Consumption of Legal Marijuana Rises in British Columbia

At least two thirds of the province’s residents are not ready to legalize other drugs, such as fentanyl, heroin and cocaine.

Vancouver, BC [July 17, 2020] – More residents of British Columbia are acquiring marijuana exclusively from licensed retailers than last year, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 51% of British Columbians who have consumed cannabis in the past six months say that “all” of their product was acquired at a licensed retailer. This represents an 18-point increase since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in October 2019.

About one-in-five marijuana consumers in British Columbia acknowledge that “most” (11%) or “some” (11%) of their cannabis was obtained at a licensed retailer.

Across the province, 16% of cannabis consumers (-8) say that “none” of the marijuana they have used since legalization has been acquired at a licensed retailer—including 25% of those aged 55 and over.

Just under half of British Columbians (45%) consumed marijuana in Canada before it became legal, while the same proportion (45%) have never tried it. One-in-ten (10%) only used cannabis after it became legal in October 2018.

Seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%, +6 since October 2019) agree with marijuana being legal in Canada, while 26% (-3) disagree. Public backing for the legalization of cannabis is highest among men (75%), British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (76%) and residents of Northern BC (80%).

Most British Columbians disagree with the notion of making other drugs lawfully available for adult consumption. Three-in-four respondents (75%, -4) are opposed to legalizing fentanyl. Similar proportions of respondents are against making methamphetamine or “crystal meth” (74%, -5), crack cocaine (73%, -6), heroin (72%, -4), powder cocaine (70%, -7) and ecstasy (66%, -6) legal.

“While we continue to see a large majority of British Columbians disagreeing with the legalization of other drugs, the survey outlines an immense gender gap,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 37% of men in the province are in favour of legalizing fentanyl, only 5% of women are in agreement with that course of action.”

In some countries, including the United States, a company can administer “drug tests” to employees, even if they do not operate machinery (such as pilots, truck drivers or crane operators).

Three-in-five British Columbians (61%, -6) think companies in British Columbia should be able to administer “drug tests” to any employee now that marijuana can be legally consumed in Canada.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from July 10 to July 12, 2020, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error — which measures sample variability — is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Endorse Speed-on-Green Cameras on Roads

Three other types of automated speed enforcement are also backed by a majority of the province’s residents.

Vancouver, BC [June 30, 2020] – For the third year in a row, most British Columbians are in favour of relying on red light cameras to capture speeding vehicles, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 70% of British Columbians approve of the use of speed-on-green intersection cameras, while 24% disapprove and 5% are undecided.

Support for speed-on-green cameras is highest among women (74%), British Columbians aged 55 and over (77%) and residents of Vancouver Island (74%). Most voters who supported the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (76%), the BC Liberals (74%) and the BC Green Party (65%) in the last provincial election are also in agreement.

Speed-on-green cameras are red light cameras that also capture vehicles that are speeding through intersections. Public backing for the use of this specific type of automated speed enforcement stood at 70% in a Research Co. survey conducted in 2018 and 68% in a poll conducted in 2019.

“British Columbians have been consistent in their overall analysis of automated speed enforcement,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the specific case of speed-on-green cameras, there is little difference between drivers (70%) and non-drivers (71%).”

Automated speed enforcement works by using cameras or sensors to pick up a vehicle speeding. A ticket is then issued to the owner of the vehicle. Driver’s license points are not issued as the driver of the vehicle cannot be identified.

More than two thirds of British Columbians also approve of the use of two other types of automated speed enforcement: fixed speed cameras, or cameras that stay in one location and measure speed as a vehicle passes (71%, +2 since 2019) and mobile speed cameras, which can be moved from place to place and measure speed as a vehicle passes (68%, +5 since 2019).

Almost three-in-five British Columbians (58%, +6 since 2019) are in favour of point-to-point speed enforcement, which uses cameras at two or more distant points on a road. The average speed of vehicles that pass between points is calculated and tickets are issued to vehicles whose average speed over the distance was excessive.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 13 to June 15, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Would Ban Foreigners from Owning Real Estate

More than seven-in-ten residents endorse the housing taxes implemented by the current provincial government.

Vancouver, BC [June 18, 2020] – More than three-in-four British Columbians are in favour of implementing a regulation that would forbid most foreigners from purchasing real estate in Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 78% of British Columbians support having legislation similar to the one currently in place in New Zealand, while 15% are opposed and 7% are undecided.

New Zealand passed legislation that bans most foreigners from purchasing real estate in the country. There are exceptions for foreigners who hold residency status in New Zealand, as well as citizens from Australia and Singapore, due to existing free trade agreements.

“The notion of forbidding most foreigners from owning real estate in Canada is popular among all demographics in British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The groups that voice the highest level of support for this change are residents of Vancouver Island (88%) and those aged 35-to-54 (also 88%).”

Public support for specific policies related to housing that were implemented by the current Government of British Columbia remains strong across the province.

Almost four-in-five British Columbians (79%) agree with the decisions to increase the foreign buyers tax from 15% to 20% and to expand the foreign buyers tax to areas located outside of Metro Vancouver.

Similarly high proportions of British Columbians agree with the implementation of the “speculation tax” in specific urban areas targeting foreign and domestic homeowners who pay little or no income tax in the province, and those who own second properties that are not long-term rentals (77%) and the introduction of a tax of 0.2% on the value of homes between $3 million and $4 million, and a tax rate of 0.4% on the portion of a home’s value that exceeds $4 million (76%).

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (72%) agree with the decision to increase the property transfer tax from 3% to 5% for homes valued at more than $3 million. The 5% portion only applies to the value greater than $3 million.

Across the province, 57% of British Columbians think the actions of the current provincial government will be “effective”, in making housing more affordable—an eight-point increase since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2019.

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians who voted for the BC Green Party in the 2017 provincial election (72%) expect the actions of the provincial government to be effective in the area of housing affordability. This perception is more common among those who cast ballots for the BC Liberals (81%) and the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (87%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 13 to June 15, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Contemplate COVID-19 Government Bailouts

Most residents support helping agri-food companies, individual municipalities, retailers and news organizations.

Vancouver, BC [June 11, 2020] – British Columbians have a clear idea of which businesses and corporations affected by the COVID-19 pandemic should receive financial assistance from governments, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, almost three-in-four British Columbians (73%) think agri-food companies should “definitely” or “probably” be eligible for a government bailout.

A bailout entails providing financial assistance to a corporation that otherwise would fail or become bankrupt.

Most of the province’s residents are also supportive of providing financial assistance to individual municipalities (70%), retailers (67%) and news organizations (57%).

“A government bailout for individual municipalities is more popular among British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (78%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However, majorities of residents aged 18-to-34 (65%) and aged 55 and over (67%) also favour this course of action.”

While 63% of men are in favour of providing financial assistance to news organizations, the proportion drops to 53% among women.

More than two-in-five British Columbians are in favour of allowing airlines (49%), taxi companies (also 49%) and film and entertainment companies (45%) to be eligible for government bailouts.

The level of support for governmental financial assistance is lower for ride-hailing companies (39%), individual sports franchises (38%) and professional sports leagues (34%).

Across British Columbia, men are more likely to endorse the notion of bailing out individual sports franchises (46%) and professional sports leagues than women (29% and 26% respectively.

Residents of Metro Vancouver are more likely than those in other areas of the province to endorse financial assistance for news organizations (63%), airlines (56%) and film and entertainment companies (50%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 5 to June 7, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Some British Columbians Perceive More Crime in Their Community

Since March, one-in-four residents of East Asian and South Asian descent have endured racial slurs or insults.

Vancouver, BC [June 4, 2020] – Almost two-in-five British Columbians believe that delinquency has risen where they live, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 38% of British Columbians say the level of criminal activity in their community has increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. A similar proportion (37%) report no change, while 13% think crime has decreased.

Men (49%) and Metro Vancouverites (47%)—as well as residents of East Asian and South Asian descent (55% and 50% respectively)—are more likely to claim that criminality has risen during the pandemic.

“More than half of British Columbians who voted for the BC Liberals in the 2017 provincial election (52%) believe crime has increased recently in their community,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “About a third of those who cast ballots for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (32%) and the BC Green Party (29%) concur with this assessment.”

When asked about specific law-breaking experiences since March, one-in-five British Columbians (20%) say someone attempted to extort them in an email or text message—a proportion that rises to 24% in Metro Vancouver.

Other instances of crime endured by the province’s residents include someone breaking into their workplace or office (16%), someone attempting to extort them by phone (also 16%), someone breaking into or stealing something from their car (15%) and someone breaking into or stealing something from their home (14%).

Across the province, 11% of residents say someone directed racial slurs or insults at them since March. While only 7% of residents of European descent acknowledge that this happened to them, the proportion rises to 24% among those of East Asian and South Asian descent.

There are some remarkable differences among specific groups. More than seven-in-ten residents of Vancouver Island (73%), Southern BC (79%) and Northern BC (92%) have not experienced any of these problems during the COVID-19 pandemic. The proportion is significantly lower in the Fraser Valley (55%) and Metro Vancouver (42%).

When asked about the factors that are to blame for the current situation regarding criminal activity in their communities, British Columbians primarily cite addiction and mental health issues (43%), gangs and the illegal drug trade (38%), poverty and inequality (36%) and an inadequate court system (32%).

Fewer British Columbians place “a great deal” of blame on lack of values and the improper education of youth (28%), bad economy and unemployment (28%), insufficient policing and lack of resources to combat crime (27%) and immigrants and minorities (19%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from May 8 to May 17, 2020, among 1,600 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More British Columbians Support Community Benefits Agreements

Almost four-in-five residents want to rely on the program to help the province recover from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Vancouver, BC [June 1, 2020] – A new survey finds that most British Columbians support Community Benefits Agreements (CBAs) and want to see them applied to public infrastructure projects as part of the province’s economic recovery plan.

The online survey conducted by Research Co. found that 74% of British Columbians either “strongly” or “moderately” support CBAs, and 77% agree with using them to help the province mend from the COVID-19 pandemic.

CBAs prioritize jobs for local residents and ensure employment opportunities for apprentices, Indigenous workers and women, and provide union wages and benefits.

Overall support for CBAs is strongest among British Columbians who voted for the BC Green Party in the 2017 provincial election (83%), but is also high among those who cast ballots for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (79%) and the BC Liberals (71%) three years ago.

A sizeable majority of British Columbians who voted BC Green in the last election (84%) are also in favour of using CBAs for the post-pandemic economic recovery.

In addition, 81% of BC NDP voters and 76% of BC Liberal voters also agree that CBAs should be used to support the province’s economic recovery plan.

Meanwhile, only 8% per cent of Green voters, 11% of NDP voters, and 16% of Liberal voters either “strongly” or “moderately” oppose CBAs overall.

In terms of demographics, support for CBAs is strongest among men (76%), British Columbians aged 55 and older (77%) and residents of Northern BC (78%).

“The level of support for CBAs is four points higher than it was when we first asked this question in August 2018,” said Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “When it comes to using CBAs for economic recovery, support is fairly uniform across gender, age and region.”

This survey was commissioned by the BC Building Trades Council.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on May 26 and May 27, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

BC NDP Keeps Upper Hand in British Columbia’s Political Scene

The approval ratings for John Horgan and Andrew Wilkinson increased since last year, along with concerns about health care.

Vancouver, BC [May 28, 2020] – The governing New Democratic Party (NDP) is ahead of all other contenders in British Columbia, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 41% of decided voters in British Columbia would back the BC NDP candidate in their constituency, while 33% would cast a ballot for the BC Liberals.

Support for the BC New Democrats increased by two points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2019, while backing for the BC Liberals increased by three points.

The BC Green Party is currently in third place with 16% (-5), followed by the BC Conservative Party with 9% (unchanged).

The New Democrats are the most popular choice among female decided voters in the province (45%), as well as among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (46%) and 35-to-54 (41%).

The BC NDP and the BC Liberals are practically tied in the preference of male decided voters (38% and 36% respectively). A similar scenario is observed with decided voters aged 55 and over (38% for the BC Liberals, 37% for the BC NDP).

“Right now, 12% of BC Liberal voters in 2017 are looking at the BC Conservatives as an option they could back in a provincial election,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The BC Green Party could see 14% of their 2017 voters walk away and support the BC NDP.”

The approval rating for Premier and BC NDP leader John Horgan stands at 73% this month, up 22 points since May 2019.

Almost half of British Columbians (48%, +14) approve of BC Liberals leader Andrew Wilkinson. The numbers are similar for interim BC Green Party leader Adam Olsen (49%), and lower for BC Conservative Party leader Trevor Bolin (35%, +15).

Almost three-in-ten British Columbians (28%) believe health care is the most important issue facing the province, up 17 points in a year.

The economy and jobs and COVID-19 are tied for second place with 21% each, followed by housing, homelessness and poverty with 17%, the environment with 4%, education with 3%, crime and public safety with 2%, accountability also at 2%, and energy and pipelines with 1%.

Health care is the most pressing concern for voters aged 55 and over (38%), while COVID-19 is the top issue for those aged 35-to-54 (36%) and housing, homelessness and poverty takes precedence among those aged 18-to-34 (29%).

Photo Credit: Ryan Bushby

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 23 to May 25, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Hesitant About Life Without COVID-19 Vaccine

Most residents are willing to visit barbershops and restaurants, but the proportion drops for public transit, gyms and music venues.

Vancouver, BC [May 21, 2020] – A significant proportion of British Columbians are unwilling to partake in specific activities unless a vaccine against COVID-19 is available, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, more than half of British Columbians say they would not attend a live sporting event as a spectator (61%) or a music venue (59%) before there is a vaccine against COVID-19.

At this stage, more than half of British Columbians are willing to visit a community centre (60%) as well as a gym or fitness facility (53%).

“More than half of women in British Columbia (54%) say they would not set foot inside a gym or fitness facility before they can have access to a COVID-19 vaccine,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, most men (60%) say they would have no problem visiting these venues.”

There is a split among residents on the issue of public transit usage. Across the province, 57% of British Columbians are willing to ride on a bus without a COVID-19 vaccine, while 43% would not do so. In addition, 55% would ride on SkyTrain, while 45% would not.

Men are more likely than women to say they would be willing to ride a bus (63% to 52%) and ride on SkyTrain (60% to 50%) before a COVID-19 vaccine is accessible.

Fewer than a third of British Columbians say they would not visit restaurants, pubs or bars where people can only eat indoors (32%), libraries (29%), restaurants, pubs or bars where people eat outside (also 29%) and barbershops or salons (27%) without a COVID-19 vaccine.

British Columbians aged 55 and over are more likely to have no reservations about going to a restaurant patio (72%) or to a restaurant that only offers food indoors (64%).

British Columbians of European descent are more likely to say that they would visit an indoor restaurant before a COVID-19 vaccine is available (76%) than those of East Asian (69%) and South Asian (57%) heritage.

At least three-in-five British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (60%) and aged 55 and over (64%) say they are not willing to visit a music venue without a COVID-19 vaccine. The proportion is lower among those aged 35-to-54 (54%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 15 to May 17, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most British Columbians Favour Reopening the Economy Slowly

Residents aged 35-to-54, as well as those who have experienced job losses in their household, would prefer a quicker renewal.

Vancouver, BC [May 14, 2020] – More than three-in-five British Columbians favour a cautious approach for a return to economic activity during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 62% of British Columbians believe we should reopen the economy slowly and ensure that COVID-19 infection rates remain low.

Conversely, more than a third of British Columbians (35%) believe we should reopen the economy quickly and ensure that no more jobs are lost due to COVID-19.

“There is an impressive gender gap when British Columbians ponder the pace of easing restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic ,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While three-in-four women (76%) call for a cautious approach, fewer than half of men (48%) concur.”

More than four-in-five British Columbians aged 55 and over (68%) are in favour of a gradual return to economic activity in the province, a view shared by 64% of those aged 18-to-34 and 44% of those aged 35-to-54.

The COVID-19 pandemic has directly affected British Columbians in different ways. More than two-in-five of the province’s residents (42%) say they have been unable to visit relatives who live in their municipality, and more than a third (35%) say someone in their household applied for the federal Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB).

In addition, 32% of British Columbians say someone in their household was laid off, 32% are working from home instead of at their regular workplace, and 24% have taken care of children in their household while schools are closed.

British Columbians aged 35-to-54 are more likely to report that someone in their household has applied for the CERB (47%) and to be working at home (51%) than their younger and older counterparts.

Majorities of British Columbians who have taken care of children in their household (58%), are working from home instead of at their regular workplace (53%) and who have had someone in the household lose a job (52%) are in favour of reopening the economy quickly and avoid more job losses due to the pandemic.

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (72%) approve of the provincial government’s plan to resume economic activity— including 81% of BC Liberal voters in 2017, 75% of BC Green Party voters and 72% of BC New Democratic Party (NDP) voters.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 8 to May 11, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most British Columbians Agree with Building Coastal GasLink

Seven-in-ten residents believe the project will create hundreds of jobs in the province.

Vancouver, BC [March 17, 2020] – British Columbians are in favour of carrying on with the construction of the Coastal GasLink pipeline by a 2-to-1 margin, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 61% of British Columbians agree with building the Coastal GasLink pipeline, while 30% disagree.

Support for the continuation of the project is highest among men (68%), British Columbians aged 55 and over (69%) and residents of Vancouver Island (67%).

“More than half of British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the last provincial election (56%) want to build the Coastal GasLink pipeline,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “A similar proportion of BC Green Party voters agree (53%), but support is highest among those who cast ballots for the BC Liberals in 2017 (75%).”

Seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%) have followed news related to the Coastal GasLink pipeline “very closely” or “moderately closely” over the past two months.

Almost half of British Columbians (48%) agree with the actions that have been taken by the Wet’suwet’en elected band council in connection with the Coastal GasLink pipeline. The rating is slightly lower for the actions of the Government of British Columbia (44%) and the Government of Canada (41%).

Fewer than two-in-five British Columbians agree with the actions of the people who have participated in protests (38%), the Wet’suwet’en Hereditary Chiefs (37%) and the people who have participated in road blockades (33%).

When asked if the provincial government should do anything necessary to ensure that the Coastal GasLink pipeline does not happen, 38% of British Columbians agreed and 53% disagreed.

Half of British Columbians (50%) disagree with the notion of the Coastal GasLink pipeline threatening the health and safety of residents, and 70% believe the project will create hundreds of jobs.

Three-in-five British Columbians (61%) support the development of LNG in the province, while 25% are opposed.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 4 to March 7, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Four-in-Five British Columbians Would Delay Cruise Ship Season

Support for this measure, on account of the COVID-19 outbreak, is high across all demographics in the province.

Vancouver, BC [March 12, 2020] – Most residents of British Columbia would follow a recent suggestion made by provincial health officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry, to postpone the start of the cruise ship season in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 82% of British Columbians agree with delaying the start of the cruise ship season on account of the COVID-19 outbreak, while 12% disagree and 6% are undecided.

The cruise ship season is currently slated to begin in April in Victoria and Vancouver. Public support for a postponement of the cruise ship season is strong across both genders in British Columbia (84% among women and 80% among men) and all three major age groups (79% among those aged 18-to-34 and 84% among both those aged 35-to-54 and aged 55 and over).

On a regional basis, support for a delay in the cruise ship season is highest in Vancouver Island (92%), followed by Northern BC (89%), the Fraser Valley (85%), Metro Vancouver (82%) and Southern BC (71%).

“British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the last provincial election are the most likely to agree with postponing the cruise ship season (86%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support is slightly lower among BC Green Party voters (84%) and BC Liberal voters (80%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 9 to March 11, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Most Women in British Columbia Have Endured Discrimination

More than one-in-four women have experienced verbal harassment in the province.

Vancouver, BC [March 6, 2020] – A significant number of women in British Columbia have experienced discrimination on account of their gender, and younger residents are more likely to have faced harassment in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, one-in-five women (21%) have experienced “a significant amount” or “a moderate amount” of discrimination on account of their gender in British Columbia. More than a third of women in British Columbia have endured “a small amount” of gender discrimination (37%) in the province.

“Half of women in British Columbia aged 55 and over (50%) have not experienced discrimination because of their gender in the province.” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are decidedly lower in the other age brackets, with just 34% of women aged 35-to-54 and only 21% of women aged 18-to-34 saying they have not endured gender discrimination in British Columbia.”

More than one-in-four women in British Columbia (28%) have been verbally harassed on account of their gender, while 24% have been sexually harassed.

At least one-in-five women in the province have experienced poor customer service (23%), sexist jokes (20%) and unfair treatment in the workplace (also 20%).

In addition, 17% of women have been mocked or ridiculed and 12% lost a potential employment opportunity because of their gender.

Seven-in-ten women in British Columbia aged 18-to-34 (71%) have experienced at least one of the 12 negative incidents tested in the survey, compared to 66% among women aged 35-to-54 and 44% among women aged 55 and over.

More than a third of women who reside in Metro Vancouver (34%) have experienced verbal harassment, and practically one-in-four (24%) have endured sexual harassment.

Women who reside in Southern BC were more likely to report being mocked or ridiculed because of their gender (26%), while those in Northern BC were more likely to have been treated unfairly in the workplace (27%).

Methodology:

Results are based on online studies conducted from December 12 to December 16, 2019, and from January 21 to January 24, 2020, among 800 adult women in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Food Delivery Options Altering Dining Habits in British Columbia

A third of British Columbians—including 44% of those aged 18-to-34—have ordered food delivery using an app on their phone.

Vancouver, BC [February 28, 2020] – Some British Columbians are relying more often on food delivery at home, a trend that is more prevalent among Millennials, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, three-in-ten British Columbians (30%) say they are ordering food delivery to their homes more often than five years ago.

In addition, 45% of British Columbians report no change from their food ordering habits since 2015, while 22% are partaking in this behaviour less often than five years ago.

“Age is the key differentiator when it comes to the reliance of British Columbians on food delivery,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 9% of those aged 55 and over and 26% of those aged 35-to-54 are ordering in more often than five years ago, the proportion increases to 45% among British Columbians aged 18-to-34.”

Across the province, 43% of British Columbians said they had food delivered to their home after placing a phone call to a specific restaurant over the past year, while more than a third (36%) ordered online through the website of a restaurant or chain.

One third of British Columbians (32%) relied on a food delivery app on their phone, such as DoorDash, GrubHub, Uber Eats, Foodora or Skip The Dishes. This particular way or ordering food currently finds more acceptance in Metro Vancouver (34%) than in other regions of the province.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are significantly more likely to have ordered food through an app in the past year(44%) than those aged 35-to-54 (30%) and those aged 55 and over (13%).

Just over one-in-five British Columbians (22%) order food that is delivered to their home “about once a week or more”, while one-in-five (25%) order food that they pick up themselves from a restaurant at the same rate.

A slightly larger proportion of British Columbians (28%) dine out at a restaurant “about once a week or more”, including 36% of those in the Fraser Valley.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 11 to February 14, 2020, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Snowstorm Made British Columbians Drive Less, Work From Home

Three in ten residents say their municipality is “getting better” when it comes to dealing with snow.

Vancouver, BC [February 19, 2019] – The snowstorm that affected most of British Columbia last month had an effect on the daily lives of residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two-in-five British Columbians (39%) say they chose not to drive their own vehicle on account of the snowstorm.

“A majority of residents of the Fraser Valley (51%) avoided getting behind the wheel with snow on the roads,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Vancouver Island was a close second on this question at 49%.”

In addition, three-in-ten British Columbians (31%) acknowledge that they, or somebody in their household, worked from home on account of the snowstorm.

Practically half of British Columbians report having witnessed two negative behaviours, with 49% saying that they saw neighbours who did not shovel snow on their sidewalk and 48% witnessing a vehicle with snow on the top circulating in their municipality.

Across the province, two thirds of British Columbians (68%) say they are satisfied with how their municipality dealt with the timeliness of alerts, such as school closures, and 61% feel the same way about snow clearing on roads.

The satisfaction rating is lower for snow clearing on sidewalks (54%) and responsiveness to requests on social media (51%, with 30% undecided).

Three-in-ten British Columbians (29%) say that, compared to five years ago, their municipality is “getting better” when it comes to dealing with snow. Half of the province’s residents (49%) see no change, and 16% believe the situation has “worsened” over the past five years.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are significantly more likely to believe that their municipality is now better equipped to deal with snow (40%) than their older counterparts (22% among those aged 35-to-54 and those aged 55 and over).

A majority of residents of Northern BC (57%) believe their municipality is handling snow better than it did in 2015. The numbers are lower in all other regions of the province, including Vancouver Island (30%), Metro Vancouver (29%), Southern BC (20%) and the Fraser Valley (18%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 21 to January 24, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Parents in British Columbia Stressed by Work and Finance

The proportion of Metro Vancouver parents who expect their kids to relocate increased by 24 points since 2019.

Vancouver, BC [February 18, 2020] – A majority of parents across British Columbia are experiencing tension on account of specific issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample of parents, 58% say they experience work-related stress “frequently” or “occasionally.”

Majorities of parents in the province say they have also “frequently” or “occasionally” experienced financial stress (57%), family-related stress (53%) and housing-related stress (51%).

Across British Columbia, two-in-five parents (40%) say it is currently “moderately difficult” or “very difficult” for them to make ends meet. 

The proportion of parents who are having a hard time getting by financially is highest in Northern BC (60%), followed by Vancouver Island (45%), the Fraser Valley (40%), Metro Vancouver (39%) and Southern BC (28%).

Almost three-in-five parents in British Columbia (58%) say it is currently “very difficult” or “moderately difficult” for them to save money in a bank account. 

Other tasks that are currently tough for about two-in-five parents in the province are paying for day to day expenses (44%), paying for child care (42%) and paying for transportation (39%).

“Majorities of parents who reside in the Fraser Valley (62%), Metro Vancouver (59%), Vancouver Island (55%) and Southern BC (52%) acknowledge that saving for the future has become more complicated,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Transportation is a bigger issue for parents in Southern BC (47%), while day to day expenses are more of a problem in Northern BC (48%) and Vancouver Island (47%).”

Across the province, 65% of parents say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that their child (or any one of their children) will have to move away from the municipality where they currently live due to the high cost of living.

The proportion of parents in Metro Vancouver who expect their children to move away on account of financial constraints stands at 66%, up 24 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in 2019.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 4 to February 7, 2020, among 623 adult parents of children aged 0 to 18 in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca