Snowstorm Made British Columbians Drive Less, Work From Home

Three in ten residents say their municipality is “getting better” when it comes to dealing with snow.

Vancouver, BC [February 19, 2019] – The snowstorm that affected most of British Columbia last month had an effect on the daily lives of residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two-in-five British Columbians (39%) say they chose not to drive their own vehicle on account of the snowstorm.

“A majority of residents of the Fraser Valley (51%) avoided getting behind the wheel with snow on the roads,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Vancouver Island was a close second on this question at 49%.”

In addition, three-in-ten British Columbians (31%) acknowledge that they, or somebody in their household, worked from home on account of the snowstorm.

Practically half of British Columbians report having witnessed two negative behaviours, with 49% saying that they saw neighbours who did not shovel snow on their sidewalk and 48% witnessing a vehicle with snow on the top circulating in their municipality.

Across the province, two thirds of British Columbians (68%) say they are satisfied with how their municipality dealt with the timeliness of alerts, such as school closures, and 61% feel the same way about snow clearing on roads.

The satisfaction rating is lower for snow clearing on sidewalks (54%) and responsiveness to requests on social media (51%, with 30% undecided).

Three-in-ten British Columbians (29%) say that, compared to five years ago, their municipality is “getting better” when it comes to dealing with snow. Half of the province’s residents (49%) see no change, and 16% believe the situation has “worsened” over the past five years.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are significantly more likely to believe that their municipality is now better equipped to deal with snow (40%) than their older counterparts (22% among those aged 35-to-54 and those aged 55 and over).

A majority of residents of Northern BC (57%) believe their municipality is handling snow better than it did in 2015. The numbers are lower in all other regions of the province, including Vancouver Island (30%), Metro Vancouver (29%), Southern BC (20%) and the Fraser Valley (18%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 21 to January 24, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Parents in British Columbia Stressed by Work and Finance

The proportion of Metro Vancouver parents who expect their kids to relocate increased by 24 points since 2019.

Vancouver, BC [February 18, 2020] – A majority of parents across British Columbia are experiencing tension on account of specific issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample of parents, 58% say they experience work-related stress “frequently” or “occasionally.”

Majorities of parents in the province say they have also “frequently” or “occasionally” experienced financial stress (57%), family-related stress (53%) and housing-related stress (51%).

Across British Columbia, two-in-five parents (40%) say it is currently “moderately difficult” or “very difficult” for them to make ends meet. 

The proportion of parents who are having a hard time getting by financially is highest in Northern BC (60%), followed by Vancouver Island (45%), the Fraser Valley (40%), Metro Vancouver (39%) and Southern BC (28%).

Almost three-in-five parents in British Columbia (58%) say it is currently “very difficult” or “moderately difficult” for them to save money in a bank account. 

Other tasks that are currently tough for about two-in-five parents in the province are paying for day to day expenses (44%), paying for child care (42%) and paying for transportation (39%).

“Majorities of parents who reside in the Fraser Valley (62%), Metro Vancouver (59%), Vancouver Island (55%) and Southern BC (52%) acknowledge that saving for the future has become more complicated,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Transportation is a bigger issue for parents in Southern BC (47%), while day to day expenses are more of a problem in Northern BC (48%) and Vancouver Island (47%).”

Across the province, 65% of parents say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that their child (or any one of their children) will have to move away from the municipality where they currently live due to the high cost of living.

The proportion of parents in Metro Vancouver who expect their children to move away on account of financial constraints stands at 66%, up 24 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in 2019.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 4 to February 7, 2020, among 623 adult parents of children aged 0 to 18 in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Vancouver 2010 Was Worth It for Most British Columbians

Three-in-five of the province’s residents would welcome a bid for Vancouver to become the host of the Summer Olympics.

Vancouver, BC [February 12, 2020] – A decade after Vancouver hosted the Winter Olympics, most British Columbians appear content with the event and its legacy, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two thirds of British Columbians (68%) think holding the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver was worth it.

“Only 24% of British Columbians currently have second thoughts about the decision to host the Winter Olympics in 2010,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of residents in all five regions of the province say organizing the games was worth it, including 71% in Metro Vancouver and 73% in the Fraser Valley.”

At least two thirds of British Columbians believe the 2010 Winter Olympics had a positive impact on the City of Vancouver (70%), the entire Metro Vancouver region (67%), the Province of British Columbia (69%) and Canada (74%).

Four-in-five British Columbians (82%) are satisfied with the infrastructure projects of the 2010 Winter Olympics, such as the Canada Line SkyTrain and improvements to the Sea-to-Sky Highway.

More than seven-in-ten of the province’s residents (72%) are satisfied with the legacy projects of the 2010 Winter Olympics, such as the Richmond Oval and the Hillcrest Community Centre.

When asked if Vancouver should launch a bid to host the Summer Olympics, British Columbians support the idea by a 2-to-1 margin (62% to 31%).

The level of excitement about a Vancouver Summer Olympics bid is highest among British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (67%), but also includes majorities of those aged 35-to-54 (61%) and those aged 55 and over (52%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 21 to January 24, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

BC’s Three Biggest Cities Get Satisfactory Grades on Most Issues

Vancouver posts the highest score on dealing with transportation, while Burnaby is ahead on handling crime.

Vancouver, BC [January 29, 2020] – More than two thirds of residents of Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby are pleased with the way their municipal governments have handled three specific issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative samples in the three cities, 79% of residents say their municipal administration has done a “very good” or “good” job in providing sanitation services.

In addition, 70% of residents are satisfied with how parks and recreation facilities are being managed, and 69% think their municipal government is enhancing their overall quality of life.

More than three-in-five residents of Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby are also content with what their municipal governments are doing to protect the environment (66%), promote tourism (65%), foster artistic and cultural activities (also 65%) and manage development and growth (63%).

At least half of residents are satisfied with the way Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby are dealing with transportation (57%), dealing with crime (54%), making City Hall work in a transparent and unbiased fashion (52%), handling the city’s finances (52%) and engaging with regular people (50%).

“There are some subtle differences between the three cities when it comes to public safety,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 60% of Burnaby residents endorse the performance of their administration, the proportion falls to 54% in Vancouver and 52% in Surrey.”

The lowest ranked issue across all three cities is dealing with homelessness and poverty (44%). Satisfaction with this file rises to 52% in Surrey, but is lower in Vancouver (42%) and Burnaby (39%).

The assessment of City of Vancouver residents on many services has increased markedly since a Research Co. survey conducted in October 2018, particularly on managing development and growth (from 24% to 62%), dealing with crime (from 44% to 54%) and protecting the environment (from 55% to 64%).

A similar situation is observed in Surrey, where the current administration has a higher ranking than the previous one on issues such as promoting tourism (from 39% to 64%), dealing with transportation (from 24% to 57%) and enhancing quality of life (from 36% to 68%).

The approval rating for the three mayors is very similar: 52% for Vancouver’s Kennedy Stewart, 51% for Burnaby’s Mike Hurley and 50% for Surrey’s Doug McCallum.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 2 to January 6, 2020, among 1,200 adults in Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age and gender in each municipality. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 2.8 percentage points for each municipality, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

End of Free Parking at Granville Island Splits Metro Vancouverites

More than a third of recent visitors (35%) arrived by public transit, while 45% travelled to Granville Island in their own vehicles.

Vancouver, BC [December 27, 2019] – The decision to eliminate free parking at Granville Island is causing different reactions among residents of Metro Vancouver, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 33% of residents say they are “less likely” to go to Granville Island after the cancellation of free parking from 11:00 am to 6:00 pm. More two-in-five (42%) say this decision will not affect their plans, and one-in-five (19%) are now “more likely” to visit.

“Two-in-five Metro Vancouverites who drive to Granville Island (40%) claim to be less likely to visit under the new parking regime,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However, more than half of them (58%) say they will not be deterred by this new regulation.”

Almost one-in-five Metro Vancouverites (18%) have been to Granville Island six times or more over the past two years, while 42% have been visited two to five times.

While more than one third of recent visitors to Granville Island (35%) relied on public transit to get there, a higher proportion (45%) arrived in their own vehicle. This includes 38% of residents of the City of Vancouver, as well as majorities of visitors from Surrey (55%), Burnaby (56%) and other municipalities in the Lower Mainland (52%).

The main reason to visit Granville Island continues to be shopping at the Public Market (56%, up seven points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November 2018), followed by sightseeing (20%) and getting a meal or snack (19%).

Other reasons cited for visiting Granville Island are shopping at a store that is not located inside the Public Market (13%) and going to an Arts and Culture performance (9%). 

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 9 to December 12, 2019, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.7 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca