Americans and Canadians Shun Travel Without COVID-19 Vaccine

Railway journeys are more attractive, while few residents of the two countries would take a trip on a cruise ship.

Vancouver, BC [July 31, 2020] – Most Canadians and Americans are unwilling to become tourists again during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, majorities of residents of Canada and the United States say they would not travel in nine different ways before there is a vaccine against COVID-19.

“The appetite for travel before a COVID-19 vaccine is readily available is low in Canada and the United States,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “North American residents aged 55 and over, who are usually ready to explore and spend, are particularly reticent about all journeys unless inoculation is a reality.”

In Canada, more than a third of respondents (35%) are currently  willing to take a ferry trip—a proportion that rises to 50% in Atlantic Canada and 49% in British Columbia.

Fewer than a third of Canadians would take an airplane flight within their own province (32%), a bus trip shorter than 3 hours (31%), an airplane flight to another province (30%) or a railway trip (29%) without inoculation against COVID-19.

Significantly fewer Canadians are willing to take an airplane flight to a different continent (21%), a bus trip longer than 3 hours  (20%),  an airplane flight to the United States (17%) or a trip on a cruise ship (13%).

More than a third of Americans say they are willing to take a railway trip (36%), an airplane flight within their own state (35%), an airplane flight to another state (34%) or a ferry trip (also 34%) before a vaccine against COVID-19 is available.

Fewer Americans would entertain five other forms of travel under the current conditions: a bus trip shorter than 3 hours (31%), an airplane flight to Canada (28%), a bus trip longer than 3 hours (25%), an airplane flight to a different continent (21%) and a trip on a cruise ship (also 21%).

There is a sizeable gender gap when Americans are asked about travel, with men saying they are more likely to travel without a vaccine than their female counterparts.

Methodology:

Results are based on online studies conducted from July 1 to July 5, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States.

Find our Canadian tables here, our American tables here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Half of Canadians Have Experienced Racism in Social Interactions

Three-in-four Canadians (74%) think the policy of multiculturalism has been good for the country, up 15 points since January 2019. 

Vancouver, BC [July 21, 2020] – Racist behaviour in day-to-day social interactions has impacted half of Canadians, with a significantly higher incidence reported among those who identify as First Nations, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians say they have experienced racist behaviour in day-to-day social interactions with others, such as shopping and taking public transit.

More than four-in-five Canadians who identify as First Nations, Métis or Inuit (86%) say they have endured racism in day-to-day social interactions, along with 78% of Canadians of African descent, 68% of South Asians, 63% of East Asians and 58% of Southeast Asians.

Slightly lower proportions of Canadians acknowledge experiencing racist behaviour on social media (46%), at school (43%) or at work (41%).

A third of Canadians say they have endured racism during interactions with police or law enforcement officers (33%) and the health care system (29%).

“Canadians of European ancestry are less likely to have endured racism, and the numbers on specific settings go through significant fluctuations according to a person’s ethnicity,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Three-in-five Canadians of African descent (61%) have experienced racism during interactions with police, and seven-in-ten Canadians who identify as First Nations (70%) have endured racism at work.”

Majorities of Canadians of First Nations (56%), South Asian (also 56%) and African descent (58%) say they have faced racism during interactions with the health care system.

When asked if they have witnessed behaviour that they would describe as racist, more than half of Canadians say they have perceived it in day-to-day social interactions (58%) and social media (57%), while fewer have seen it at school (50%), at work (47%), dealing with police and law enforcement (41%) and engaging with the health care system (34%).

Half of Canadians (49%) believe race relations in Canada have improved over the past two years, while 29% feel they have worsened. Men (56%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (61%) are more likely to think that the situation is getting better.

Three-in-four Canadians (74%) believe the policy of multiculturalism has been “very good” or “good” for Canada—up 14 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in January 2019.

The proportion of Canadians who think multiculturalism has been “bad” or “very bad” for the country fell to 18% (-15).

As was the case last year, Canadians are divided when assessing two distinct concepts. Almost half (46%, -3 since January 2019) believe Canada should be a melting pot and immigrants should assimilate and blend into Canadian society.

A smaller proportion of Canadians (41%, -1) believe the country should be a mosaic and think cultural differences within Canadian society are valuable and should be preserved.

Quebecers (51%), Ontarians (48%) and Albertans (also 48%) are more likely to endorse the concept of the melting pot for Canada. Smaller proportions of residents of British Columbia (43%), Atlantic Canada (38%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 38%) concur.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from July 3 to July 8, 2020, among 2,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.2 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Endorse Speed-on-Green Cameras on Roads

Three other types of automated speed enforcement are also backed by a majority of the province’s residents.

Vancouver, BC [June 30, 2020] – For the third year in a row, most British Columbians are in favour of relying on red light cameras to capture speeding vehicles, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 70% of British Columbians approve of the use of speed-on-green intersection cameras, while 24% disapprove and 5% are undecided.

Support for speed-on-green cameras is highest among women (74%), British Columbians aged 55 and over (77%) and residents of Vancouver Island (74%). Most voters who supported the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (76%), the BC Liberals (74%) and the BC Green Party (65%) in the last provincial election are also in agreement.

Speed-on-green cameras are red light cameras that also capture vehicles that are speeding through intersections. Public backing for the use of this specific type of automated speed enforcement stood at 70% in a Research Co. survey conducted in 2018 and 68% in a poll conducted in 2019.

“British Columbians have been consistent in their overall analysis of automated speed enforcement,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the specific case of speed-on-green cameras, there is little difference between drivers (70%) and non-drivers (71%).”

Automated speed enforcement works by using cameras or sensors to pick up a vehicle speeding. A ticket is then issued to the owner of the vehicle. Driver’s license points are not issued as the driver of the vehicle cannot be identified.

More than two thirds of British Columbians also approve of the use of two other types of automated speed enforcement: fixed speed cameras, or cameras that stay in one location and measure speed as a vehicle passes (71%, +2 since 2019) and mobile speed cameras, which can be moved from place to place and measure speed as a vehicle passes (68%, +5 since 2019).

Almost three-in-five British Columbians (58%, +6 since 2019) are in favour of point-to-point speed enforcement, which uses cameras at two or more distant points on a road. The average speed of vehicles that pass between points is calculated and tickets are issued to vehicles whose average speed over the distance was excessive.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 13 to June 15, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Contemplate COVID-19 Government Bailouts

Most residents support helping agri-food companies, individual municipalities, retailers and news organizations.

Vancouver, BC [June 11, 2020] – British Columbians have a clear idea of which businesses and corporations affected by the COVID-19 pandemic should receive financial assistance from governments, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, almost three-in-four British Columbians (73%) think agri-food companies should “definitely” or “probably” be eligible for a government bailout.

A bailout entails providing financial assistance to a corporation that otherwise would fail or become bankrupt.

Most of the province’s residents are also supportive of providing financial assistance to individual municipalities (70%), retailers (67%) and news organizations (57%).

“A government bailout for individual municipalities is more popular among British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (78%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However, majorities of residents aged 18-to-34 (65%) and aged 55 and over (67%) also favour this course of action.”

While 63% of men are in favour of providing financial assistance to news organizations, the proportion drops to 53% among women.

More than two-in-five British Columbians are in favour of allowing airlines (49%), taxi companies (also 49%) and film and entertainment companies (45%) to be eligible for government bailouts.

The level of support for governmental financial assistance is lower for ride-hailing companies (39%), individual sports franchises (38%) and professional sports leagues (34%).

Across British Columbia, men are more likely to endorse the notion of bailing out individual sports franchises (46%) and professional sports leagues than women (29% and 26% respectively.

Residents of Metro Vancouver are more likely than those in other areas of the province to endorse financial assistance for news organizations (63%), airlines (56%) and film and entertainment companies (50%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 5 to June 7, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Hesitant About Life Without COVID-19 Vaccine

Most residents are willing to visit barbershops and restaurants, but the proportion drops for public transit, gyms and music venues.

Vancouver, BC [May 21, 2020] – A significant proportion of British Columbians are unwilling to partake in specific activities unless a vaccine against COVID-19 is available, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, more than half of British Columbians say they would not attend a live sporting event as a spectator (61%) or a music venue (59%) before there is a vaccine against COVID-19.

At this stage, more than half of British Columbians are willing to visit a community centre (60%) as well as a gym or fitness facility (53%).

“More than half of women in British Columbia (54%) say they would not set foot inside a gym or fitness facility before they can have access to a COVID-19 vaccine,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, most men (60%) say they would have no problem visiting these venues.”

There is a split among residents on the issue of public transit usage. Across the province, 57% of British Columbians are willing to ride on a bus without a COVID-19 vaccine, while 43% would not do so. In addition, 55% would ride on SkyTrain, while 45% would not.

Men are more likely than women to say they would be willing to ride a bus (63% to 52%) and ride on SkyTrain (60% to 50%) before a COVID-19 vaccine is accessible.

Fewer than a third of British Columbians say they would not visit restaurants, pubs or bars where people can only eat indoors (32%), libraries (29%), restaurants, pubs or bars where people eat outside (also 29%) and barbershops or salons (27%) without a COVID-19 vaccine.

British Columbians aged 55 and over are more likely to have no reservations about going to a restaurant patio (72%) or to a restaurant that only offers food indoors (64%).

British Columbians of European descent are more likely to say that they would visit an indoor restaurant before a COVID-19 vaccine is available (76%) than those of East Asian (69%) and South Asian (57%) heritage.

At least three-in-five British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (60%) and aged 55 and over (64%) say they are not willing to visit a music venue without a COVID-19 vaccine. The proportion is lower among those aged 35-to-54 (54%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 15 to May 17, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Foresee “Back to Normal” by Mid-August or Later

More than seven-in-ten (73%) would take a vaccine against COVID-19 if it ultimately becomes available.

Vancouver, BC [April 21, 2020] – A majority of Canadians are not anticipating a return to the routines they had before the COVID-19 outbreak in the early weeks of the summer, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 54% of Canadians expect things in their city or town to go back to the way they were before the outbreak three months from now (16%) or four months from now or longer (38%).  

Only 18% of Canadians expect a return to normal life within the next month (6%) or a month from now (12%), while 31% believe their daily routines will come back two months from now (15%) or three months from now (16%).  

“Across the country, residents of Quebec (55%) and Ontario (54%) are more hopeful of a return to normalcy early in the summer,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents of Atlantic Canada and the western provinces are decidedly more skeptical.”  

More than seven-in-ten Canadians (73%) say they would “definitely” or “probably” take a vaccine against COVID-19 if it ultimately becomes available—including 78% of men, 76% of those aged 18-to-34 and 79% of those in Atlantic Canada.  

When asked about their personal experience during the COVID-19 outbreak, almost half of Canadians (47%) say they are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection and two-in-five (40%) say they are not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection.  

About one-in-seven Canadians (14%) acknowledge wearing a mask every time they go out, including 19% of residents of Ontario and British Columbia and 22% of those aged 18-to-34.  

Three-in-ten Canadians (29%) admit to overeating at home, while smaller proportions acknowledge losing their temper more than usual (18%) and drinking more alcohol (13%).  

Practically two thirds of Canadians (65%) expect most people to maintain their current precautions on hygiene after the COVID-19 outbreak ends. The same proportion (65%) foresee most companies keeping their current hygiene precautions as well.  

One-in-five Canadians (21%) expect more people to consider adopting vegetarian or vegan diets after the COVID-19 outbreak ends—a proportion that rises to 26% in British Columbia.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 13 to April 15, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Canadians Expect to Work from Home More After COVID-19

More than three-in-five (63%) believe more companies will phase out business travel in favour of teleconferencing.  

Vancouver, BC [April 17, 2020] – The way Canadian workers are currently dealing with the COVID-19 outbreak will have repercussions on how we conduct business in the future, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 73% of Canadians think more people will “definitely” or “probably” work from home than before once the COVID-19 outbreak ends.  

In addition, 63% of Canadians expect more companies to phase out business travel in favour of teleconferencing.  

“Many Canadians believe some of the current features of their job will remain in place once offices are fully operational again,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Two thirds of Atlantic Canadians (67%) and Quebecers (also 67%) believe meetings that do not require travel will become the norm.”  

Canadians who are currently working from home instead of their regular office were asked about specific issues they are facing as they fulfill their duties during the COVID-19 outbreak.  

Almost two thirds of Canada’s “provisional home workers” (65%) hope they would like to be able to work from home more often after the COVID-19 outbreak has passed—a proportion that jumps to 72% among men and 76% among those aged 55 and over.  

Across the country, 62% of “provisional home workers” say working from home has been easier than they originally thought, but almost half (46%) are having a difficult time working due to the distractions at home.  

Home distractions are a big concern for “provisional home workers” in British Columbia (55%), while only 23% of those in Atlantic Canada feel the same way.  

Two thirds of “provisional home workers” in Canada (67%) say they miss interacting with other people at their regular office, and a smaller proportion (44%) miss commuting to their workplace.  

“Provisional home workers” in Quebec are more likely to say their miss their daily commute (50%), followed by those who reside in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (47%), Ontario (44%), British Columbia (43%), Atlantic Canada (39%) and Alberta (38%).  

Four-in-five “provisional home workers” (80%) feel their company trusts they are doing their work from home, and almost seven-in-ten (69%) believe their company is perfectly equipped for them to carry on with their duties from home.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 9 to April 11, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Miss Family, Friends and Travel Most During COVID-19

More than three-in-five Canadians are paying attention to the news more often than they did before the outbreak.

Vancouver, BC [April 3, 2020] – As Canadians remain mostly confined to their homes on account of the COVID-19 outbreak, more than two-in-five are finding it challenging to relinquish personal contact with family and friends, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 45% of Canadians say it has been hard to give up seeing family members in person during the outbreak.  

A similar proportion of Canadians (44%) say it has been difficult to give up seeing friends in person, while 41% find it hard to not be able to travel.  

“Albertans are more likely to say that being away from family members during the COVID-19 outbreak has been difficult (49%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than half of British Columbians (53%) feel the same way about being away from friends.”  

More than a third of Canadians say it has been hard to abandon dining out in restaurants (38%) and being able to attend entertainment events, such as concerts, plays or movies (36%).  

A smaller proportion of Canadians (32%) say it has been difficult to be without live sports—a proportion that rises to 41% among Canadian men.  

Just over half of Canadians with children aged 14 or younger  (51%) say it has been easy having their kids at home all day on account of the COVID-19 outbreak, while 44% say the experience has been difficult.  

When asked about specific activities, more than three-in-five Canadians (61%) say they are following the news—either reading, listening to or watching—more often than they did a few weeks ago.  

More than a third of Canadians say they are participating more regularly in entertainment activities that involve electronics (such as tablets, smartphones or video game consoles) (41%), streaming content online (such as movies or television shows) (40%) and communicating with relatives (36%).  

Slightly smaller proportions of Canadians are exercising at home (30%), reading books (27%), participating in entertainment activities that do not involve electronics (such as board games or puzzles) (20%), ordering food in (14%) and exercising outside their home (10%) more often than before.  

One-in-four Canadians who profess a religion (25%) say they are praying more regularly now than they did before, including 29% of women and 36% of those aged 18-to-34.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 21 to March 22, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Most in Canada and U.S. Friendly to Breastfeeding in Public

Agreement is lowest among Canadians who voted for the Conservatives and Americans who identify as Republican.

Vancouver, BC [March 20, 2020] – Sizeable majorities of Canadians and Americans have no problem with women breastfeeding in specific public spaces, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 82% of Canadians and 74% of Americans think women should have the right to breastfeed a baby in a park.

Most residents of the two countries believe women should be allowed to breastfeed a baby in a shopping mall (78% in Canada and 71% in the United States), in a restaurant (74% in Canada and 65% in the United States) and in a public transit vehicle (71% in Canada and 68% in the United States).

Conversely, more than one-in-five Canadians are not sympathetic to breastfeeding in public transit vehicles (23%) and at restaurants (21%), while fewer believe the practice should be allowed in shopping malls (16%) and parks (12%).

In the United States, at least one-in-five Americans voice opposition to breastfeeding in each of the four locations: restaurants (28%), public transit vehicles (27%), shopping malls (23%) and parks (20%).

“While most Canadians and Americans preserve the right of women to breastfeed in public, there are some nuances when it comes to opposition,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Some Americans are more likely to resist the practice inside a restaurant, while some Canadians are more hesitant about it happening inside a public transit vehicle.”

Among Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in last year’s federal election, the level of opposition climbs to 31% for breastfeeding in a public transit vehicle.

In the United States, at least a third of those who identify as Republicans are against breastfeeding inside a public transit vehicle (33%) and a restaurant (36%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 7 to February 9, 2020, among 1,000 Canadian adults, and an online study conducted from February 6 to February 8, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each study, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full Canadian dataset here, our full American dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Four-in-Five British Columbians Would Delay Cruise Ship Season

Support for this measure, on account of the COVID-19 outbreak, is high across all demographics in the province.

Vancouver, BC [March 12, 2020] – Most residents of British Columbia would follow a recent suggestion made by provincial health officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry, to postpone the start of the cruise ship season in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 82% of British Columbians agree with delaying the start of the cruise ship season on account of the COVID-19 outbreak, while 12% disagree and 6% are undecided.

The cruise ship season is currently slated to begin in April in Victoria and Vancouver. Public support for a postponement of the cruise ship season is strong across both genders in British Columbia (84% among women and 80% among men) and all three major age groups (79% among those aged 18-to-34 and 84% among both those aged 35-to-54 and aged 55 and over).

On a regional basis, support for a delay in the cruise ship season is highest in Vancouver Island (92%), followed by Northern BC (89%), the Fraser Valley (85%), Metro Vancouver (82%) and Southern BC (71%).

“British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the last provincial election are the most likely to agree with postponing the cruise ship season (86%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support is slightly lower among BC Green Party voters (84%) and BC Liberal voters (80%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 9 to March 11, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Snowstorm Made British Columbians Drive Less, Work From Home

Three in ten residents say their municipality is “getting better” when it comes to dealing with snow.

Vancouver, BC [February 19, 2019] – The snowstorm that affected most of British Columbia last month had an effect on the daily lives of residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two-in-five British Columbians (39%) say they chose not to drive their own vehicle on account of the snowstorm.

“A majority of residents of the Fraser Valley (51%) avoided getting behind the wheel with snow on the roads,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Vancouver Island was a close second on this question at 49%.”

In addition, three-in-ten British Columbians (31%) acknowledge that they, or somebody in their household, worked from home on account of the snowstorm.

Practically half of British Columbians report having witnessed two negative behaviours, with 49% saying that they saw neighbours who did not shovel snow on their sidewalk and 48% witnessing a vehicle with snow on the top circulating in their municipality.

Across the province, two thirds of British Columbians (68%) say they are satisfied with how their municipality dealt with the timeliness of alerts, such as school closures, and 61% feel the same way about snow clearing on roads.

The satisfaction rating is lower for snow clearing on sidewalks (54%) and responsiveness to requests on social media (51%, with 30% undecided).

Three-in-ten British Columbians (29%) say that, compared to five years ago, their municipality is “getting better” when it comes to dealing with snow. Half of the province’s residents (49%) see no change, and 16% believe the situation has “worsened” over the past five years.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are significantly more likely to believe that their municipality is now better equipped to deal with snow (40%) than their older counterparts (22% among those aged 35-to-54 and those aged 55 and over).

A majority of residents of Northern BC (57%) believe their municipality is handling snow better than it did in 2015. The numbers are lower in all other regions of the province, including Vancouver Island (30%), Metro Vancouver (29%), Southern BC (20%) and the Fraser Valley (18%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 21 to January 24, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Parents in British Columbia Stressed by Work and Finance

The proportion of Metro Vancouver parents who expect their kids to relocate increased by 24 points since 2019.

Vancouver, BC [February 18, 2020] – A majority of parents across British Columbia are experiencing tension on account of specific issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample of parents, 58% say they experience work-related stress “frequently” or “occasionally.”

Majorities of parents in the province say they have also “frequently” or “occasionally” experienced financial stress (57%), family-related stress (53%) and housing-related stress (51%).

Across British Columbia, two-in-five parents (40%) say it is currently “moderately difficult” or “very difficult” for them to make ends meet. 

The proportion of parents who are having a hard time getting by financially is highest in Northern BC (60%), followed by Vancouver Island (45%), the Fraser Valley (40%), Metro Vancouver (39%) and Southern BC (28%).

Almost three-in-five parents in British Columbia (58%) say it is currently “very difficult” or “moderately difficult” for them to save money in a bank account. 

Other tasks that are currently tough for about two-in-five parents in the province are paying for day to day expenses (44%), paying for child care (42%) and paying for transportation (39%).

“Majorities of parents who reside in the Fraser Valley (62%), Metro Vancouver (59%), Vancouver Island (55%) and Southern BC (52%) acknowledge that saving for the future has become more complicated,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Transportation is a bigger issue for parents in Southern BC (47%), while day to day expenses are more of a problem in Northern BC (48%) and Vancouver Island (47%).”

Across the province, 65% of parents say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that their child (or any one of their children) will have to move away from the municipality where they currently live due to the high cost of living.

The proportion of parents in Metro Vancouver who expect their children to move away on account of financial constraints stands at 66%, up 24 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in 2019.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 4 to February 7, 2020, among 623 adult parents of children aged 0 to 18 in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Vancouver 2010 Was Worth It for Most British Columbians

Three-in-five of the province’s residents would welcome a bid for Vancouver to become the host of the Summer Olympics.

Vancouver, BC [February 12, 2020] – A decade after Vancouver hosted the Winter Olympics, most British Columbians appear content with the event and its legacy, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two thirds of British Columbians (68%) think holding the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver was worth it.

“Only 24% of British Columbians currently have second thoughts about the decision to host the Winter Olympics in 2010,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of residents in all five regions of the province say organizing the games was worth it, including 71% in Metro Vancouver and 73% in the Fraser Valley.”

At least two thirds of British Columbians believe the 2010 Winter Olympics had a positive impact on the City of Vancouver (70%), the entire Metro Vancouver region (67%), the Province of British Columbia (69%) and Canada (74%).

Four-in-five British Columbians (82%) are satisfied with the infrastructure projects of the 2010 Winter Olympics, such as the Canada Line SkyTrain and improvements to the Sea-to-Sky Highway.

More than seven-in-ten of the province’s residents (72%) are satisfied with the legacy projects of the 2010 Winter Olympics, such as the Richmond Oval and the Hillcrest Community Centre.

When asked if Vancouver should launch a bid to host the Summer Olympics, British Columbians support the idea by a 2-to-1 margin (62% to 31%).

The level of excitement about a Vancouver Summer Olympics bid is highest among British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (67%), but also includes majorities of those aged 35-to-54 (61%) and those aged 55 and over (52%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 21 to January 24, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

BC’s Three Biggest Cities Get Satisfactory Grades on Most Issues

Vancouver posts the highest score on dealing with transportation, while Burnaby is ahead on handling crime.

Vancouver, BC [January 29, 2020] – More than two thirds of residents of Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby are pleased with the way their municipal governments have handled three specific issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative samples in the three cities, 79% of residents say their municipal administration has done a “very good” or “good” job in providing sanitation services.

In addition, 70% of residents are satisfied with how parks and recreation facilities are being managed, and 69% think their municipal government is enhancing their overall quality of life.

More than three-in-five residents of Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby are also content with what their municipal governments are doing to protect the environment (66%), promote tourism (65%), foster artistic and cultural activities (also 65%) and manage development and growth (63%).

At least half of residents are satisfied with the way Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby are dealing with transportation (57%), dealing with crime (54%), making City Hall work in a transparent and unbiased fashion (52%), handling the city’s finances (52%) and engaging with regular people (50%).

“There are some subtle differences between the three cities when it comes to public safety,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 60% of Burnaby residents endorse the performance of their administration, the proportion falls to 54% in Vancouver and 52% in Surrey.”

The lowest ranked issue across all three cities is dealing with homelessness and poverty (44%). Satisfaction with this file rises to 52% in Surrey, but is lower in Vancouver (42%) and Burnaby (39%).

The assessment of City of Vancouver residents on many services has increased markedly since a Research Co. survey conducted in October 2018, particularly on managing development and growth (from 24% to 62%), dealing with crime (from 44% to 54%) and protecting the environment (from 55% to 64%).

A similar situation is observed in Surrey, where the current administration has a higher ranking than the previous one on issues such as promoting tourism (from 39% to 64%), dealing with transportation (from 24% to 57%) and enhancing quality of life (from 36% to 68%).

The approval rating for the three mayors is very similar: 52% for Vancouver’s Kennedy Stewart, 51% for Burnaby’s Mike Hurley and 50% for Surrey’s Doug McCallum.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 2 to January 6, 2020, among 1,200 adults in Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age and gender in each municipality. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 2.8 percentage points for each municipality, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

End of Free Parking at Granville Island Splits Metro Vancouverites

More than a third of recent visitors (35%) arrived by public transit, while 45% travelled to Granville Island in their own vehicles.

Vancouver, BC [December 27, 2019] – The decision to eliminate free parking at Granville Island is causing different reactions among residents of Metro Vancouver, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 33% of residents say they are “less likely” to go to Granville Island after the cancellation of free parking from 11:00 am to 6:00 pm. More two-in-five (42%) say this decision will not affect their plans, and one-in-five (19%) are now “more likely” to visit.

“Two-in-five Metro Vancouverites who drive to Granville Island (40%) claim to be less likely to visit under the new parking regime,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However, more than half of them (58%) say they will not be deterred by this new regulation.”

Almost one-in-five Metro Vancouverites (18%) have been to Granville Island six times or more over the past two years, while 42% have been visited two to five times.

While more than one third of recent visitors to Granville Island (35%) relied on public transit to get there, a higher proportion (45%) arrived in their own vehicle. This includes 38% of residents of the City of Vancouver, as well as majorities of visitors from Surrey (55%), Burnaby (56%) and other municipalities in the Lower Mainland (52%).

The main reason to visit Granville Island continues to be shopping at the Public Market (56%, up seven points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November 2018), followed by sightseeing (20%) and getting a meal or snack (19%).

Other reasons cited for visiting Granville Island are shopping at a store that is not located inside the Public Market (13%) and going to an Arts and Culture performance (9%). 

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 9 to December 12, 2019, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.7 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca