British Columbians Would Ban Mobile Phones in K-12 Classrooms

Public support for the measure that was implemented in Ontario earlier this year is high among parents and non-parents alike.

Vancouver, BC [November 29, 2019] – The notion of forbidding students from using their mobile phones in classrooms unreservedly is very popular in British Columbia, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 88% of British Columbians think the province should implement a ban on the use of mobile phones during instructional time in K-12 classrooms.

Earlier this year, the Province of Ontario restricted the use of mobile phones in K-12 classrooms, unless the devices are required for health or medical purposes, or to support educational needs as decided by an instructor.

In British Columbia, residents aged 55 and over are more likely to express support for a prohibition (85%) than those aged 35-to-54 (80%) and those aged 18-to-34 (68%).

At least four-in-five residents of Vancouver Island (86%), the Fraser Valley (83%) and Metro Vancouver (80%) are in favour of banning mobile phones during instructional time in K-12 classrooms. Support is lower, but still high, in Northern BC (75%) and Southern BC (62%).

“More than four-in-five British Columbians who have a child currently enrolled in K-12 are supportive of a classroom mobile phone ban (81%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is similar (77%) for those who have no children in school at this point.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 6 to November 8, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Agree with Physician-Assisted Suicide Rules

Fewer than one-in-five of the province’s residents would completely ban medical assistance in dying.

Vancouver, BC [November 15, 2019] – Most British Columbians are in favour of allowing physician-assisted suicide under the guidelines implemented by the federal government, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, three-in-four British Columbians (75%) support allowing a person to seek medical assistance to die in Canada under the conditions authorized in June 2016.

In Canada, federal legislation allows physician-assisted suicide if five conditions are met:

  • Being eligible for health services funded by the federal government, or a province or territory (or during the applicable minimum period of residence or waiting period for eligibility).
  • Being at least 18 years old and mentally competent.
  • Having a grievous and irremediable medical condition.
  • Making a voluntary request for medical assistance in dying that is not the result of outside pressure or influence.
  • Giving informed consent to receive medical assistance in dying.

“The highest level of opposition to allowing physician-assisted suicide in British Columbia is observed in the Fraser Valley (32%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, Metro Vancouver holds the highest level of support (78%).”

When asked about their personal feeling about medical assistance in dying, almost three-in-five British Columbians (58%) think it should be allowed, but only under specific circumstances.

Fewer than one-in-five British Columbians (18%) think physician-assisted suicide should never be allowed, regardless of who requests it, while 12% believe it should always be permitted.

Just under half of British Columbians (47%) say they are satisfied with the regulations that are currently in place in Canada to deal with the issue of physician-assisted suicide. One-in-four residents of the province (25%) are dissatisfied and a similar proportion (28%) are undecided.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 4 to November 6, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca


Two Thirds of British Columbians Unaffected by Carbon Tax

Residents are divided on whether the goal of making people more mindful of their carbon consumption has been achieved.

Vancouver, BC [November 6, 2019] – Most British Columbians believe the provincial carbon tax—originally implemented on July 1, 2008—has not been detrimental to their domestic assets, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 66% of British Columbians believe that the provincial carbon tax has not negatively affected the finances of their household, while one-in-five (21%) think it has.

Men (28%) are more likely to believe that the carbon tax has negatively affected their household finances than women (15%). Residents aged 18-to-34 are also more likely to have an adverse opinion on this issue (26%) than those aged 35-to-54 (20%) and those aged 55 and over (15%).

When asked if they think the introduction of the carbon tax in British Columbia has led people to be more mindful of their carbon consumption, residents of the province are deeply divided.

While 45% of British Columbians believe the carbon tax has led people to change their behaviour, 44% disagree and 13% are undecided.

“Residents of Northern BC (63%) are more likely to believe that the carbon tax has made residents more mindful,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are significantly lower in the Fraser Valley (45%), Southern BC (44%), Metro Vancouver (43%) and Vancouver Island (42%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 25 to October 28, 2019, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error — which measures sample variability — is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Some Marijuana Users in British Columbia Shun Licensed Retailers

Across the province, 24% of consumers say they have not acquired any cannabis at a licensed retailer.

Vancouver, BC [October 18, 2019] – A year after marijuana became legal in Canada, only a third of cannabis users in British Columbia are acquiring their product exclusively at licensed retailers, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, only 33% of British Columbians who have consumed marijuana since legalization say that “all” of their cannabis was acquired at a licensed retailer.

About one-in-five marijuana consumers in British Columbia (19%) say “most” of their cannabis was obtained at a licensed retailer, and 14% acknowledge that “some” of it was purchased this way.

One-in-four marijuana consumers in British Columbia (24%) say that “none” of the cannabis they have used since legalization has been acquired at a licensed retailer—including 37% of consumers aged 55 and over.

Across the province. 44% of residents say they consumed marijuana in Canada before it became legal, while 43% have never tried it. 

In April, only 6% of British Columbians said they had consumed marijuana only after it became legal,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Now, the proportion has risen to 13%, including more than one-in-five residents aged 18-to-34 (22%).”

As was the case in a Research Co. survey conducted six months ago, more than three-in-five British Columbians (63%) agree with marijuana being legal in Canada, while 29% disagree.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (70%) and residents of Northern BC (67%) are more likely to endorse the legal status of marijuana.

When asked to review the decisions that the provincial government has taken to enable the legal sale of marijuana in British Columbia, four-in-five residents (81%) agree with prohibiting the use of marijuana on school properties and in vehicles.

Sizeable majorities of residents also agree with establishing 19 years as the legal age to purchase, sell or consume marijuana in the province (73%), restricting marijuana smoking to areas where tobacco smoking is allowed (74%), authorizing adults to grow up to four cannabis plants per household, as long as the plants are not visible from public spaces off the property, and home cultivation is banned in homes used as day-cares (60%), and establishing the Liquor Distribution Branch (LDB) as the wholesale distributor of non-medical marijuana in British Columbia (56%)

Two thirds of British Columbians (67%, +7 since April) think companies that operate in the province should be able to administer “drug tests” to any employee now that marijuana is legal.

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians disagree with legalizing ecstasy (72%), heroin (76%), powder cocaine (77%), crack cocaine (79%), methamphetamine or “crystal meth” (also 79%) and fentanyl (also 79%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 7 to October 10, 2019, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error — which measures sample variability — is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Unsolicited Calls and Messages Affect Most British Columbians

More than a third of the province’s  residents received a text asking about their support for a party or policy.

Vancouver, BC [September 27, 2019] – A significant proportion of British Columbians recently had to deal with unsolicited text messages and calls on their mobile phone, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, 37% of respondents say that, over the course of the past two months, they received text messages asking them if they support a specific party or policy sent by an individual they do not know.

Men (42%) and British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (44%) are more likely to report getting text messages of a political nature from unknown senders.

A similar proportion of British Columbians (35%) received phone calls and/or phone messages from an individual purporting to represent a government agency (such as the Canada Revenue Agency).

Women (36%) and Metro Vancouverites (39%) are more likely to have received calls or messages from a scammer over the past two months.

Three-in-ten British Columbians (31%) say they received phone calls or messages over the past two months where an individual speaks Cantonese or Mandarin, including 42% of those who reside in Metro Vancouver.

“Younger British Columbians appear to be more affected by unsolicited phone calls and messages than their older counterparts,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 40% of residents aged 55 and over say they did not receive any of the three types of calls or messages included in the survey, the proportion falls to 25% among those aged 35-to-54 and 20% among those aged 18-to-34.”

More than a third of British Columbians (37%) have reported an unwanted call or phone number to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre (formerly known as PhoneBusters).

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (46%), men (43%) and residents of both Northern BC (47%) and the Fraser Valley (44%) are more likely to have contacted the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre to report an unwanted call or number.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 14, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca