Most British Columbians Eager to Experience Holiday Travel

Willingness to embark on a trip in 10 different ways is significantly higher this year than in 2021.

Vancouver, BC [November 26, 2021] – Residents of British Columbia are more likely to be planning to spend time away from their homes during the holiday season than last year, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 51% of British Columbians plan to take a holiday—or spend at least one night away from their current location—in the next three months, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2021.

“More than three-in-five British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (64%) are considering a holiday trip,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower among British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (50%) and aged 55 and over (43%).”

More than half of British Columbians say they are willing to travel in two ways right now: on a ferry (56%, +10) and taking an airplane flight to another province (54%, +18).

More than two-in-five British Columbians are ready to travel using four other forms of transportation: a trip by car to the United States (48%, +21), an airplane flight within British Columbia (46%, +14), an airplane flight to a different continent (45%, +23) and an airplane flight to the United States (44%, +23).

Fewer British Columbians are willing to take a railway trip (37%, +14), a bus trip shorter than 3 hours (33%, +8), a trip on a cruise ship (26%, +15) or a bus trip longer than 3 hours (23%, +7).

Just over three-in-four British Columbians (76%, -1) say they are “very concerned” or “moderately concerned” about losing money due to cancelations.

More than three-in-five British Columbians (63%) are worried about getting infected with COVID-19 during their trip, down 12 points since late 2021.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 14 to November 16, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Some British Columbians Keep Options Open to Work from Home

Only 11% of British Columbians who worked from home during the COVID-19 pandemic have returned to the office full time.

Vancouver, BC [October 7, 2002] – Employed British Columbians are still figuring out the new qualms of office life, and more than a third are not particularly thrilled with their current arrangements to work from home, a new Research Co. poll has found

In the online survey of a representative sample, more than three-in-five home workers in British Columbia (63%) say they are happy with their current arrangements to perform their duties away from the office. Similar proportions claim to be working from home more often (19%) or less often (18%) than they would like to.

Just over one-in-ten British Columbians who worked from home during the COVID-19 pandemic (11%) have returned to the office full time. About a third (32%) are working from home once or twice a week, while 25% are there three to four times a week and 31%  work from home five days a week.

“There is a significant generational divide when it comes to the home office in British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 19% of home workers aged 18-to-34 are not commuting at all, the proportion rises to 35% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 47% among those aged 55 and over.”

More than half of British Columbians who worked from home during the pandemic (53%) say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to seek a different job if their current company does not allow them to work from home as often as they want. Just under one-in-ten (8%) have already left a position because of this reason.

Two thirds of home workers in British Columbia (66%, +2 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2022) say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to explore the possibility of switching to a different job that can be performed from home in their own metropolitan area.

Smaller proportions of home workers in British Columbia would consider switching to a different job that can be performed from home for a company headquartered in the province (59%, +2) or in a different Canadian province (45%, =).

Compared to January 2022, we see fewer employed British Columbians reporting an increase in virtual staff meetings (28%, -17) and virtual business development (21%, -24) at their workplace.

Conversely, employed British Columbians say that they have seen more in person staff meetings (27%, +13) and more in-person business development (21%, +6) than three months ago.

The change is not as pronounced on business travel, with 15% of employed British Columbians (+5) noticing more trips and 31% (-8) saying they are less common than three months ago. In addition, there is a slight reduction in the amount of virtual communications between offices (27%, -19).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 28 to September 30, 2022, among 700 adults who work in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Automated Speed Enforcement Still Favoured in British Columbia

More than three-in-five residents of the province agree with four different types of automated speed enforcement.

Vancouver, BC [September 16, 2022] – Sizeable majorities of British Columbians continue to endorse the use of technology to identify vehicles whose drivers choose not to abide by existing speed limits, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 76% of British Columbians approve of the use of fixed speed cameras, or cameras that stay in one location and measure speed as a vehicle passes, up four points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2021.

Automated speed enforcement works by using cameras or sensors to pick up a vehicle speeding. A ticket is then issued to the owner of the vehicle. Driver’s license points are not issued as the driver of the vehicle cannot be identified.

Majorities British Columbians have voiced support for automated speed enforcement in Research Co. surveys conducted in 2018, 2019, 2020 and 2021.

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (72%, +1) approve of the use of speed-on-green intersection cameras in the province. This type of enforcement entails using red light cameras to capture vehicles that are speeding through intersections.

“Women (74%) and British Columbians aged 55 and over (79%) are particularly supportive of speed-on-green intersection cameras,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The practice is also endorsed by majorities of British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (77%), the BC Liberals (75%) and the BC Green Party (69%) in the 2020 provincial election.”

Two thirds of British Columbians (66%, +2) are in favour of mobile speed cameras, or devices that can be moved from place to place to measure speed as a vehicle passes.

Just over three-in-five British Columbians (61%, +8 since 2021) favour the use of point-to-point speed enforcement, which relies on cameras placed at two or more distant points on a road. The average speed of vehicles that pass between points is calculated and tickets are issued to vehicles whose average speed over the distance was excessive.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from September 8 to September 10, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Just Under Half of Canadians Dread Their City or Town’s Drivers

Practically seven-in-ten Canadians saw a driver not signaling before a turn in the past month. 

Vancouver, BC [September 6, 2022] – The level of confidence that Canadians bestow upon drivers in their city or town has dropped drastically over the past year, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 48% of Canadians think drivers in their city or town are worse now than five years ago, up 18 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2021.

More than half of Canadians who live in Atlantic Canada (61%, +36), British Columbia (57%, +13) and Ontario (56%, +26) say drivers are worse now. The proportions are lower in Alberta (43%, +10), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (42%, +7) and Quebec (34%, +10).

More than half of Canadians aged 55 and over (58%, +22) and aged 35-to-54 (52%, +20) claim that drivers in their city or town are worse now than five years ago. The proportion is lower among Canadians aged 18-to-34 (34%, +13).

The survey also tracks the incidence of six specific occurrences on the country’s roads over the past month. Practically seven-in-ten Canadians (69%, +14) say they witnessed a driver not signalling before a turn, a proportion that climbs to 74% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

A majority of Canadians (54%, +13) recently observed a car taking up two or more spots in a parking lot.

Practically half of Canadians (49%, +11) saw a driver not stopping at an intersection. This behaviour is more prevalent in Atlantic Canada (58%), British Columbia (55%) and Ontario (54%).

Two-in-five Canadians (40%, +8) witnessed a driver turning right or left from an incorrect lane, including 49% of British Columbians.

More than a third of Canadians (37%, +9) went through a close call, such as having to slam the brakes or steer violently to avoid a collision—including 48% of Atlantic Canadians and 44% of Albertans.

“Only 15% of Canadians say they did not see any illegal or regrettable behaviour on the road over the past month,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This represents a 12-point drop since our previous survey in 2021.”

Just under three-in-five Canadians (58%, +7) claim that there are specific groups or people in their city or town who are worse drivers than others—a proportion that rises to 67% in British Columbia.

As was the case last year, the top four responses issued by Canadians who point the finger at a specific group for bad driving behaviours are “young” (40%, +8), “Asian (19%, +3), “elderly” (18%, -3) and “immigrant” (8%, +2).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 19 to August 21, 2022, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Half of Canadians Say Their City or Town is Noisier Than in 2021

More than a third of the country’s residents (36%) have been bothered by unnecessary noise from vehicles in their own homes.

Vancouver, BC [August 23, 2022] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians have been bothered by a variety of noises while inside their homes, and practically half claim that their surroundings are not as quiet as they were in 2021, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians believe their city or town has become noisier over the past year, up 22 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in January 2021.

Just over two-in-five Canadians (41%, +18) think their street is noisier now than it was in 2021, while three-in-ten (30%, +2) feel the same way about their homes.

More than two-in-five Canadians of Indigenous (44%) and South Asian (41%) descent feel their home is noisier now, along with 32% of women, 40% of Canadians aged 18-to-34 and 37% of British Columbians.

When asked about specific disturbances that have bothered them at home over the past year, more than a third of Canadians (36%, +6) mention unnecessary noise from vehicles (such as motorcycles and cars revving up).

At least one-in-four Canadians were also subjected to construction-related noises (such as roofing, land clearing and heavy machinery) (29%, new), loud people outside their home (28%, +8), dogs barking (27%, +3), a car alarm (25%, +5) and yard work (such as lawnmowers and leaf blowers) (also 25%, +6).

Fewer Canadians were disturbed over the past 12 months by nine other noises, including loud music playing inside a vehicle (21%, +3), power tools (such as electric saws and sanders) (21%, +3), drivers honking the horn excessively (20%, +8), yelling or screaming at a nearby home (19%, +1), loud music at a nearby home (18%, +1), fireworks (18%, +2), a loud gathering or party at a nearby home (17%, +2), a home alarm (10%, +1) and cats meowing (7%, +2).

“Compared to 2021, there is significant growth in the proportion of Canadians who have been bothered at home by drivers honking the horn excessively,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In British Columbia, three-in-ten residents (30%) have experienced this nuisance.”

Practically three-in-four Canadians (74%, -5) have not taken any action to deal with noise at home. About one-in-seven (14%, +2) have worn earplugs or earmuffs to mitigate noise—including 20% of Quebecers and 22% of Canadians aged 18-to-34.

Fewer Canadians have chosen to report noise concerns to the police (8%, +3), acquired hardware to mitigate noise while inside their home (such as noise cancelling headphones or earphones) (7%, =) or moved away from their previous dwelling because of noise (5%, +1).

Methodology: Results are based on an online survey conducted from August 14 to August 16, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Few Canadians Want to Go Back to Imperial Measurement System

A sizeable majority of the country’s residents rely on feet and inches, and not metres, to measure a person’s height.

Vancouver, BC [August 15, 2022] – While Canadians are not particularly supportive of moving away from the International Metric System, many continue to use Imperial measurements in their daily lives, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, only 29% of Canadians would like to see the country adopting the Imperial system. More than half (56%) disagree and would carry on with the International Metric System.

“Practically two-in-five Canadians aged 55 and over (38%) would go back to the Imperial system of units,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This wish is less prevalent among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (23%) and aged 18-to-34 (24%).”

When asked about how they personally measure six different things, majorities of Canadians gravitate towards Imperial units in three specific cases.

Four-in-five Canadians (80%) measure a person’s height in feet and inches, while 20% rely on metres and centimetres.

More than three-in-four Canadians (76%) use pounds when calculating a person’s weight, while 24% rely on kilograms.

Three-in-five Canadians (59%) measure the temperature of their ovens in degrees Fahrenheit, while 41% use degrees Celsius.

Feet and inches are the preferred units to measure a person’s height for Canadians aged 18-to-34 (71%), aged 35-to-54 (79%) and aged 55 and over (88%).

Across Canada, three other measurements are more likely to be conducted using the International Metric System.

More than four-in-five Canadians (84%) calculate the amount of liquid in a container using litres, while 16% rely on quarts and gallons.

More than four-in-five Canadians (82%) measure a vehicle’s speed in kilometres per hour, while 28% use miles per hour.

More than three-in-four Canadians (77%) gauge the temperature outside their home in degrees Celsius, while 23% rely on degrees Fahrenheit.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 1 to August 3, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Than Half of Vancouver Voters Would Abolish Park Board

Almost three-in-five respondents support changing zoning laws to allow up to six strata title units on a standard lot.

Vancouver, BC [June 17, 2022] – Public confidence in the only elected Park Board in Canada has eroded considerably over the past year and a half, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample, 52% of likely voters in the City of Vancouver think the Board of Parks and Recreation should be eliminated, and that public parks and the public recreation system should be placed under the jurisdiction of City Council.

“In November 2020, only 44% of municipal likely voters in Vancouver favoured the elimination of the Board of Parks and Recreation,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This month, the proportion has reached 52%.”

Public support for abolishing Vancouver’s Park Board is highest among likely voters who reside Downtown (63%), followed by those who live in the West Side (52%) and the East Side (45%).

Vancouverites who voted for Kennedy Stewart or Ken Sim in the 2018 mayoral election are significantly more likely to endorse the abolition of the Board of Parks and Recreation (61% and 60% respectively) than those who cast a ballot for Shauna Sylvester  (43%).

Just over half of likely voters in Vancouver (51%, +5) believe it would be worthwhile to explore the idea of amalgamating all of the municipalities in Metro Vancouver, like they did in Toronto or Montreal.

Two thirds of Vancouverites who voted for Stewart in 2018 (67%) support exploring the concept of amalgamation, compared to just under half of those who cast a ballot for Sim (49%).

Almost three-in-five likely voters in Vancouver (58%, +5) are in favour of changing zoning laws to allow property owners to build up to six strata title units on a standard lot, provided the new building is no taller than an average home.

Majorities of Vancouver’s likely voters who currently rent or own their primary residence support a change in zoning laws (65% and 54% respectively).

Seven-in-ten likely voters in the City of Vancouver (71%, -10) are in favour of the plan to extend the Skytrain Millennium Line (currently under construction to Arbutus) to the University of British Columbia (UBC) campus at Point Grey.

Public support for the proposed SkyTrain extension is strongest among likely voters who reside Downtown (75%), followed by those who live in the East Side (72%) and the West Side (67%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 7 to June 9, 2022, among 400 municipal likely voters in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty. 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two Thirds of British Columbians Would Reduce Speed Limits

Support for lowering speeds in residential areas to 30 km/h has increased from 58% in 2019 to 66% this year.

Vancouver, BC [June 10, 2022] – More British Columbians believe it is a good idea to have a lower speed limit on residential streets, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 66% of British Columbians acknowledge that they would “definitely” or “probably” like to see the speed limit reduced to 30 km/h on all residential streets in their municipality, while keeping the speed limit on arterial and collector roads at 50 km/h.

Support for a lower speed limit on British Columbia’s residential areas is higher with women (68%) than with men (63%). While seven-in-ten of the province’s residents aged 18-to-34 would welcome this regulation (70%), the rating is lower among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (65%) and aged 55 and over (62%).

On a regional basis, the notion of a lower residential speed limit is most popular in Southern BC (72%), followed by Metro Vancouver (67%), Northern BC (also 67%), the Fraser Valley (63%) and Vancouver Island (58%).

In 2019, Vancouver City Council unanimously passed a motion to establish a pilot project to reduce the speed limit to 30 km/h on select residential streets in the city. The pilot project is currently underway in the Grandview-Woodland neighbourhood.

“In 2019, public support for a lower speed limit on British Columbia’s residential streets stood at 58%,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion climbed to 61% in 2021 and has increased again this year to 66%.”

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (72%, +6) believe Vancouver’s pilot project is a “very good” or “good” idea—a proportion that rises to 84% among residents of Southern BC.

As was the case last year, almost two-in-five British Columbians (39%, =) say they witness cars circulating above the current speed limit on the street where they live “at least once a day.”

Fewer of the province’s residents are exposed to speeding vehicles on their street “a few times a week” (29%, +2), “a few times a month” (18%, =) or “never” (15%, -1).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 3 to June 5, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of British Columbians Are Worried About Data Breaches

More than four-in-five of the province’s residents are comfortable accessing banking information and shopping online.

Vancouver, BC [June 3, 2022] – While a sizeable majority of British Columbians are at ease managing specific tasks online, more than half express concerns about where their data could end up, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 51% of British Columbians say they have worried “frequently” or “occasionally” over the past couple of months about having their personal information stolen over the Internet, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2021.

Similar proportions of British Columbians have worried “frequently” or “occasionally” about computers and technology being used to invade their privacy (51%, -1) and somebody hacking into their own computer or smartphone (46%, -3).

“In British Columbia, women (55%) are particularly concerned about their personal information falling into the wrong hands when they are online,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer men (46%) share the same preoccupation.”

As was the case in 2021, more than four-in-five British Columbians are “very” or “moderately” comfortable shopping (89%, +2) and accessing banking information (87%, =) online. The level of comfort is lower across the province for making charitable donations online (73%, =) or commenting on an online forum that requires an email address (56%, +2).

Some British Columbians continue to encounter setbacks when relying on digital tools. More than three-in-five (63%, +2) have received “phishing” emails—where somebody attempts to acquire personal information by masquerading as a trustworthy entity—and a majority (58%, +4) received an email offering them money for their help and assistance, in what is usually referred to as the “Nigerian scam.”

Fewer than a third of the province’s residents reveal that their computer became infected with a virus while they were browsing the Internet (31%, =) or endured hackers accessing their social media platform (16%, +1) or email address (15%, =).

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians are partaking on five activities online at least a few times per month: visiting websites or blogs (89%, +2), accessing banking information (87%, -1), looking for deals on websites (81%, +2), using an instant messaging service (79%, +2) and looking for directions and/or maps to get to a destination (73%, +4),

Fewer British Columbians are purchasing goods from a website (60%, =), posting on social media (57%, -2), uploading pictures or videos to the Internet (53%, +3) or using the Internet to place telephone calls (39%, -2) at least a few times per month.

More than three-in-five British Columbians (62%, =) have googled themselves to see what has been posted about them online.

Among the province’s residents who typed their names on Google, 61% (+6) state that the information that came up was “accurate”, while 12% (-1) considered it “inaccurate”. More than a quarter of these residents (27%, -5) did not find information about themselves online.

Just over one-in-five British Columbians (22%) report having only one email address, while 41% possess two and 37% have three or more.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 25 to April 27, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Separated Bike Lanes Remain Particularly Popular in Vancouver

About a third of residents believe that some of the existing paths should be removed, but two-in-five endorse the status quo.

Vancouver, BC [May 27, 2022] – Two thirds of residents of the City of Vancouver are satisfied with the existence of dedicated cycling infrastructure, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative municipal sample, 66% of Vancouverites support having separated bike lanes in the city, up two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2021.

“Vancouver’s cycling infrastructure is accepted by sizeable majorities of residents who bike (82%) or take public transit (79%) on weekdays,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Most Vancouverites who drive (59%) are also in favour of the separated bike lanes.”

Just over half of Vancouverites of East Asian descent (54%) support the city’s separated bike lanes. The rating is higher among the city’s residents of South Asian (70%) and European (71%) ancestry.

About a third of Vancouverites (32%, +4) believe there are too many separated bike lanes in the city and some should be removed, while just under one-in-five (19%, -3) say there are not enough separated bike lanes and more should be added.

Two-in-five residents of Vancouver (40%, -1) think the current number of bike lanes is correct—a proportion that rises to 46% among women, 48% among Vancouverites aged 18-to-34 and 43% among residents of the West side.

The Vancouver Park Board approved a temporary bike lane on Park Drive in Stanley Park until the Summer of 2022. More than three-in-five Vancouverites (63%, +4) think this is a “good idea”, while 24% (-5) consider the decision a “bad idea.”

Vancouverites who bike to school or work are extremely supportive of the temporary bike lane in Stanley Park (86%), along with those who rely on public transit to commute (69%).

While 32% of drivers in Vancouver consider the approval of a bike lane on Park Drive as a “bad idea”, more than half (57%) say it is a “good idea.”

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 17 to May 19, 2022, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Almost Three-in-Five British Columbia Drivers Ready for Electric Car

More than seven-in-ten of the province’s residents endorse the goal of only selling “zero emission” vehicles by 2040.

Vancouver, BC [May 3, 2022] – The proportion of drivers in British Columbia who are willing to consider the purchase of an electric vehicle has increased since 2020, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 59% of British Columbians who drive their own vehicles claim it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that the next car they buy for themselves or their household will be electric, up six points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2021.

“Significant majorities of drivers in Metro Vancouver (64%) and the Fraser Valley (62%) foresee their next vehicle being electric,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower in Southern BC (54%), Vancouver Island (53%) and Northern BC (36%).”

The Government of British Columbia has passed legislation to ensure that, by the year 2040, all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province will be “zero emission.” More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (73%, +3) endorse this course of action—including 81% of those who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the 2020 provincial election, 76% of those who supported the BC Green Party and 73% of those who cast ballots for the BC Liberals.

More than three-in-four British Columbians aged 18 to 34 (78%) endorse the provincial government’s “zero emission” mandate, along with 75% of those aged 35-to-54 and 69% of those aged 55 and over.

More than half of British Columbians (53%, +2) believe the goal established by the provincial government on the issue of “zero emission” vehicles is “achievable”, while 39% (+3) think it is “not achievable.”

When British Columbians who drive their own cars are asked about issues that would make them less likely to purchase an electric vehicle, 59% say the vehicles are too expensive when compared to non-electric options—a proportion that rises to 66% among those aged 55 and over and to 70% among residents of Vancouver Island.

A majority of British Columbians who drive their own cars (54%) say they fear becoming stranded in an electric vehicle if they cannot find a charging station, and half (50%) are worried about not having enough places to charge the vehicle in the areas where they usually drive.

More than two-in-five British Columbians who drive their own cars (44%) are concerned about not having a place to charge an electric vehicle where they currently live, while 13% cite the “feel” of the vehicle compared with a non-electric option.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 25 to April 27, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Saving Money Remains a Challenge for Many British Columbians

Significant proportions of the province’s residents are spending more on transportation and groceries than in 2020.  

Vancouver, BC [March 15, 2022] – Most British Columbians acknowledge that it is hard to meet certain financial goals two years after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 64% of British Columbians say it is “very difficult” or “moderately difficult” to save money for retirement or a rainy day, while 56% feel the same way about having money for leisure.  

More than two-in-five British Columbians (43%) say it is currently hard to pay for necessities—a proportion that rises to 50% among women and to 56% among residents aged 18-to-34.  

“Disposable income is a significant problem for younger British Columbians, with two thirds of those aged 18-to-34 (68%) saying it is difficult to find money for dining out or entertainment,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (55%) and aged 55 and over (47%).”  

Across the province, 33% of British Columbians say that, compared to how things were before the COVID-19 pandemic, their household’s financial situation is currently worse, unchanged since a Research Co. poll conducted in March 2021.  

One-in-five British Columbians (21%, +4) say that their household’s financial standing is better now than before the pandemic, while 42% (-6) believe it is about the same.  

On a regional basis, residents of Vancouver Island are more likely to state that their household’s financial situation has worsened (37%) than those who reside in Northern BC (34%), Metro Vancouver (33%), the Fraser Valley (32%) and Southern BC (30%).  

British Columbians report spending more than they did before the COVID-19 pandemic started on several items, including books (19%), board games (16%) and newspapers and magazines (15%).  

In March 2021, only 14% of British Columbians said they were spending more on housing—such as rent or mortgage—than they did a year earlier. In March 2022, the proportion has risen markedly to 44%.   

Residents of the province report significantly higher expenses than in 2021 on other categories, including electronic entertainment (46%, +17), transportation (54%, +36) and groceries (75%, +21).  

Methodology: Results are based on an online survey conducted from March 2 to March 4, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here, and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co. 778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Housing is Greatest Source of Stress for Parents in British Columbia

Almost three-in-five parents across the province say it is difficult for them and their family to save money in a bank account.  

Vancouver, BC [February 21, 2022] – Compared to two years ago, parents across British Columbia are not as worried about issues related to finances, work or family, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample of parents, 48% say they experience financial stress “frequently” or “occasionally”, down nine points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in February 2020.  

Fewer than half of parents in British Columbia acknowledge experiencing family-related stress (47%, -6) and work-related stress (37%, -21) “frequently” or “occasionally”.  

Almost three-in-five parents (58%, +7) say they experience housing-related stress—such as finding a place to live or paying for a mortgage or rent—“frequently” or “occasionally”.  

“Losing sleep over housing is not an occurrence exclusive to parents in the Lower Mainland,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In fact, parents in Southern BC (71%) and Northern BC (66%) are significantly more likely to say that they are experiencing housing-related stress.”  

Two-in-five parents (40%, =) say it is “moderately difficult” or “very difficult” for them to make ends meet at this point—a proportion that rises to 46% among those who reside in Southern BC.  

As was the case in 2020, almost three-in-five parents in British Columbia (59%, +1) acknowledge having difficulties saving money in a bank account. More than two-in-five (42%, -2) feel the same way about covering day-to-day expenses.  

Fewer parents in British Columbia say it is currently difficult to pay for transportation (34%, -5) and to pay for child care (30%, -12).  

Almost half of parents in British Columbia (49%, -16) believe it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that their child (or any one of their children) will have to move away from the municipality where they currently live due to the high cost of living.  

While majorities of parents in Metro Vancouver (56%) and Southern BC (52%) expect their kids to move away at some point because of affordability issues, the proportion is lower in Vancouver Island (38%), the Fraser Valley (30%) and Northern BC (23%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from February 7 to February 9, 2022, among 627 adult parents of children aged 0 to 18 in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca  

Most Canadians Continue to Have Positive Views on Immigration

Canadians who supported the Liberals and the New Democrats in 2021 are more likely to feel this way than Conservative voters.  

Vancouver, BC [February 15, 2022] – A majority of Canadians hold favourable views on immigration, although some political and regional disparities persist, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 54% of Canadians think immigration is having a mostly positive effect in the country, unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2020.  

Just over one-in-four Canadians (26%, -4) think immigration is having a mostly negative effect, while 19% (+3) are not sure.  

Majorities of Canadians who reside in Ontario (58%), Quebec (56%), Alberta (also 56%), Atlantic Canada (54%) and British Columbia (also 51%) hold favourable views on immigration.  

In Saskatchewan and Manitoba, 40% of residents think immigration is having a mostly positive effect in Canada, while 39% believe it is having a mostly negative effect.  

Almost seven-in-ten Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2021 federal election (69%) think immigration is having a mostly positive effect in Canada, compared to 60% among those who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP) and 46% among those who cast ballots for Conservative Party candidates.  

Just under two-in-five Canadians (39%, -4) think the number of legal immigrants who are allowed to relocate in Canada should remain the same, while 25% (+8) would increase this amount and 25% (-7) would decrease it.  

“More than a third of Quebecers (36%) are in favour of allowing a larger number of immigrants to settle in Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, 36% of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba call for a reduction in immigration levels.”  

Three-in-four Canadians (75%, =) believe the hard work and talent of immigrants makes Canada better, and practically two thirds (65%, =) believe immigrants should only be allowed in Canada if they adopt Canadian values.  

Canadians who voted for the Conservatives in the 2021 federal election are more likely to call for newcomers to Canada to adopt Canadian values (80%) than those who cast ballots for the Liberals (65%) or the New Democrats (55%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on February 6 and February 7, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Would Take “Home Office” To New Employer

More than half of those who worked from home during the pandemic are willing to switch jobs to avoid commuting.  

Vancouver, BC [January 25, 2002] – Most British Columbians who have had to work from home during the COVID-19 pandemic are willing to explore opportunities that provide the flexibility to be away from an office setting, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative sample, 58% of employed British Columbians who have worked from home during the pandemic say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to seek a different job if their current company does not allow them to labour from home as often as they want, up two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September 2021.  

“British Columbians aged 18-to-34 have developed a deeper attachment to the home office, with 64% saying they would switch jobs if their new employer allows them to avoid commuting,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among those aged 35-to-54 (59%) and those aged 55 and over (45%).”  

Almost two thirds of British Columbia’s “home workers” (64%, =) would consider switching to a different job that can be performed from home for a company located in their own metropolitan area. A majority (57%, +2) would consider this course of action for a business located in the province, while 45% (+1) would be willing to enter an arrangement with a company headquartered in another province.  

More than half of employed British Columbians (54%) acknowledge working from home at some point during the COVID-19 pandemic—a proportion that rises to 65% among those aged 18-to-34.  

This month, only 34% of employed British Columbians who have worked from home during the pandemic say they expect to be able to remain in their home office at least three times a week when the pandemic ends, down 13 points since September 2021. Only 11% (-4) believe they will not be able to work from home at all when COVID-19 is over.  

Fewer than two-in-five “home workers” in British Columbia have been advised of a plan for employees to return to the usual office (37%, -8) or of a plan for how employees will be able to work from home after the pandemic is over (also 37%, -3).  

Employed British Columbians continue to expect certain features of their jobs to remain in place after COVID-19 is behind us. More than two-in-five foresee increases in virtual communications between offices (46%, +3), virtual staff meetings (45%, +2) and virtual business development (also 45%, +4).  

Conversely, sizeable proportions of employed British Columbians expect reductions for in-person staff meetings (43%, +1), business travel (39%, +2) and in-person business development meetings (38%, =) once the pandemic is over.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on January 6 and January 7, 2022, among 700 adults who work in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Metro Vancouverites Ponder Guidelines for Municipal Votes

More than half are against “corporate votes”, non-resident electors and allowing residents aged 16 and 17 to cast ballots.  
 
Vancouver, BC [December 23, 2021] – More than three-in-five residents of Metro Vancouver believe it is time to end the regulation that allows people who do not reside in a municipality to vote in local elections if they own property there, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 63% of residents agree with eliminating non-residency property electors and only letting residents of a city vote in municipal elections.  
 
Majorities of Metro Vancouverites disagree with the notion of allowing “corporate voting” by giving businesses the ability to vote in municipal elections (56%) and with letting Canadians aged 16 and 17 cast ballots in municipal elections (51%).  
 
The idea of allowing adult Permanent Residents of Canada to vote in municipal elections is endorsed by more than seven-in-ten Metro Vancouverites (71%), while only 22% disagree and 7% are undecided.  
 
Three-in-ten Metro Vancouverites (31%) identify housing as the most important issue facing their municipality right now, followed by COVID-19 (24%), property taxes (10%), climate change (7%), drug overdoses (6%) and crime (5%).
 
“While concerns about housing are particularly high in Burnaby (45%), this is also the main preoccupation for residents of Vancouver (31%) and Surrey (24%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Drug overdoses are a salient issue in Vancouver (9%) while crime is a significant worry in Surrey (12%).”  
 
The approval rating for Vancouver Mayor Kennedy Stewart stands at 57%, up six points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in January 2020. The numbers are stable for Burnaby Mayor Mike Hurley (51%, =), while Surrey Mayor Doug McCallum has seen his rating drop from 50% at the start of 2020 to 30% in the last month of 2021.  
 
Across Metro Vancouver, 42% of residents believe their current mayor deserves re-election, while 37% disagree and 20% are undecided.  
 
Almost half of residents of Burnaby (48%) and Vancouver (47%) are currently willing to re-elect Hurley and Stewart respectively. In Surrey, only 28% think McCallum deserves a new term in office while 59% disagree.
 
Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from December 17 to December 19, 2021, among 1,200 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Metro Vancouver Drivers Reject Paying to Park on the Street

Seven-in-ten drivers say it is harder to find a parking spot in their municipality when they need one.  
 
Vancouver, BC [December 14, 2021] – A sizeable majority of drivers in Metro Vancouver reject the notion of having to pay to park their cars on residential streets overnight, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative sample, almost two thirds of drivers in Metro Vancouver (64%) think it is a “bad idea” to charge a fee to vehicle owners who park their cars on residential streets overnight.  
 
“More than three-in-five drivers in Surrey (62%) and Vancouver (61%) are not in favour of an overnight residential parking fee,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the rest of the Metro Vancouver region, 67% of drivers are opposed.”  
 
A majority of drivers in Metro Vancouver (51%) say they have a garage and park their vehicle there, while 22% rely on a shared parkade. Just over one-in-ten (13%) say they have a garage, but do not park their vehicle inside it—including 16% of men and 15% of those who reside in Surrey.  
 
Seven-in-ten drivers in Metro Vancouver (70%) say it is harder now to find a parking spot in their municipality when they need one, down 11 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2018.  
 
Over the past two years, 27% of drivers in Metro Vancouver acknowledge having received a parking ticket. Similar proportions of citations have been issued by municipalities (17%, -1) and by parking management companies (15%, -5).  
 
Drivers in Vancouver are significantly more likely to report getting a parking ticket of any kind (40%, +12) than their counterparts in Surrey (22%, -11) and in other Metro Vancouver municipalities (20%, -13).  
 
When asked how they dealt with the last parking ticket they were issued by a municipality, two thirds of offending drivers (68%, -8) say they paid quickly to get a discount, while 26% (+15) covered the full amount days later and 6% (-7) never paid it.  
 
The situation is similar for tickets issued by a parking management company, with a majority of offending drivers (56%, +5) paying quickly, three-in-ten (30%,+15) covering the full amount later and 15% (-19) admitting to never paying the fine.  
 
Drivers aged 55 and over who receive a parking ticket are significantly more likely to pay the fine early, whether the citation was issued by a municipality (86%) or by a parking management company (65%).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 27 to November 29, 2021, among 521 adults in Metro Vancouver who drive to school or work on weekdays. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.3 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Shopping Habits of British Columbians Altered by Pandemic

A majority of the province’s residents aged 18-to-34 acknowledge that they prefer to buy things online instead of in person.  

Vancouver, BC [December 3, 2021] – British Columbians are not visiting restaurants and coffee shops as much as they did before the COVID-19 pandemic, and more than a third are relying on online platforms more often to acquire items and gifts, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, at least three-in-five British Columbians say they are visiting a sit-down restaurant less often than before the pandemic for breakfast (60%), lunch (62%) or dinner (65%).  

Almost two thirds of British Columbians (64%) also acknowledge that they are having a drink at a pub or bar less often than they did two years ago.  

Significant proportions of British Columbians also report visiting coffee shops less often to purchase beverages or snacks to go (40%) or to be enjoyed inside the venue (59%).  

Seven-in-ten British Columbians of East Asian descent (70%) say they are dining out less often than they did before the pandemic. Two thirds of the province’s residents of European (66%) and First Nations origins (also 66%) are also not visiting restaurants for dinner as often as they used to.  

Across the province, 27% of British Columbians say they are buying groceries in person less often now than two years ago. About two-in-five of the province’s residents also say they are going to stores less often than before the pandemic to purchase items for the home or family (38%) or to buy gifts (42%).  

Conversely, 22% of British Columbians say they are purchasing groceries online for home delivery more often than two years ago. More than a third are also relying on online platforms more often now to acquire gifts (36%) or items for the home or family (38%).  

When asked if they prefer buying things online or in person, a majority of British Columbians (54%) express a predilection for in store purchases, while two-in-five (41%) say they would rather use the internet.  

“There are some clear generational differences when British Columbians are asked about how they like to buy things,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Most of the province’s residents aged 18-to-34 (56%) prefer online platforms, those aged 55 and over are fonder of buying things in person (71%) and those aged 35-to-54 are evenly split.”  

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 15 to November 17, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Confidence in Local Drivers Improving Across Canada

The proportion of Canadians who say drivers are “worse” than five years ago has fallen from 50% in 2018 to 39% this year.  
 
Vancouver, BC [November 30, 2021] – The proportion of Canadians who believe drivers in their city or town are getting worse has reached the lowest level recorded over the past four years, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 30% of Canadians say drivers in their city or town are worse now than five years ago, while half (50%) report no change and 10% believe they are better.  
 
“When we first asked this question in 2018, half of Canadians (50%) felt that drivers were worse than in the past,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion has fallen each year, to 47% in 2019, then to 39% in 2020 and now to 30% in 2021.”  
 
At least a third of Canadians who reside in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (35%, -7), British Columbia (34%, -6) and Alberta (33%, -9) believe drivers in their city or town are worse now than five years ago. The proportion is lower among Canadians who live in Ontario (30%, -13), Atlantic Canada (25%, -14) and Quebec (24%, -8).  
 
Canadians aged 55 and over are more critical of drivers in their city or town, with 36% believing that the situation is worse now than five years ago, compared to 32% among those aged 35-to-54 and 21% among those aged 18-to-34.  
 
The survey also tracks the incidence of six specific occurrences on the country’s roads. A majority of Canadians (55%, +1) report seeing a driver not signalling before a turn over the past month, a proportion that climbs to 62% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.  
 
Almost two-in-five Canadians (38%, +2) witnessed a driver not stopping at an intersection and a third (32%, -1) saw a driver turning right or left from an incorrect lane, including 37% of British Columbians.
 
Fewer than three-in-ten Canadians (28%, +2) experienced a close call, or having to slam the brakes or steer violently to avoid a collision. In addition, 41% of Canadians (+3) say they saw a car taking up two or more spots at a parking lot, including a majority of Albertans (51%).  
 
Just over half of Canadians (51%, -5) say that there are specific groups or people in their city or town who are worse drivers than others.  
 
The top four responses among Canadians who blamed a specific group for bad driving behaviours are “young” (32%, -11), “elderly” (21%, -4), “Asian (16%, -1) and “immigrant” (6%, +1).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 20 to November 22, 2021, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20..
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Most British Columbians Will Avoid Travel During Holiday Season

More than four-in-five of the province’s residents are concerned about travellers not following COVID-19 protocols.  

Vancouver, BC [November 26, 2021] – Many residents of British Columbia acknowledge that they are not going to go on a trip in the next few weeks, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 56% of British Columbians say they do not plan to take a holiday—or spend at least one night away from their current location—in the next three months.  

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to say that they intend to travel during this holiday season (56%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (45%) and aged 55 and over (34%).  

Significant proportions of British Columbians are uneasy about relying on specific forms of transportation at this point. Fewer than half of the province’s residents (46%) say they are willing to travel on a ferry right now—a proportion that rises to 58% among residents of Vancouver Island.  

At least one-in-four British Columbians are willing to take an airplane flight to another province (36%), an airplane flight within British Columbia (32%), a trip by car to the United States (27%) or a bus trip shorter than 3 hours (25%).  

Fewer British Columbians are willing to take a railway trip (23%), an airplane fight to a different continent (22%), an airplane flight to the United States (21%), a bus trip longer than 3 hours (16%) or a trip on a cruise ship (11%).  

“More than a third of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (35%) say they would have no problem taking a trip by car to the United States,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion drops to 26% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 22% among those among those aged 55 and over.”  

When asked about possible problems that may arise during travel, more than four-in-five British Columbians (83%) say they are “very concerned” or “moderately concerned” about travellers not following COVID-19 protocols.  

At least three-in-four British Columbians say they are worried about three other issues: facing delays due to COVID-19 restrictions (78%), losing money due to cancellations (77%) and getting infected with COVID-19 during a trip (75%).  

Concerns about travellers not following COVID-19 protocols and getting infected with COVID-19 during a trip are higher among British Columbians who have a child under the age of 12 in their household (85% and 79% respectively).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 15 to November 17, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490