Many Likely Voters in British Columbia Plan to Vote by Mail in 2020

Nine-in-ten likely voters in the province have confidence in Elections BC to oversee the entire voting process this year.

Vancouver, BC [September 28, 2020] – British Columbia could see a substantial number of mail-in ballots in this year’s provincial election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, three-in-ten likely voters in British Columbia (29%) say they intend to cast their ballot by mail this year, up from 2% who recall voting this way in 2017.

While 58% of respondents to this survey remember voting in person on Election Day in the last provincial election, only 28% say they are currently planning to cast their ballot in the same fashion on October 24.

The proportion of likely voters who intent to cast their ballot during the Advance Voting period is also lower in 2020. In 2017, 36% of respondents say they took advantage of this option. This year, only 27% intend to vote this way.

In addition, 16% of likely voters in British Columbia are currently not sure about the way in which they will cast their ballot in 2020.

“The concept of postal voting is particularly attractive for likely voters in Vancouver Island (32%) and the Fraser Valley (also 32%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “A similar proportion of those who reside in Metro Vancouver (29%) would also currently prefer to vote by mail,”

Likely voters aged 55 and over are slightly less likely to cast their ballot on Election Day (25%) than those aged 18-to-34 (31%) and those aged 35-to-54 (30%).

Conversely, voting by mail is a more popular option for likely voters aged 35-to-54 (33%) and aged 55 and over (31%) than for those aged 18-to-34 (21%).

Across the province, 90% of likely voters are “very confident” or “moderately confident” that Elections BC —the non-partisan office of the British Columbia legislature responsible for conducting provincial and local elections—will be able to oversee the entire voting process in this year’s provincial ballot.

Sizeable proportions of likely voters also express confidence in Elections BC to ensure that there is no fraudulent activity with mailed ballots (82%) and to enforce social distancing at polling stations (74%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 21 to September 23, 2020, among 750 likely voters in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.6 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by James Wheeler

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians and Americans Would Shun Debate on Abortion

The proportion of Conservatives in Canada and Republicans in the U.S. who want a discussion on this topic fell by double digits.

Vancouver, BC [September 25, 2020] – The appetite for national discussions on abortion has dropped drastically in North America, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 58% of Canadians and Americans believe there is no point in re-opening a debate about abortion in their respective countries.

Only three-in-ten Americans (30%) and one-in-four Canadians (25%) think a debate on abortion is long overdue and the discussion should be re-opened.

This represents a 16-point drop in the United States and a 12-point drop in Canada since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in July 2019.

Majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (64%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (63%) and the Conservative Party (56%) in the last federal election believe there is no point in reopening a debate about abortion right now.

“Republicans in the United States and Conservatives in Canada are not particularly convinced that this is the right time to debate abortion,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 55% of Republicans were willing to engage in a national discussion about this topic in 2019, the proportion has fallen to 40% this year. Among Canadian Conservatives, appetite for this debate dropped from 44% to 28%.”

In Canada, just under half of residents (48%, +2 since 2019) think abortion should be legal under any circumstances. More than a third of Canadians (36%, -7) think the procedure should only be allowed under certain circumstances.

In the United States, more than two-in-five respondents (44%, -4) believe abortion should be legal only under certain circumstances, while more than a third (37%, +9) think the procedure should be legal under any circumstances.

Few Americans (13%, -6) and Canadians (8%, +3) endorse the concept of abortion being illegal in all circumstances.

Americans aged 35-to-54 (43%), residents of the West (46%) and Democrats (also 46%) are more likely to believe that abortion should be legal under any circumstances.

Methodology:

Results are based on online studies conducted from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States.

Find our Canadian tables here, our American tables here and download the press release here.

Photo by Josh Hild.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

BC NDP Ahead of Rivals as Campaign Starts in British Columbia

John Horgan has a 17-point lead over Andrew Wilkinson when voters are asked who would make the Best Premier.

Vancouver, BC [September 24, 2020] – As British Columbia prepares for a unique electoral campaign in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic, the governing New Democratic Party (NDP) is in first place, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 44% of decided voters in British Columbia would support the BC NDP candidate in their constituency in the election scheduled for October 24. The BC NDP has gained three points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May.

The BC Liberals are in second place with 37% (+4), followed by the BC Green Party with 13% (-3) and the BC Conservative Party with 4% (-5). 

The BC NDP holds a 12-point lead among decided female voters (47% to 35%). The race is significantly closer among decided male voters (41% for the BC NDP and 39% for the BC Liberals).

The BC Liberals are six-points ahead of the BC NDP in Southern BC (43% to 37%). 

The BC Green Party has its best numbers among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (22%, with the BC NDP at 38%) and in Vancouver Island (22%, with the BC NDP at 50%).

Two thirds of British Columbians (67%, -6) approve of the way Premier and BC NDP leader John Horgan is handling his duties, while one-in-four (25%, +7) disapprove.

Since May, the approval rating for BC Liberals leader Andrew Wilkinson dropped by nine points to 39%. Recently selected BC Green Party leader Sonia Furstenau holds similar numbers (37%), while the rating is significantly lower for BC Conservative Party leader Trevor Bolin (23%, -12).

When likely voters are asked who would make the Best Premier of British Columbia, more than two-in-five (44%) select Horgan, while 27% choose Wilkinson. Furstenau and Bolin are in single digits (7% and 2% respectively) and 21% are undecided.

More than one-in-four likely voters (26%, -2) think health care is the most important issue facing the province. Housing, poverty and homelessness is a close second at 24% (+7), followed by the economy and jobs (21%, =), COVID-19 (11%, -10), crime and public safety (8%, +6) and the environment (7%, +3).

“At the start of the provincial campaign, the most pressing concerns of voters in British Columbia vary greatly depending on age,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Housing, poverty and homelessness is especially important for those aged 18-to-34 (29%), while the economy and jobs is top of mind for those aged 35-to-54 (26%) and health care is paramount for those aged 55 and over (29%).”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 21 to September 23, 2020, among 750 likely voters in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.6 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by James Wheeler

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Americans Reject Lifting Term Limits for Presidents

Likely voters in the United States are more supportive of reforms that would reduce the tenures of Members of Congress.

Vancouver, BC [September 23, 2020] – The notion of allowing the President of the United States to serve more than two terms in office is not attractive to a large proportion of American likely voters, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of likely voters, only 6% of respondents are willing to lift term litis to allow American presidents to serve as many four-year terms as they want.

While one-in-four likely voters (26%) would prefer to limit the head of state to a single four-year term, almost two thirds (65%) would keep the current regulations that allow presidents to serve for two four-year terms,

“Support for completely abolishing term limits at the White House has dropped from 12% in a survey conducted in May 2013, four months after Barack Obama was sworn in for his final term, to 6% this year,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “A majority of likely voters in all regions believe the current guidelines should remain in place.”

Just over a third of likely voters (35%) would limit U.S. Senators to one six-year term, while a similar proportion (34%) would prefer to limit members of the upper house to two six-year terms.

While 9% of likely voters would endorse an 18-year tenure for U.S. Senators (three six-year terms), 16% would keep the current regulations that allow members of the upper house to serve as many terms as they want.

Half of likely voters in the United States (50%) are willing to limit members of the House of Representatives to six-year tenures (three two-year terms), while about one-in-five (21%) would prefer to allow members of the lower house to serve for up to 12 years.

Just under one-in-five likely voters (18%) would continue to allow members of the House of Representatives to serve as many terms as they want.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among 1,200 American adults.  The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Liberals Hold a Six-Point Lead Over Conservatives in Canada

The economy and jobs (30%) and health care (25%) are identified as the most important issues facing the country.

Vancouver, BC [September 17, 2020] – The governing Liberal Party is ahead of all other contenders in Canada’s federal political scene, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 38% of decided voters would support the Liberal candidate in their constituency if an election were held today, down one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May.

The Conservative Party is second with 32% (+2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 17% (=), the Bloc Québécois with 8% (+3), the Green Party with 3% (-4) and the People’s Party with 1% (=).

“Among decided voters, the Liberals are the most popular party in Atlantic Canada (45%) and Ontario (43%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The Conservatives lead in Alberta (58%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (45%).”

In Quebec, the Liberals are five points ahead of the Bloc (39% to 34%). In British Columbia, the three main federal parties are locked in a close race (Conservatives 34%, Liberals 31%, New Democrats 29%).

Three-in-ten Canadians (30%) say the economy and jobs is the most important issue facing the country right now, followed by health care (25%), housing, homelessness and poverty (12%), the environment (7%), and accountability and leadership (6%).

Residents of Alberta are particularly preoccupied with the economy and jobs (52%, the highest proportion across all regions), while Atlantic Canadians are more worried about health care (44%).

Housing, homelessness and poverty is a bigger concern in British Columbia and Ontario (each at 19%) than in other Canadian provinces, while Quebec has the highest proportion of residents who think the environment is the most important issue right now (16%).

Across the country, 51% of Canadians approve of the performance of Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau, while 45% disapprove. The incumbent prime minister has his best numbers with Canadians aged 18-to-34 (59%), Ontarians (58%) and Quebecers (52%). 

The approval rating for opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole stands at 33%, with 34% of Canadians disapproving and 33% being undecided. O’Toole’s rating is highest in Alberta (50%) and lowest in Quebec (26%).

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%) approve of the way NDP leader Jagmeet Singh has handled his duties, while the rating is significantly lower for Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (20%, and 42% in Quebec), interim Green Party leader Jo-Ann Roberts (21%) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (14%).

Almost two-in-five Canadians (38%) think Trudeau would make the best Prime Minister of Canada. O’Toole is second on the list with 23%, followed by Singh with 13%. Blanchet, Bernier and Roberts are in single digits.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 13, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Biden Keeps National Lead Over Trump in United States Race

The Democratic nominee is regarded as the best person to handle health care, the environment and race relations.

Vancouver, BC [September 9, 2020] – Democratic Party presidential nominee Joe Biden remains ahead of Republican Party incumbent Donald Trump in the United States presidential race, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of likely voters, 53% of decided voters (unchanged since a Research Co. poll conducted in August) will vote for Biden in the election, while 44% (+2) would cast a ballot for Trump.

Support remains low at the national level for Libertarian Party nominee Jo Jorgensen (1%), Green Party nominee Howie Hawkins (also 1%) and other candidates (also 1%).

Among decided voters, Trump gets his best numbers with men (55%) and Americans aged 35-to-54 (54%). Biden leads with women (63%), Americans aged 18-to-34 (57%) and Americans aged 55 and over (61%).

Among White decided voters, Trump is ahead of Biden (51% to 47%). Majorities of decided voters of African American descent (83%) and Hispanic and Latino origin (70%) would support the Democratic nominee.

“Just 7% of likely voters in the United States have not chosen a candidate to support on Election Day,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 4% of decided voters say they may change their mind and support another candidate in the election.”

When asked about their motivation for supporting each of the two major party nominees, almost half of Trump voters (46%) say the most important factor is the candidate’s ideas and policies, followed by his party (30%). 

More than a third of Biden voters (36%) say the candidate’s ideas and policies are paramount, followed by disgust with other candidates (18%) and a desire for change (also 18%).

When likely voters are asked which one of the two main candidates is better suited to handle specific issues, Biden remains well ahead on nine issues: health care (52%), the environment (51%), race relations (also 51%), education (50%), COVID-19 (48%), government accountability (47%), foreign policy (46%), managing the deficit (44%) and energy and oil (43%).

In August, the two contenders, were practically tied on five issues. This month, the Democratic nominee has gained points on three: immigration (Biden 46%, Trump 39%), crime (Biden 44%, Trump 35%) and national defense (Biden 44%, Trump 41%). The numbers are tighter on job creation (Biden 44%, Trump 41%) and the economy (Biden 45%, Trump 42%).

By a 2-to-1 margin, Americans continue to reject the notion of postponing the U.S. presidential election to a later date because of the COVID-19 pandemic. While 29% of likely voters support this course of action, 65% disagree with it.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among 1,114 likely voters in the United States and 1,036 decided voters in the 2020 presidential election. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.9 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 3.0 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: AgnosticPreachersKid 

For more information on this poll, please contact:Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Almost Half of Canadians Expect COVID-19 Pandemic to Worsen

Public support for requiring all customers to wear a mask or face covering when they are indoors reaches 85% across the country.

Vancouver, BC [September 8, 2020] – Canadians hold a gloomier view of the COVID-19 pandemic than they did two months ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 46% of Canadians think the worst of the COVID-19 outbreak is “definitely” or “probably” ahead of us, up 11 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in June. The proportion of Canadians who think the worst of COVID-19 is “behind us” dropped from 49% in June to 37% in September.

On a regional basis, British Columbians are more likely to believe that the worst of the pandemic lies ahead (61%) than residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (50%), Alberta (45%), Quebec (44%), Ontario (40%) and Atlantic Canada (42%).

Nine-in-ten Canadians (90%) agree with two regulations that have been in place for weeks: keeping the border with the United States closed to non-essential travel, and placing all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period.

Public support is also extremely high (85%) for requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside. When Research Co. posed this same question to Americans this month, 90% were in favour of this guideline.

A majority of Canadians (51%) agree with allowing K-12 students to go back to in-class learning in their province, while two-in-five (42%) disagree.

Satisfaction with the way provincial governments have handled the COVID-19 pandemic fell by six points since late June to 69%. The rating remained at 83% in British Columbia, but fell in Ontario (68%, -8), Quebec (67%, -2) and Alberta (57%, -5).

Just under two thirds of Canadians (64%, -6) are satisfied with the way the federal government has managed COVID-19. The rating is the same (64%, -6) for municipal governments.

There has been an extraordinary increase in the proportion of Canadians who say they are wearing a mask every time they go out. This month, 70% of Canadians say they are behaving this way, up from 48% in late June and just 14% in May.

“Women are more likely to be wearing a mask every time they go out (75%) than men (65%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Canadians aged 18-to-34 are also more observant of this practice (74%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (70%) and those aged 55 and over (66%).”

More than seven-in-ten Ontarians (81%), Quebecers (73%) and Albertans (71%) say they are always wearing masks outside. The proportion is lower for residents of Atlantic Canada (65%), British Columbia (56%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (53%).

A third of Canadians (33%, -7) say they clean the groceries they buy to prevent infection, and 22% (-1) are not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection.

Almost one-in-four Canadians (23%, -6) say they are overeating or eating more than usual at home. The figures are stable on Canadians drinking more at home (17%, -1) and losing their temper more often (15%, -1).

Across the country, three-in-four Canadians (74%, -1) say they are willing to take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from August 30 to September 1, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Four Canadians Call for Investigation into Birth Tourism

More than half think Canada should consider establishing new guidelines for birthright citizenship.

Vancouver, BC [September 4, 2020] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians believe the issue of “birth tourism” requires the attention of federal lawmakers, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 78% of Canadians agree with the federal government establishing a committee to investigate the full extent of “birth tourism” in Canada.

“Birth tourism” is the practice of traveling to a specific country for the purpose of giving birth there and securing citizenship for the child in a country that has birthright citizenship. Canada allows expectant mothers who are foreign nationals to gain automatic citizenship for their children born in Canada.

There have been reports of unregulated “for profit” businesses that have facilitated the practice of “birth tourism” in Canada. Two-in-five Canadians (41%) say they have followed media stories related to the issue of “birth tourism” in the past year “very closely” or “moderately closely”.

“Residents of British Columbia are more likely to be paying attention to this issue, partly because of the situation that has unfolded in the City of Richmond,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Almost half of British Columbians (49%) are following stories about ‘birth tourism’, compared to just 34% of Albertans.”

Seven-in-ten Canadians (71%) think “birth tourism” can be unfairly used to gain access to Canada’s education, health care and social programs. In addition, more than half of respondents agree that “birth tourism” can degrade the value of Canadian citizenship (59%) and can displace Canadians from hospitals (56%).

Two thirds of Canadians (67%) believe birthright citizenship may have made sense at one point, but now people have taken advantage of existing rules. Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to agree with this view (76%).

A majority of Canadians (54%) think the country should “definitely” or “probably” consider establishing new guidelines for birthright citizenship, while 34% would “definitely” or “probably” maintain existing regulations.

Support for a new approach to birthright citizenship in Canada is highest in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (66%), followed by Alberta (60%), British Columbia (56%), Atlantic Canada (53%), Ontario (52%) and Quebec (48%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Split When Assessing the Military Mission in Afghanistan

More than a third of Canadians think three successive federal governments provided little information about the war.

Vancouver, BC [September 1, 2020] – Canadians are divided in their analysis of the country’s participation in the military operation in Afghanistan, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 43% of Canadians think the country made a mistake in sending military forces to Afghanistan, while 39% believe it did the right thing.

Canada participated in the military effort in Afghanistan from October 2001 to March 2014. More than 40,000 members of the Canadian Armed Forces were mobilized during the deployment, which led to the deaths of 158 Canadian soldiers and seven Canadian civilians.

More than two-in-five Canadian men (42%) believe Canada took the right course of action in committing troops to the military effort in Afghanistan, but only 37% of women share the same point of view.

On a regional basis, more than half of residents of Alberta (55%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (51%) think Canada did the right thing in sending troops to Afghanistan. Fewer Atlantic Canadians (43%), Ontarians (35%), British Columbians (also 35%) and Quebecers (34%) concur.

Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election are more likely to believe that Canada made the right decision in joining the military effort in Afghanistan (47%) than those who voted for the Liberal Party (40%) or the New Democratic Party (NDP) (also 40%).

While 42% of Canadians feel they have a clear idea of what the war in Afghanistan was about, a slightly larger proportion (46%) do not.

“The perceptions of Canadians on the rationale for war in Afghanistan vary with age,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to say they do not have a clear idea of what the conflict was about (51%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (44%) and aged 18-to-34 (45%).”

More than a third of Canadians think the federal government provided too little information about the war in Afghanistan during the tenures of Jean Chrétien (38%), Paul Martin (41%) and Stephen Harper (46%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 21 to August 23, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Topic of Residential Schools Absent in Some Canadian Classrooms

Two thirds of Canadians who attended K-12 in the country say they currently have a negative assessment of residential schools.

Vancouver, BC [August 28, 2020] – Fewer than half of Canadians remember learning about residential schools inside a classroom, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of adults who attended Elementary School and/or High School in Canada, just over two-in-five respondents (42%) say the topic of residential schools was discussed by their teachers.

More than one-in-four respondents (27%) say they heard about residential schools when they attended High School, while 15% were introduced to the topic in Elementary School.

Across the country, 45% of respondents say they did not hear about residential schools as students in Canada.

“The findings outline some glaring generational differences when it comes to in-class instruction about residential schools,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 26% of respondents aged 18-to-34 say they did not discuss this topic inside the classroom, the proportion jumps to 51% among those aged 35-to-54 and 58% among those aged 55 and over.”

A third of respondents (34%) say the assessment of residential schools that their teacher (or teachers) provided to them was “positive”. Two-in-five respondents (41%) remember the assessment of residential schools as “negative” and 25% are not sure.

When asked about their current personal view of residential schools, two thirds of respondents (68%) say it is “negative” while only one-in-five (21%) describe it as “positive.”

On a regional basis, more than three-in-four respondents in British Columbia (88%), Alberta (77%) and Ontario (76%) currently have a negative perception of residential schools, along with majorities of those who reside in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (68%), Atlantic Canada (62%) and Quebec (57%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 7 to August 9, 2020, among 805 adults who attended Elementary School and/or High School in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Support for New Organ and Tissue Donation Rules Rises in Canada

Seven-in-ten Canadians think their province should consider every adult an organ and tissue donor unless they specifically opt-out.

Vancouver, BC [August 25, 2020] – Seven-in-ten Canadians are in favour of their province implementing new regulations for organ and tissue donation after death, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 70% of Canadians believe their province should “definitely” or “probably” implement an “Active Donor Registration” system for organ and tissue donation after death. This represents at seven-point increase since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in August 2019.

Some jurisdictions around the world have established “Active Donor Registration” systems for organ and tissue donation. Under these systems, every person over the age of 18 is considered an organ and tissue donor after death unless they specifically opt-out of a registry.

 

“Public support for Active Donor Registration has increased markedly over the past year across Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Sizeable majorities of Canadians in every region of the country would favour enacting this modification for organ and tissue donation after death in their own province.”

 

The highest level of support for an “Active Donor Registration” system for organ and tissue donation after death is observed in Alberta (74%), followed by Manitoba and Saskatchewan (73%), Quebec (also 73%), Atlantic Canada (also 73%), Ontario (68%) and British Columbia (65%).

Two thirds of Canadians aged 35-to-54 (67%) support the change to an “Active Donor Registration” system in their province. The proportion of supporters for this modification is higher among Canadians aged 55 and over (69%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (75%).

Only 18% of Canadians believe their province should not move to implement an opt-out system for organ and tissue donation—down seven points in a year—and 12% are undecided.

In 2019, Nova Scotia’s House of Assembly unanimously passed the “Human Organ and Tissue Act”. The law makes every single person who has resided in the province for at least a year a potential organ and tissue donor after death. Nova Scotians who do not wish to be donors are able to opt-out of the system.

Nova Scotia’s “Human Organ and Tissue Act” will come into effect on January 18, 2021.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 7 to August 9, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Maintain Confidence in the Health Care System

Long wait times are still seen as the biggest problem, along with a shortage of medical professionals.

Vancouver, BC [August 18, 2020] – Three-in-four Canadians express commitment to the health care system and are opposed to a decrease in federal funding for medical services, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 76% of Canadians are “very confident” or “moderately confident” that the country’s health care system would be there to provide help and assistance if they had to face an unexpected medical condition.

On a regional basis, Ontarians are more likely to express confidence in the health care system (82%) than residents of British Columbia (75%), Alberta (also 75%), Quebec (74%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (69%) and Atlantic Canada (67%).

When asked about the biggest problem facing the health care system right now, 31% of Canadians mention long wait times, down two points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in January 2019.

A shortage of doctors and nurses is second on the list of problems with the health care system with 26% (+8), followed by bureaucracy and poor management with 13% (-11).

Fewer Canadians cite inadequate resources and facilities (8%), a lack of a wider range of services for patients (6%), little focus on preventive care (also 6%) and insufficient standards of hygiene (3%).

“Long wait times remain a major health care issue for residents of Ontario and Quebec,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Concerns about a shortage of doctors and nurses are more prevalent in Atlantic Canada.”

Across the country, 30% of Canadians (+5) believe Canada’s health care system works well, and only minor changes are needed to make it work better.

A majority of respondents (55%, -5) think there are some good things in Canada’s health care system, but many changes are required.

Only 9% of Canadians (-4) say the country’s health care system has so much wrong with it that we need to completely rebuild it.

A majority of Canadians (51%) disagree with the notion of health care in Canada becoming better than it is now if it were run by the private sector, and three-in-four (75%) are opposed to the federal government making cuts to health care funding in order to reduce government debt.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 7 to August 9, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Sour on Donald Trump, Lukewarm on Joe Biden

Respondents are divided on whether Canadian politicians should “speak their mind” as the American campaign continues.

Vancouver, BC [August 14, 2020] – Few Canadians believe the tenure of United States President Donald Trump has been beneficial to Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 73% of Canadians think that Trump’s term at the White House has been “bad” or “very bad” for Canada, while just 17% deem it “very good” or “good.”

Two thirds of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (67%) regard Trump’s presidency as “bad” for Canada, along with 74% of those aged 35-to-54 and 80% of those aged 55 and over.

Four-in-five Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) and the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election (80% and 79% respectively) believe that Trump’s tenure has been detrimental to Canada.

While 28% of Conservative Party voters in 2019 think Trump’s presidency has been good for Canada, 63% hold the opposite view.

“The animosity from Canadians towards Donald Trump has risen dramatically over the past two years,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In June 2019, only 15% of Canadians felt Trump had been very bad for Canada. In January 2020, the proportion increased to 29%. This month, it reached 47%.”

When asked to consider Democratic Party candidate Joe Biden as President of the United States, just over two-in-five Canadians (44%) say he would be “very good” or “good” for Canada, while 23% consider him “bad” or “very bad.”

One third of Canadians (33%) are undecided when pondering Biden—a proportion that rises to 41% among women, 39% among Canadians aged 35-to-54 and 51% among Albertans.

A Biden presidency is regarded favourably by 57% of Liberal Party voters and 51% of NDP voters. Significantly fewer Conservative voters (29%) hold the same view.

Canadians are split when asked whether elected officials should become involved in the U.S. election. While 46% would prefer for Canadian politicians to stay neutral and avoid public statements during the American campaign, 43% think they should speak their mind if they are concerned about the American presidential election.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 7 to August 9, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Fewer Canadians Are Feeling Financial Anxiety During Pandemic

The proportion of residents who have worried about being able to pay their mortgage or rent fell by 10 points since April.

Vancouver, BC [August 7, 2020] – The past four months have brought a decline in the proportion of Canadians who are experiencing apprehension over financial matters, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-ten Canadians (31%) say they have worried “frequently” or “occasionally” in the past month about being able to pay their mortgage or rent. This represents a 10-point drop since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in April 2020.

More than two-in-five Canadians have worried about the safety of their savings (43%, down nine points in four months) and about the value of their investments (41%, down nine points) over the past four weeks,

Three-in-ten Canadians (29%, -8) have been concerned “frequently” or “occasionally” about their employer running into serious financial trouble, while 39% (-9) have been worried about unemployment affecting their household.

“The nationwide trends on financial anxiety are positive, but there are still groups of Canadians that have been more affected than others,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Concerns about meeting mortgage or rent payments rise to 38% among those aged 18-to-34, and 49% of Albertans have recently worried about unemployment in their household.”

Two-in-five Canadians (41%) say the COVID-19 outbreak has led them to re-evaluate their career or profession—a proportion that jumps to 52% among those aged 18-to-34.

While 77% of Canadians expect the COVID-19 outbreak to have a long-lasting negative effect on Canada, significantly fewer (52%) predict a similar situation for their own lives.

More than three-in-four Canadians (78%) think the COVID-19 outbreak is proof that the way the global economy works will have to change. Majorities of Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party (76%), the Liberal Party (80%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (85%) in the 2019 federal election are in agreement with this notion.

As was the case in April 2020, two thirds of Canadians (66%, +1) plan to keep their current long-term strategy on investments, while 16% (+4) plan to change their approach.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from August 1 to August 3, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Americans Think Worst of COVID-19 Pandemic Lies Ahead

Sizeable majorities of Americans of all political stripes agree with requiring all customers to wear masks at indoor premises.

Vancouver, BC [August 5, 2020] – Americans remain worried about the COVID-19 pandemic, and fewer are satisfied with the way federal authorities have handled the situation, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Americans believe “the worst is ahead” when it comes to the COVID-19 pandemic. This represents an 11-point increase since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June.

Americans aged 55 and over are more likely to expect the COVID-19 situation to worsen (58%) than those aged 35-to-54 (48%) and those aged 18-to-34 (47%).

“In June, 47% of Americans thought they had left the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic behind,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This month, only 37% feel the same way.”

Across the United States, just over a third of Americans (37%) are satisfied with how the federal government has dealt with the COVID-19 outbreak, down nine points since June. Dissatisfaction has risen from 48% to 53%.

The level of satisfaction in how the COVID-19 pandemic has been handled continues to be higher when Americans rate their state governments (56%, -6) and their local governments (61%, -3).

More than four-in-five Americans (82%) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside. Support for this measure is high among Democrats (90%), Independents (83%) and Republicans (73%).

About two thirds of Americans (65%, -4) say they would take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available, while 25% (+5) say they would not.

Three-in-ten Republicans (31%) say they are not willing to get inoculated against COVID-19, along with 27% of Independents and 18% of Democrats.

The approval rating for U.S. President Donald Trump stands at 43% this month, up three points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in July. Satisfaction with Trump’s performance is highest among men (47%), Americans aged 35-to-54 (also 47%), White Americans (46%), Fox News watchers (66%) and Republicans (83%)

A majority of Americans (54%, -2) disapprove of how Trump is handling his duties, including 59% of women, 57% of Americans aged 55 and over, 62% of African Americans and 83% of Democrats.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on August 3 and August 4, 2020, among 1,200 American adults.  The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our datasets here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca