British Columbians OK with Abandoning Winter Olympic Bid

Agreement with the FIFA World Cup coming to Vancouver in 2026 has increased since June.

Vancouver, BC [November 21, 2022] – Most British Columbians think the provincial government made the right call in refusing to back a proposed bid to host the Winter Olympics again, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 57% of British Columbians agree with the provincial government’s decision to not support the 2030 Winter Olympics bid that was being explored by Four Host First Nations—Musqueam, Squamish, Tsleil-Waututh, and Lilwat—and the municipal governments of Vancouver and Whistler.

Vancouver hosted the XXI Olympic Winter Games, from February 12 to February 28, 2010.

Only 29% of British Columbians disagree with the provincial government’s decision to abandon the proposed 2030 bid—a proportion that rises to 48% among respondents of First Nation or Indigenous descent.

“British Columbians of all political stripes believe this is not the best moment to consider hosting the Winter Games again,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of residents who voted in 2020 for the BC Liberals (66%), the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (63%) and the BC Green Party (58%) are in agreement.”

In previous surveys, support for exploring the possibility of holding the 2030 Winter Olympics in Vancouver fluctuated from 60% in January 2020 to 43% in October 2021 and to 54% in June 2022,

The notion of Vancouver hosting the Summer Olympics in 2036 remains contentious, with 42% of British Columbians (-6) thinking a bid should be launched and 45% (+5) disagreeing with this idea.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more eager to entertain a Summer Olympics bid for 2036 (51%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (46%) and aged 55 and over (33%).

More than three-in-five British Columbians (62%, +7) agree with Vancouver being a host city during the FIFA (Soccer) 2026 Men’s World Cup, while one-in-four (24%, -10) disagree and 14% are undecided.

Satisfaction with the 2026 Men’s World Cup coming to Vancouver is particularly high in the Fraser Valley (65%), Southern BC (64%) and Metro Vancouver (63%).

Just over two-in-five British Columbians (41%, -6) hold positive views on the International Olympic Committee (IOC), while a smaller proportion (38%) feel the same way about FIFA.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 6 to November 8, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Move Away from Conscience Rights in Health Care

Compared to 2020, more Canadians believe practitioners should not be able to refuse services on account of moral beliefs.

Vancouver, BC [November 18, 2022] – Disapproval with the notion of provinces taking legislative action to entrench conscience rights for health care workers has grown in Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Canadians would oppose a bill that sought to allow health care professionals the ability to have a moral or faith-based objection to providing services, up three points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in February 2020.

“Opposition to the concept of conscience rights in health care delivery is strongest among Canadians aged 55 and over (56%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (50%) and aged 18-to-34 (48%).”

In 2019, Alberta considered the implementation of Bill 207 which was later abandoned. The proposed legislation sought to enable the province’s health care practitioners to abstain from providing services to an individual if they considered that their conscientious beliefs would be infringed upon.

Just over half of Canadians (51%, +9) disagree with health care professionals having the ability to object to providing services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to physician-assisted death.

Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (59%) and the Liberal Party (56%) in the 2021 federal election are more likely to disagree with conscience rights in physician-assisted death than those who backed the Conservative Party (40%).

A majority of Canadians (56%, +7) are against health care professionals being able to object to providing services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to abortion.

Opposition to conscience rights on abortion is highest in Quebec (63%), followed by Atlantic Canada (60%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (55%), British Columbia (54%), Alberta (also 54%) and Ontario (50%).

More than three-in-five Canadians (63%, +5) reject the notion of health care practitioners refusing to serve lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, gender diverse, queer and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2+) people because of a moral or faith-based objection—a proportion that rises to 69% among both Canadians aged 55 and over and Atlantic Canadians.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 12 to November 14, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Oblivious to Acts Proposed by Western Premiers

Half of residents (50%) agree with what Saskatchewan is trying to accomplish, while 39% feel the same way about Alberta’s actions.

Vancouver, BC [November 11, 2022] – Few Canadians are actively following stories related to the recent pronouncements issued by the premiers of Alberta and Saskatchewan, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 37% of Canadians say they are paying close attention to the Alberta Sovereignty Act.

Just over three-in-ten Canadians (31%) are following stories related to the Saskatchewan First Act “very closely” or “moderately closely”

The Alberta Sovereignty Act proposed by Premier Danielle Smith seeks to allow the province to refuse to follow specific federal laws if they are deemed not to be in Alberta’s best interests.

The Saskatchewan First Act proposed by Premier Scott Moe seeks to confirm Saskatchewan’s autonomy and exclusive jurisdiction over its natural resources.

“Half of Conservative Party voters in the last Canadian federal election (50%) are keeping an eye on news related to the Alberta Sovereignty Act,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower among Canadians who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (36%) or the Liberal Party (35%) in 2021.”

Just over half of Canadians (51%) are concerned about the Alberta Sovereignty Act, while 45% feel the same way about the Saskatchewan First Act.

Half of Canadians (50%) think the Government of Saskatchewan is right to confirm its autonomy and exclusive jurisdiction over its natural resources, while 27% disagree with this notion and 22% are undecided.

On a regional basis, residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (60%) and Alberta (57%) agree with the principle of the Saskatchewan First Act, along with 48% of those who live in Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia.

Only 34% of Canadians think the Government of Alberta is right to refuse to follow specific federal laws if they are deemed not to be in Alberta’s best interests, while 42% disagree with this assessment and 21% are not sure.

Just over half of Albertans (52%) agree with the ideals behind the Alberta Sovereignty Act. The numbers are lower in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (43%), British Columbia and Ontario (38% each), Atlantic Canada (34%) and Quebec (33 %).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from November 4 to November 6, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

A Third of British Columbians Willing to Change Province’s Name

Residents aged 18-to-34 are particularly supportive of a move to acknowledge the province’s Indigenous heritage.

Vancouver, BC [November 8, 2022] – While most British Columbians disagree with the notion of changing the province’s name, young adults believe this would be the correct course of action, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 53% of British Columbians disagree with changing the name of the province to acknowledge its Indigenous heritage, down seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2021.

A third of British Columbians (32%, +6) would like to go forward with a name change—a proportion that rises to 50% among those aged 18-to-34.

“More than a third of Vancouver Island residents (37%) would welcome changing British Columbia’s name,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support is lower in Northern BC (32%), Metro Vancouver (31%), the Fraser Valley (30%) and Southern BC (26%).”

Just over three-in-five British Columbians (62%, -5) are not bothered by any component of the province’s name. About one-in-five are upset about the absence of an acknowledgement to Indigenous peoples (20%, +2) and the “British” part (19%, +4). Only 8% (=) are bothered by the presence of the word “Columbia”.

The numbers did not move much when British Columbians were asked if the provincial flag should be amended to remove the Union Jack. Just over three-in-ten (31%, +1) agree with this plan, while 46% (-3) disagree with it.

Only 24% of British Columbians aged 55 and over would consent to having a provincial flag that does not feature the Union Jack. Support is higher among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (30%) and aged 18-to-34 (43%).

In 2010, the Queen Charlotte Islands were renamed as Haida Gwaii. Most British Columbians (58%, +2) believe this was the right decision, while 20% (=) disagree and 23% (-1) are undecided.

More than seven-in-ten residents of Vancouver Island (71%) believe changing the name of the Queen Charlotte Islands was the correct course of action, along with majorities of residents of Southern BC (58%), the Fraser Valley (57%), Metro Vancouver (55%) and Northern BC (also 55%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 29 to October 31, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Concerns About Birth Tourism Drop Slightly in Canada

More than seven-in-ten Canadians still want the federal government to investigate the full extent of the practice.

Vancouver, BC [November 4, 2022] – Canadians are currently not paying as much attention to the issue of “birth tourism” as they did in 2020, but a sizeable majority believe the practice should still be scrutinized, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 28% of Canadians say they have followed media stories related to the issue of “birth tourism” in the past year “very closely” or “moderately closely”, down 13 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2020.

British Columbians and Quebecers are significantly more likely to be paying attention to news related to “birth tourism” (36% and 34% respectively) than their counterparts in other Canadian provinces.

“Birth tourism” is the practice of traveling to a specific country for the purpose of giving birth there and securing citizenship for the child in a country that has birthright citizenship. Canada allows expectant mothers who are foreign nationals to gain automatic citizenship for their children born in Canada.

Over the past few years, there have been reports of unregulated “for profit” businesses that have facilitated the practice of “birth tourism” in Canada. More than half of Canadians agree that “birth tourism” can displace Canadians from hospitals (54%, -2) and can degrade the value of Canadian citizenship (53%, -6).

More than three-in-five Canadians (64%, -7) believe “birth tourism” can be unfairly used to gain access to Canada’s education, health care and social programs—a point of view shared by 76% of British Columbians.

More than seven-in-ten Canadians (73%, -5) believe the federal government should establish a committee to investigate the full extent of “birth tourism” in Canada.

“A federal inquiry into the full scope of birth tourism would not represent a political liability for the federal government,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (82%), the Conservative Party (77%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (72%) in the last federal election are on board.”

Almost half of Canadians (48%, -6) think the country should ponder establishing new guidelines for birthright citizenship, while more than a third (37%, +3) would prefer to keep existing regulations.

Support for developing a new framework to birthright citizenship in Canada is highest in Ontario (50%), followed by Manitoba and Saskatchewan (49%), Quebec (48%) and Alberta, British Columbia and Atlantic Canada (each at 47%).

More than three-in-five Canadians (62%, -5) agree with the notion that birthright citizenship may have made sense at one point, but now people have taken advantage of existing rules.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 24 to October 26, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Conservatives Have Four-Point Lead Over Liberals in Canada

Canadians are evenly split when assessing the accomplishments of the Liberals and the NDP following their March 2022 agreement.

Vancouver, BC [October 31, 2022] – The opposition Conservative Party is ahead in Canada’s federal political scene, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 35% of decided voters would cast a ballot for the Conservative candidate in their constituency.

The governing Liberal Party is in second place with 31%, followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 19%, the Bloc Québécois with 8%, the Green Party with 4% and the People’s Party with 2%.

The Conservatives hold sizeable leads in their traditional strongholds of Alberta (51%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (47%) and are also first in Ontario (41%) and British Columbia (37%). The Liberals are leading in Quebec (38%, with the Bloc at 32%) and Atlantic Canada (38%).

“Among Canadian decided voters aged 55 and over, the Conservatives have a double-digit lead over the Liberals (41% to 30%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The race is much closer among younger voters.”

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%) approve of the performance of Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau while just over half (51%) disapprove.

The approval rating is higher this month for NDP leader Jagmeet Singh (46%, -5 since the last Research Co. survey conducted before the 2021 federal election).

More than a third of Canadians (37%) approve of the way Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Pierre Poilievre has handled his duties, while 44% disagree and 19% are undecided.

The numbers are lower for Green interim leader Amita Kuttner (22%), Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (20%, and 38% in Quebec) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (18%).

Practically three-in-ten Canadians (29%, +7 since September 2021) identify the economy and jobs as the most important issue facing Canada, followed by housing, homelessness and poverty (21%, +6), health care (also 21%, -6), the environment (7%, -3), accountability and leadership (5%, -1), immigration (4%, +1) and crime and public safety (also 4%, +1).

The economy and jobs is regarded as the most pressing federal concern for residents of Alberta (38%), Quebec (33%), Ontario (30%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 30%).

Health care is the prevalent issue for Atlantic Canadians (35%), while housing, homelessness and poverty is the most important matter in British Columbia (33%).

When asked which one of the six main party leaders would make the best prime minister of Canada, Trudeau holds a six-point advantage over Poilievre (30% to 24%), followed by Singh (17%), Blanchet (4%), Bernier (2%) and Kuttner (1%).

Residents of two provinces are almost evenly divided on whether Trudeau or Poilievre would be the best head of government for Canada right now. In Ontario, Poilievre is a point ahead of Trudeau (30% to 29%). In British Columbia, the current prime minister edges the opposition leader by the same margin (27% to 26%).

More than two-in-five Canadians (43%) say they are comfortable with Trudeau being charge of Canada’s economy, a proportion that rises to 45% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 52% in Quebec.

Just under two-in-five Canadians (39%) say they would be comfortable with Poilievre being charge of Canada’s economy, including 48% of Albertans and 43% of Ontarians.

There is no clear consensus on what the March 2022 supply and confidence agreement between the Liberals and the NDP has meant to Canada so far. Across the country, 44% are satisfied with the accomplishments of this deal, while the same proportion (44%) are dissatisfied.

Liberal voters in the 2021 federal election are significantly more likely to hold positive views on the March 2022 supply and confidence agreement (80%) than those who voted for the New Democrats (51%) or the Conservatives (13%).

The country is also divided on whether a federal election should be called in the next six months now that the Conservatives have a full time leader (Agree 44%, Disagree 41%).

Canadians who voted for the Conservatives in the last federal election are more convinced about the need to hold a fresh ballot now (73%) than their counterparts who supported the NDP (44%) or the Liberals (30%) in 2021.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 24 to October 26, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Mixed Messages on Organ Donation After Death in Canada

While sizeable majorities of Canadians agree with the practice, significantly fewer have explicitly outlined their wishes.

Vancouver, BC [October 25, 2022] – While a vast majority of Canadians say they want to donate their human organs and tissue after death, few are actually registered to do so, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 84% of Canadians support the donation of human organs and tissue after death.

Canadians aged 55 and over are the most supportive of the practice (92%), followed by their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (84%) and aged 18-to-34 (78%).

Two thirds of Canadians (68%) say they would want their organs and tissue to be donated after their death, while 21% disagree and 11% are undecided.

On a regional basis, residents of Atlantic Canada are more likely to say that they would like to donate their organs and tissue after death (79%), followed by those who live in British Columbia and Alberta (each at 71%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (69%), Quebec (66%) and Ontario (64%).

Across the country, only 43% of Canadians say they have registered to be an organ and tissue donor after their death, an “explicit consent” usually expressed in a health card or driver’s licence.

“On the issue of organ and tissue donation after death, the thoughts and actions of Canadians differ greatly,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While two thirds want to go through with donations, fewer than half have actually registered to do so.”

Some jurisdictions around the world have established “Active Donor Registration” systems for organ and tissue donation. Under these systems, every person over the age of 18 is considered an organ and tissue donor after death unless they specifically opt-out of a registry.

In January 2021, Nova Scotia’s “Human Organ and Tissue Act” came into effect. The law makes every single person who has resided in the province for at least a year a potential organ and tissue donor after death. Nova Scotians who do not wish to be donors are able to opt-out of the system.

Almost two thirds of Canadians (65%, down five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2020) want their provincial government to “definitely” or “probably” implement an “Active Donor Registration” system for organ and tissue donation after death.

Support for the implementation of an “Active Donor Registration” system is highest among Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) in the 2021 federal election (74%), but also encompasses majorities of those who cast ballots for the Liberal Party (68%) and the Conservative Party (67%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from October 1 to October 3, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Concerns About Opioid Crisis Stagnant in Canada, Rise in U.S.

Just over a third of Canadians and Americans are satisfied with the way Justin Trudeau and Joe Biden are managing this issue.

Vancouver, BC [October 21, 2022] – Residents of Canada and the United States voice a high level of support for specific strategies to deal with the opioid crisis, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 45% of Canadians and 60% of Americans describe the current situation related to the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in their community as “a major problem”.

Grave concerns about the opioid crisis remain stagnant in Canada compared to a Research Co. poll conducted in October 2021, but have risen by seven points in the United States since September 2020.

Respondents to this survey were asked to consider six ideas related to opioids. More than four-in-five Canadians and Americans endorse two of them: launching more education and awareness campaigns about drug use (CAN 84%, USA 88%) and creating more spaces for drug rehabilitation (CAN 82%, USA 84%).

The concept of “safe supply” programs, where alternatives to opioids can be prescribed by health professionals, is supported by 74% of Canadians and 80% of Americans. In addition, three-in-four residents of each country (CAN 75%, USA 75%) believe it is time to reduce the prescription of opioids by medical professionals.

Two other proposals are more contentious. Majorities of Canadians and Americans (CAN 63%, USA 56%) agree with setting up more “harm reduction” strategies, such as legal supervised injection sites.

The notion of decriminalizing all drugs for personal use is endorsed by 40% of Canadians and 35% of Americans.

“Nationwide support for the decriminalization of all drugs for personal use increased in Canada from 33% in 2021 to 40% this year,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the United States, it dropped from 47% in 2020 to 35% in 2022.”

Canadians and Americans have similar opinions on the work of elected politicians to deal with the opioid crisis. More than a third consider the performance of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the Canadian federal government (36%) and President Joe Biden and the American federal government (34%) as satisfactory.

While 34% of Canadians think their own Member of Parliament is doing a “good job” managing the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in your community, only 23% of Americans feel the same way about the U.S. Congress.

The ratings are equivalent for Canadians premiers and provincial governments (36%) and American governors and state governments (also 36%).

Local governments fare slightly better, with 39% of Americans endorsing the work of their mayor and local government on the opioid crisis and 38% of Canadians feeling the same way about their mayor and council.

Methodology: Results are based on online studies conducted from October 15 to October 17, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Ponder Future Effect of BC NDP Leadership Race

Women are more likely to support the BC New Democrats if David Eby replaces John Horgan as leader.

Vancouver, BC [October 18, 2022] – The governing BC New Democratic Party (NDP) remains ahead of the opposition BC Liberals in British Columbia’s political scene, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 44% of decided voters would support the BC NDP candidate in their constituency if a provincial ballot were held today, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in February.

The BC Liberals are in second place with 35% (-3), followed by the BC Green Party with 15% (+2) and the BC Conservative Party with 4% (+2).

More than half of British Columbians (57%, -12) approve of the way Premier and BC NDP leader John Horgan has handled his duties. The numbers are lower for both BC Liberals leader Kevin Falcon (36%, -2) and BC Greens leader Sonia Furstenau (35%, -1).

The survey also asked about the two prospective candidates seeking to replace Horgan at the helm of the BC NDP. Just over two-in-five British Columbians (42%) approve of David Eby, while three-in-ten (30%) feel the same way about Anjali Appadurai.

Across British Columbia, a third of residents (33%) say it makes no difference to them who becomes the next leader of the BC NDP, while one-in-five (25%) are undecided. Eby is ahead of Appadurai among all residents of the province (30% to 12%) and among those who voted for the BC New Democrats in the 2020 provincial election (42% to 11%).

Respondents to this poll were asked about four different scenarios that could materialize upon the conclusion of the BC NDP leadership race.

In a match-up with Eby as leader, 43% of decided voters would support the BC NDP and 34% would back the BC Liberals. The race becomes much closer if Appadurai supplants Horgan: 38% for the BC NDP and 36% for the BC Liberals.

“The BC NDP would have an easier time connecting with female voters with David Eby as leader,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support for the governing party among women stands at 51% with him and at 44% under Appadurai.”

The results are also different if either of the losing contenders in the BC NDP leadership race decided to create their own political parties.

With Eby as leader, the BC NDP would keep the upper hand over the BC Liberals (40% to 34%), with lower support for the BC Greens (15%), the BC Conservatives (6%) and a new political party led by Appadurai (3%).

An Appadurai-led BC NDP would be four points behind the BC Liberals (31% to 35%). The BC Greens would be third with 16%, followed by a new provincial party led by Eby (10%) and the BC Conservatives (6%).

When asked about the most important issue facing the province, almost two-in-five British Columbians (38%, +5) select housing, homelessness and poverty—a proportion that jumps to 43% among women and to 47% among those aged 18-to-34.

Health care is second on the list of concerns with 28% (+5), rising to 44% among British Columbians aged 55 and over. The economy and jobs is third on the list with 11% (-5), followed by crime and public safety (8%, +4) and the environment (6%, -4).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 9 to October 11, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Endorse Pardons for Simple Possession of Marijuana

Two thirds of Canadians agree with cannabis being legal in Canada, as reliance on licensed retailers increases.

Vancouver, BC [October 12, 2022] – More than three-in-five Canadians are in favour of a plan to pardon people convicted of simple possession of marijuana, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 64% of Canadians agree with the federal government providing expungement orders to people convicted of possession of cannabis for personal use with no intent to traffic.

In Canada, an expungement order compels police forces, federal departments or agencies to destroy or remove any judicial record of a conviction.

“The issue of pardons for simple possession of marijuana is not particularly divisive politically,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Sizeable majorities of Canadians who voted for the New Democrats (78%), the Liberals (70%) and the Conservatives (63%) in 2021 believe it is the right course of action.”

Two thirds of Canadians (66%, +2 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in April 2021) agree with cannabis being legal in Canada.

There are some significant differences among Canadians of different ethnic backgrounds when it comes to marijuana. Majorities of Canadians of Indigenous (80%), European (68%) and South Asian (57%) heritage agree with cannabis being legal in the country, compared to just 41% of those of East Asian descent.

While half of Canadians (50%) have never tried marijuana, about two-in-five (39%) used cannabis before it became legal in October 2018.

Just over one-in-ten Canadians (11%) consumed it only after legalization—a proportion that rises to 16% among those aged 18-to-34.

Almost half of Canadians who have used marijuana after legalization (48%) say they acquired “all” of their product at a licensed retailer, up 10 points since 2021.

There is also a reduction in the proportion of marijuana consumers who have not bought any cannabis from a licensed retailer, from 20% in April 2021 to 15% this month.

Few Canadians think it is time to make other substances legal in Canada, including ecstasy (10%, -4), powder cocaine (10%, -6), heroin (10%, -5), fentanyl (8%,-6), crack cocaine (8%, -5) and methamphetamine or “crystal meth” (8% -5).

Three-in-five Canadians (60%, -1) believe companies should be able to administer “drug tests” to any employee now that marijuana is legal in Canada, even if they do not operate machinery (such as pilots, truck drivers or crane operators).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from October 1 to October 3, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

CAQ Headed for Second Majority Mandate in Quebec

Vancouver, BC [October 2, 2022] – The governing Coalition Avenir Québec (CAQ) heads to tomorrow’s provincial election as the overwhelming favourite, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of likely voters in Quebec, 41% of decided voters will cast a ballot for the CAQ candidate in their constituency, up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in mid-September.

The Liberal Party of Quebec and the Conservative Party of Quebec are tied for second place with 16% each (-1 and -2 respectively), followed by Québec solidaire with 14% (=) and the Parti Québécois (PQ) with 12% (+2).

More than three-in-five decided voters aged 55 and over (64%) say they will support the CAQ, along with 39% of those aged 35-to-54. Québec solidaire is the top choice for decided voters aged 18-to-34 (30%).

A majority of likely voters in Quebec (55%, -2) approve of François Legault’s performance as Premier and CAQ leader—a proportion that rises to 68% among those aged 55 and over.

Since mid-September, the approval rating improved for Québec solidaire co-spokesperson Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois (42%, +5), PQ leader Paul St-Pierre Plamondon (40%, +4) and Official Opposition and Liberal leader Dominique Anglade (39%, +6). The numbers are lower for Conservative leader Éric Duhaime (29%, -2).

On the “Best Premier” question, Legault maintains a sizeable lead (40%, -3), followed by Nadeau-Dubois (12%, +2), Duhaime (also 12%, -1), Anglade (10%, -1), and  Plamondon (8%, +2).

“More than seven-in-ten CAQ voters from the 2018 election (73%) think Legault would make the best premier out of the five main party leaders in Quebec ,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In stark contrast, only 30% of Liberal voters from the previous provincial ballot feel the same way about Anglade.”

The most important issue for likely voters in Quebec is health care (40%, -5), followed by the economy and jobs (17%, +1) and housing, homelessness and poverty (12%, unchanged).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from September 30 to October 2, 2022, among 708 likely voters in Quebec, including 637 decided voters in the 2022 provincial election. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points for the sample of likely voters and +/- 3.9 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Positive Views on State of Health Care Drop in British Columbia

Half of the province’s residents say a shortage of doctors and nurses is the biggest problem facing the system right now.

Vancouver, BC [September 30, 2020] – Just over three-in-ten British Columbians believe the province’s health care system requires a major overhaul, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 31% of British Columbians believe health care in the province has so much wrong with it that we need to completely rebuild it, up 20 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November 2020.

Only 13% of British Columbians (-9) think health care in the province works well, and only minor changes are needed to make it work better, while half (50%, -14) say there are some good things in health care in British Columbia, but some changes are required.

“Negative perceptions about the current state of the health care system in British Columbia increase with age,“ says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 22% of residents aged 18-to-34 call for a complete rebuild, the proportion rises to 30% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 40% among those aged 55 and over.”

Half of British Columbians (50%, +26) consider a shortage of doctors and nurses as the biggest problem facing the health care system right now. Long waiting times is a distant second on the list of concerns with 18% (-9), followed by bureaucracy and poor management (10%, =) and inadequate resources and facilities (7%, -6).

Two-in-five British Columbians (40%, =) say they would be willing to pay out of their own pocket to have quicker access to medical services that currently have long waiting times—a proportion that rises to 49% among those aged 18-to-34.

In addition, a third of British Columbians (33%, +6) would consider travelling to another country to have quicker access to medical services that currently have long waiting times.

In September 2020, a B.C. Supreme Court justice ruled that access to private health care is not a constitutional right, even if wait times for care under the public system are too long.

More than a third of British Columbians (37%, -9) agree with the decision taken by the B.C. Supreme Court justice, while 49% (+18) disagree and 14% (-9) are undecided.

British Columbians who voted for the BC Liberals and the BC Green Party in the 2020 provincial election are more likely to disagree with the justice’s decision (52% and 51% respectively) than those who supported the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (43%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 23 to September 25, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Vast Majority of Surrey Voters Endorse New Fire Hall

More than nine-in-ten eligible voters in Surrey want to increase number of fire trucks that operate in the municipality. 

Vancouver, BC [September 27, 2022] – Sizeable majorities of eligible voters in the City of Surrey call for decisive action to properly prepare for emergencies, a new Research Co. poll conducted on behalf of the Surrey Fire Fighters’ Association has found.

In the telephone survey of a representative sample of eligible voters in Surrey, almost nine-in-ten respondents (89%) support establishing another fire hall in the city, specifically tailored with the appropriate equipment and firefighters for managing emergencies and fires in high rise buildings.

“The Surrey Fire Service needs immediate attention with a growth plan for additional resources,” says Saverio Lattanzio, President of the Surrey Fire Fighters’ Association. “Fire fighters on the front line are stretched thin, suffering from burnout and in dire need of staffing. Properly resourced fire protection must be maintained to ensure public and fire fighter safety.”

More than four-in-five eligible voters in Surrey (87%) support increasing Surrey Fire Fighters’ staffing levels to reach the average ratio currently seen in cities such as Vancouver, Burnaby, Toronto, Calgary and Ottawa.

“As the municipal campaign continues, eligible voters in Surrey have a clear idea of what they would like to see in order to protect lives and property,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Voters across the entire city believe it is time to hire more fire fighters and make additional investments in equipment.”

Almost seven-in-ten eligible voters in Surrey (69%) would prefer for the ratio of firefighters to citizens to increase as the city grows.

Just under four-in-five eligible voters in Surrey (79%) think it is “very important” that the next Mayor supports Surrey Fire Fighters by making the workplace safer and ensuring proper response to emergencies in Surrey.

Methodology:

Results are based on a telephone survey conducted from September 12 to September 16, 2022, among 402 eligible voters in the City of Surrey. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for region in the City of Surrey. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Saverio Lattanzio, President, Surrey Fire Fighters’ Association

778.322.6363 [e] sav@iaff1271.org

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Governing CAQ Heavily Favoured by Voters in Quebec

More than half of Quebecers approve of the way François Legault is handling his duties as premier.

Vancouver, BC [September 23, 2022] – The ruling Coalition Avenir Québec (CAQ) is the top choice of voters in the upcoming provincial ballot, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Quebecers, 40% of decided voters say they will support the CAQ candidate in their constituency in next month’s provincial election.

The Conservative Party of Quebec is second with 18%, followed by the Liberal Party of Quebec with 17%, Québec solidaire with 14% and the Parti Québécois (PQ) with 10%.

Support is particularly impressive for the CAQ among decided voters aged 55 and over (60%). The governing party is also ahead among decided voters aged 35-to-54 (35%) while Québec solidaire is first among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (31%).

“The CAQ is holding on to more than three-in-four of its voters (77%) in the 2018 provincial election,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The retention rates are decidedly lower for the Liberals (52%), Québec solidaire (50%) and the PQ (47%).”

More than half of Quebecers (57%) approve of the way Premier and CAQ leader François Legault has performed in his job. The rating is lower for Québec solidaire co-spokesperson Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois (37%), PQ leader Paul St-Pierre Plamondon (36%), Official Opposition and Liberal leader Dominique Anglade (33%) and Conservative leader Éric Duhaime (31%).

Legault is also ahead on the “Best Premier” question (43%), with Duhaime (13%), Anglade (11%), Nadeau-Dubois (10%) and  Plamondon (6%) far behind.

Among the five main party leaders, only Plamondon manages a positive momentum score at this stage of the campaign (+1). Nadeau-Dubois (-4), Legault (-11), Duhaime (-15) and Anglade (-15) are in negative territory.

More than two-in-five Quebecers (45%) identify health care as the most important issue facing the province—a proportion that rises to 58% among those aged 55 and over. Only two other issues reach double-digits at the province-wide level: the economy and jobs (16%) and housing, homelessness and poverty (12%).

Legault is seen as the best party leader to handle six issues: the economy and jobs (39%), health care (36%), accountability (also 36%), crime and public safety (33%), education (30%) and energy and pipelines (28%).

The numbers are tighter on two other concerns: housing, poverty and homelessness (Legault 27%, Nadeau-Dubois 23%) and the environment (Legault 23%, Nadeau-Dubois 22%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 19 to September 21, 2022, among 700 Quebec adults, including 616 decided voters in the 2022 provincial election. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points for the entire sample and +/- 3.9 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Canadians Want King to Focus on Reconciliation and Environment

More than half of Canadians would have preferred a full holiday to observe and mark the passing of Queen Elizabeth II.

Vancouver, BC [September 22, 2022] – More than two thirds of Canadians think the country’s new head of state should make an effort to address two pressing issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, almost seven-in-ten Canadians (69%) believe King Charles III should advance the cause of reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, while almost three-in-four (74%) want him to commit to reduce the carbon footprint of the entire Royal Family.

More than half of Canadians (55%) say they would have preferred to see Prince William become King of the United Kingdom and the other 14 Commonwealth realms, including Canada.

Women (57%), Canadians aged 35-to-54 (58%) and British Columbians (59%) are more likely to be supportive of William’s ascension to the throne.

When asked about the fact that King Charles III will be featured on coins and bills that will be used in Canada, 56% of Canadians say they do not have a problem with this situation, while one third (34%) disagree.

Animosity towards the presence of King Charles III on Canada’s currency reaches 42% among Canadians aged 18-to-34 and 38% among women.

More than half of Canadians (54%) believe Queen Elizabeth II’s passing should have been observed and marked with a full holiday for everyone, while 9% would have preferred a full holiday for public sector employees only.

Just under three-in-ten Canadians (29%) think a holiday should not have been considered at all—a proportion that jumps to 39% among Conservative Party voters in the 2021 federal election.

Compared to a Research Co. survey conducted in February 2022, the perceptions of Canadians on the country have changed.

More than a third of Canadians (36%) say they would prefer for Canada to have an elected head of state, down 13 points since February. In contrast, just over three-in-ten Canadians (31%, +10) would like for Canada to remain a monarchy, while 24% (+6) do not care either way.

“More than a third of Albertans (42%), Atlantic Canadians (40%) and British Columbians (34%) are supportive of the continuation of the monarchy in Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower in Ontario (31%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (26%) and Quebec (25%).”

The notion of an elected head of state is more prevalent among Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (39%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (also 39%) in the 2021 federal election than among those who cast ballots for the Conservatives (32%).

Positive perceptions of six members of the Royal family have improved since February. Almost half of Canadians (46%, +11) have a favourable view of King Charles III, while just under a third (32%, +5) feel the same way about Queen Consort Camilla.

Just over two thirds of Canadians hold favourable views on William, Prince of Wales (67%, +9) and Catherine, Princess of Wales (also 67%, +7). The rating is lower for Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex (64%, +14) and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex (53%, +9).

A majority of Canadians (52%, +4) believe Canada will still be a monarchy in twenty years, while just over three-in-ten (31%, +1) think the country will have an elected head of state.

Residents of Alberta are significantly more likely to predict Canada remaining a monarchy in 2042 (65%) than their counterparts in Atlantic Canada (60%), Ontario (55%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (51%), British Columbia (45%) and Quebec (also 45%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from September 16 to September 18, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Automated Speed Enforcement Still Favoured in British Columbia

More than three-in-five residents of the province agree with four different types of automated speed enforcement.

Vancouver, BC [September 16, 2022] – Sizeable majorities of British Columbians continue to endorse the use of technology to identify vehicles whose drivers choose not to abide by existing speed limits, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 76% of British Columbians approve of the use of fixed speed cameras, or cameras that stay in one location and measure speed as a vehicle passes, up four points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2021.

Automated speed enforcement works by using cameras or sensors to pick up a vehicle speeding. A ticket is then issued to the owner of the vehicle. Driver’s license points are not issued as the driver of the vehicle cannot be identified.

Majorities British Columbians have voiced support for automated speed enforcement in Research Co. surveys conducted in 2018, 2019, 2020 and 2021.

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (72%, +1) approve of the use of speed-on-green intersection cameras in the province. This type of enforcement entails using red light cameras to capture vehicles that are speeding through intersections.

“Women (74%) and British Columbians aged 55 and over (79%) are particularly supportive of speed-on-green intersection cameras,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The practice is also endorsed by majorities of British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (77%), the BC Liberals (75%) and the BC Green Party (69%) in the 2020 provincial election.”

Two thirds of British Columbians (66%, +2) are in favour of mobile speed cameras, or devices that can be moved from place to place to measure speed as a vehicle passes.

Just over three-in-five British Columbians (61%, +8 since 2021) favour the use of point-to-point speed enforcement, which relies on cameras placed at two or more distant points on a road. The average speed of vehicles that pass between points is calculated and tickets are issued to vehicles whose average speed over the distance was excessive.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from September 8 to September 10, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

More in Canada and U.S. Feel Climate Change is Major Crisis

Most Canadians and Americans are willing to pay higher taxes in order to adequately address global warming.

Vancouver, BC [September 13, 2022] – The concerns of residents of Canada and the United States about global warming have increased over the past two years, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 68% of Canadians (+6 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2020) and 60% of Americans (+9) feel that climate change is a “major crisis”.

Almost seven-in-ten Canadians (69%, +5) and three-in-five Americans (60%, +7) think global warming is a fact and is mostly caused by emissions from vehicles and industrial facilities.

About one-in-five respondents in the two countries (20% in Canada and 21% in the United States) believe climate change is a fact and is mostly caused by natural changes. Only 5% of Canadians and 12% of Americans brand global warming as a theory that has not yet been proven.

“Belief in human-made climate change is low among Republicans in the United States (35%) and Conservatives in Canada (47%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are strikingly different among Democrats in the United States (80%) and Liberal Party voters in Canada (82%).”

Majorities of Canadians and Americans (59% and 61% respectively) say they are willing to pay higher taxes to adequately address climate change. Only two other issues come close to this level of acceptance for higher taxation: schools (CAN 57%, USA 64%) and homelessness (CAN 57%, USA 61%).

Fewer Canadians and Americans are willing to pay higher taxes in order to adequately address four other issues: forest fires (55% and 58% respectively), floods (52% and 56% respectively), housing improvements (51% each) and transit improvements (44% and 46% respectively).

Sizeable majorities of Canadians and Americans believe three groups should be doing more now to deal with issues related to climate change that are happening or impacting people directly now: companies and corporations (75% and 70% respectively), governments (69% and 65%) and individuals and consumers (67% and 65%).

Most residents of both countries also believe that more action is required to address issues related to climate change that may happen or impact people directly in the future from companies and corporations (76% in Canada and 70% in the United States), governments (72% and 66% respectively) and individuals and consumers (68% and 65%).

Parents of children under the age of 18 were asked about the effect of conversations they have had with their kids about climate change. Significant proportions of parents in Canada (85%) and the United States (79%) say they are recycling more as a result of these chats.

Practically half of American parents (49%) and a majority of Canadian parents (55%) claim to be driving less, and more than two-in-five (44% in the United States, 47% in Canada) say they are taking shorter showers as a result of conversations about global warming with their children.

Fewer parents in each country acknowledge taking other steps, such as reducing their consumption of meat (CAN 36%, USA 30%), changing the way they voted in a federal election (24% each) or changing the way they voted in a local election (CAN 18%, USA 21%).

Methodology: Results are based on online studies conducted from August 19 to August 21, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Stewart and Sim Are Frontrunners in Vancouver Mayoral Election

More than a third of likely voters believe housing is the most important issue facing the city right now.

Vancouver, BC [September 8, 2022] – Four mayoral candidates are in double-digits as voters in Vancouver ponder their choices in next month’s election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample, 35% of decided voters in the City of Vancouver would support incumbent Kennedy Stewart of Forward Vancouver, while 30% would cast their ballot for Ken Sim of A Better City (ABC).

Colleen Hardwick of TEAM for a Livable Vancouver is in third place with 17 per cent, followed by Mark Marissen of Progress Vancouver with 13% and Fred Harding of the Non-Partisan Association (NPA) with 4%.

More than a third of likely voters in Vancouver (35%) say housing is the most important issue facing the city, followed by drug overdoses (14%), crime (9%), poverty (also 9%) and property taxes (also 9%).

“Concerns about housing are particularly high among women (42%) and likely voters aged 35-to-54 (39%) in the City of Vancouver,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Drug overdoses are a more prevalent topic among likely voters who reside Downtown (19%) than among their counterparts who live on the West Side (13%) or the East Side (11%).”

Two thirds of likely voters in the City of Vancouver (67%) have followed the municipal electoral campaign “very closely” or “moderately closely.”

Over the past two months, a majority of likely voters in the City of Vancouver (52%) have seen, read or heard media stories where mayoral or council candidates discussed their position on issues. Almost three-in-ten (29%) have visited the website of a mayoral or council candidate.

While 16% of likely voters in the City of Vancouver have interacted with a mayoral or council candidate on social media (such as following on Twitter or liking on Facebook), the proportion rises to 25% among those aged 18-to-34.

Just over two thirds of likely voters in Vancouver (68%) support the use of “SOGI-Inclusive Education”, which raises awareness of and welcomes students of all sexual orientations, gender identities and family structures.

In national survey conducted by Research Co. in July 2019, 62% of Canadians supported the use of “SOGI-Inclusive Education” in their province.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from September 3 to September 5, 2022, among a representative sample of 400 municipal likely voters in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Just Under Half of Canadians Dread Their City or Town’s Drivers

Practically seven-in-ten Canadians saw a driver not signaling before a turn in the past month. 

Vancouver, BC [September 6, 2022] – The level of confidence that Canadians bestow upon drivers in their city or town has dropped drastically over the past year, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 48% of Canadians think drivers in their city or town are worse now than five years ago, up 18 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2021.

More than half of Canadians who live in Atlantic Canada (61%, +36), British Columbia (57%, +13) and Ontario (56%, +26) say drivers are worse now. The proportions are lower in Alberta (43%, +10), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (42%, +7) and Quebec (34%, +10).

More than half of Canadians aged 55 and over (58%, +22) and aged 35-to-54 (52%, +20) claim that drivers in their city or town are worse now than five years ago. The proportion is lower among Canadians aged 18-to-34 (34%, +13).

The survey also tracks the incidence of six specific occurrences on the country’s roads over the past month. Practically seven-in-ten Canadians (69%, +14) say they witnessed a driver not signalling before a turn, a proportion that climbs to 74% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

A majority of Canadians (54%, +13) recently observed a car taking up two or more spots in a parking lot.

Practically half of Canadians (49%, +11) saw a driver not stopping at an intersection. This behaviour is more prevalent in Atlantic Canada (58%), British Columbia (55%) and Ontario (54%).

Two-in-five Canadians (40%, +8) witnessed a driver turning right or left from an incorrect lane, including 49% of British Columbians.

More than a third of Canadians (37%, +9) went through a close call, such as having to slam the brakes or steer violently to avoid a collision—including 48% of Atlantic Canadians and 44% of Albertans.

“Only 15% of Canadians say they did not see any illegal or regrettable behaviour on the road over the past month,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This represents a 12-point drop since our previous survey in 2021.”

Just under three-in-five Canadians (58%, +7) claim that there are specific groups or people in their city or town who are worse drivers than others—a proportion that rises to 67% in British Columbia.

As was the case last year, the top four responses issued by Canadians who point the finger at a specific group for bad driving behaviours are “young” (40%, +8), “Asian (19%, +3), “elderly” (18%, -3) and “immigrant” (8%, +2).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 19 to August 21, 2022, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Fewer Than One-in-Four Albertans Support Outright Sovereignty

Public backing for the creation of an independent state rises if other western provinces join the new nation.

Vancouver, BC [September 2, 2022] – Few Albertans openly endorse the idea of their province becoming a sovereign entity, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 23% of Albertans support their province becoming a country independent from Canada, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in February 2021. Seven-in-ten Albertans (70%, +1) are opposed to this idea.

Support for establishing an independent country encompassing Alberta and Saskatchewan reaches 24% (-2). The same proportion of Albertans (24%) would welcome the creation of a sovereign state featuring their province, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

The notion of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and British Columbia becoming a country independent from Canada is supported by three-in-ten Albertans (30%), while just over three-in-five (61%) are opposed.

Almost three-in-four Albertans (73%, -3) oppose the idea of Alberta joining the United States, while 21% (+3) are supportive—including 26% of those aged 18-to-34.

Just over three-in-five Albertans (61%, +2 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in July 2019) consider themselves “Canadians first, Albertans second.” Fewer than three-in-ten (28%, +1) say they are “Albertans first, Canadians second.”

“There is a remarkable political divide when Albertans ponder their allegiance to province and country,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 17% of those who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) in the last provincial election say they are Albertans first, the proportion rises to 45% among those who supported the United Conservative Party (UCP).”

More than a third of Albertans (37%, -7) believe Ralph Klein is the best premier the province has had since November 1985. Rachel Notley is second on the list with 20% (+3).

When asked to name the worst recent premier of the province, two-in-five Albertans (40%, +37) select current head of government Jason Kenney. Notley (19%, -7) and Alison Redford (12%, -13) are the only former premiers to reach double-digits on this question.

Half of Albertans (50%) say they would move to British Columbia if they had to leave and relocate to another Canadian province. Saskatchewan is a distant second  with 11%, followed by Ontario with 10% and Nova Scotia with 4%.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 21 to August 23, 2022, among 700 adults in Alberta. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Alberta. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca