British Columbians Support More Action on Child Care

Nine-in-ten consider the investments to build a quality affordable child care system as “very important” or “moderately important.”

Vancouver, BC [June 13, 2019] – In an online survey of a representative provincial sample, 76% of British Columbians think the province should move more quickly to achieve the established goals of more affordable parent fees, more spaces, and better wages and education for those who work in child care settings, a new Research Co. poll conducted on behalf of the $10aDay Child Care Plan has found.

When parents who currently have a child enrolled in child care were asked about their experience, 64% said the current government investments are having a positive impact on their situation.

There is still more to be done, as 70% of parents report that their return to work was delayed because of lack of access to child care.

“British Columbians of all ages, regions and political allegiances agree that children, parents and employers benefit when there’s access to quality affordable child care,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co.

Two thirds of British Columbians (66%) believe the provincial government should continue to put a priority on public funding for child care, to make it more affordable and available for families. 

“Some parents are experiencing benefits of new investments in child care, but many families are still struggling when it comes to cost, finding a licensed space, and educators are still earning low wages—BC need further investments,” says Sharon Gregson, spokesperson for the $10aDay Child Care Plan.

Across the province, almost two-in-five parents who currently have a child in child care (38%) say they waited at least five months before a space became available for their child. Three-in-four parents (76%) say the cost of child care has put a financial strain on their families.

Four-in-five British Columbians (81%) believe that, when child care is affordable and available to parents, more mothers work and pay taxes. An even larger proportion of residents (86%) agree with the notion that having children today costs a lot more than it did 40 years ago.

About the $10aDay Child Care Plan

Since 2011, supporters across the province have advanced the $10aDay Child Care Plan as the solution to BC’s child care chaos calling for parent fees of no more than $10aDay, access to licensed spaces for all families who choose child care, and fair wages for early childhood educators.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 9 to May 12, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Sharon Gregson, $10aDay Child Care Plan.
[c] 604.505.5725
[e] info@10aday.ca

Most British Columbians Want Slower Speeds on Residential Streets

Two-in-five residents say they perceive a car going over the speed limit on the street where they live “at least once a day.”

Vancouver, BC [June 7, 2019] – A sizeable proportion of British Columbians would like to see changes to municipal speed limits, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 58% of British Columbians say they would “definitely” or “probably” like to see the speed limit reduced to 30 km/h on all residential streets in their own municipality, while keeping the speed limit on arterial and collector roads at 50 km/h.

Support for the implementation of this policy is highest among women (63%), British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (62%) and residents of Vancouver Island (60%).

Earlier this year, Vancouver City Council unanimously passed a motion to establish a pilot project that will see the speed limit reduced to 30 km/h on select residential streets in the city. 

Two thirds of British Columbians (66%) believe the City of Vancouver’s pilot project is a “very good” or “good idea”, while 22% consider it “bad” or “very bad.”

“While many British Columbians are in favour of the City of Vancouver’s pilot project, there are some differences related to political allegiance,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) and the BC Green Party in the last provincial election are more supportive of the project (74% and 72% respectively) than those who voted for the BC Liberals in 2017 (60%).”

More than two-in-five British Columbians (42%) say they see a car that they perceive is circulating above the current speed limit on the street where they reside “at least once a day”, while only 16% say this “never” happens.

Residents of the Fraser Valley (54%), Northern BC (50%) and Southern BC (48%) are significantly more likely to perceive speeding vehicles on their street “at least once a day” than those who live in Vancouver Island (40%) and Metro Vancouver (39%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 26 to May 28, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Drivers in British Columbia Are Considering Electric Vehicles

Seven-in-ten residents agree with the goal of making all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province “zero emission” by 2040.

Vancouver, BC [May 31, 2019] – A significant proportion of car drivers in British Columbia would consider acquiring a “zero emission” vehicle in the future, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 51% of British Columbians who drive their own vehicles say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that the next vehicle they acquire for themselves or their household will be electric.

Majorities of drivers in Metro Vancouver (55%) and Vancouver Island (52%) are likely to consider a “zero emission” vehicle as their next purchase. The proportion is lower in the Fraser Valley (43%), Southern BC (40%) and Northern BC (37%)

When asked about specific issues that might make them less likely to purchase an electric vehicle, 24% of drivers say that they are too expensive when compared to non-electric vehicles, 24% fear becoming stranded if they cannot find a charging station, and 23% say they do not have enough places to charge the vehicle in the areas where they usually drive.

“There are some significant regional differences when the concerns of potential electric vehicle owners are analyzed,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than a third of drivers who reside in Southern BC (35%) and Northern BC (45%) claim they lack places to charge electric vehicles, compared to just 20% among those who live in Metro Vancouver.”

Earlier this year, the Government of British Columbia passed legislation to ensure that, by the year 2040, all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province will be “zero emission.” Seven-in-ten residents (70%) agree with this decision, while 21% disagree and 10% are undecided.

Almost half of British Columbians (49%) believe the goal established by the provincial government on “zero emission” vehicles is “achievable”, while 42% think it is “not achievable.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 20 to May 22, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Endorse Money Laundering Public Inquiry

More than a third (36%) would place the emphasis on “identifying solutions to help reduce the impact of money laundering.”

Vancouver, BC [May 24, 2019] – A sizeable majority of British Columbians voice satisfaction with the provincial government’s decision to call a public inquiry into money laundering in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 86% of British Columbians “strongly agree” (55%) or “moderately agree” (31%) with this decision.

Victoria’s course of action is endorsed by 93% of residents who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the 2017 provincial election, as well as 86% of those who supported the BC Liberals and 80% of those who voted for the BC Green Party.

In surveys conducted by Research Co. in June 2018August 2018 and February 2019, more than three-in-four British Columbians voiced support for a public inquiry into money laundering. 

When asked about specific goals that the public inquiry should deal with, more than a third of British Columbians (36%) mentioned “identifying solutions to help reduce the current and future impact of money laundering in the province.”

“In Metro Vancouver, the proportion of residents who want the public inquiry to concentrate on solutions reaches 39%,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This course of action is also slightly more popular among women (38%) than men (35%).”

Three-in-ten residents (30%) believe “finding out those responsible (in government and crown corporations) for allowing money laundering to become such a big problem” should be the main priority.

Fewer British Columbians would concentrate the public inquiry’s efforts on “recovering ill-gotten gains and assets from people who laundered money in British Columbia” (17%) or “figuring out how money laundering became such a big problem” (11%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 16 to May 19, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Support Having Seatbelts in School Buses

More than half of residents “strongly support” the measure, while a third express “moderate support.”

Vancouver, BC [May 7, 2019] – A sizeable majority of British Columbians would like to see a modification inside the school buses that currently operate in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, almost nine-in-ten British Columbians (88%) support making seatbelts mandatory for school buses in the province.

The level of “strong support” for the proposal reaches 55%, while 33% of British Columbians “moderately support the idea.”

“There are very few British Columbians who voice opposition to the notion of installing seatbelts in the province’s school buses,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The level of support for the proposal is high across all regions.”

Earlier this year, federal Transport Minister Marc Garneau announced the creation of a task force that will study whether school buses operating in Canada should be retrofitted with seatbelts.

An online petition on change.org has garnered more than 95,000 signatures in support of making seatbelts in school buses mandatory in Canada.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 4 to April 7, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca