Positive Views on TMX Pipeline Rise in BC, Drop Slightly in Alberta

A third of British Columbians (33%) believe the project should be stopped, down eight points since October 2021.

Vancouver, BC [August 5, 2022] – Favourable perceptions on the expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline have increased in British Columbia and remain high in Alberta, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative provincial samples, 51% of British Columbians agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the project, up six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in October 2021.

Practically seven-in-ten Albertans (69%) also agree with the re-approval of the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion, down five points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November 2020.

In British Columbia, residents of Southern BC (66%), Northern BC (61%) and the Fraser Valley (58%) are more likely to hold positive views on the pipeline project. The rating is lower in Metro Vancouver (50%) and Vancouver Island (41%).

In Alberta, sizeable majorities of residents of Edmonton (72%) and Calgary (66%) are in favour of the pipeline expansion, along with 70% of those who live other areas of the province.

“The proportion of British Columbians who want the provincial government to do anything necessary to ensure that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion does not happen dropped from 41% in October 2021 to 33% in July 2022,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In Alberta, 25% of residents (+3) share the same point of view.”

More than half of British Columbians (51%, -4) and three-in-five Albertans (61%, +2) say they are disappointed with the way the federal government has managed the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion.

Significant majorities of Albertans (78%, -1) and British Columbians (71%, +6) believe the Trans Mountain Pipeline will create hundreds of jobs for residents of each province.

Two-in-five British Columbians (40%, -7) think the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of the province’s residents. Just under three-in-ten Albertans (28%, +11) share this point of view.

Fewer than half of residents of the two provinces expect gas prices to be lower now that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion has been re-approved: 40% in Alberta (+6) and 37% in British Columbia (+1).

In November 2016, the federal government rejected a proposal—known as the Enbridge Northern Gateway—to build a new pipeline from Alberta to British Columbia’s north coast, to export oil on tankers to Asian markets.

Just under half of British Columbians (46%, +5) believe it is time to reconsider the Enbridge Northern Gateway proposal, while just over a quarter (27%, -7) disagree.

Support for taking a second look at the Enbridge Northern Gateway is highest in Northern BC (60%), followed by Southern BC (51%), Metro Vancouver (45%), the Fraser Valley (43%) and Vancouver Island (38%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from July 29 to July 31, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia and 800 adults in Alberta. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in each province. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.5 percentage points for each province, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables for British Columbia here, our data tables for Alberta here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 Photo Credit: Codex

Five-Point Lead for Ruling Progressive Conservatives in Ontario

Ontarians are divided when asked if the Liberals and the New Democrats should merge into a single party. 

Vancouver, BC [May 18, 2022] – The Ontario Progressive Conservative Party holds the upper hand in the provincial election campaign, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Ontarians, 34% of decided voters say they will support the Ontario PC candidate in their riding in next month’s provincial ballot.

The Ontario Liberal Party is second with 29%, followed by the Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) with 23%, the Ontario Green Party with 7%, the New Blue Party of Ontario with 3% and the Ontario Party with 1%.

The Progressive Conservatives are particularly popular among men (37%) and Ontarians aged 55 and over (41%). The Liberals are ahead in the 416 region (37%), while the New Democrats post their best numbers in Southwestern Ontario (32%).

Ontarians are divided when assessing the performance of Premier and Ontario Progressive Conservative Party leader Doug Ford. While 46% of the province’s residents approve of the way he has handled his duties, 48% disapprove.

More than two-in-five Ontarians approve of both Official Opposition and Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Andrea Horwath (47%) and Ontario Liberal Party leader Steven Del Duca (42%). The rating is lower for Ontario Green Party leader Mike Schreiner (31%), New Blue Party of Ontario leader Jim Karahalios (13%) and Ontario Party leader Derek Sloan (12%).

The first weeks of the campaign have not yielded a positive momentum score for any of the six main party leaders. One-in-five Ontarians (20%) say their opinion of Del Duca has improved. The numbers are paltrier on this indicator for Horwath (17%), Ford (16%), Schreiner (9%), Karahalios (4%) and Sloan (3%).

A third of Ontarians (33%) say Ford would make the best premier of the province, followed by Horwath (23%), Del Duca (20%), Schreiner (3%), Sloan (2%) and Karahalios (also 2%).

Ontarians identify three issues as the most important ones facing the province: housing, poverty and homelessness (26%), health care (25%) and the economy and jobs (20%).

“Ontarians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to look at housing, homelessness and poverty as the most important challenge (36%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Ontarians aged 55 and over are currently more concerned about health care (32%).”

Ford is perceived as the best leader to manage the economy and jobs (35%), crime and public safety (33%), energy and pipelines (31%) and accountability (29%). Horwath is ahead on being able to handle housing, homelessness and poverty (29%).

There is no clear leader when Ontarians ponder the best person to deal with health care (Horwath 28%, Ford 27%), education (Ford 26%, Del Duca 24%) and the environment (Ford 20%, Horwath 19%, Del Duca 19%, Schreiner 17%).

Ontarians are evenly split when asked if the Ontario Liberal Party and the Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) should merge into a single political party. While 41% of the province’s residents agree with this idea, 43% disagree and 16% are undecided.

Support for a provincial merger of Liberals and New Democrats is strongest in the 416 region (48%), but drops in Eastern Ontario (41%), Northern Ontario (also 41%), Southwestern Ontario (39%) and the 905 region (37%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 15 to May 17, 2022, among 700 Ontario adults, including 602 decided voters in the 2022 provincial election. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points for the entire sample and +/- 4.0 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: DXR

Almost Three-in-Five British Columbia Drivers Ready for Electric Car

More than seven-in-ten of the province’s residents endorse the goal of only selling “zero emission” vehicles by 2040.

Vancouver, BC [May 3, 2022] – The proportion of drivers in British Columbia who are willing to consider the purchase of an electric vehicle has increased since 2020, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 59% of British Columbians who drive their own vehicles claim it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that the next car they buy for themselves or their household will be electric, up six points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2021.

“Significant majorities of drivers in Metro Vancouver (64%) and the Fraser Valley (62%) foresee their next vehicle being electric,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower in Southern BC (54%), Vancouver Island (53%) and Northern BC (36%).”

The Government of British Columbia has passed legislation to ensure that, by the year 2040, all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province will be “zero emission.” More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (73%, +3) endorse this course of action—including 81% of those who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the 2020 provincial election, 76% of those who supported the BC Green Party and 73% of those who cast ballots for the BC Liberals.

More than three-in-four British Columbians aged 18 to 34 (78%) endorse the provincial government’s “zero emission” mandate, along with 75% of those aged 35-to-54 and 69% of those aged 55 and over.

More than half of British Columbians (53%, +2) believe the goal established by the provincial government on the issue of “zero emission” vehicles is “achievable”, while 39% (+3) think it is “not achievable.”

When British Columbians who drive their own cars are asked about issues that would make them less likely to purchase an electric vehicle, 59% say the vehicles are too expensive when compared to non-electric options—a proportion that rises to 66% among those aged 55 and over and to 70% among residents of Vancouver Island.

A majority of British Columbians who drive their own cars (54%) say they fear becoming stranded in an electric vehicle if they cannot find a charging station, and half (50%) are worried about not having enough places to charge the vehicle in the areas where they usually drive.

More than two-in-five British Columbians who drive their own cars (44%) are concerned about not having a place to charge an electric vehicle where they currently live, while 13% cite the “feel” of the vehicle compared with a non-electric option.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 25 to April 27, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

What Is Saskatchewan?

Canada’s first crowdsourced poll reveals a province divided, deadlocked and potentially disengaged.  

Vancouver, BC [February 25, 2022] – Last week, Saskatchewan residents, hungry for a new way to inform themselves about their government, community and province, crowdsourced Vancouver’s Research Co. to conduct a poll on their behalf.  

The answer to the question “What is Saskatchewan?”, however, remains fairly elusive.  

An online study conducted from February 19 to February 23, 2022, among a representative sample of 808 adults in Saskatchewan, with a focus on the present and future of the province’s politics, COVID-19 pandemic response and economic conditions, revealed consensus opinion on very little.  

For example, one of the most consistent answers, 1 in 4, was “Not sure”, in response to questions on the necessity of new or rebranded political parties to replace the New Democratic Party (NDP) or the Saskatchewan Party. More than a third of residents (37%) agreed with the statement that “neither of the two major political parties in Saskatchewan truly represent my views.”  

“While support for the Saskatchewan Party amongst all voters remains strong, a significant number of residents feel disengaged when it comes to Saskatchewan’s political future,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Premier Scott Moe’s approval rating stands at 50%, yet 54% of residents agree that his government is not doing enough to deal with the suicide crisis in northern Saskatchewan.”  

Tammy Nicklas-Robert, a Saskatoon, Saskatchewan-based researcher and communications’ consultant, used the GoFundMe platform to crowdsource the Research Co. study as one potential solution to what she sees as mounting frustration in her province due to a collective sense of isolation and powerlessness.  

“When I first floated the idea on social media, I was overwhelmed by the volume and intensity of the response,” says Nicklas-Robert. “What I heard is after two years of the pandemic, Saskatchewan people are feeling isolated, disheartened by what they perceive to be a lack of trustworthy data and facts related to their province’s social, economic and political reality, but also ready to reconnect with like-minded collectives.”  

She points to the result on mask-wearing in Saskatchewan after the mandate drops as evidence that those collectives will emerge. More than three-in-five Saskatchewanians (63%) say they plan to continue wearing a mask or face covering when entering businesses and public venues, even if this is no longer a requirement.  

“When we know how much anger can be triggered in others when they see someone wearing a medical mask, even during a pandemic, those who plan to continue to wear one in public after February 28 will hopefully find some comfort in knowing that they are well within the majority planning to do the same,” she continued.    

More highlights from this study:    

COVID-19  

A majority of Saskatchewan residents (58%) consider COVID-19 as a real threat to them and their familys health and safety. More than a third (36%) think COVID-19 is not a real threat.  

Most of the province’s residents (53%) are satisfied with the way their municipal government has dealt with COVID-19. The rating is lower for the Saskatchewan government (48%) and the federal Liberal government (37%).  

While a majority of Saskatchewanians trust their provincial government to respond to a natural disaster (57%), the trust-level drops on all other issues tested, such as managing the provincial budget (49%), ensuring the sustainability of the health care system (46%) and collaborating with public health and medical professionals to establish health guidelines and restrictions (44%).  

Just over two-in-five residents trust their provincial government to release accurate (43%) and complete (41%) information about COVID-19 cases and hospitalization rates to the media and the public.  

More than half of Saskatchewanians (55%) agree with the provincial governments decision to cancel “Proof of Vaccination” or negative test requirement in order to enter specific businesses and public venues, while two-in-five (40%) disagree with it.  

Residents are evenly divided on the provincial governments decision to end the indoor mask mandate on February 28 (Agree 48%, Disagree 47%).    

The Economy  

Residents are also evenly divided on the state of Saskatchewans economy, with 43% considering it very good” or good” and 45% deeming it bad” or very bad.”  

One-in-four Saskatchewanians (26%) expect the provincial economy to improve over the next six months, while 43% foresee no change and one-in-five (19%) predict a decline.    

Politics  

Half of the province’s residents (50%) approve of Scott Moe’s performance as Premier and Saskatchewan Party leader, while two-in-five (40%) disapprove. The rating is lower for departing Saskatchewan NDP leader Ryan Meili (34%), Progressive Conservative Party leader Glen Leson (17%), Green Party leader Naomi Hunter (15%) and Liberal Party leader Jeff Walters (13%).  

More than half of decided voters in the province (53%) would support the Saskatchewan Party if a provincial election were held today, with the Saskatchewan NDP a distant second with 37%. Support is in single digits for the Buffalo Party (3%), the Green Party (2%), the Progressive Conservative Party (also 2%) and the Liberal Party (1%).  

Almost half of residents (47%) say they would vote for the Saskatchewan Party if Moe is no longer its leader in the next provincial election—including 86% of those who voted for the party in 2020.  

A third of Saskatchewanians (34%) say they plan to vote for the NDP even with a leader other than Meili—including 84% of those who cast ballots for NDP candidates in the last provincial election.  

More than three-in-ten residents believe the province needs a new centre-right political party that is not the Saskatchewan Party (33%) or a new centre-left political party that is not the NDP (32%). More than a third (37%) feel that neither of the two major parties in Saskatchewan truly represent their views.  

A majority of residents (55%) believe the NDP should consider a re-brand before the next election—a proportion that rises to 61% among those who voted for the New Democrats in 2020.  

Just under half of Saskatchewanians believe that the provincial government is doing enough to deal with two pending concerns: the discovery of residential school grave sites (49%) and the future of the oil and gas industry (46%).  

Fewer residents think the provincial government is paying enough attention to the impact of climate change (42%), the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs (30%) and the suicide crisis in northern Saskatchewan (27%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from February 19 to February 23, 2022, among 808 adults in Saskatchewan. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Saskatchewan. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Still Back Proposed Ban on Single-Use Plastics

Three-in-four of the province’s residents say they rely on their own re-usable bags to transport groceries out of a store.  
 
Vancouver, BC [December 31, 2021] – Public support remains high in British Columbia for the federal government’s plan to reduce plastic use across Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 82% of British Columbians are in favour of banning single-use plastics, unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2021.
 
The federal government’s proposed regulation focuses on items such as grocery checkout bags, straws, stir sticks, six-pack rings, plastic cutlery and food takeout containers made from hard-to-recycle plastics. Several municipalities in British Columbia have already implemented their own guidelines for specific items, such as grocery checkout bags.  
 
Just over three-in-four British Columbians (76%, -1) acknowledge relying on their own reusable bag to transport groceries out of a store after purchasing them. Significantly smaller proportions of the province’s residents use bags provided by the store, either made out of paper (11%) or plastic (9%).  
 
“There is a generational gap in the adoption of reusable bags in British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Practically nine-in-ten residents aged 55 and over (88%) are already using their own bags at grocery stores, compared to 73% among those aged 35-to-54 and 62% among those aged 18-to-34.”  
 
Just over half of British Columbians (51%, -3) say they go out of their way to recycle “all of the time”, such as holding on to bottles and cans until they can be placed into a proper recycling bin. Once again, this behaviour is more common among the province’s residents aged 55 and over (66%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (50%) and aged 18-to-34 (32%).  
 
More than three-in-five residents of Vancouver Island (65%) and Northern BC (63%) claim to go out of their way to recycle “all of the time.” The proportion is lower in Southern BC (58%), the Fraser Valley (57%) and Metro Vancouver (44%).  
 
One-in-five British Columbians (20%, -6) acknowledge limiting hot water usage in their home “all the time” by taking shorter showers or running washing machines or dishwashers with full loads only.  
 
Fewer British Columbians say they unplug electrical devices in their home—such as TVs, computers and cell phone chargers—when they are not in use (12%, -1), buy biodegradable products (5%, -2) or eat organic or home-grown foods (also 5%, -2) “all of the time.”
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 21 to December 23, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Lukewarm Support for Pipeline Expansion in British Columbia

A proposal to reconsider the shelved Enbridge Northern Gateway project is endorsed by 41% of British Columbians.  
 
Vancouver, BC [October 7, 2021] – Public backing for the expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline has dropped in British Columbia over the past year, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 45% of British Columbians agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the project, down seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in October 2020.  
 
Opposition to the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion stands at 34% this month, up five points since 2020 and on par with the numbers reported by Research Co. in December 2019 (35%).  
 
“Most residents of Northern BC (60%) and Southern BC (54%) agree with the federal government’s decision to carry on with the pipeline expansion,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The level of support is currently lower in Metro Vancouver (42%), the Fraser Valley (41%) and Vancouver Island (41%).”  
 
Across the province, practically two thirds of British Columbians (65%, -3) believe the pipeline project will create hundreds of jobs for residents, while more than half (55%, -1) say they are disappointed with the way the federal government has managed this file.  
 
Almost half of British Columbians (47%, +3) think the pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of residents and just over two-in-five (41%, +1) want the provincial government to do whatever is necessary to ensure that the pipeline expansion does not happen.  
 
In November 2016, the federal government rejected a proposal—known as the Enbridge Northern Gateway—to build a new pipeline from Alberta to British Columbia’s north coast, to export oil on tankers to Asian markets.  
 
Just over two-in-five British Columbians (41%) agree with reconsidering the Enbridge Northern Gateway proposal, while one third (34%) disagree and one-in-four (25%) are undecided.  
 
The idea of reviving the Enridge Northern Gateway is more popular among British Columbians who voted for the BC Liberals in the 2020 provincial election (57%) than among those who cast ballots for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (38%) or the BC Green Party (36%).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 1 to October 3, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Canadians Pick Trudeau to Manage Pandemic, O’Toole for Jobs

There is no clear leader on two matters: housing, homelessness and poverty, and transportation projects.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 15, 2021] – The incumbent prime minister is the first choice of Canadians to handle issues such as health care and the COVID-19 pandemic, while the leader of the official opposition is preferred for financial and public safety concerns, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
The online survey of a representative national sample asked Canadians to select which one of the five federal party leaders who are running nationwide campaigns is the best person to manage 16 different issues.  
 
More than a third of Canadians (36%) think Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is better suited to handle the COVID-19 pandemic, followed by Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole with 22%, New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Jagmeet Singh with 12%, People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier with 6% and Green Party leader Annamie Paul with 2%.  
 
More than three-in-ten Canadians also pick Trudeau to manage foreign affairs (31%), child care (also 31%) and regulations related to firearms (also 31%).  
 
Earlier in the campaign, Erin O’Toole was tied with Justin Trudeau on the foreign affairs file,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the final week before votes are cast, Trudeau has a five-point lead on this particular issue.”  
 
The Liberal leader is also ahead of all rivals on being the best person to handle immigration (29%), health care (also 29%), the environment (28%), Indigenous issues and reconciliation (27%), seniors care (26%), and racism and discrimination (also 26%).  
 
One third of Canadians (33%) believe O’Toole would be the best leader to manage the economy and jobs, followed by Trudeau with 29%, Singh with 15%, Bernier with 4% and Paul with 2%.  
 
The Conservative leader is in first place on three other issues: crime and public safety (29%), accountability and leadership (27%), and energy and pipelines (also 27%).  
 
There is a tie on two specific concerns. Across the country, 25% of Canadians select either Trudeau or Singh as the best leaders to manage housing, homelessness and poverty. When asked about transportation projects, equal proportions of respondents pick Trudeau and O’Toole (25% each).  
 
Paul gets her best rating on the environment (14%), while Bernier scores highest on the COVID-19 pandemic (6%).  
 
In a survey released by Research Co. this week, health care, the economy and jobs, housing homelessness and poverty, and the environment were identified as the most important issues facing Canada.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 13, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Tobi 87
 
 

Liberals Regain Lead, Conservatives and NDP Drop in Canada

One-in-ten Conservative Party voters from 2019 say they will cast a ballot for the People’s Party in this month’s election.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 14, 2021] – As Canada heads to the final week of campaigning in the 2021 federal election, the governing Liberal Party is ahead of its competitors, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 34% of decided voters in Canada would support the Liberal candidate in their constituency, up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in late August.  
 
The Conservative Party is second with 30% (-2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (-2), the Bloc Québécois with 7% (+1), the People’s Party with 5% (+2) and the Green Party with 3% (-1). In addition, 1% of decided voters in the country would back a different party or an independent candidate.  
 
The Conservatives remain ahead of the Liberals among male voters (36% to 31%) and voters aged 55 and over (35% to 31%). The Liberals hold the upper hand over the Conservatives among female voters (38% to 25%) and voters aged 35-to-54 (39% to 30%). The Liberals are also in first place among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (37%, with the NDP at 27% and the Conservatives at 18%).  
 
In Atlantic Canada, the Liberals remain the most favoured option for voters (40%, with the Conservatives at 34%). In Quebec, the governing party holds an eight-point lead over the Bloc (37% to 29%).  
 
Half of decided voters in Alberta (50%) would support the Conservative candidate in their constituency, along with more than two-in-five (43%) of those who reside in Saskatchewan and Manitoba.  
 
The race remains closely contested in Ontario, where the Liberals are slightly ahead of the Conservatives (37% to 34%) and in British Columbia, where the three main federal parties are virtually tied (30% for the Conservatives, 29% for the New Democrats and 28% for the Liberals).  
 
The People’s Party is benefiting from a higher level of support in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (9%), Alberta (7%) and Ontario (6%). In fact, 10% of Canadians who supported the Conservatives in the 2019 federal election say they will be voting for the People’s Party in 2021.  
 
Almost one-in-four Canadians (23%, -3) think health care is the most important issue facing the country today, followed by the economy and jobs (22%, +2), housing, homelessness and poverty (16%, +1) and the environment (12%, -1).  
 
Across Canada, the NDP’s Jagmeet Singh continues to post the highest approval rating among the five leaders who are running nationwide campaigns (49%, -2), followed by Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau (43%, -2), Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole (40%, -1), Annamie Paul of the Green Party (23%, +2) and Maxime Bernier of the People’s Party (15%, =).  
 
Singh also remains ahead on personal momentum, with 27% of Canadians saying their opinion of him has improved since the start of the campaign. The numbers on this indicator are lower for O’Toole (22%), Trudeau (15%), Paul (12%) and Bernier (8%).  
 
On the “Best Prime Minister” question, Trudeau remains in first place with 33% (+1), followed by O’Toole (26%, =), Singh (18%, -2), Bernier (5%, +2) and Paul (2%, +1).  
 
“A third of Canadian women (33%) feel Justin Trudeau is the best person to manage the federal government, while only one-in-five (19%) select Erin O’Toole,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The race is significantly tighter among male voters on this same question, with Trudeau at 34% and O’Toole at 33%.”
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 13, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Dave Doe
 

Canadians Hold Mixed Views on Which Leader is Best on Issues

Just under one-in-five Canadians (17%) say they intend to vote by mail in this year’s federal election.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 6, 2021] – As the federal election campaign continues, the three main federal party leaders are connecting in different ways with Canadians on the most important issues facing the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, just under a third of Canadians (32%) think Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is the best person to handle crime and public safety.  
 
Trudeau is also the preferred choice of Canadians to manage immigration (30%), health care (29%) and the environment (28%).  
 
Official opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole is the top option for Canadians to handle the economy and jobs (34%), energy and pipelines (32%), and accountability and leadership (27%). O’Toole and Trudeau are tied, with 30% each, when Canadians are asked about the best leader to manage foreign affairs (30%).  
 
New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Jagmeet Singh is the most popular leader to deal with housing, homelessness and poverty (27%), with Trudeau and O’Toole tied at 24%.  
 
Health care is identified as the most important issue facing Canada for 26% of respondents, followed by the economy and jobs with 20%, housing, homelessness and poverty with 15% and the environment with 13%.  
 
The survey also asked Canadians about other characteristics and topics related to the three main federal party leaders. Trudeau emerged as the most popular option to be the Prime Minister in the event of another Quebec referendum (31%) and to represent Canada at the next round of climate change talks (30%).  
 
The incumbent prime minister is also ahead on four personality traits: having a drink with you at the local bar (28%), being on your sports team (also 28%), babysitting your kids or a relative’s kids (25%) and being part of your trivia quiz team (23%, with Singh close behind at 21%).  
 
Singh is practically tied with Trudeau on two of the items tested: having a coffee or tea with you at the local coffee shop (27%, with Trudeau at 26%) and giving you a good recommendation on a book to read (22%, with Trudeau at 21%).  
 
More than three-in-ten Canadians express a preference for O’Toole on three separate matters: negotiating with U.S. President Joe Biden on trade and security issues (34%), being the Prime Minister in the event of a terrorist attack (32%) and negotiating with Russia over Arctic sovereignty (31%).  
 
“There is a theme developing when it comes to the perceptions of Canadians on the three main party leaders,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While Trudeau and Singh score highly on some of the personality traits, like hanging around at a bar or coffee shop, O’Toole has a decisive advantage on foreign policy items.”  
 
This week, there will be two televised debates organized by the Leaders’ Debate Commission. More than two-in-five Canadians (42%) agree with the Commission’s decision to not extend an invitation to these debates to People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier, while 33% disagree and 25% are undecided.  
 
The results are similar when Canadians are asked about the presence of Maverick Party leader Jay Hill on the televised meetings, with 44% agreeing with the decision to leave him out, 27% disagreeing and 29% saying they are not sure.  
 
Almost half of Quebecers (49%) are in favour of the Commission’s decision to leave both Bernier and Hill off the stage.  
 
Across the country, 17% of Canadians say they plan to vote by mail this year—a proportion that includes 30% of British Columbians and 21% of Albertans.  
 
While more than one-in-four Canadians (26%) plan to cast their ballot during Advance Voting from September 10 to September 13, more than two-in-five (44%) intend to vote on Election Day (September 20).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Conservatives Close Gap in Canada as Liberal Lead Disappears

Justin Trudeau’s approval rating fell to 45% (-5 since June), but he is still ahead of Erin O’Toole in the “Preferred PM” question.
 
Vancouver, BC [August 31, 2021] – The federal election in Canada is currently a dead heat between the two most prominent parties in the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 33% of Canadian decided voters would cast a ballot for the candidate of the Liberal Party in their riding, down five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June.
 
The Conservative Party remains in second place with 32% (+2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 22% (+2), the Bloc Québécois with 6% (+1), the Green Party with 4% (-1) and the People’s Party with 3% (+2). Fewer than 1% of decided voters would vote for the Maverick Party, for another party or for an independent candidate.
 
In June, the Liberals were ahead of the Conservatives by 15 points among female decided voters in Canada. This month, the advantage has narrowed to just eight points (36% to 28%). The Tories are now in first place among male decided voters (36% to 31%).
 
The Liberals are still popular among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (34%, followed by the NDP with 29%) and among decided voters aged 35-to-54 (38%, with the Conservatives at 32%). The Tories hold a seven-point advantage over the Liberals among decided voters aged 55 and over (37% to 30%).
 
The Liberals are in first place among decided voters in Atlantic Canada (40%) and Quebec (also 40%). The Conservatives have outright leads in Alberta (49%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (46%).
 
There are close races developing in two Canadian provinces. In Ontario, the Conservatives and the Liberals are essentially tied (36% and 35% respectively). In British Columbia, the Liberals—who were leading in a Research Co. survey conducted in early August—have fallen to third place (28%), with both the Conservatives and the New Democrats at 32%.
 
There is some movement when Canadians are asked about the most important issue facing the country. Health care is first with 26% (-3), followed by the economy and jobs with 20% (-3) and housing, homelessness and poverty with 15% (+1). The environment is fourth on the list with 13% (+6).
 
“While health care remains the dominant issue for Atlantic Canadians and Quebecers, financial matters are crucial for those who reside in Alberta,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “One-in-five Ontarians and British Columbians are worried about housing, but the issue that has seen the biggest gains since June is the environment.”
 
The approval rating for Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau stands at 45% at the end of the month. This is higher than the numbers posted by Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole (41%, +7) and lower than NDP leader Jagmeet Singh (51%, +1).
 
Just over one-in-five Canadians (21%, -11) approve of the way Green Party leader Annamie Paul is handling her duties, while there was no significant movement for People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (15%, +1).
 
When Canadians are asked which one of the five leaders who are running nationwide campaigns would make the best head of government, the incumbent prime minister also lost some ground. Trudeau is in first place with 32% (-5), followed by O’Toole (26%, +11), Singh (20%, +4), Bernier (3%, =) and Paul (1%, -1).
 
Since the start of the campaign, Trudeau posts a negative momentum score (-24, with 39% of Canadians saying their opinion of him has worsened). Paul and Bernier are also in negative territory (-18 and -19 respectively), while O’Toole is even and Singh is at +10 (with 27% of Canadians reporting a better assessment of the current NDP leader).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

British Columbians Split on Banning Gas-Powered Leaf Blowers

Half of the province’s residents worry “a great deal” or “a fair amount” about noise pollution associated with landscaping.

Vancouver, BC [July 13, 2021] – There is no consensus when residents of British Columbia are asked if the time has come to prohibit the use of a specific type of landscaping equipment, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 38% of British Columbians support their municipality enacting a by-law that would ban the use of gas-powered leaf blowers, while 40% oppose this course of action.

Support for prohibiting gas-powered leaf blowers reaches 48% on Vancouver Island, but drops to 39% in Metro Vancouver, 37% in Northern BC, 32% in Southern BC and 29% in the Fraser Valley.

One third of British Columbians (34%) are in favour of a municipal ban on gas-powered lawn mowers, while more than two-in-five (44%) are opposed.

Opposition to prohibiting gas-powered lawn mowers is strongest among British Columbians aged 55 and over (53%) and drops to 43% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 33% among those aged 18-to-34.

Fewer British Columbians are supportive of prohibiting electric leaf blowers (31%, with 48% opposed) and electric lawn mowers (27%, with 53% opposed) in their municipality.

Half of British Columbians (50%) say they worry about noise pollution associated with the use of landscaping equipment “a great deal” or “a fair amount”, while 44% feel the same way about air pollution.

“More than half of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (54%) and aged 35-to-54 (51%) are concerned about noise pollution from landscaping equipment,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among their counterparts aged 55 and over (45%).”

Almost two-in-five British Columbians (38%) say that a gas-powered lawn mower has been used on their property, while fewer recall the operation of electric lawn mowers (30%), electric leaf blowers (27%), gas-powered leaf blowers (20%) and reel lawn mowers (10%).

Reliance on gas-powered lawn mowers is more prevalent in Northern BC (58%), Southern BC (52%) and Vancouver Island (50%) than in the Fraser Valley (42%) and Metro Vancouver (30%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 18 to June 20, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Liberals Have Eight-Point Lead Over Tories in Canada

Health care is the most important issue facing the country for three-in-ten Canadians, followed by the economy and jobs.

Vancouver, BC [June 17, 2021] – The governing Liberal Party remains ahead of its rivals in Canada’s federal political scene, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 38% of Canadian decided voters would support the Liberal candidate in their constituency if a federal election were held tomorrow, up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March.

The Conservative Party is second with 30% (+2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (=), the Bloc Québécois with 5% (-2), the Green Party also with 5% (-1) and the People’s Party with 1% (=).

The Liberals are ahead of the Conservatives by 15 points among female decided voters (40% to 25%). Among male decided voters, the Liberals are barely ahead of the Conservatives (37% to 35%).

This month, the Liberal Party fares best with decided voters aged 55 and over (41%, with the Conservatives at 36%) and decided voters aged 18-to-34 (40%, with the NDP at 29%). The race is closer among decided voters aged 35-to-54 (36% for the Liberals, and 34% for the Conservatives).

The Liberals remain the most popular federal party among decided voters in Atlantic Canada (49%), Ontario (42%) and Quebec (39%). The Conservatives continue to dominate in Alberta (50%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (also 50%). In British Columbia, the New Democrats are in first place (34%), followed by the Liberals (31%) and the Conservatives (27%).

Half of Canadians (50%, -6) approve of the way Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is handling his duties.

NDP leader Jagmeet Singh posted the same approval rating as Trudeau (50%, +4). The numbers are lower for Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole (34%, +1), Green Party leader Annamie Paul (32%, +2) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (14%, -1).

More than a third of Canadians select Trudeau when asked which one of the main party leaders would make the best prime minister (37%, -3). For the first time, Singh is in second place on this indicator (17%, +5), followed by O’Toole (15%, =), Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (3%, +1), Bernier (3%, +1) and Paul (2%, -1).

Health care is identified as the most important issue facing the country by 29% of Canadians (-4), followed by the economy and jobs (23%, -1), housing, homelessness and poverty (14%, +5), the environment (9%, +2) and COVID-19 (7%, -4).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from June 12 to June 14, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Makaristos

Slower Cars on Residential Streets Still Welcome in British Columbia

Almost three-in-five respondents would like to see speed limits reduced to 30 km/h on all residential streets in their municipality.

Vancouver, BC [June 15, 2021] – Public support for a reduction of the speed limit on residential streets remains high across British Columbia, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 61% of British Columbians say they would “definitely” or “probably” like to see the speed limit reduced to 30 km/h on all residential streets in their municipality, while keeping the speed limit on arterial and collector roads at 50 km/h.

This represents a three-point increase in support for this policy since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2019.

“Almost two thirds of British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (64%) support establishing a lower speed limit on residential streets,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of residents aged 18-to-34 (62%) and aged 55 and over (57%) share the same view.”

In 2019, Vancouver City Council unanimously passed a motion to establish a pilot project that will see the speed limit reduced to 30 km/h on select residential streets in the city. The pilot project started earlier this year in the Grandview-Woodland neighbourhood.

As was the case two years ago, two thirds of British Columbians (66%) think Vancouver’s pilot project is a “very good” or “good idea”, while 22% deem it “bad” or “very bad.”

Just under two-in-five British Columbians (39%, -3) admit to witnessing a car that they perceive is circulating above the current speed limit on the street where they live “at least once a day”, while only 16% claim this “never” happens.

Residents of the Fraser Valley are more likely to report seeing cars speeding on their street on a daily basis (45%) than those who live in Vancouver Island (42%), Northern BC (41%), Metro Vancouver (37%) and Northern BC (35%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from June 6 to June 8, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Little Momentum as British Columbia Drivers Ponder Electric Cars

Residents of Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley are more likely to say that their next vehicle will be electric.

Vancouver, BC [June 1, 2021] – Over the past two years, there has been a negligible increase in the proportion of drivers in British Columbia who acknowledge that their next car will probably be electric, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 53% of British Columbians who drive their own cars say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that the next vehicle they acquire for themselves or their household will be electric, up two points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2019.

Male drivers are more likely to lean towards acquiring an electric vehicle (56%) than their female counterparts (51%). Three-in-five drivers aged 35-to-54 (60%) are likely to buy an electric vehicle, along with 57% of those aged 18-to-34 and 47% of those aged 55 and over.

Drivers who voted for the BC Green Party in last year’s provincial election are more likely to be seriously considering an electric vehicle (66%) than those who cast ballots for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (56%) or the BC Liberals (51%).

“There are some major regional differences when it comes to the appetite of drivers in British Columbia for electric vehicles,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 59% of those who reside in Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley foresee their next vehicle being electric, fewer feel the same way in Southern BC (42%), Vancouver Island (also 42%) and Northern BC (41%).”

More than a quarter of drivers in British Columbia say they are less likely to purchase an electric vehicle because they are too expensive when compared to non-electric options (27%, +3) and because they fear becoming stranded if they cannot find a charging station (also 27%, +3).

More than one-in-five drivers are also worried about not having enough places to charge the vehicle in the areas where they usually drive (23%, -2) and not having a place to charge the vehicle where they currently live (22%, +2). Only 6% of drivers (-1) are deterred by the “feel” of the vehicle compared with a non-electric option.

While only 22% of drivers who reside in the Fraser Valley say that a perceived lack of charging stations would make them less likely to purchase an electric vehicle in the future, the proportion rises to 24% in Metro Vancouver, 25% in Vancouver Island, 28% in Southern BC and 35% in Northern BC.

The Government of British Columbia has passed legislation to ensure that, by the year 2040, all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province will be “zero emission.” As was the case in 2019, 70% of residents are in favour of this decision.

A majority of British Columbians (51%, +2) think the goal established by the provincial government on the issue of “zero emission” vehicles is “achievable”, while 36% (-6) believe it is “not achievable.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 23 to May 25, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 
Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 
 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Six Communities Endorse South Fraser Community Rail Project

Almost four-in-five residents say they are likely to rely on the service for work or leisure, including 81% of those who drive a vehicle.

Vancouver, BC [May 20, 2021] – A proposal to reactivate a rail corridor for daily passenger service using hydrogen powered trains is very popular among residents of six British Columbia municipalities, a new Research Co. poll conducted on behalf of the South Fraser Community Rail Society has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of residents of six provincial communities, 88% of respondents say they support the South Fraser Community Rail project.

At least three-in-four respondents in each community are in favour of the project, including 93% in Abbotsford, 89% in Chilliwack, 85% in North Delta, 83% in North Surrey, 82% in the Township of Langley and 76% in the City of Langley.

The South Fraser Community Rail project would rely on a publicly owned 99 km operating corridor (known as the Interurban Corridor) available with passenger rights saved and protected by a previous provincial government at no cost for its use between the Pattullo Bridge SkyTrain Station and the City of Chilliwack.

The South Fraser Community Rail project would connect 16 cities and communities, eight First Nations communities, 14 post-secondary Institutions, Industrial Parks and the Abbotsford International Airport.

Almost four-in-five respondents in the six communities (78%) say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to rely on the service once it becomes operational—including 88% of those who commute using public transit and 81% of those who drive to school or work.

In the survey, only 32% of respondents think the Express Bus being used on the Highway 1 corridor from Chilliwack to the Carvolth Exchange in Langley fits the needs of the community and no other public transit alternative is required at this time.

Nine-in-ten respondents who have taken the Express Bus on Highway 1 (90%) support the South Fraser Community Rail project.

More than half of respondents say they are more likely to support the project because it will be good for the environment since it relies on a Hydrogen propulsion system, with zero greenhouse gas emissions (56%) and because it would allow for a commute time of 90 minutes from Chilliwack to the Pattulo Bridge—a significantly quicker commute time than the 135 minutes plus transfer time to cover the same distance with existing transit services (53%).

Practically half of respondents say they are more likely to support the project because one South Fraser Community Rail train would potentially remove 160 vehicles from Highway 1 (49%) and because the project will take three years to implement—a significantly quicker delivery timeframe than any other potential option (also 49%).

More than two-in-five respondents (44%) say they are more likely to support the project because it will cost an estimated $1.38 billion for 99 km —significantly less expensive than any other Inter-regional transit option.

Almost nine-in-ten respondents (87%) believe there must be a reactivated environmentally friendly Interurban passenger rail transit option while Highway 1 is currently being widened in stages.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 5 to May 8, 2021, among a representative sample of 800 adults in North Delta, North Surrey, City of Langley, Township of Langley, Abbotsford and Chilliwack. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Agree with Supreme Court on Carbon Tax Decision

More than three-in-five Canadians (62%) say they are personally concerned about climate change.

Vancouver, BC [April 9, 2021] – The recent ruling by the Supreme Court of Canada that upheld the federal government’s carbon tax plan is supported by a majority of the country’s residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 57% of Canadians agree with the court’s decision, while 29% disagree and 13% are undecided.

The Supreme Court stated that the federal government is free to impose minimum pricing standards due to the threat posed by climate change. 

Support for the Supreme Court’s ruling is highest in Quebec (64%), followed by British Columbia (58%), Atlantic Canada (also 58%), Ontario (57%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (50%) and Alberta (47%).

Across the country, 45% of Canadians say that the carbon tax has negatively affected the finances of their household. This includes majorities of men (51%), Albertans (58%) and Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election (65%).

Canadians are divided on whether the introduction of a carbon tax has led people to be more mindful of their carbon consumption and change their behaviour. While 42% of Canadians believe this to be the case, 44% disagree and 15% are not sure.

“The notion of a carbon tax modifying the habits of Canadians is more prevalent among those who voted for the Liberals (71%) and the New Democrats (70%) in the last federal election,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 32% of Canadians who voted for the Conservatives share this point of view.”

The survey provided respondents with a list of 10 different environmental issues. More than three-in-five Canadians say they are personally concerned about four different matters: air pollution (64%), the pollution of rivers, lakes and reservoirs (62%), global warming or climate change (also 62%) and the pollution of drinking water (61%).

Fewer Canadians are personally concerned about six other environmental issues: the contamination of soil and water by toxic waste (53%), the extinction of plant and animal species (52%), deforestation or the clearance of naturally occurring forests (51%), the loss of tropical rain forests (50%), the depletion of fish stocks through overfishing (44%) and the maintenance of the supply of fresh water for household needs (also 44%).

Almost half of Canadians (47%) think the federal government is not paying enough attention to the environment—a proportion that rises to 54% among Atlantic Canadians and 50% among both Quebecers and British Columbians.

Similar proportions of Canadians also think their provincial government (51%) and their municipal government (48%) are not focusing on the environment as much as they should.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on April 2 and April 3, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Support Return to System of Compulsory Trades Certification

Astounding 94 per cent of British Columbians considered government’s initiative important.

Vancouver, BC [March 12, 2021] – A new survey finds that most British Columbians support compulsory certification of the skilled trades and believe certification will make the construction industry safer.

“This poll demonstrates that British Columbians overwhelmingly support a return to compulsory trades certification,” noted Brynn Bourke, interim executive director of the BC Building Trades.

A compulsory trade is a skilled trade that requires training or apprenticeship in order to legally work in that trade. The provincial Liberals eliminated compulsory trades in 2002, and today B.C. is the only province in Canada that doesn’t have compulsory trades training.

A poll conducted March 8 and 9 by Research Co. and commissioned by the BC Building Trades shows 80 per cent of British Columbians support restoring compulsory trades in this province. A full 90 per cent of British Columbians believe that compulsory trades will make the construction industry safer due to the requirement for training and regulation, and that compulsory trades will contribute to workers being more highly skilled.

Meanwhile, 89 per cent of British Columbians believe compulsory trades will build consumer confidence and an expectation of quality workmanship.

“The results of this poll could not be clearer,” said Bourke. “British Columbians support and understand the importance of compulsory trades, they believe in compulsory trades, and they think compulsory trades will contribute to increased safety, skills development and quality work in the construction sector.”

The BC NDP government has committed to restoring compulsory trades. The poll also found that 94 per cent of British Columbians consider the government’s initiative either very or moderately important. Interestingly, women and residents 55 and over were more likely to consider the initiative “very important.”

The online survey polled 800 adults in B.C. Results are considered correct plus or minus 3.5 percentage points 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Brynn Bourke, interim executive director, 
BC Building Trades
778-397-2220

A Third of British Columbians Endure COVID-19 Financial Struggles

More than half of the province’s residents (54%) say they are spending more on groceries than they did a year ago.

Vancouver, BC [March 15, 2021] – One third of British Columbians acknowledge that the financial situation of their household has not returned to the level it had before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 33% of British Columbians say that their household’s financial standing is worse now than prior to the pandemic.

While almost half of British Columbians (48%) report no change in their financial situation over the past year, 17% say they are better off now.

“There are specific groups of British Columbians who are more likely to have been negatively impacted by the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than a third of women (36%) and practically half of residents of Northern BC (49%) say their household’s finances have suffered on account of COVID-19.”

About a third of British Columbians of European and East Asian origins (32% and 33% respectively) say their household’s financial situation has worsened because of the pandemic, along with 38% of the province’s residents of First Nation and South Asian descent.

When asked about specific things they pay for, a majority of British Columbians (54%) say their household expenditures on groceries are higher now than they were before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. This proportion climbs to 63% among women, British Columbians aged 55 and over and residents of the Fraser Valley.

Another area of increased spending for British Columbians is electronic entertainment, such as cable television and streaming services. While 6% of the province’s residents say they are paying less for these items than they did a year ago, almost three-in-ten (29%) are allocating more money to them.

Conversely, while 18% of British Columbians say they are spending more on transportation—such as fuel for vehicles, transit passes and taxis—more than a third (37%) say their costs are lower now than before COVID-19.

Significantly fewer residents of the province say they are spending more on four other categories than they did before the start of the pandemic: books (15%), housing (14%), board games (13%) and newspapers and magazines (9%). 

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from March 1 to March 3, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here, and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Stealthy Thermostat Fiddling Continues in Some Canadian Homes

Women are more likely to change the temperature at home without telling their spouse or significant other than men.

Vancouver, BC [February 12, 2021] – Half of Canadians who are cohabiting with a spouse or partner claim that setting the temperature at home is a joint effort, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians who are married or live with a significant other say that both partners are equally in charge of setting the thermostat.

Similar proportions of respondents say the responsibility for setting the temperature at home is theirs alone (26%) or in the hands of their spouse or partner (23%).

“The idea of an equal partnership for managing the thermostat is more prevalent in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (61%), Alberta (58%), Atlantic Canada (56%) and British Columbia (53%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer than half of Ontarians (46%) and Quebecers (41%) behave in the same fashion.”

Since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November 2018, there is a 19-point increase in the proportion of Canadians who are cohabiting with a spouse or partner who say setting the temperature is a joint effort.

Two-in-five Canadians who are married or live with a significant other (39%, +9) admit that they change the temperature at home without telling their spouse or partner “all of the time” or “most of the time”.

Women are more likely to touch the home thermostat without telling their spouse or partner “all of the time” or “most of the time” (45%) than men (34%).

Conversely, 28% of men say they “never” fiddle with the home thermostat without informing their spouse or partner, compared to 22% of women.

More than a third of Canadians (37%, -4) acknowledge that their energy and heating use at home has increased over the past few weeks. Only 13% (-2) report that it has decreased, while 45% (+7) say it has not changed.

Residents of British Columbia are more likely to state that their home energy and heating use has increased (44%), followed by those who reside in Alberta (40%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 40%), Ontario (39%), Quebec (28%) and Atlantic Canada (also 28%).

There are some shifts in the preferred temperature of homes when compared to 2018. Just over one-in-ten Canadians (12%, +3) typically set their thermostat at 18C or lower.

A third of residents (33%, +5) select 19C or 20C, while two-in-five (39%, -1) choose 21C or 22C and 10% (+4) set the temperature at 23C or higher.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from February 1 to February 3, 2021, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Liberals Stay Ahead in Canada as Trudeau’s Rating Improves

Health care (28%, +3) is regarded as the most important issue facing the country, followed by the economy and jobs (27%, -2).

Vancouver, BC [December 17, 2020] – The governing Liberal Party maintains the upper hand in Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 37% of decided voters would support the Liberal candidate in their riding if a federal election were held today, down one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September.

The Conservative Party is second with 31% (-1), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (+3), the Bloc Québécois with 7% (-1), the Green Party with 3% (=) and the People’s Party with 1% (=).

The Liberals are nine points ahead of the Conservatives among female decided voters (38% to 29%) and hold a three-point edge among male decided voters (36% to 33%).

The Conservatives are the most popular federal party in Alberta (51%) and in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (48%). The Liberals are ahead in Atlantic Canada (44%), Quebec (45%, with the Bloc at 35%) and Ontario (37%). In British Columbia, the New Democrats and the Conservatives are essentially tied (34% and 33% respectively), with the Liberals at 29%.

Health care is regarded as the most important issue facing the country by 28% of Canadians (+3), followed by the economy and jobs (27%, -2), COVID-19 (15%), housing, homelessness and poverty (9%, -3) and the environment (6%, -1).

“Concerns about health care are more prevalent among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (30%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (29%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Those aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be preoccupied with the economy and jobs (36%).”

The approval rating for Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is 55%, up five points since September, while 40% of Canadians disapprove of his performance (-5).

Trudeau’s rating is highest in Atlantic Canada (60%), followed by Ontario (59%), British Columbia (58%), Quebec (55%), Manitoba and Saskatchewan (42%) and Alberta (37%).

Just over one third of Canadians (35%, +2) approve of the way Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole has handled his duties, while 38% (+4) disapprove—including 45% of Quebecers.

Almost half of Canadians (46%, +2) approve of the performance of Jagmeet Singh as leader of the NDP. The numbers are lower for Green Party leader Annamie Paul (25%) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (17%, +3).

Trudeau remains ahead of all other leaders when Canadians are asked who would make the best prime minister of the country (39%, +1), followed by O’Toole (22%, -1), Singh (13%, =), Bernier (3%, +1), Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (2%, -1) and Paul (2%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 12 to December 14, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca