas and policies.  

Vancouver, BC [October 1, 2021] – Canadians who cast a ballot in the 44th federal election say that the party platforms were particularly important in helping them choose which candidate to support, a new Research Co. “exit poll” has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample of Canadians who voted in this year’s federal election, 59% say that party platforms were “very influential” or “moderately influential” in their decision to support a party.  

Practically three-in-four Canadians who voted for the People’s Party in this month’s federal election (74%) cite the platform as a major influence. Sizeable majorities of Canadians who supported the Conservative Party (67%), the Liberal Party (64%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (also 64%) feel the same way, along with 39% of Green Party supporters and 19% of Bloc Québécois supporters.  

More than two-in-five Canadian voters believe discussions with family (42%) and discussions with friends (also 42%) influenced their vote in the last election, while 35% mention campaign ads on radio and television.  

While interaction with candidates on social media was an influencer for 30% of Canadian voters, the proportion rises to 43% among those aged 18-to-34. A similar scenario ensues on the issue of interactions with other people on social media. One-in-four Canadian voters (26%)—and 44% of those aged 18-to-34—say these exchanges influenced their vote.  

The survey also asked Canadian voters about the effect of seven different endorsements. More than one-in-four (27%) say they were influenced by the endorsement of U.S. President Barack Obama, including 42% of Liberal Party supporters.  

The level of influence was lower for all other endorsements, including those originating from non-governmental organizations (25%), newspapers (24%), trade associations (23%), unions (21%) former U.S. Secretary of State Hilary Clinton (18%, and 27% for Liberal voters) and current U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders (17%, and 25% for NDP voters).  

When Canadians are asked about their main motivation for supporting a party, almost two-in-five (39%) mention its ideas and policies, while one-in-four (26%) say it is the party leader.  

Fewer Canadians are primarily moved by a desire for change (12%), the party’s candidate in the riding (10%), a desire for stability (9%) or disgust with other candidates (7%).  

“More than three-in-ten Canadians who voted for the Liberals and the Bloc (32% and 31% respectively) say the most important factor behind their choice was the party leaders,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among those who cast ballots for the Conservatives (25%), the New Democrats (also 25%), the People’s Party (21%) and the Greens (10%).”  

Canadians who voted for the People’s Party were more likely to say that their main motivation was disgust with other candidates (14%).  

When asked to ponder what this federal election would have looked like with different leaders, just under three-in-ten Canadians (29%) admit they would have voted for the Conservative Party with Peter MacKay as leader or for the Liberal Party with Chrystia Freeland as leader. Fewer Canadian voters (22%) would have supported the Liberals with Mark Carney as leader.  

In the “exit poll”, a majority of Canadians (52%) say they would be “very upset” if the Liberal Party forms the government again in Canada. A slightly lower proportion (48%) would feel the same way if the Conservative Party forms the government.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 18 to September 21, 2021, among 1,900 adults in Canada who voted in the 2021 federal election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.3 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Fewer Canadians Are Happy with Liberal Minority than in 2019

The NDP ran a “positive” campaign for 54% of Canadian voters, but only 24% feel the same way about the People’s Party.  

Vancouver, BC [September 27, 2021] – Canadians who cast a ballot in the 44th federal election are not as enthused about the plausible formation of the government as they were two years ago, a new Research Co. “exit poll” has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample of Canadians who voted in this year’s federal election, 42% say they would be happy with a minority government led by the Liberal Party, while 49% would be upset.  

In the Research Co. “exit poll” released after the 2019 federal election, 49% of Canadian voters were happy with a Liberal minority mandate, while 45% were upset.  

Canadian voters are divided when assessing the prospect of a formal governing agreement between the Liberal Party and the New Democratic Party (NDP). Across the country, 44% say they would be happy if this scenario ultimately materializes, while 45% would be upset.  

“Compared to 2019, there is a significant shift in the way Canadian voters look at formal cooperation between the Liberals and New Democrats,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Two years ago, more than half of voters (56%) welcomed such a deal, but the proportion has fallen by 12 points after the most recent federal election.”  

Almost half of Canadian voters (48%) say they made up their minds about which party to support in the federal election before the campaign began—a proportion that rises to 55% among those aged 55 and over, 55% in Atlantic Canada and 52% in Ontario.  

Across the country, 14% of Canadian voters say they decided which party to support on the final week of the campaign. This finding is fairly consistent across most contending parties, from a high of 17% among those who voted for the Greens to a low of 10% among those who cast ballots for the Conservatives.  

More than half of Canadian voters (54%) describe the NDP’s electoral campaign as “very positive” or “moderately positive.”  The results on this question are lower for the Liberal Party (44%), the Conservative Party (43%), the Green Party (31%) and the People’s Party (24%).  

While only 21% of Canadian voters feel the campaign of the Bloc Québécois was positive, the proportion rises to 42% in Quebec.   Practically half of Canadian voters (49%) say they voted for the candidate in their riding who had the best chance of defeating a party they disliked, even if the candidate they voted for was not their first preference.  

“Strategic voting” was more prevalent among Canadian voters aged 18-to-34 (66%) than among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (49%) and aged 55 and over (40%).  

More than half of Canadians who voted for the Bloc Québécois (56%) and the Conservatives (53%) say they cast their ballots strategically. The numbers are lower among those who supported the Liberals (49%), the Greens (48%), the People’s Party (also 48%) and the New Democrats (38%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 18 to September 21, 2021, among 1,900 adults in Canada who voted in the 2021 federal election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.3 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Fewer Canadians Believe the Worst of COVID-19 is Behind Us

Only 26% of Albertans are satisfied with how their provincial government is handling the pandemic.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 23, 2021] – The proportion of Canadians who envision a quick end to the COVID-19 pandemic has reduced drastically since the middle of the summer, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, just under half of Canadians (48%) believe the worst of the pandemic is behind us, down 24 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in July.  
 
Conversely, more than a third of Canadians (36%, +21) think that the worst of COVID-19 is ahead of us.
 
“Almost two thirds of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (64%) believe that the COVID-19 situation will not worsen,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Significantly smaller proportions of Canadians aged 35-to-54 (50%) and aged 55 and over (39%) hold the same view.”
 
More than four-in-five Canadians (84%) consider the COVID-19 pandemic as a real threat, while 12% disagree and 4% are undecided.  
 
Fewer than one-in-five Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (5%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (6%) and the Conservative Party (16%) in this month’s federal election suggest that COVID-19 is not a real threat.  
 
The proportion of “pandemic skeptics” reaches 22% among Canadians who cast ballots for the Green Party and 58% among those who supported the People’s Party.  
 
More than half of Canadians (55%, -6) are satisfied with the way the federal government in Ottawa has dealt with COVID-19—including majorities of those who reside in Atlantic Canada (60%), Quebec (60%), Ontario (56%) and British Columbia (51%).  
 
Satisfaction is slightly lower this month for the way in which municipal governments (60%, -3) and provincial governments (56%, -6) have performed during the pandemic.  
 
At least two thirds of residents of Quebec (67%, -4) and British Columbia (66%, -5) are satisfied with the way their provincial administrations have managed COVID-19, along with half of those in Ontario (50%, -1).  
 
The situation is extremely different in Alberta, where only 26% of residents are satisfied with the provincial administration on this file. This represents a 20-point decrease since July and the lowest level recorded for a government of any level since Research Co. started asking this question in March 2020.  
 
Seven-in-ten Canadians (71%) agree with allowing K-12 students to go back to in-class learning in their province. Support for this measure is highest in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (79%), followed by Ontario (72%), Quebec (71%), British Columbia (69%), Atlantic Canada (65%) and Alberta (61%).  
 
More than four-in-five Canadians (84%) are in favour of requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on September 18 and September 19, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Dave Doe

British Columbians Tired of Government Inaction on Mobile Costs

Seven-in-ten of the province’s cell phone users say their current plan is “expensive”, unchanged since 2019.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 20, 2021] – More than two years after the federal Liberal Party promised to reduce the cost of mobile phones and internet bills for Canadians, few British Columbians expect this pledge to ultimately be fulfilled, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, only 25% of British Columbians think the federal government will “definitely” or “probably” achieve this promise, down six points from a similar Research Co. survey conducted in December 2019.  
 
British Columbians are also not particularly hopeful about their provincial administration, which appointed MLA Bob D’Eith to work with the federal government to explore more affordable and transparent mobile phone options.  
 
Across the province, only 32% of British Columbians expect the provincial government’s push to be successful, down three points since December 2019.  
 
“British Columbians aged 55 and over are more likely to be skeptical about a future where mobile service is more affordable,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 22% of the province’s oldest adults think the provincial government will be effective in its efforts and just 16% think the federal government will fulfil the promise made in the previous electoral campaign.”  
 
Across the province, seven-in-ten mobile phone users (70%) describe the cost of their mobile phone plan as “very expensive” or “moderately expensive”, unchanged since December 2019.  
 
Women (70%) and British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (74%) are more likely to believe that they pay too much for their cell phone every month.  
 
A monthly plan for a mobile phone in Canada with two gigabytes of data costs about $75.  
 
About a third of British Columbians think a similar plan would be less expensive if they lived in Australia (33%) or Italy (34%), while more than half (57%) think they would pay less to access the same services in the United States.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on September 5 and September 6, 2021, among 700 adults who work in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

All Tied Up as Canadians Prepare to Vote in the Federal Election

Support for both the Liberal Party and the Conservative Party is 32%, while approval of their two leaders is also identical (42%).  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 19, 2021] – Voters in Canada head to tomorrow’s federal election with the two main contending parties enjoying the same level of voter support across the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 32% of decided voters (-2 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted earlier this month) would cast a ballot for the candidate of the Liberal Party in their constituency, while 32% (+2) would support the contender of the Conservative Party.  
 
The New Democratic Party (NDP) is in third place with 19% (-1), followed by the Bloc Québécois with 7% (=), the People’s Party with 6% (+1) and the Green Party with 4% (+1). In addition, 1% of decided voters in the country would vote for a different political party or an independent candidate.  
 

On a regional basis, the Liberals are in first place in Atlantic Canada (42%, with the Conservatives at 27%), Quebec (34%, with the Bloc at 31%) and Ontario (37%, with the Conservatives at 30%).  
 
Conversely, the Conservatives dominate in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (43%, with the NDP at 23%) and Alberta (50%, with the NDP at 21%). In British Columbia, the Conservatives are slightly ahead of the New Democrats (33% to 31%), with the Liberals at 25%.  
 
The Green Party gets its best result in British Columbia (6%, but reaching 14% in its stronghold of Vancouver Island). The People’s Party is particularly prevalent in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (10%) and Alberta (8%).  
 
As the campaign draws to a close, the approval rating for the two main contenders is exactly the same. Just over two-in-five Canadians (42%) approve of the way both Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau and Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole have performed in their jobs. The disapproval rating is higher for Trudeau (53%) than it is for O’Toole (47%).  
 
NDP leader Jagmeet Singh has the highest approval rating (51%, +2), while the numbers are significantly lower for Green Party leader Annamie Paul (24%, +1) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (20%, +5). Since the start of the campaign, one-in-four Canadians report having an improved opinion of both Singh (26%) and O’Toole (25%). The proportions are significantly lower for Trudeau (16%), Paul (10%) and Bernier (also 10%).  
 
Trudeau remains ahead when Canadians are asked which of the five leaders running nationwide campaigns would make the best Prime Minister (31%, -2), followed by O’Toole (27%, +1), Singh (19%, +1), Bernier (7%, +2) and Paul (2%, =).  
 
More than a quarter of Canadians (27%, +4) think health care is the most important issue facing the country. The economy and jobs is second on the list with 22% (=), followed by housing, homelessness and poverty (15%, -1) and the environment (10%, -2).  
 
The COVID-19 pandemic is the most important issue for 8% of Canadians—a proportion that rises to 16% in Alberta.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on September 18 and September 19, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada, and 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for the survey of Canadians and +/- 3.5 percentage points for the survey of British Columbians, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Iouri Goussev

Many British Columbians in the Dark About Return to Office

Almost half of those who worked from home during the COVID-19 pandemic expect to be able to do so at least three times a week.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 13, 2021] – Sizeable proportions of British Columbians who worked from home during the COVID-19 pandemic have not been adequately informed about an eventual return to the workplace, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative sample, only 45% of employed British Columbians who have worked from home during the pandemic say their company has outlined a plan for employees to return to the office after the pandemic is over.  
 
In addition, only 40% of British Columbians who worked from home during the pandemic say their company has outlined a plan for how they will be able to work from home in the future.  
 
Across the province, 55% of employed British Columbians say they laboured from home instead of at their usual workplace during the COVID-19 pandemic, including 59% of women, 59% of those aged 18-to-34 and 73% of those whose duties are primarily related to office work.  
 
Just under half of employed British Columbians who have worked from home during the pandemic (47%) say they expect to be able to continue doing so at least three times a week, up nine points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in March.  
 
“The past six months have not provided clarity for many employed British Columbians on what their work arrangements will look like,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The expectations of a future where the home office plays a prominent role on weekdays have increased markedly, particularly in the Fraser Valley and Vancouver Island.”  
 
More than half of British Columbians who worked from home (56%) say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to seek a different job if their current company does not allow them to work from home as often as they want, up seven points since March.  
 
Almost two thirds of employed British Columbians who have worked from home (64%) say they would consider switching to a different job that can be performed from home for a company located in their own metropolitan area. More than half (55%) would consider a similar arrangement reporting to a company headquartered in their own province, while more than two-in-five (44%) would entertain an offer from a company in another province.  
 
There is some change when it comes to some of the current features of office life. Compared to March, fewer employed British Columbians expect an increase in virtual communications between offices (43%, -3), virtual staff meetings (43%, -7) and virtual business development (41%, -6).  
 
The proportions are also lower on the expectations of fewer in-person staff meetings (42%, -5), less business travel (37%, -7) and a reduction of in-person business development meetings (38%, -5) once the pandemic ends.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on September 5 and September 6, 2021, among 700 adults who work in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Tokyo Olympics Coverage Compelling for Younger Canadians

Support for a Canadian boycott of the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics reaches 56% across the country.
 
Vancouver, BC [September 10, 2021] – While a majority of Canadians tuned in to this year’s Summer Olympics, almost two-in-five event watchers report that they did not pay as much attention to the competition as they had in the past, a new Research Co. poll has found.
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 58% of Canadians say they watched at least some coverage of the most recent Summer Olympics, which were held in Tokyo earlier this year.
 
Canadians aged 18-to-34 were more likely to watch the Summer Olympics (62%) than their counterparts aged 55 and over (58%) and aged 35-to-54 (56%).
 
Among those Canadians who tuned in to the Tokyo 2020 games, almost two-in-five (38%) admit that they watched less coverage than in past Summer Olympics. A similar proportion (40%) enjoyed the same amount as in previous editions, while 21% say they watched more coverage.
 
While 46% of Canadians aged 55 and over say they watched fewer Olympic events this year, one third of those aged 18-to-34 (33%) say they were exposed to more coverage in 2021.
 
Canadians who watched television coverage were asked about the platforms they relied upon. Across the country, more than half of the time spent on Tokyo 2020 (52%) was enjoyed live on television, while 24% amounted to tape delayed broadcasts.
 
Just under a quarter of the time that Canadians spent watching the games (24%) took place via streaming, either live (12%) or tape delayed (also 12%).
 
“There are some sizeable age differences when it comes to the platforms that Canadians used to watch events during the Tokyo 2020 games,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While Canadians aged 55 and over relied on streaming only 17% of the time, the proportion rises to 39% for those aged 18-to-34.”
 
A majority of Canadians (56%) say they think Canada should boycott the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing over China’s human rights record, up two points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in March.
 
Men (61%), Canadians aged 55 and over (60%), Albertans (61%) and British Columbians (59%) are more likely to endorse the notion of Canadian athletes not participating in the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Wiiii

Province’s Name is Fine for Most Residents of British Columbia

Just under one-in-five residents are upset by the absence of an acknowledgment to Indigenous peoples in British Columbia.

Vancouver, BC [August 30, 2021] – A majority of British Columbians believe the time is not right to consider a change in the province’s name or flag, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 60% of British Columbians disagree with changing the name of the province to acknowledge its Indigenous heritage, while 26% agree and 14% are undecided.

“The debate over British Columbia’s name finds very different positions from a generational standpoint,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While more than a third of residents aged 18-to-34 (37%) would welcome a change, the proportion falls to 30% among those aged 35-to-54 and to just 14% among those aged 55 and over.”

The proposal does not find a significant variation by political allegiance, with 30% of BC Green Party voters in the 2020 provincial election supporting a name change, along with 29% of those who cast ballots for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) and 26% of those who supported the BC Liberals.

The notion of changing the provincial flag to remove the Union Jack resonates with 30% of British Columbians, but practically half (49%) are opposed and 20% are not sure.

British Columbians aged 35-to-54 are more likely to be in favour of this change in the provincial flag (37%) than their counterparts aged 18-to-34 (33%) and aged 55 and over (23%).

Two thirds of British Columbians (67%) say that nothing upsets them about the name of the province. Just under one-in-five (18%) say they are bothered by the absence of an acknowledgement to Indigenous peoples, while fewer are upset at the “British” (15%) and “Columbia” (8%) components of the name.

Residents of Northern BC are significantly more likely to be upset with the absence of an acknowledgement to Indigenous peoples in the province’s name (26%) and with the “Columbia” component (16%) than their counterparts in other regions.

The Queen Charlotte Islands were renamed as Haida Gwaii in 2010. More than half of British Columbians (56%) agree with this decision, while 20% disagree and 24% are undecided.

More than three-in-five residents of Vancouver Island (64%) and the Fraser Valley (63%) agree with the decision to rename the islands as Haida Gwaii, along with majorities of those who live in Southern BC (55%), Metro Vancouver (53%) and Northern BC (52%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 7 to August 9, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

 
Photo Credit: CPG1100