Most Canadians Have Favourable View of UK, Split on USA

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians have a positive opinion of Saudi Arabia, Iran and North Korea.

Vancouver, BC [January 10, 2020] – More than four-in-five Canadians hold a favourable opinion of the United Kingdom, but just under half feel the same way about the United States, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 83% of Canadians have a positive view of the United Kingdom.

At least seven-in-ten Canadians hold positive opinions on four other nations: Germany (73%), Italy (72%), Japan (also 72%) and France (70%). More than half of Canadians (52%) have a positive view of South Korea.

Canadians are split when assessing the United States, with 47% saying they have a positive opinion of the country and 48% stating they have a negative one.

Canadian men are more likely to have a positive opinion of the United States than Canadian women (50% to 42%). Canadians aged 18-to-34 are also more likely to hold favourable views on the United States (53%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (43%) and 55 and over (45%). 

“A majority of Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in last year’s federal election (64%) have a positive opinion of the United States,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are decidedly lower among Canadians who voted for the Liberals (42%) or the New Democrats (31%) last year.”

Just under half of Canadians (46%) have a positive view of Mexico, while more than a third (36%) have a positive opinion of India and three-in-ten (30%) have a favourable view of Venezuela.

Just over one-in-four Canadians have a positive opinion of China (27%) and Russia (26%), while more than three-in-five (61%) have a negative view of each country.

In the specific case of China, the proportion of positive opinions varies greatly around the country: 29% in Atlantic Canada, Ontario and Quebec, 28% in Alberta, 22% in British Columbia and 17% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians have a positive view of Saudi Arabia (17%), Iran (14%) and North Korea (11%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 18 to December 20, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Than Seven-in-Ten British Columbians Endorse Housing Taxes

Almost half of residents think these actions will be effective in making housing more affordable in the province.

Vancouver, BC [January 3, 2020] – The “speculation tax” introduced by the Government of British Columbia is still backed by a sizeable proportion of the province’s residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 76% of British Columbians agree with the implementation of the “speculation tax” in specific urban areas targeting foreign and domestic homeowners who pay little or no income tax in BC, and those who own second properties that aren’t long-term rentals.

The survey outlines an eight-point increase in agreement with the “speculation tax” since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March 2019.

“Agreement with this particular tax is strong among voters of all three major political parties in the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “It encompasses 86% for those who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in 2017, as well as 75% of those who cast ballots for candidates from the BC Liberals and the BC Green Party.”

More than three-in-four British Columbians agree with two other policies: Increasing the foreign buyers tax from 15% to 20% (77%, -3) and expanding the foreign buyers tax to areas located outside of Metro Vanncouver (also 77%, +2).

Agreement is also strong with two other measures: increasing the property transfer tax from 3% to 5% for homes valued at more than $3 million. The 5% portion only applies to the value greater than $3 million (72%, +8) and introducing a tax of 0.2% on the value of homes between $3 million and $4 million, and a tax rate of 0.4% on the portion of a home’s value that exceeds $4 million (also 72%, +6).

Across the province, 49% of residents think the actions of the provincial government will be “effective”, in making housing more affordable in British Columbia, while 39% consider they will be ”ineffective.”

There is a pronounced regional divide on this question. While majorities of residents of Northern BC (56%) and Metro Vancouver (52%) think the provincial government’s actions will help make housing more affordable, the proportion is lower in the Fraser Valley (45%), Vancouver Island (44%) and Southern BC (40%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 12 to December 16, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Unhappy with Their Mobile Phone Plan Prices

Most residents are skeptical about the promises of lower wireless costs issued by the federal and provincial governments.

Vancouver, BC [December 25, 2019] – Most residents of British Columbia are dissatisfied with how much they are paying for wireless communications, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, seven-in-ten mobile phone users (70%) describe the cost of their plan as “very expensive” or “moderately expensive.”

Mobile phone users aged 35-to-54 (77%) and those who reside in the Fraser Valley (74%) are more likely to believe that they currently pay too much for wireless services.

A monthly plan for a mobile phone in Canada with two gigabytes of data costs about $75. More than three-in-five British Columbians (62%) say a similar plan would be less expensive in the United States. 

More than a third of residents also think the cost of a similar phone plan would be lower in Italy (39%) and Australia (37%). 

“Most British Columbians know that wireless costs are lower in the United States than in Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But the current cost of a monthly plan for a mobile phone with two gigabytes of data in Australia and Italy is significantly lower, at $21 and $25 a month respectively.”

Two levels of government have promised action on this issue. The federal Liberal Party pledged to reduce the cost of wireless bills for Canadians by 25 per cent over the next four years. 

The Government of British Columbia recently appointed MLA Bob D’Eith to work with the federal government to explore more affordable and transparent mobile phone options.

Across British Columbia, only 31% of residents believe that the federal government will actually deliver on its promise of lower phone bills for Canadians.

A slightly higher proportion (35%) think the provincial government’s push for more affordable and transparent mobile phone options will ultimately be successful.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 12 to December 16, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views of Pipeline Expansion in British Columbia Remain Stable

Two thirds believe the project will create hundreds of jobs, but fewer than two-in-five expect lower gas prices.

Vancouver, BC [December 18, 2019] – After six months that included a federal election, the perceptions of British Columbians on pipeline expansion did not go through a severe fluctuation, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 56% of British Columbians agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion, while 35% disagree and 10% are undecided.

“There has been practically no change in the way British Columbians feel about this project,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Our survey from June also showed 56% of British Columbians agreeing with the re-approval of the project.”

More than seven-in-ten residents of Southern BC (74%) and Northern BC (71%) are in favour of the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion. Support for the course of action authorized by the federal government is lower in the Fraser Valley (59%), Metro Vancouver (51%) and Vancouver Island (49%).

There is a sizeable gender gap on this question. While two thirds of men (66%) agree with the pipeline expansion, only 46% of women concur.

Two thirds of British Columbians (68%, -5 since May) expect the Trans Mountain Pipeline to create hundreds of jobs for British Columbians—an argument that resonates especially well with 81% of those who voted for the BC Liberals in the 2017 provincial election.

Three-in-five British Columbians (59%, unchanged) say they are disappointed with the way the federal government has handled the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion. 

More than two-in-five British Columbians (45%, -1) believe the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of British Columbians. Voters who cast ballots for the BC Green Party (64%) and the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (59%) in 2017 are more likely to have this point of view.

Across the province, 40% of British Columbians (-1) believe the provincial government should do anything necessary to ensure that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion does not happen—including 45% of women, 51% of residents aged 18-to-34, and 63% of BC Green Party voters in 2017.

The notion of gas prices being lower in British Columbia now that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion has been re-approved is convincing for just over a third of British Columbians (37%, -2).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 4 to December 7, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Seven-in-Ten Vancouverites Happy with Separated Bike Lanes

Men and residents aged 55 and over are more likely to believe that the city currently has too many separated bike lanes.

Vancouver, BC [December 13, 2019] – More than two thirds of City of Vancouver residents appear satisfied with bike infrastructure, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative municipal sample, practically seven-in-ten Vancouverites (69%) support having separated bike lanes in the city, while 25% are opposed and 5% are undecided.

“It is not surprising to see 90% of Vancouverites who commute to school or work on a bike express support for this type of infrastructure,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “We also see that majorities of Vancouverites who commute by taking public transit (79%) and driving (69%) are also in favour of having separated bike lanes.”

Across the city, 40% of residents believe Vancouver currently has the right number of separated bike lanes. In addition, 30% of Vancouverites think there are too many separated bike lanes and some should be removed, and 21% feel there are not enough separated bike lanes and more should be added.

About a third of Vancouverites aged 55 and over (33%) and aged 35-to-54 (32%) believe that the city has too many separated bike lanes at this stage. The proportion is significantly lower among residents aged 18-to-34 (24%).

Men are also more likely to believe that some separated bike lanes should be removed than women (36% and 24% respectively).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 12 to November 15, 2019, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca