British Columbians Back LNG Expansion, Split on Nuclear Power

The possibility of rising energy costs for households is a prevalent concern for half of the province’s residents.

Vancouver, BC [February 3, 2022] – A majority of British Columbians endorse the expansion of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) sector in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 55% of British Columbians support the provincial government allowing for further development of the LNG industry, while 29% are opposed and 17% are undecided.

Support for the expansion of LNG development is highest in Southern BC (67%), followed by the Fraser Valley (56%), Metro Vancouver (also 56%), Northern BC (55%) and Vancouver Island (41%).

Two other ideas related to energy are more contentious. While 43% of British Columbians are in favour of allowing nuclear power (small modular reactors) for electricity generation, 40% disagree.

The notion of the provincial government banning the use of natural gas (on stoves and/or heaters) in new buildings is supported by 39% of British Columbians and opposed by 45%.

Half of British Columbians (50%) say they are “very concerned” about energy costs for households becoming too expensive.

Fewer residents are particularly worried about the effects of climate change in the world (48%), the effects of climate change in Canada (45%), energy shortages leading to measures such as rationing and rolling blackouts (31%) and energy costs for businesses becoming too expensive (28%).

The provincial government will require all car and passenger truck sales to be zero-emission by 2035. Seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%) support this goal, while 21% oppose it and 8% are not sure.

“There are some regional differences in British Columbia on the impending move to electric vehicles,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. ”Opposition to the goal is highest in Southern BC (37%), followed by Northern BC (30%), the Fraser Valley (22%), Metro Vancouver (20%) and Vancouver Island (15%).”

Among those who support the zero-emission goal established by the provincial government, 32% believe it is achievable and 38% think it is not achievable.

British Columbians are split on the current pace of the move to electric vehicles, with 26% saying the change is being implemented too quickly, 38% thinking it is happening at the right pace and 23% thinking it is taking place too slowly.

Methodology:Results are based on an online study conducted on January 9 to January 11, 2023, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Optimistic About New Housing Regulations

Almost half of the province’s residents think the actions will be effective in making housing more affordable.

Vancouver, BC [January 27, 2022] – Practically half of British Columbians think the housing measures recently announced by the provincial government will help residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 48% of British Columbians believe the actions will be effective in making housing more affordable, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2021.

Just over two-in-five British Columbians (41%, -2) believe the actions of the provincial government will be ineffective, while 11% (-5) are undecided.

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians agree with three policies related to housing recently outlined by the provincial government: building more modular supportive homes in areas where people are experiencing homelessness (78%), implementing a three-business-day protection period for financing and home inspections (71%) and capping rent increases in 2023 at 2% (also 71%).

Majorities of British Columbians are also in favour of two other recent measures: ending most strata age restrictions (64%) and removing strata rental restrictions (59%).

Support remains high for the policies implemented by the provincial government before 2022, such as increasing the foreign buyers tax from 15% to 20% (77%, +2), expanding the foreign buyers tax to areas located outside of Metro Vancouver (75%, =) and introducing a “speculation tax” in specific urban areas targeting foreign and domestic homeowners who pay little or no income tax in BC, and those who own second properties that aren’t long-term rentals (72%, +2).

Most British Columbians also continue to agree with the introduction of a tax of 0.2% on the value of homes between $3 million and $4 million, and a tax rate of 0.4% on the portion of a home’s value that exceeds $4 million (68%, -1) and with the decision to increase the property transfer tax from 3% to 5% for homes valued at more than $3 million. The 5% portion only applies to the value greater than $3 million (65%, -2).

Just over seven-in-ten British Columbians (71%) support the federal government’s decision to ban non-Canadians (with exclusions for international students and temporary residents) from purchasing residential properties in Canada for the next two years.

More than three-in-five British Columbians (61%) think the federal government should tie immigration numbers to affordable housing targets and new housing starts.

“There is no political divide in British Columbia on the idea that housing and immigration should go hand-in-hand,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Sizeable majorities of residents who voted for the BC Liberals (63%), the BC Green Party (62%) and the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (59%) in the 2020 provincial election want the federal government to do its part.”

A majority of British Columbians (57%) call on the provincial government to implement a $400 renters’ rebate for households earning up to $80,000 a year. This proposed measure is particularly popular among those who currently rent (72%).

Only 30% of British Columbians would consent to the cancellation of the home owner grant, which reduces the amount of property tax people pay for their principal residence. Among respondents who own their primary residence, support for this policy stands at 23%.

Three-in-five British Columbians (60%) agree that municipal governments should immediately dismantle any encampment or “tent city” located within their municipality—a proportion that rises to 66% among those aged 55 and over.

Almost half of British Columbians (49%, -6 since a Research Co. survey conducted in December 2021) trust the provincial government under the BC NDP to deliver affordable housing in British Columbia. The rating is lower for prospective provincial administrations headed by the BC Greens (39%, +6) or the BC Liberals (33%, -3).

At the federal level, confidence on affordable housing is highest for a potential federal government headed by the NDP (40%, -11) than administrations assembled by the Liberal Party (37%, -2) or the Conservative Party (31%, -1).

Trust in municipal governments to deliver affordable housing stands at 46% in British Columbia this month (-1). Confidence remains higher for not-for-profit developers (49%, =) than for for-profit developers (21%, +2).

Methodology:Results are based on an online study conducted on January 9 to January 11, 2023, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Single-Use Plastics Ban Welcomed by Most British Columbians

The proportion of residents who rely on re-usable bags when they go grocery shopping has increased since December 2021.

Vancouver, BC [January 25, 2023] – The recently implemented federal ban on the manufacture and import of single-use plastics in Canada is endorsed by four-in-five British Columbians, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 80% of British Columbians support the federal government’s decision.

The federal government has banned the manufacture and import of single-use plastics, including grocery checkout bags, straws, stir sticks, six-pack rings, plastic cutlery and food takeout containers made from hard-to-recycle plastics.

Several municipalities in British Columbia have already implemented their own guidelines for specific items, such as grocery checkout bags.

“The highest level of support for the federal ban on single-use plastics is observed on Vancouver Island (84%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The prohibition is also supported by majorities of residents in Metro Vancouver (81%), the Fraser Valley (also 81%), Northern BC (77%) and Southern BC (73%).”

More than four-in-five British Columbians (85%, +9 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2021) say that they transport groceries out of a store after purchasing them using their own re-usable bag. Only 13% say they rely on bags provided or purchased at the store.

A sizeable proportion of British Columbians aged 55 and over (96%, +8) are relying on their own re-usable bag when they go grocery shopping. The numbers are lower among those aged 35-to-54 (85%, +12) and those aged 18-to-34 (69%, +7).

About half of British Columbians (49%, -2) claim to go out of their way to recycle “all of the time”, such as holding on to bottles and cans until they can be placed into a proper recycling bin.

Fewer British Columbians are actively partaking on other behaviours “all of the time”, such as limiting hot water usage in their home by taking shorter showers or running washing machines or dishwashers with full loads only (19%, -1), unplugging electrical devices in their home—such as TVs, computers and cell phone chargers—when they are not in use (12%, =), buying biodegradable products (9%, +4) or eating organic or home-grown foods (5%, =).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on January 2 to January 4, 2023, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Financial Recovery Elusive for Two-in-Five British Columbians

More than four-in-five British Columbians say the price of groceries is now higher than before the COVID-19 pandemic.

Vancouver, BC [January 10, 2023] – A significant proportion of British Columbians acknowledge that their economic status is not as good as it was three years ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 45% of British Columbians say their household’s financial situation is worse now than before the COVID-19 pandemic, up 12 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March 2022.

“Two-in-five British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (40%) say their household’s finances are not at the level they were in February 2020,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are higher among those aged 35-to-54 (47%) and aged 55 and over (46%).”

Almost half of British Columbians (48%, +5) say it is currently difficult to pay for necessities or “make ends meet”—a proportion that rises to 54% among women and 58% among residents of the Fraser Valley.

The increases are more pronounced on two other categories, with more than seven-in-ten British Columbians (71%, +7) saying they are finding it difficult to save money for retirement or a “rainy day” and two thirds (66%, +10) saying it is currently difficult to have money for leisure, such as dining out and entertainment.

Sizeable majorities of British Columbians report that two household expenses are higher now than before the COVID-19 pandemic: groceries (83%, +8) and transportation (73%, +19).

About half of British Columbians are also paying more than in February 2019 for housing (such as rent or mortgage) (49%, +5) and electronic entertainment (48%, +2).

Fewer British Columbians say they are paying more now for books (21%, +2), newspapers and magazines (16%, +1) and board games (13%, -3).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on December 27 to December 29, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here, and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca  

British Columbians Call for Action to Revamp the Justice System

Fewer than one-in-five of the province’s residents give the justice system high grades.

Vancouver, BC [December 28, 2022] – Residents of British Columbia are not particularly satisfied with the justice system, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, only 19% of British Columbians rate the justice system with a grade of 8, 9 or 10, while a larger proportion (25%) rate it as a 1, 2 or 3.

Half of the province’s residents (50%) provide grades ranging from 4 to 7 to the justice system.

“More than one-in-ten British Columbians (13%) give the lowest grade available to the justice system,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This includes 17% of British Columbians aged 55 and over and 23% of residents of Indigenous descent.”

More than four-in-five British Columbians (82%) think the justice system needs more resources because it takes too long to get cases dealt with.

Sizeable majorities of British Columbians who voted for the BC Liberals (88%), the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (85%) and the BC Green Party (73%) in the 2020 provincial election agree on calling for additional resources for the justice system.

Just under four-in-five British Columbians (79%) say the outcome of cases depends heavily on how good your lawyer is.

For almost three-in-four British Columbians (74%), the justice system is too soft on offenders when it comes to criminal cases—a proportion that jumps to 85% among those aged 55 and over.

Most British Columbians (58%) agree that the justice system has not done enough to address bias against Indigenous Canadians. Majorities of residents of Indigenous (72%), South Asian (61%), East Asian (60%) and European ancestry (51%) agree on this question.

Just under half of British Columbians (47%) have interacted with the justice system. One-in-ten (10%) went to small claims court, while more dealt with cases related to proceedings of criminal (17%), family (20%) or traffic and bylaw (22%) natures.

Majorities of British Columbians say the resolution during their last interaction with three components of the justice system was fair: traffic and bylaw (59%), small claims (53%) and family (also 53%).

British Columbians who interacted with the criminal justice system are split in their assessment of their last experience, with 46% calling the resolution fair and 45% deeming it unfair.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 16 to December 18, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca
 
Photo Credit: Wpcpey

Most British Columbians Eager to Experience Holiday Travel

Willingness to embark on a trip in 10 different ways is significantly higher this year than in 2021.

Vancouver, BC [November 26, 2021] – Residents of British Columbia are more likely to be planning to spend time away from their homes during the holiday season than last year, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 51% of British Columbians plan to take a holiday—or spend at least one night away from their current location—in the next three months, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2021.

“More than three-in-five British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (64%) are considering a holiday trip,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower among British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (50%) and aged 55 and over (43%).”

More than half of British Columbians say they are willing to travel in two ways right now: on a ferry (56%, +10) and taking an airplane flight to another province (54%, +18).

More than two-in-five British Columbians are ready to travel using four other forms of transportation: a trip by car to the United States (48%, +21), an airplane flight within British Columbia (46%, +14), an airplane flight to a different continent (45%, +23) and an airplane flight to the United States (44%, +23).

Fewer British Columbians are willing to take a railway trip (37%, +14), a bus trip shorter than 3 hours (33%, +8), a trip on a cruise ship (26%, +15) or a bus trip longer than 3 hours (23%, +7).

Just over three-in-four British Columbians (76%, -1) say they are “very concerned” or “moderately concerned” about losing money due to cancelations.

More than three-in-five British Columbians (63%) are worried about getting infected with COVID-19 during their trip, down 12 points since late 2021.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 14 to November 16, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians OK with Abandoning Winter Olympic Bid

Agreement with the FIFA World Cup coming to Vancouver in 2026 has increased since June.

Vancouver, BC [November 21, 2022] – Most British Columbians think the provincial government made the right call in refusing to back a proposed bid to host the Winter Olympics again, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 57% of British Columbians agree with the provincial government’s decision to not support the 2030 Winter Olympics bid that was being explored by Four Host First Nations—Musqueam, Squamish, Tsleil-Waututh, and Lilwat—and the municipal governments of Vancouver and Whistler.

Vancouver hosted the XXI Olympic Winter Games, from February 12 to February 28, 2010.

Only 29% of British Columbians disagree with the provincial government’s decision to abandon the proposed 2030 bid—a proportion that rises to 48% among respondents of First Nation or Indigenous descent.

“British Columbians of all political stripes believe this is not the best moment to consider hosting the Winter Games again,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of residents who voted in 2020 for the BC Liberals (66%), the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (63%) and the BC Green Party (58%) are in agreement.”

In previous surveys, support for exploring the possibility of holding the 2030 Winter Olympics in Vancouver fluctuated from 60% in January 2020 to 43% in October 2021 and to 54% in June 2022,

The notion of Vancouver hosting the Summer Olympics in 2036 remains contentious, with 42% of British Columbians (-6) thinking a bid should be launched and 45% (+5) disagreeing with this idea.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more eager to entertain a Summer Olympics bid for 2036 (51%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (46%) and aged 55 and over (33%).

More than three-in-five British Columbians (62%, +7) agree with Vancouver being a host city during the FIFA (Soccer) 2026 Men’s World Cup, while one-in-four (24%, -10) disagree and 14% are undecided.

Satisfaction with the 2026 Men’s World Cup coming to Vancouver is particularly high in the Fraser Valley (65%), Southern BC (64%) and Metro Vancouver (63%).

Just over two-in-five British Columbians (41%, -6) hold positive views on the International Olympic Committee (IOC), while a smaller proportion (38%) feel the same way about FIFA.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 6 to November 8, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Rising Cost of Food Impacting the Habits of British Columbians

More than three-in-five of the province’s residents have reduced their visits to restaurants since September.

Vancouver, BC [November 15, 2022] – Residents of British Columbia are starting to take action to deal with increasing food prices, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 64% of British Columbians say they have cut back on dining out on the weekend over the past two months, and a slightly smaller proportion (61%) have cut back on buying or going out to lunch on a weekday.

More than half of British Columbians have also cut back on treats (59%) and visits to coffee shops (56%), while more than two-in-five (44%) have switched packaged food brands to lower priced alternatives.

“Only 14% of British Columbians have not made any adjustments to their food budget over the past two months,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This includes 19% of male residents and 10% of female residents.”

More than four-in-five British Columbians (82%) say the price of groceries has increased since September, and practically seven-in-ten say lunch at a restaurant (69%) and dinner at a restaurant (71%) are more expensive now than they were two months ago.

Almost half of British Columbians (49%) also think the price of food delivery has increased—a proportion that rises to 60% among those aged 18-to-34.

More than three-in-five British Columbians (61%) say their diet has been healthy over the past two months, while just over a third (34%) describe it as unhealthy.

Women (39%), residents of Vancouver Island (40%) and British Columbians in the lowest income bracket (43%) are more likely to report that their diet has not been healthy since September.

More than three-in-five British Columbians who have not followed a healthy diet recently (61%) say an inability to afford healthier foods has negatively impacted their nourishment, while just over half (51%) blame the stress and pressures of daily life getting in the way of good eating habits.

Fewer British Columbians who claim their diet is unhealthy say they find it difficult to make lifestyle changes (38%), lack the time for food preparation at home (33%) or lack the time to buy groceries (16%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 6 to November 8, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

A Third of British Columbians Willing to Change Province’s Name

Residents aged 18-to-34 are particularly supportive of a move to acknowledge the province’s Indigenous heritage.

Vancouver, BC [November 8, 2022] – While most British Columbians disagree with the notion of changing the province’s name, young adults believe this would be the correct course of action, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 53% of British Columbians disagree with changing the name of the province to acknowledge its Indigenous heritage, down seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2021.

A third of British Columbians (32%, +6) would like to go forward with a name change—a proportion that rises to 50% among those aged 18-to-34.

“More than a third of Vancouver Island residents (37%) would welcome changing British Columbia’s name,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support is lower in Northern BC (32%), Metro Vancouver (31%), the Fraser Valley (30%) and Southern BC (26%).”

Just over three-in-five British Columbians (62%, -5) are not bothered by any component of the province’s name. About one-in-five are upset about the absence of an acknowledgement to Indigenous peoples (20%, +2) and the “British” part (19%, +4). Only 8% (=) are bothered by the presence of the word “Columbia”.

The numbers did not move much when British Columbians were asked if the provincial flag should be amended to remove the Union Jack. Just over three-in-ten (31%, +1) agree with this plan, while 46% (-3) disagree with it.

Only 24% of British Columbians aged 55 and over would consent to having a provincial flag that does not feature the Union Jack. Support is higher among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (30%) and aged 18-to-34 (43%).

In 2010, the Queen Charlotte Islands were renamed as Haida Gwaii. Most British Columbians (58%, +2) believe this was the right decision, while 20% (=) disagree and 23% (-1) are undecided.

More than seven-in-ten residents of Vancouver Island (71%) believe changing the name of the Queen Charlotte Islands was the correct course of action, along with majorities of residents of Southern BC (58%), the Fraser Valley (57%), Metro Vancouver (55%) and Northern BC (also 55%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 29 to October 31, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Ponder Future Effect of BC NDP Leadership Race

Women are more likely to support the BC New Democrats if David Eby replaces John Horgan as leader.

Vancouver, BC [October 18, 2022] – The governing BC New Democratic Party (NDP) remains ahead of the opposition BC Liberals in British Columbia’s political scene, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 44% of decided voters would support the BC NDP candidate in their constituency if a provincial ballot were held today, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in February.

The BC Liberals are in second place with 35% (-3), followed by the BC Green Party with 15% (+2) and the BC Conservative Party with 4% (+2).

More than half of British Columbians (57%, -12) approve of the way Premier and BC NDP leader John Horgan has handled his duties. The numbers are lower for both BC Liberals leader Kevin Falcon (36%, -2) and BC Greens leader Sonia Furstenau (35%, -1).

The survey also asked about the two prospective candidates seeking to replace Horgan at the helm of the BC NDP. Just over two-in-five British Columbians (42%) approve of David Eby, while three-in-ten (30%) feel the same way about Anjali Appadurai.

Across British Columbia, a third of residents (33%) say it makes no difference to them who becomes the next leader of the BC NDP, while one-in-five (25%) are undecided. Eby is ahead of Appadurai among all residents of the province (30% to 12%) and among those who voted for the BC New Democrats in the 2020 provincial election (42% to 11%).

Respondents to this poll were asked about four different scenarios that could materialize upon the conclusion of the BC NDP leadership race.

In a match-up with Eby as leader, 43% of decided voters would support the BC NDP and 34% would back the BC Liberals. The race becomes much closer if Appadurai supplants Horgan: 38% for the BC NDP and 36% for the BC Liberals.

“The BC NDP would have an easier time connecting with female voters with David Eby as leader,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support for the governing party among women stands at 51% with him and at 44% under Appadurai.”

The results are also different if either of the losing contenders in the BC NDP leadership race decided to create their own political parties.

With Eby as leader, the BC NDP would keep the upper hand over the BC Liberals (40% to 34%), with lower support for the BC Greens (15%), the BC Conservatives (6%) and a new political party led by Appadurai (3%).

An Appadurai-led BC NDP would be four points behind the BC Liberals (31% to 35%). The BC Greens would be third with 16%, followed by a new provincial party led by Eby (10%) and the BC Conservatives (6%).

When asked about the most important issue facing the province, almost two-in-five British Columbians (38%, +5) select housing, homelessness and poverty—a proportion that jumps to 43% among women and to 47% among those aged 18-to-34.

Health care is second on the list of concerns with 28% (+5), rising to 44% among British Columbians aged 55 and over. The economy and jobs is third on the list with 11% (-5), followed by crime and public safety (8%, +4) and the environment (6%, -4).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 9 to October 11, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Some British Columbians Keep Options Open to Work from Home

Only 11% of British Columbians who worked from home during the COVID-19 pandemic have returned to the office full time.

Vancouver, BC [October 7, 2002] – Employed British Columbians are still figuring out the new qualms of office life, and more than a third are not particularly thrilled with their current arrangements to work from home, a new Research Co. poll has found

In the online survey of a representative sample, more than three-in-five home workers in British Columbia (63%) say they are happy with their current arrangements to perform their duties away from the office. Similar proportions claim to be working from home more often (19%) or less often (18%) than they would like to.

Just over one-in-ten British Columbians who worked from home during the COVID-19 pandemic (11%) have returned to the office full time. About a third (32%) are working from home once or twice a week, while 25% are there three to four times a week and 31%  work from home five days a week.

“There is a significant generational divide when it comes to the home office in British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 19% of home workers aged 18-to-34 are not commuting at all, the proportion rises to 35% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 47% among those aged 55 and over.”

More than half of British Columbians who worked from home during the pandemic (53%) say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to seek a different job if their current company does not allow them to work from home as often as they want. Just under one-in-ten (8%) have already left a position because of this reason.

Two thirds of home workers in British Columbia (66%, +2 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2022) say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to explore the possibility of switching to a different job that can be performed from home in their own metropolitan area.

Smaller proportions of home workers in British Columbia would consider switching to a different job that can be performed from home for a company headquartered in the province (59%, +2) or in a different Canadian province (45%, =).

Compared to January 2022, we see fewer employed British Columbians reporting an increase in virtual staff meetings (28%, -17) and virtual business development (21%, -24) at their workplace.

Conversely, employed British Columbians say that they have seen more in person staff meetings (27%, +13) and more in-person business development (21%, +6) than three months ago.

The change is not as pronounced on business travel, with 15% of employed British Columbians (+5) noticing more trips and 31% (-8) saying they are less common than three months ago. In addition, there is a slight reduction in the amount of virtual communications between offices (27%, -19).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 28 to September 30, 2022, among 700 adults who work in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Positive Views on State of Health Care Drop in British Columbia

Half of the province’s residents say a shortage of doctors and nurses is the biggest problem facing the system right now.

Vancouver, BC [September 30, 2020] – Just over three-in-ten British Columbians believe the province’s health care system requires a major overhaul, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 31% of British Columbians believe health care in the province has so much wrong with it that we need to completely rebuild it, up 20 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November 2020.

Only 13% of British Columbians (-9) think health care in the province works well, and only minor changes are needed to make it work better, while half (50%, -14) say there are some good things in health care in British Columbia, but some changes are required.

“Negative perceptions about the current state of the health care system in British Columbia increase with age,“ says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 22% of residents aged 18-to-34 call for a complete rebuild, the proportion rises to 30% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 40% among those aged 55 and over.”

Half of British Columbians (50%, +26) consider a shortage of doctors and nurses as the biggest problem facing the health care system right now. Long waiting times is a distant second on the list of concerns with 18% (-9), followed by bureaucracy and poor management (10%, =) and inadequate resources and facilities (7%, -6).

Two-in-five British Columbians (40%, =) say they would be willing to pay out of their own pocket to have quicker access to medical services that currently have long waiting times—a proportion that rises to 49% among those aged 18-to-34.

In addition, a third of British Columbians (33%, +6) would consider travelling to another country to have quicker access to medical services that currently have long waiting times.

In September 2020, a B.C. Supreme Court justice ruled that access to private health care is not a constitutional right, even if wait times for care under the public system are too long.

More than a third of British Columbians (37%, -9) agree with the decision taken by the B.C. Supreme Court justice, while 49% (+18) disagree and 14% (-9) are undecided.

British Columbians who voted for the BC Liberals and the BC Green Party in the 2020 provincial election are more likely to disagree with the justice’s decision (52% and 51% respectively) than those who supported the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (43%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 23 to September 25, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Automated Speed Enforcement Still Favoured in British Columbia

More than three-in-five residents of the province agree with four different types of automated speed enforcement.

Vancouver, BC [September 16, 2022] – Sizeable majorities of British Columbians continue to endorse the use of technology to identify vehicles whose drivers choose not to abide by existing speed limits, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 76% of British Columbians approve of the use of fixed speed cameras, or cameras that stay in one location and measure speed as a vehicle passes, up four points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2021.

Automated speed enforcement works by using cameras or sensors to pick up a vehicle speeding. A ticket is then issued to the owner of the vehicle. Driver’s license points are not issued as the driver of the vehicle cannot be identified.

Majorities British Columbians have voiced support for automated speed enforcement in Research Co. surveys conducted in 2018, 2019, 2020 and 2021.

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (72%, +1) approve of the use of speed-on-green intersection cameras in the province. This type of enforcement entails using red light cameras to capture vehicles that are speeding through intersections.

“Women (74%) and British Columbians aged 55 and over (79%) are particularly supportive of speed-on-green intersection cameras,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The practice is also endorsed by majorities of British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (77%), the BC Liberals (75%) and the BC Green Party (69%) in the 2020 provincial election.”

Two thirds of British Columbians (66%, +2) are in favour of mobile speed cameras, or devices that can be moved from place to place to measure speed as a vehicle passes.

Just over three-in-five British Columbians (61%, +8 since 2021) favour the use of point-to-point speed enforcement, which relies on cameras placed at two or more distant points on a road. The average speed of vehicles that pass between points is calculated and tickets are issued to vehicles whose average speed over the distance was excessive.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from September 8 to September 10, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Young British Columbians Lose Faith on Staying in the Province

Only 19% of British Columbians believe the province would be better off as its own country.

Vancouver, BC [August 30, 2022] – Young adults who reside in British Columbia are having a hard time envisioning the possibility of growing old in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 72% of British Columbians believe they will stay in the province for the rest of their lives, down three points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in 2021.

“Only 56% of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 expect to stay in the province for the rest of their lives,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are significantly higher among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (70%) and aged 55 and over (84%).”

More than four-in-five British Columbians (82%, -2) say they are very proud of the province that they live in and just under three-in-five (59%, +2) consider their views as different from the rest of the country.

More than three-in-five British Columbians (62%, +3) believe they have more in common with the people of Seattle and Portland than with those in Toronto or Montreal.

Residents of the Fraser Valley are more likely to express an affinity towards the people of Seattle and Portland (64%), followed by those who live in Metro Vancouver (63%), Vancouver Island (62%), Northern BC (61%) and Southern BC (55%).

Just under one-in-five British Columbians (19%, +1) think British Columbia would be better off as its own country—a proportion that rises to 23% among those aged 18-to-34.

More than three-in-five respondents (63%, +2) claim to consider themselves “Canadians first, and British Columbians second”, while 22% (=) acknowledge being “British Columbians first, and Canadians second.”

Three-in-ten British Columbians (30%, +1) think that John Horgan has been the province’s best premier since 1986, followed by Christy Clark (7%, -2), Gordon Campbell (also 7%, +1) and Mike Harcourt (6%, =).

Just under one-in-five British Columbians (19%, -2) believe Clark is the worst recent head of government, followed by Campbell (10%, -1) and Horgan (also 10%, +2).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 20 to August 22, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Say Homelessness Has Increased in Province

Most residents think all levels of government have done a “bad job” coming up with solutions to deal with this problem.

Vancouver, BC [August 19, 2022] – Majorities of residents of British Columbia are disappointed with the way their elected officials have addressed the issue of homelessness, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 61% of British Columbians think the federal government has done a “bad” or “very bad” job coming up with solutions to deal with homelessness.

More than half of British Columbians also believe both the provincial government (56%) and their municipal government (55%) have done a “bad” or “very bad” job on this file.

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (73%) consider the current situation related to homelessness in the province as a major problem—a proportion that rises to 83% in the Fraser Valley.

More than half of the province’s residents (52%) think homelessness in their municipality is a major problem, while 27% feel the same way about the current state of affairs in their neighbourhood.

Practically four-in-five British Columbians (79%) believe homelessness has increased across the province over the past three years, and more than three-in-five (63%) feel the same way about the current situation in their municipality. Just over two-in-five (42%) also say that homelessness has intensified in their neighbourhood.

When asked about factors that are to blame “a great deal” for the current situation regarding homelessness in the province, most British Columbians point the finger at addiction and mental health issues (60%) and a lack of affordable housing (53%).

Fewer British Columbians blame poverty and inequality (41%), personal actions and decisions (30%) and bad economy and unemployment (24%) for homelessness.

British Columbians are evenly split on whether homelessness can be eradicated. While 47% of the province’s residents believe this can be achieved with the proper funding and policies, 46% claim that homelessness will always be a problem in British Columbia.

“More than three-in-five British Columbians aged 55 and over (62%) believe that the notion of a province without homelessness is unattainable,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer of their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (39%) and aged 18-to-34 (34%) are skeptical.”

Most British Columbians agree with four different ideas to reduce homelessness in the province: increasing temporary housing options for people experiencing homelessness (80%), offering incentives to developers if they focus on building affordable housing units (78%), devoting tax money to build units to house homeless residents (67%) and changing zoning laws to allow property owners to build more units on standard lots (60%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 13 to August 15, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Positive Views on TMX Pipeline Rise in BC, Drop Slightly in Alberta

A third of British Columbians (33%) believe the project should be stopped, down eight points since October 2021.

Vancouver, BC [August 5, 2022] – Favourable perceptions on the expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline have increased in British Columbia and remain high in Alberta, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative provincial samples, 51% of British Columbians agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the project, up six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in October 2021.

Practically seven-in-ten Albertans (69%) also agree with the re-approval of the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion, down five points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November 2020.

In British Columbia, residents of Southern BC (66%), Northern BC (61%) and the Fraser Valley (58%) are more likely to hold positive views on the pipeline project. The rating is lower in Metro Vancouver (50%) and Vancouver Island (41%).

In Alberta, sizeable majorities of residents of Edmonton (72%) and Calgary (66%) are in favour of the pipeline expansion, along with 70% of those who live other areas of the province.

“The proportion of British Columbians who want the provincial government to do anything necessary to ensure that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion does not happen dropped from 41% in October 2021 to 33% in July 2022,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In Alberta, 25% of residents (+3) share the same point of view.”

More than half of British Columbians (51%, -4) and three-in-five Albertans (61%, +2) say they are disappointed with the way the federal government has managed the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion.

Significant majorities of Albertans (78%, -1) and British Columbians (71%, +6) believe the Trans Mountain Pipeline will create hundreds of jobs for residents of each province.

Two-in-five British Columbians (40%, -7) think the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of the province’s residents. Just under three-in-ten Albertans (28%, +11) share this point of view.

Fewer than half of residents of the two provinces expect gas prices to be lower now that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion has been re-approved: 40% in Alberta (+6) and 37% in British Columbia (+1).

In November 2016, the federal government rejected a proposal—known as the Enbridge Northern Gateway—to build a new pipeline from Alberta to British Columbia’s north coast, to export oil on tankers to Asian markets.

Just under half of British Columbians (46%, +5) believe it is time to reconsider the Enbridge Northern Gateway proposal, while just over a quarter (27%, -7) disagree.

Support for taking a second look at the Enbridge Northern Gateway is highest in Northern BC (60%), followed by Southern BC (51%), Metro Vancouver (45%), the Fraser Valley (43%) and Vancouver Island (38%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from July 29 to July 31, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia and 800 adults in Alberta. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in each province. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.5 percentage points for each province, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables for British Columbia here, our data tables for Alberta here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 Photo Credit: Codex

Few British Columbians Ponder Calorie Counts When Dining Out

More than three-in-four believe it should be mandatory to display calories on any menu that lists or depicts standard food items.

Vancouver, BC [July 26, 2022] – Residents of British Columbia pay more attention to the nutritional value of foods when they are at the supermarket than when dining out or ordering in, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, more than a third of British Columbians (37%) say they “frequently” check labels to review nutritional content when buying groceries for themselves or others in their household.

Significantly fewer British Columbians “frequently” pay attention to menus to review nutritional content when dining out (13%) or when ordering food delivery (11%).

While almost three-in-ten British Columbians (29%) “frequently” check labels at the grocery store to review the total calories of a product, the proportion drops drastically when residents dine out (14%) or order in (11%).

A similar scenario ensues when respondents are asked about checking for two other items in the food they consume. About three-in-ten British Columbians check labels at the grocery store for sodium (32%) and fat (29%). Fewer follow the same course of action when they go to a restaurant (Sodium 14%, Fat 13%) or when they browse menus or apps for food delivery (Sodium 10%, Fat 11%).

In the Province of Ontario, it is mandatory to display calories on any menu that lists or depicts standard food items offered for sale by a regulated food service premises. More than three-in-four British Columbians (76%, -5 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2018) are in favour of adopting this regulation.

In 2012, the Province of British Columbia implemented the Informed Dining initiative, a program designed to allow residents to have nutrition information available when eating at participating food service establishments. The voluntary program was abandoned in 2020.

“British Columbians appear to be affected by the lack of standards when it comes to nutritional information in restaurants,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Customers do not have the same information to make a decision that they currently have at the grocery store.”

The proportion of British Columbians who use an activity tracker to monitor certain fitness-related metrics—such as distance walked, amount of exercise and/or calorie consumption—increased from 41% in November 2018 to 45% this month.

Practically half of Metro Vancouverites (49%) rely on an activity tracker. The proportions are lower in Southern BC (46%), Northern BC (42%), Vancouver Island (36%) and the Fraser Valley (35%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from July 4 to July 6, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Enthusiastic and Selective About Activism

Three-in-ten British Columbians would protest a low-income housing project located within three blocks of their home.

Vancouver, BC [July 19, 2022] – A significant proportion of British Columbians are engaged in campaigns to bring about political or social change, but their willingness to protest plans to establish specific facilities in their neighbourhood is not substantial, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 30% of British Columbians say they have used social media to protest or support an issue, while 25% have donated money to an organization that supports or opposes an issue.

About one-in-seven British Columbians have attended a public consultation meeting or process (15%) or a protest (14%), while fewer acknowledge joining a political party or campaign (7%), participating in a political campaign (6%) or taking legal action against a development or project (5%)

“Two thirds of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (67%) have been involved in some form of activism,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (48%) and aged 55 and over (41%).”

The survey also asked British Columbians about which actions they would take under hypothetical circumstances related to their municipality and their neighbourhood.

More than half of the province’s residents would take no action if there were plans to install a military base (57%), a casino (62%), a recycling plant (64%) or wind turbines (67%) within the boundaries of their municipality.

British Columbians are more likely to consider passive protest—such as sending letters to politicians or complaining on social media—to register concerns about a natural gas pipeline (19%), an incinerator for waste treatment (21%), a prison (22%), an oil pipeline, a landfill site, an oil refinery or a nuclear power plant (23% each) or a coal terminal (26%).

Active protest, which includes donating to opponents and attending town halls, would be the recourse of 24% of British Columbians to deal with a coal terminal and of 29% to deal with a nuclear power plant.

When asked about the possibility of specific facilities seeking a permit to operate three blocks away from their home, majorities of British Columbians would take no action on a cell phone tower (54%), a low-income housing project (58%), a marijuana store (60%), a recycling depot (63%), a retail or mall development (65%), an entertainment complex (69%), a pub or bar (also 69%) or a hospital (75%).

At least one-in-five British Columbians would passively protest if a composting site (20%), a homeless shelter (22%) or a sewage plant (27%) attempted to operate within three blocks of their home. Similar proportions of residents would actively protest against a composting site and a homeless shelter (20% each) and a sewage plant (25%).

Three-in-ten British Columbians (30%) are willing to passively (16%) or actively (14%) protest a low-income housing project seeking a permit to set-up within three blocks of their home, while 58% would take no action.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from July 4 to July 6, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Ambiguous About Province-Wide Police Force

Seven-in-ten residents (70%) support increasing the use of closed circuit television (CCTV) in their community.

Vancouver, BC [July 12, 2022] – Residents of British Columbia are split when assessing if a province-wide police force that would replace the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) should be created, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 39% of British Columbians agree with this idea, while 38% disagree and 23% are undecided.

Earlier this year, the all-party Special Committee on Reforming the Police Act in the Legislative Assembly issued a report which recommended the establishment of a BC-wide police force that would replace the RCMP.

At least two-in-five residents of Northern BC (45%), the Fraser Valley (43%), Vancouver Island (also 43%) and Metro Vancouver (40%) are in favour of instituting a BC-wide police force. Support is decidedly lower in Southern BC (26%).

The concept of “defunding the police” calls for divesting funds from police departments and reallocating them to non-policing forms of public safety and community support. Almost half of British Columbians (49%) agree with this idea, while 38% disagree and 14% are not sure.

Support for “defunding the police” is highest among BC Green Party voters in the last provincial election (66%). The level of agreement is lower among British Columbians who cast ballots for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (53%) or the BC Liberals (50%) in 2020.

Seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%) agree with increasing the use of closed circuit television (CCTV) cameras in their community as a means of surveillance to help deter and solve crimes.

Compared to a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2021, there are no changes in the perceptions of British Columbians on two issues: almost half (48%) continue to fear becoming victims of crime in their community “a great deal” or “a fair amount” and 63% would feel “very safe” or “moderately safe” walking alone in their own neighbourhood after dark.

This month, fear of crime is highest in Northern BC (52%, +3), followed by Metro Vancouver (51%, -3), Southern BC (48%, +16),  the Fraser Valley (45%, +4) and Vancouver Island (40%, -1).

Fewer than one-in-five British Columbians (18%, -2) say they have been victims of a crime involving the police (such as an assault or a car break-in) in their community over the past four years.

Just over half of British Columbians (51%, +7) believe that the level of criminal activity in their community has increased in the past four years—a proportion that jumps to 62% in Southern BC.

British Columbians continue to support the authorization of two bans in their municipality: one on military-style assault weapons (82%, -2) and another one on handguns (75%, -4).

More than half of British Columbians (51%, +3) think addiction and mental health issues are to blame “a great deal” for the current situation regarding crime in their community.

Fewer residents of the province blame other factors, such as gangs and the illegal drug trade (37%, -1), poverty and inequality (32%, +1), an inadequate court system (32%, +2), lack of values and improper education for youth (27%, =), a bad economy and unemployment (24%, +4), insufficient policing and a lack of resources to combat crime (also 22%, +2) and immigrants and minorities (8%, -1).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from July 4 to July 6, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

2030 Winter Olympic Bid Trending Upward in British Columbia

Most of the province’s residents agree with Vancouver being a host city during the FIFA (Soccer) 2026 Men’s World Cup.

Vancouver, BC [July 5, 2022] – Public support for a new opportunity to host the Winter Olympics has improved in British Columbia, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 54% of British Columbians think Vancouver should launch a bid to host the Winter Olympics in 2030, up 11 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in October 2021.

Support for the 2030 Winter Games bid is highest among British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (61%). The proportions are lower among those aged 35-to-54 (56%) and those aged 55 and over (48%).

On a regional basis, public backing for the 2030 bid is highest in the Fraser Valley (58%), followed by Northern BC (57%), Metro Vancouver (56%), Southern BC (52%) and Vancouver Island (46%).

Vancouver hosted the XXI Olympic Winter Games, from February 12 to February 28, 2010. A Winter Olympics bid in 2030 is being explored by Four Host First Nations—Musqueam, Squamish, Tsleil-Waututh, and Lilwat—and the municipal governments of Vancouver and Whistler.

Almost one-in-four British Columbians (23%) say they are more likely to support the 2030 bid because of the Indigenous partnership, while 44% say it has no effect on their views and 18% are less likely to back the project.

“Practically a third of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (32%) are more inclined to support the 2030 Winter Olympic bid because of the Indigenous partnership,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, just over one-in-four British Columbians aged 55 and over (26%) are less likely to back the bid because of this reason.”

A significant majority of British Columbians (58%, +5) believe it is impossible for Vancouver to host the 2030 Winter Olympics without any public or government funds.

Just under half of British Columbians (48%, +10) think Vancouver should launch a bid to host the Summer Olympics in 2036, a proportion that rises to 58% among residents aged 18-to-34.

The views of British Columbians on the International Olympic Committee (IOC) did not go through significant changes since 2021. Almost half (47%, -1) have positive views of the IOC, while more than a third (33%, -3) hold negative opinions.

Vancouver was selected as one of the 16 host cities for the FIFA (Soccer) 2026 Men’s World Cup. More than half of British Columbians (55%) agree with this decision, including 58% of those aged 35-to-54.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 24 to June 26, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca