Liberals Have Eight-Point Lead Over Tories in Canada

Health care is the most important issue facing the country for three-in-ten Canadians, followed by the economy and jobs.

Vancouver, BC [June 17, 2021] – The governing Liberal Party remains ahead of its rivals in Canada’s federal political scene, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 38% of Canadian decided voters would support the Liberal candidate in their constituency if a federal election were held tomorrow, up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March.

The Conservative Party is second with 30% (+2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (=), the Bloc Québécois with 5% (-2), the Green Party also with 5% (-1) and the People’s Party with 1% (=).

The Liberals are ahead of the Conservatives by 15 points among female decided voters (40% to 25%). Among male decided voters, the Liberals are barely ahead of the Conservatives (37% to 35%).

This month, the Liberal Party fares best with decided voters aged 55 and over (41%, with the Conservatives at 36%) and decided voters aged 18-to-34 (40%, with the NDP at 29%). The race is closer among decided voters aged 35-to-54 (36% for the Liberals, and 34% for the Conservatives).

The Liberals remain the most popular federal party among decided voters in Atlantic Canada (49%), Ontario (42%) and Quebec (39%). The Conservatives continue to dominate in Alberta (50%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (also 50%). In British Columbia, the New Democrats are in first place (34%), followed by the Liberals (31%) and the Conservatives (27%).

Half of Canadians (50%, -6) approve of the way Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is handling his duties.

NDP leader Jagmeet Singh posted the same approval rating as Trudeau (50%, +4). The numbers are lower for Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole (34%, +1), Green Party leader Annamie Paul (32%, +2) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (14%, -1).

More than a third of Canadians select Trudeau when asked which one of the main party leaders would make the best prime minister (37%, -3). For the first time, Singh is in second place on this indicator (17%, +5), followed by O’Toole (15%, =), Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (3%, +1), Bernier (3%, +1) and Paul (2%, -1).

Health care is identified as the most important issue facing the country by 29% of Canadians (-4), followed by the economy and jobs (23%, -1), housing, homelessness and poverty (14%, +5), the environment (9%, +2) and COVID-19 (7%, -4).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from June 12 to June 14, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Makaristos

Slower Cars on Residential Streets Still Welcome in British Columbia

Almost three-in-five respondents would like to see speed limits reduced to 30 km/h on all residential streets in their municipality.

Vancouver, BC [June 15, 2021] – Public support for a reduction of the speed limit on residential streets remains high across British Columbia, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 61% of British Columbians say they would “definitely” or “probably” like to see the speed limit reduced to 30 km/h on all residential streets in their municipality, while keeping the speed limit on arterial and collector roads at 50 km/h.

This represents a three-point increase in support for this policy since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2019.

“Almost two thirds of British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (64%) support establishing a lower speed limit on residential streets,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of residents aged 18-to-34 (62%) and aged 55 and over (57%) share the same view.”

In 2019, Vancouver City Council unanimously passed a motion to establish a pilot project that will see the speed limit reduced to 30 km/h on select residential streets in the city. The pilot project started earlier this year in the Grandview-Woodland neighbourhood.

As was the case two years ago, two thirds of British Columbians (66%) think Vancouver’s pilot project is a “very good” or “good idea”, while 22% deem it “bad” or “very bad.”

Just under two-in-five British Columbians (39%, -3) admit to witnessing a car that they perceive is circulating above the current speed limit on the street where they live “at least once a day”, while only 16% claim this “never” happens.

Residents of the Fraser Valley are more likely to report seeing cars speeding on their street on a daily basis (45%) than those who live in Vancouver Island (42%), Northern BC (41%), Metro Vancouver (37%) and Northern BC (35%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from June 6 to June 8, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Little Momentum as British Columbia Drivers Ponder Electric Cars

Residents of Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley are more likely to say that their next vehicle will be electric.

Vancouver, BC [June 1, 2021] – Over the past two years, there has been a negligible increase in the proportion of drivers in British Columbia who acknowledge that their next car will probably be electric, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 53% of British Columbians who drive their own cars say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that the next vehicle they acquire for themselves or their household will be electric, up two points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2019.

Male drivers are more likely to lean towards acquiring an electric vehicle (56%) than their female counterparts (51%). Three-in-five drivers aged 35-to-54 (60%) are likely to buy an electric vehicle, along with 57% of those aged 18-to-34 and 47% of those aged 55 and over.

Drivers who voted for the BC Green Party in last year’s provincial election are more likely to be seriously considering an electric vehicle (66%) than those who cast ballots for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (56%) or the BC Liberals (51%).

“There are some major regional differences when it comes to the appetite of drivers in British Columbia for electric vehicles,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 59% of those who reside in Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley foresee their next vehicle being electric, fewer feel the same way in Southern BC (42%), Vancouver Island (also 42%) and Northern BC (41%).”

More than a quarter of drivers in British Columbia say they are less likely to purchase an electric vehicle because they are too expensive when compared to non-electric options (27%, +3) and because they fear becoming stranded if they cannot find a charging station (also 27%, +3).

More than one-in-five drivers are also worried about not having enough places to charge the vehicle in the areas where they usually drive (23%, -2) and not having a place to charge the vehicle where they currently live (22%, +2). Only 6% of drivers (-1) are deterred by the “feel” of the vehicle compared with a non-electric option.

While only 22% of drivers who reside in the Fraser Valley say that a perceived lack of charging stations would make them less likely to purchase an electric vehicle in the future, the proportion rises to 24% in Metro Vancouver, 25% in Vancouver Island, 28% in Southern BC and 35% in Northern BC.

The Government of British Columbia has passed legislation to ensure that, by the year 2040, all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province will be “zero emission.” As was the case in 2019, 70% of residents are in favour of this decision.

A majority of British Columbians (51%, +2) think the goal established by the provincial government on the issue of “zero emission” vehicles is “achievable”, while 36% (-6) believe it is “not achievable.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 23 to May 25, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 
Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 
 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Six Communities Endorse South Fraser Community Rail Project

Almost four-in-five residents say they are likely to rely on the service for work or leisure, including 81% of those who drive a vehicle.

Vancouver, BC [May 20, 2021] – A proposal to reactivate a rail corridor for daily passenger service using hydrogen powered trains is very popular among residents of six British Columbia municipalities, a new Research Co. poll conducted on behalf of the South Fraser Community Rail Society has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of residents of six provincial communities, 88% of respondents say they support the South Fraser Community Rail project.

At least three-in-four respondents in each community are in favour of the project, including 93% in Abbotsford, 89% in Chilliwack, 85% in North Delta, 83% in North Surrey, 82% in the Township of Langley and 76% in the City of Langley.

The South Fraser Community Rail project would rely on a publicly owned 99 km operating corridor (known as the Interurban Corridor) available with passenger rights saved and protected by a previous provincial government at no cost for its use between the Pattullo Bridge SkyTrain Station and the City of Chilliwack.

The South Fraser Community Rail project would connect 16 cities and communities, eight First Nations communities, 14 post-secondary Institutions, Industrial Parks and the Abbotsford International Airport.

Almost four-in-five respondents in the six communities (78%) say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to rely on the service once it becomes operational—including 88% of those who commute using public transit and 81% of those who drive to school or work.

In the survey, only 32% of respondents think the Express Bus being used on the Highway 1 corridor from Chilliwack to the Carvolth Exchange in Langley fits the needs of the community and no other public transit alternative is required at this time.

Nine-in-ten respondents who have taken the Express Bus on Highway 1 (90%) support the South Fraser Community Rail project.

More than half of respondents say they are more likely to support the project because it will be good for the environment since it relies on a Hydrogen propulsion system, with zero greenhouse gas emissions (56%) and because it would allow for a commute time of 90 minutes from Chilliwack to the Pattulo Bridge—a significantly quicker commute time than the 135 minutes plus transfer time to cover the same distance with existing transit services (53%).

Practically half of respondents say they are more likely to support the project because one South Fraser Community Rail train would potentially remove 160 vehicles from Highway 1 (49%) and because the project will take three years to implement—a significantly quicker delivery timeframe than any other potential option (also 49%).

More than two-in-five respondents (44%) say they are more likely to support the project because it will cost an estimated $1.38 billion for 99 km —significantly less expensive than any other Inter-regional transit option.

Almost nine-in-ten respondents (87%) believe there must be a reactivated environmentally friendly Interurban passenger rail transit option while Highway 1 is currently being widened in stages.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 5 to May 8, 2021, among a representative sample of 800 adults in North Delta, North Surrey, City of Langley, Township of Langley, Abbotsford and Chilliwack. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Agree with Supreme Court on Carbon Tax Decision

More than three-in-five Canadians (62%) say they are personally concerned about climate change.

Vancouver, BC [April 9, 2021] – The recent ruling by the Supreme Court of Canada that upheld the federal government’s carbon tax plan is supported by a majority of the country’s residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 57% of Canadians agree with the court’s decision, while 29% disagree and 13% are undecided.

The Supreme Court stated that the federal government is free to impose minimum pricing standards due to the threat posed by climate change. 

Support for the Supreme Court’s ruling is highest in Quebec (64%), followed by British Columbia (58%), Atlantic Canada (also 58%), Ontario (57%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (50%) and Alberta (47%).

Across the country, 45% of Canadians say that the carbon tax has negatively affected the finances of their household. This includes majorities of men (51%), Albertans (58%) and Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election (65%).

Canadians are divided on whether the introduction of a carbon tax has led people to be more mindful of their carbon consumption and change their behaviour. While 42% of Canadians believe this to be the case, 44% disagree and 15% are not sure.

“The notion of a carbon tax modifying the habits of Canadians is more prevalent among those who voted for the Liberals (71%) and the New Democrats (70%) in the last federal election,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 32% of Canadians who voted for the Conservatives share this point of view.”

The survey provided respondents with a list of 10 different environmental issues. More than three-in-five Canadians say they are personally concerned about four different matters: air pollution (64%), the pollution of rivers, lakes and reservoirs (62%), global warming or climate change (also 62%) and the pollution of drinking water (61%).

Fewer Canadians are personally concerned about six other environmental issues: the contamination of soil and water by toxic waste (53%), the extinction of plant and animal species (52%), deforestation or the clearance of naturally occurring forests (51%), the loss of tropical rain forests (50%), the depletion of fish stocks through overfishing (44%) and the maintenance of the supply of fresh water for household needs (also 44%).

Almost half of Canadians (47%) think the federal government is not paying enough attention to the environment—a proportion that rises to 54% among Atlantic Canadians and 50% among both Quebecers and British Columbians.

Similar proportions of Canadians also think their provincial government (51%) and their municipal government (48%) are not focusing on the environment as much as they should.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on April 2 and April 3, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Support Return to System of Compulsory Trades Certification

Astounding 94 per cent of British Columbians considered government’s initiative important.

Vancouver, BC [March 12, 2021] – A new survey finds that most British Columbians support compulsory certification of the skilled trades and believe certification will make the construction industry safer.

“This poll demonstrates that British Columbians overwhelmingly support a return to compulsory trades certification,” noted Brynn Bourke, interim executive director of the BC Building Trades.

A compulsory trade is a skilled trade that requires training or apprenticeship in order to legally work in that trade. The provincial Liberals eliminated compulsory trades in 2002, and today B.C. is the only province in Canada that doesn’t have compulsory trades training.

A poll conducted March 8 and 9 by Research Co. and commissioned by the BC Building Trades shows 80 per cent of British Columbians support restoring compulsory trades in this province. A full 90 per cent of British Columbians believe that compulsory trades will make the construction industry safer due to the requirement for training and regulation, and that compulsory trades will contribute to workers being more highly skilled.

Meanwhile, 89 per cent of British Columbians believe compulsory trades will build consumer confidence and an expectation of quality workmanship.

“The results of this poll could not be clearer,” said Bourke. “British Columbians support and understand the importance of compulsory trades, they believe in compulsory trades, and they think compulsory trades will contribute to increased safety, skills development and quality work in the construction sector.”

The BC NDP government has committed to restoring compulsory trades. The poll also found that 94 per cent of British Columbians consider the government’s initiative either very or moderately important. Interestingly, women and residents 55 and over were more likely to consider the initiative “very important.”

The online survey polled 800 adults in B.C. Results are considered correct plus or minus 3.5 percentage points 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Brynn Bourke, interim executive director, 
BC Building Trades
778-397-2220

A Third of British Columbians Endure COVID-19 Financial Struggles

More than half of the province’s residents (54%) say they are spending more on groceries than they did a year ago.

Vancouver, BC [March 15, 2021] – One third of British Columbians acknowledge that the financial situation of their household has not returned to the level it had before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 33% of British Columbians say that their household’s financial standing is worse now than prior to the pandemic.

While almost half of British Columbians (48%) report no change in their financial situation over the past year, 17% say they are better off now.

“There are specific groups of British Columbians who are more likely to have been negatively impacted by the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than a third of women (36%) and practically half of residents of Northern BC (49%) say their household’s finances have suffered on account of COVID-19.”

About a third of British Columbians of European and East Asian origins (32% and 33% respectively) say their household’s financial situation has worsened because of the pandemic, along with 38% of the province’s residents of First Nation and South Asian descent.

When asked about specific things they pay for, a majority of British Columbians (54%) say their household expenditures on groceries are higher now than they were before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. This proportion climbs to 63% among women, British Columbians aged 55 and over and residents of the Fraser Valley.

Another area of increased spending for British Columbians is electronic entertainment, such as cable television and streaming services. While 6% of the province’s residents say they are paying less for these items than they did a year ago, almost three-in-ten (29%) are allocating more money to them.

Conversely, while 18% of British Columbians say they are spending more on transportation—such as fuel for vehicles, transit passes and taxis—more than a third (37%) say their costs are lower now than before COVID-19.

Significantly fewer residents of the province say they are spending more on four other categories than they did before the start of the pandemic: books (15%), housing (14%), board games (13%) and newspapers and magazines (9%). 

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from March 1 to March 3, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here, and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Stealthy Thermostat Fiddling Continues in Some Canadian Homes

Women are more likely to change the temperature at home without telling their spouse or significant other than men.

Vancouver, BC [February 12, 2021] – Half of Canadians who are cohabiting with a spouse or partner claim that setting the temperature at home is a joint effort, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians who are married or live with a significant other say that both partners are equally in charge of setting the thermostat.

Similar proportions of respondents say the responsibility for setting the temperature at home is theirs alone (26%) or in the hands of their spouse or partner (23%).

“The idea of an equal partnership for managing the thermostat is more prevalent in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (61%), Alberta (58%), Atlantic Canada (56%) and British Columbia (53%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer than half of Ontarians (46%) and Quebecers (41%) behave in the same fashion.”

Since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November 2018, there is a 19-point increase in the proportion of Canadians who are cohabiting with a spouse or partner who say setting the temperature is a joint effort.

Two-in-five Canadians who are married or live with a significant other (39%, +9) admit that they change the temperature at home without telling their spouse or partner “all of the time” or “most of the time”.

Women are more likely to touch the home thermostat without telling their spouse or partner “all of the time” or “most of the time” (45%) than men (34%).

Conversely, 28% of men say they “never” fiddle with the home thermostat without informing their spouse or partner, compared to 22% of women.

More than a third of Canadians (37%, -4) acknowledge that their energy and heating use at home has increased over the past few weeks. Only 13% (-2) report that it has decreased, while 45% (+7) say it has not changed.

Residents of British Columbia are more likely to state that their home energy and heating use has increased (44%), followed by those who reside in Alberta (40%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 40%), Ontario (39%), Quebec (28%) and Atlantic Canada (also 28%).

There are some shifts in the preferred temperature of homes when compared to 2018. Just over one-in-ten Canadians (12%, +3) typically set their thermostat at 18C or lower.

A third of residents (33%, +5) select 19C or 20C, while two-in-five (39%, -1) choose 21C or 22C and 10% (+4) set the temperature at 23C or higher.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from February 1 to February 3, 2021, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Liberals Stay Ahead in Canada as Trudeau’s Rating Improves

Health care (28%, +3) is regarded as the most important issue facing the country, followed by the economy and jobs (27%, -2).

Vancouver, BC [December 17, 2020] – The governing Liberal Party maintains the upper hand in Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 37% of decided voters would support the Liberal candidate in their riding if a federal election were held today, down one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September.

The Conservative Party is second with 31% (-1), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (+3), the Bloc Québécois with 7% (-1), the Green Party with 3% (=) and the People’s Party with 1% (=).

The Liberals are nine points ahead of the Conservatives among female decided voters (38% to 29%) and hold a three-point edge among male decided voters (36% to 33%).

The Conservatives are the most popular federal party in Alberta (51%) and in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (48%). The Liberals are ahead in Atlantic Canada (44%), Quebec (45%, with the Bloc at 35%) and Ontario (37%). In British Columbia, the New Democrats and the Conservatives are essentially tied (34% and 33% respectively), with the Liberals at 29%.

Health care is regarded as the most important issue facing the country by 28% of Canadians (+3), followed by the economy and jobs (27%, -2), COVID-19 (15%), housing, homelessness and poverty (9%, -3) and the environment (6%, -1).

“Concerns about health care are more prevalent among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (30%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (29%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Those aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be preoccupied with the economy and jobs (36%).”

The approval rating for Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is 55%, up five points since September, while 40% of Canadians disapprove of his performance (-5).

Trudeau’s rating is highest in Atlantic Canada (60%), followed by Ontario (59%), British Columbia (58%), Quebec (55%), Manitoba and Saskatchewan (42%) and Alberta (37%).

Just over one third of Canadians (35%, +2) approve of the way Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole has handled his duties, while 38% (+4) disapprove—including 45% of Quebecers.

Almost half of Canadians (46%, +2) approve of the performance of Jagmeet Singh as leader of the NDP. The numbers are lower for Green Party leader Annamie Paul (25%) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (17%, +3).

Trudeau remains ahead of all other leaders when Canadians are asked who would make the best prime minister of the country (39%, +1), followed by O’Toole (22%, -1), Singh (13%, =), Bernier (3%, +1), Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (2%, -1) and Paul (2%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 12 to December 14, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Opposition NDP Edges Ahead of Governing UCP in Alberta

Almost two thirds of the province’s residents (65%) oppose the introduction of a provincial sales tax (PST).

Vancouver, BC [December 7, 2020] – The New Democratic party (NDP) holds the upper hand in Alberta’s political scene, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 43% of decided voters would cast a ballot for the opposition NDP if a provincial election were held today, while 40% would support the governing United Conservative Party (UCP).

The Alberta Party is third with 9%, followed by the Green Party (2%), the Liberal party (also 2%) and the Wildrose Independence Party (also 2%).

The NDP holds a 10-point lead over the UCP among female decided voters (46% to 36%), while the governing party is ahead among male voters (43% to 41%).

The UCP is the top choice for decided voters aged 55 and over (48% to 38%) while the NDP leads among those aged 18-to-34 (45% to 36%) and those aged 35-to-54 (42% to 39%).

The NDP has a sizeable lead in Edmonton (55% to 30%), while the UCP is slightly ahead in Calgary (44% to 42%) and holds a substantial advantage in the rest of the province (49% to 32%).

“The United Conservative Party is holding on to 74% of its voters from the 2019 election,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Some former UCP voters are currently looking at supporting the New Democrats (11%), the Alberta Party (7%) and the Wildrose Independence Party (5%).”

Across the province, just over two-in-five Albertans (42%) approve of the way Premier and UCP leader Jason Kenney is handling his duties while half (50%) disapprove. Residents are split when assessing the performance of official opposition and NDP leader Rachel Notley (Approve 45%, Disapprove 46%). 

The approval ratings are significantly lower for Green Party leader Jordan Wilkie (16%), interim Wildrose Independence Party leader Paul Hinman (also 16%) and Alberta Party interim leader Jacquie Fenske (15%).

The economy and jobs is identified as the most important issue facing the province by 43% of Albertans, followed by health care (27%), government accountability (7%), COVID-19 (6%) and energy and pipelines (4%).

When asked about the possible introduction of a provincial sales tax (PST) given Alberta’s fiscal challenges, almost two thirds of residents (65%) voiced opposition to the idea, while 28% supported it.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 2 to December 4, 2020, among 600 adults in Alberta. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Alberta. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.0 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half in BC, Three-in-Four in Alberta Agree with Pipeline Expansion

Majorities of Albertans and British Columbians are disappointed with the way the federal government has handled this issue.

Vancouver, BC [November 10, 2020] – Just over half of British Columbians and practically three-in-four Albertans want to carry on with the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative provincial samples, 52% of British Columbians and 74% of Albertans agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the project.

“There is a higher level of support for the pipeline’s expansion from residents aged 55 and over in both British Columbia (60%) and Alberta (83%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Agreement with the federal government’s decision is lower among those aged 18-to-34 In each province (44% in BC, 68% in Alberta).”

In British Columbia, agreement with the pipeline expansion has dropped by four points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in December 2019

Opposition to the project fell by six points in British Columbia (from 35% to 29%) , while the proportion of undecided respondents increased from 10% last year to 18% now.

More than half of residents of each Canadian province (59% in Alberta and 54% in British Columbia) are disappointed with the way the federal government has handled the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion. These groups include 66% of Green Party voters in British Columbia and 70% of United Conservative Party voters in Alberta.

While two-in-five British Columbians (40%) want the provincial government to do anything necessary to ensure that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion does not happen, the proportion of Albertans who feel the same way about the actions of their own provincial administration stands at 22%.

Only 17% of Albertans believe the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of the province’s residents. The proportion is significantly higher in British Columbia (44%).

Two thirds of British Columbians (68%) and four-in-five Albertans (79%) believe the Trans Mountain Pipeline will create hundreds of jobs for residents of each province.

More than a third of Albertans (34%) and British Columbians (38%) believe gas prices will be lower now that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion has been re-approved.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 29 to October 31, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia, and an online study conducted from November 2 to November 4, 2020, among 700 adults in Alberta. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia and Alberta. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for British Columbia and +/- 3.4 percentage points for Alberta, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables for British Columbia here, our data tables for Alberta here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Saskatchewan Party Keeps Sizeable Edge in Provincial Election

More than three-in-five likely voters in the province approve of the way Premier Scott Moe has handled his duties

Vancouver, BC [October 25, 2020] – The Saskatchewan Party remains ahead of all challengers in the Prairie Province’s election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 56% of decided voters would cast a ballot for the Saskatchewan Party candidate in their constituency or have already done so in Advance Voting or through the mail, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted earlier this month.

The New Democratic Party (NDP) is in second place with 38%, up two points since the start of the campaign. There was no movement for the other contending parties, with the Green Party at 2%, the Progressive Conservative Party also at 2%, the Liberal Party at 1% and the Buffalo Party also at 1%.

On a regional basis, the New Democrats have a four-point edge over the Saskatchewan Party in Regina among decided voters (50% to 46%). The Saskatchewan Party leads in Saskatoon (53% to 42%) and in the rest of the province (68% to 23%).

About one-in-five decided voters who will be casting their ballot tomorrow in Saskatchewan (18%) say they may change their mind about which party or candidate to support, while 82% are certain of their choice.

At the end of the campaign, almost half of decided voters in Saskatchewan (47%) acknowledge that their main motivation is a party’s ideas and policies. The party’s leader is a distant second with 24%, followed by a desire for change (10%), the party’s candidate in the riding (9%), a desire for stability (7%) and disgust with other contending candidates (3%).

More than three-in-five likely voters (61%, -4) approve of the performance of Premier and Saskatchewan Party leader Scott Moe, while one third (33%, +5) disapprove. 

The rating for Official Opposition and NDP leader Ryan Meili improved by three points to 48%. The numbers are significantly lower for Green leader Naomi Hunter (22%), Progressive Conservative leader Ken Grey (17%), Liberal leader Robert Rudachyk (16%) and Buffalo leader Wade Sira (15%).

The leaders of Saskatchewan’s two main parties reach the end of the campaign with a negative momentum score: -9 for Moe (17% say their opinion of the incumbent premier has improved, while 26% say it has worsened) and -4 for Meilli (23% say their opinion of the opposition leader has improved, while 27% say it has worsened).

On the “Best Premier” question, Moe remains in first place with 51% (+2), followed by Meilli with 29% (+8). The other party leaders are in single digits.

As was the case at the start of the campaign, more than a third of likely voters (35%, =) say the economy and jobs is the most important issue facing Saskatchewan, followed by heath care (31%, +3), crime and public safety (7%, +2), housing, poverty and homelessness (also 7%, +2) and COVID-19 (also 7%, +2).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 23 to October 25, 2020, among 500 likely voters in Saskatchewan, including 456 decided voters in the 2020 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Saskatchewan. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.4 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 4.6 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

New Democrats Headed for Outright Victory in British Columbia

Almost half of likely voters in the province pick John Horgan as the best person to head the provincial government.

Vancouver, BC [October 23, 2020] – The BC New Democratic Party (NDP) stands to make significant gains in British Columbia’s provincial election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 50% of decided voters in British Columbia would cast a ballot for the BC NDP candidate in their constituency or have already done so in Advance Voting or through the mail. This represents a two-point increase for the New Democrats since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in early October.

The BC Liberals remain in second place with 35%, followed by the BC Green Party with 13% and the BC Conservative Party with 2%.  

The New Democrats maintain a nine-point lead over the BC Liberals among decided male voters (48% to 39%) and have a 21-point advantage among decided female voters (52% to 31%).

The BC NDP is also ahead of the main opposition party among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (54% to 29%), decided voters aged 35-to-54 (49% to 36%) and decided voters aged 55 and over (47% to 40%).

Only 11% of decided voters who will be casting their ballot tomorrow say they may change their mind about which party or candidate to support, while 89% are certain of their choice.

Almost half of decided voters in British Columbia (47%) say a party’s ideas and policies is the main motivator for their choice in this provincial election. This includes 66% of BC Green voters and 51% of BC NDP voters, but just 37% of those who will support the BC Liberals.

Other factors cited by decided voters are the party’s leader (22%), the party’s candidate in the riding (11%), a desire for stability (9%), a desire for change (7%) and disgust with other contending candidates (4%).

On the eve of the election, more than three-in-five likely voters (62%, -3) approve of the way Premier and BC NDP leader John Horgan is handling his duties, while 33% disapprove.

There was no change in the approval rating for BC Liberals leader Andrew Wilkinson since early October (40%), while BC Greens leader Sonia Furstenau improved markedly to 46% (+13).

Furstenau posts a momentum score of +13 (27% of likely voters say their opinion of her has improved since the start of the campaign, while 14% say it has worsened). The numbers are also in positive territory for Horgan (+2), while Wilkinson’s score is -21 (with 36% of likely voters reporting a worsening opinion of the BC Liberals leader).

When asked who would make the best premier of the province, Horgan remains on top with the endorsement of almost half of likely voters (48%, +1), followed by Wilkinson with 24% (-3) and Furstenau with 12% (+6).

While 81% of likely voters who supported the BC NDP in the 2017 ballot feel Horgan is the best person to act as British Columbia’s head of government, only 53% of BC Liberal voters in the last election feel the same way about Wilkinson.

The issue landscape did not shift dramatically in the final week of the campaign. One-in-four likely voters (25%, =) say the economy and jobs is their main preoccupation right now, followed by housing, poverty and homelessness (23%, -2) and health care (also 23%, =). 

Fewer likely voters mentioned COVID-19 (13%, +5), the environment (7%, =), crime and public safety (4%, =), education (2%, +1), accountability (1%, -2), and energy (also 1%, +1) as the top issue facing the province.

As has been the case throughout the past five weeks, likely voters aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be concerned about housing, homelessness and poverty (33%), while those aged 35-to-54 gravitate towards the economy and jobs (29%) and those aged 55 and over select health care (28%).

At least two-in-five likely voters pick Horgan over Wilkinson as the best party leader to handle health care (49% to 22%), the economy and jobs (43% to 31%), education (42% to 22%), housing, poverty and homelessness (40% to 22%) and accountability (40% to 25%), 

On the issue of handling the COVID-19 pandemic, likely voters in British Columbia choose Horgan over Wilkinson by a 3-to-1 margin (53% to 17%). The incumbent premier is also ahead of the opposition leader on two other matters: crime and public safety (38% to 30%) and energy (32% to 25%). 

Furstenau extended her lead as the best leader to manage the environment (44%, +11), with Horgan at 24% and Wilkinson at 14%.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on October 22 and October 23, 2020, among 750 likely voters in British Columbia, including 705 decided voters in the 2020 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.6 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 3.7 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by Adi kavazovic

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Appetite for Electric Vehicles Higher in the U.S. Than Canada

Price and the fear of becoming stranded are the major deterrents for motorists pondering a switch to a “carbon free” ride.

Vancouver, BC [October 22, 2020] – Vehicle owners in the United States are more likely to predict that their next car will be electric than their Canadian counterparts, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples of non-electric vehicle owners, 51% of American respondents and 42% of Canadian respondents say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that the next vehicle they acquire for themselves or their household will be electric.

“There is a significant gender gap on both North American countries when it comes to embracing the concept of electric vehicles,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Male non-electric vehicle owners are more likely to foresee an electric car in their future (48% in Canada and 68% in the United States) than their female counterparts (37% in Canada and 30% in the United States).”

In Canada, non-electric vehicle owners aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be considering a switch (61%) than those aged 35-to-54 (44%) and those aged 55 and over (37%).

In the United States, non-electric vehicle owners aged 35-to-54 are more likely to foresee a change in the future (78%) than those aged 18-to-34 (69%) and those aged 55 and over (21%).

When asked about specific issues that may make the purchase of an electric vehicle less likely, about three-in-five respondents in Canada (61%) say that the price is too expensive compared to non-electric options.

A majority of non-electric vehicle owners in Canada are fearful of becoming stranded if they cannot find a charging station (55%) and are worried about not having enough places to charge the vehicle in the areas where they usually drive (also 55%).

Fewer Canadian non-electric vehicle owners cited not having a place to charge the vehicle where they currently live (47%) and the “feel” of the vehicle compared to a non-electric one (14%).

In the United States, more than half of non-electric vehicle owners mentioned the fear of becoming stranded (53%) and price (51%) as the biggest hindrances to making a future purchase. 

More than two-in-five American respondents (45%) are concerned about a shortage of places to charge the vehicle where they usually drive, 37% lack a charging spot where they currently live, and 27% worried about the “feel” of an electric vehicle. 

The idea of the “feel” of the vehicle being a deal-breaker in the purchase of an electric car was more prevalent among non-electric vehicle owners who identify with the Republican Party in the United States (35%) and those who reside in the Canadian province of Alberta (23%).

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among representative samples of 797 adult non-electric vehicle owners in Canada and 804 adult non-electric vehicle owners in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for each country, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables for Canada here, our data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Steady National Lead for Biden as United States Election Nears

The main influences for American likely voters are party platforms, discussions with family and discussions with friends.

Vancouver, BC [October 21, 2020] – Joe Biden stands to capture a majority of the national vote in this year’s presidential election in the United States, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of likely voters, 53% of decided voters would cast a ballot for the Democratic Party nominee or have already done so, while 45% would support Republican Party incumbent Donald Trump.

Support for both Jo Jorgensen of the Libertarian Party and Howie Hawkins of the Green Party remains at 1%.

The popular vote forecast is practically unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September.

Biden holds 19-point leads over Trump among female decided voters (57% to 38%) and decided voters aged 18-to-34 (58% to 37%). The race is closer among male decided voters (50% to 48%), decided voters aged 35-to-54 (51% to 46%) and decided voters aged 55 and over (52% to 47%).

White decide voters are evenly split among the two main candidates(48% for Biden, 48% for Trump), while the level of support for the Democratic nominee is higher with Hispanic / Latino decided voters (58%) and African American decided voters (92%).

Across the country, 11% of decided voters who supported Trump in the 2016 presidential election are voting for Biden this year. Only 3% of decided voters who backed Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in 2016 are casting a ballot for Trump in 2020.

Almost two-in-five likely voters in the United States (39%) say their primary motivation when selecting who to back in the presidential election is the candidate’s ideas and policies, followed by the candidate’s political party (20%), a desire for stability (15%), disgust with other candidates (14%) and a desire for change (13%).

More than half of likely voters believe Biden is the best candidate to handle five issues: the environment (54%), race relations (53%), health care (52%), education (51%) and COVID-19 (also 51%).

The former Vice President holds the upper hand over the current President on nine other topics: government accountability (Biden 49%, Trump 34%), foreign policy (Biden 48%, Trump 38%), immigration (Biden 48%, Trump 38%), job creation (Biden 47%, Trump 41%), crime (Biden 46%, Trump 37%), the economy (Biden 45%, Trump 42%), managing the deficit (Biden 44%, Trump 35%), energy and oil (Biden 44%, Trump 39%) and national defense (Biden 44%, Trump 42%). 

Almost two thirds of likely voters in the United States (64%) say party platforms are “very influential” or “moderately influential” in their decision to support candidates in this year’s election, while 51% mention discussions with family and 48% mention cite discussions with friends.

Fewer American likely voters are swayed by endorsements from non-governmental organizations (44%), campaign ads on radio and television (43%), endorsements from unions (40%), endorsements from trade associations (39%), interaction with candidates on social media (also 39%), interaction with other people on social media (38%) and endorsements from newspapers (also 38%).

“More than half of Republican likely voters (54%) say campaign ads on radio and television are influential in their decision to support candidates,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among Democrats (45%) and Independents (28%).”

Sizeable majorities of American likely voters express confidence in the people responsible for conducting elections in their state being able to oversee the entire process (83%), enforce social distancing at polling stations (82%) and ensure that there is no fraudulent activity with mailed ballots (78%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 16 to October 18, 2020, among 1,035 likely voters in the United States and 973 decided voters in the 2020 presidential election. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.0 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 3.1 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Saskatchewan Party Ahead of NDP in Provincial Election

Practically half of likely voters in the province say Scott Moe is their preferred leader to serve as head of government.

Vancouver, BC [October 11, 2020] – The Saskatchewan Party holds a sizeable advantage in the electoral campaign currently underway in the Prairie Province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 58% of decided voters in Saskatchewan would cast a ballot for the candidate of the governing party in their constituency.

The New Democratic Party (NDP) is in second place with 36%, followed by the Green Party with 2%, the Progressive Conservative Party also with 2%, the Liberal Party with 1% and the Buffalo Party also with 1%.

The race is currently tight in Regina, where the Saskatchewan Party and the NDP are virtually tied among decided voters (49% and 47% respectively). The governing party is ahead in Saskatoon (54% to 41%) and in the rest of the province (65% to 25%).

Practically four-in-five decided voters in Saskatchewan (79%) say they are certain of their current choice, while 21% say they may change their mind before Election Day on Oct. 26.

The primary motivation for decided voters in Saskatchewan is a party’s ideas and policies (38%), followed by the party’s leader (32%), the candidate in the riding (10%), a desire for stability (also 10%), a desire for change (7%) and disgust with other contending candidates (3%).

“Decided voters who plan to support the Saskatchewan Party are more likely to say that their main motivation is the leader (41%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, those who plan to cast a ballot for the NDP are more likely to cite ideas and policies (42%).”

Almost two thirds of the province’s likely voters (65%) are satisfied with the way Premier and Saskatchewan Party leader Scott Moe has handled his duties, while 28% are not and 7% are undecided.

Likely voters are divided in their assessment of Official Opposition and NDP leader Ryan Meili (Approve 45%, Disapprove 44%). The rating is lower for Progressive Conservative leader Ken Grey (35%), Green leader Naomi Hunter (32%), Liberal leader Robert Rudachyk (31%) and Buffalo leader Wade Sira (25%).

On the “Best Premier” question, Moe holds a commanding lead over Meili (49% to 21%). The other four party leaders are in single digits.

More than a third of likely voters in Saskatchewan (35%) believe the economy and jobs is the most important issue facing the province, followed by heath care (28%), the environment (8%) and crime and public safety (5%).

Moe holds the upper hand over Meili as the best leader to handle eight issues: energy (46% to 19%), the economy and jobs (45% to 24%), crime and public safety (42% to 19%), accountability (41% to 22%), the environment (40% to 19%), health care (39% to 30%), education (39% to 24%) and housing, poverty and homelessness (38% to 23%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 8 to October 10, 2020, among 500 likely voters in Saskatchewan, including 447 decided voters in the 2020 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Saskatchewan. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.4 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 4.6 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by Tintaggon.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Lead for New Democratic Party Increases in British Columbia

John Horgan is ahead of Andrew Wilkinson as the best leader to handle the five most important issues for voters in the province.

Vancouver, BC [October 8, 2020] – The BC New Democratic Party (NDP) has extended its advantage in British Columbia’s provincial electoral campaign, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 48% of decided voters in British Columbia would cast a ballot for the BC NDP candidate in their constituency, up four points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in late September.

The BC Liberals remain in second place with 36% (-1), followed by the BC Green Party with 13% (=) and the BC Conservative Party with 2% (-3). 

The BC NDP holds a nine-point edge over the BC Liberals among decided male voters (47% to 38%) and a 16-point lead among decided female voters (49% to 33%).

The New Democrats are also ahead of the BC Liberals among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (45% to 31%), decided voters aged 35-to-54 (46% to 33) and decided voters aged 55 and over (44% to 34%).

Just under one-in-four decided voters (23%) say they may change their mind and support another party’s candidate in the election scheduled for Oct. 24. Supporters of the BC Liberals and the BC NDP are less likely to consider a switch (15% and 20% respectively) than those who plan to vote for the BC Greens (29%).

When asked about the main factor that motivates their selection, 43% of decided voters cite the party’s ideas and policies, while 21% focus mostly on the party’s leader and 14% concentrate on the party’s candidate in the riding. Fewer decided voters in British Columbia are swayed by a desire for stability (11%), a desire for change (10%) or disgust with other contending candidates (4%).

The approval rating for Premier and BC NDP leader John Horgan stands at 65% (-1). The numbers are lower for BC Liberals leader Andrew Wilkinson (40%, +1) and BC Greens leader Sonia Furstenau (33%, -4).

Horgan’s campaign momentum is balanced, with 24% of likely voters in British Columbia saying their opinion of him has improved and 24% stating that it has worsened. In contrast, Wilkinson has a negative momentum score (Improved 16%, Worsened 26%) as does Furstenau (Improved 12%, Worsened 16%).

On the preferred premier question, almost half of likely voters in British Columbia (47%, +3) select Horgan, with Wilkinson at 27% (=) and Furstenau at 6% (-1).

As was the case last month, likely voters in British Columbia are primarily preoccupied with housing, poverty and homelessness (25%, +1), the economy and jobs (also 25%, +4) and health care (23%, -3). Other issues mentioned by likely voters are COVID-19 (8%, -3), the environment (7%, =), crime and public safety (4%, -4), accountability (3%, =), education (1%, =) and energy (1%, +1).

When asked which leader is better suited to handle specific issues, Horgan holds sizeable leads over Wilkinson on COVID-19 (52% to 20%), health care (48% to 24%), education (42% to 23%), the economy and jobs (42% to 30%), housing, poverty and homelessness (40% to 23%), accountability (37% to 28%), crime and public safety (37% to 30%) and energy (34% to 27%).

On the environment, Furstenau is in first place (33%), followed by Horgan with 29% and Wilkinson with 18%.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 5 to October 7, 2020, among 750 likely voters in British Columbia, including 698 decided voters in the 2020 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.6 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 3.7 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by James Wheeler

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Americans Reject Delaying the 2020 Presidential Election

Among decided voters, Democratic candidate Joe Biden keeps a sizeable advantage over incumbent Donald Trump. 

Vancouver, BC [August 7, 2020] – Most likely voters in the United States reject the notion of delaying the presidential election that is scheduled for November, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of likely voters, two thirds of respondents (68%) think the election should not be postponed to a later date because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Majorities of likely voters who identify as Democrats (75%), Independents (67%) and Republicans (59%) believe this year’s presidential ballot should go on as planned.

More than half of decided voters (53%) would support prospective Democratic nominee Joe Biden in the November election, while 42% would vote for Republican incumbent Donald Trump.

Support is decidedly lower for Libertarian nominee Jo Jorgensen (2%), Green nominee Howie Hawkins (1%) and other candidates (also 1%).

These results are largely unchanged at the national level since the July Research Co. survey that also placed Biden ahead by double-digits among decided voters.

The bulk of support for Biden comes from women (59%), decided voters aged 18-to-34 (54%) and African Americans (71%). The race is closer among men, where Biden is slightly ahead of Trump (47% to 45%). Among White voters, Trump is practically tied with Biden (48% to 47%).

More than nine-in-ten decided voters (92%) say they are certain that they will vote for their chosen candidate in the election. This includes 94% of those who intend to support Trump and 91% of those who plan to vote for Biden.

There are some sizeable differences when supporters of the two main contenders are asked about the factors for their choice.

About a third of decided voters who support Trump (34%) say their main motivator is the candidate’s ideas and policies, while fewer point to disgust with other candidates (23%) and Trump’s political party (22%).

Biden voters are primarily motivated by disgust with other candidates (30%), and to a lesser extent by the candidate’s ideas and policies (23%) and his political party (21%).

When asked which one of the two main candidates is better suited to handle specific issues, Biden holds the upper hand on the environment (50%), health care (49%), race relations (48%), education (47%), COVID-19 (46%), government accountability (45%), foreign policy (43%), energy and oil (41%) and managing the deficit (40%)

The two contenders are tied or virtually even on five issues: crime (Trump 39%, Biden 39%), the economy (Trump 43%, Biden 41%), job creation (Trump 42%, Biden 41%), immigration (Biden 42%, Trump 40%) and national defense (Trump 41%, Biden 41%).

“In our June survey, Trump was ahead of Biden on job creation, the economy and national defense,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Now the numbers on these issues have tightened considerably, while Biden has also gained ground on energy and oil.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on August 3 and August 4, 2020, among 1,018 likely voters in the United States and 946 decided voters in the 2020 presidential election. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 3.2 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our datasets here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Americans Prefer Biden Over Trump on Seven Policy Issues

A third of Americans consider Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris and Amy Klobuchar as “good choices” for Vice President.

Vancouver, BC [June 3, 2020] – Prospective Democratic Party nominee Joe Biden remains ahead of incumbent Donald Trump of the Republican Party with five months to go before the United States presidential election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 51% of decided voters in the United States (+1 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in April) would support Biden, while 46% (+2) would vote for Trump. Libertarian Party nominee Jo Jorgensen garners the backing of 2% of decided voters.

In 2016, Trump received 46% of the popular vote, two points behind Hillary Clinton (48%). Trump secured 306 votes in the Electoral College to Clinton’s 232.

Trump currently holds an 11-point lead over Biden among White decided voters (54% to 43%). Sizeable proportions of African American (83%) and Hispanic / Latino decided voters (67%) are planning to vote for Biden.

“Compared to what we reported on in April, there is significant movement among Independent voters,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “At this stage of the campaign, 15% of these voters are undecided, and among those who choose a candidate, Biden is nearly tied with Trump (47% to 45%).”

Most viewers of CNN and MSNBC / CNBC would vote for Biden (74% and 78% respectively), while more than seven-in-ten Fox News watchers (72%) would cast a ballot for Trump.

Biden is regarded by a plurality of Americans as the presidential candidate best suited to deal with seven policy issues:

  • The environment (46%).
  • Health care (45%).
  • Race relations (44%).
  • Education (also 44%).
  • Foreign policy (42%).
  • Government accountability (40%).
  • COVID-19 (also 40%).

 

Trump is ahead on three issues:

 

 

  • Job creation (43%).
  • The economy (also 43%).
  • National defense (41%).

 

The two contenders are virtually tied on four other issues:

 

  • Crime (Biden 38%, Trump 37%).
  • Managing the deficit (both at 36%).
  • Energy and oil (Biden 38%, Trump 37%).
  • Immigration (Biden 40%, Trump 39%).

 

When Americans are asked about nine characteristics that people may find in politicians, Biden has a higher score than Trump on eight items:

 

  • Being able to unite America and not divide it (47% to 30%).
  • Being in touch with the problems ordinary Americans face in their daily lives (47% to 35%).
  • Generally agreeing with respondents on issues they care about (45% to 40%).
  • Being able to bring the kind of change America needs (45% to 42%).
  • Being able to deal with labour unions effectively in the event of a dispute (45% to 41%).
  • Sharing the values of respondents (44% to 34%).
  • Being a good speaker and communicator (42% to 33%).
  • Being honest and trustworthy (42% to 32%).

 

Trump holds the upper hand on only one trait:

 

  • Being a good economic manager (47%, with Biden at 39%).

 

Biden has said he intends to choose a woman as his running mate. Across the United States, 40% of respondents think Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren would be a “good choice” for Vice President, followed by California Senator Kamala Harris at 39%, Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar at 35%, former Georgia Congresswoman Stacey Abrams at 29% and New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand at 26%.

More than three-in-five Democrats think Warren (64%) and Harris (62%) would be good choices for the party’s ticket in 2020, while almost half feel the same way about Klobuchar (48%) and Abrams (46%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on June 1 and June 2, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our datasets here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most British Columbians Agree with Building Coastal GasLink

Seven-in-ten residents believe the project will create hundreds of jobs in the province.

Vancouver, BC [March 17, 2020] – British Columbians are in favour of carrying on with the construction of the Coastal GasLink pipeline by a 2-to-1 margin, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 61% of British Columbians agree with building the Coastal GasLink pipeline, while 30% disagree.

Support for the continuation of the project is highest among men (68%), British Columbians aged 55 and over (69%) and residents of Vancouver Island (67%).

“More than half of British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the last provincial election (56%) want to build the Coastal GasLink pipeline,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “A similar proportion of BC Green Party voters agree (53%), but support is highest among those who cast ballots for the BC Liberals in 2017 (75%).”

Seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%) have followed news related to the Coastal GasLink pipeline “very closely” or “moderately closely” over the past two months.

Almost half of British Columbians (48%) agree with the actions that have been taken by the Wet’suwet’en elected band council in connection with the Coastal GasLink pipeline. The rating is slightly lower for the actions of the Government of British Columbia (44%) and the Government of Canada (41%).

Fewer than two-in-five British Columbians agree with the actions of the people who have participated in protests (38%), the Wet’suwet’en Hereditary Chiefs (37%) and the people who have participated in road blockades (33%).

When asked if the provincial government should do anything necessary to ensure that the Coastal GasLink pipeline does not happen, 38% of British Columbians agreed and 53% disagreed.

Half of British Columbians (50%) disagree with the notion of the Coastal GasLink pipeline threatening the health and safety of residents, and 70% believe the project will create hundreds of jobs.

Three-in-five British Columbians (61%) support the development of LNG in the province, while 25% are opposed.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 4 to March 7, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca