British Columbians Hesitant About Life Without COVID-19 Vaccine

Most residents are willing to visit barbershops and restaurants, but the proportion drops for public transit, gyms and music venues.

Vancouver, BC [May 21, 2020] – A significant proportion of British Columbians are unwilling to partake in specific activities unless a vaccine against COVID-19 is available, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, more than half of British Columbians say they would not attend a live sporting event as a spectator (61%) or a music venue (59%) before there is a vaccine against COVID-19.

At this stage, more than half of British Columbians are willing to visit a community centre (60%) as well as a gym or fitness facility (53%).

“More than half of women in British Columbia (54%) say they would not set foot inside a gym or fitness facility before they can have access to a COVID-19 vaccine,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, most men (60%) say they would have no problem visiting these venues.”

There is a split among residents on the issue of public transit usage. Across the province, 57% of British Columbians are willing to ride on a bus without a COVID-19 vaccine, while 43% would not do so. In addition, 55% would ride on SkyTrain, while 45% would not.

Men are more likely than women to say they would be willing to ride a bus (63% to 52%) and ride on SkyTrain (60% to 50%) before a COVID-19 vaccine is accessible.

Fewer than a third of British Columbians say they would not visit restaurants, pubs or bars where people can only eat indoors (32%), libraries (29%), restaurants, pubs or bars where people eat outside (also 29%) and barbershops or salons (27%) without a COVID-19 vaccine.

British Columbians aged 55 and over are more likely to have no reservations about going to a restaurant patio (72%) or to a restaurant that only offers food indoors (64%).

British Columbians of European descent are more likely to say that they would visit an indoor restaurant before a COVID-19 vaccine is available (76%) than those of East Asian (69%) and South Asian (57%) heritage.

At least three-in-five British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (60%) and aged 55 and over (64%) say they are not willing to visit a music venue without a COVID-19 vaccine. The proportion is lower among those aged 35-to-54 (54%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 15 to May 17, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Foresee “Back to Normal” by Mid-August or Later

More than seven-in-ten (73%) would take a vaccine against COVID-19 if it ultimately becomes available.

Vancouver, BC [April 21, 2020] – A majority of Canadians are not anticipating a return to the routines they had before the COVID-19 outbreak in the early weeks of the summer, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 54% of Canadians expect things in their city or town to go back to the way they were before the outbreak three months from now (16%) or four months from now or longer (38%).  

Only 18% of Canadians expect a return to normal life within the next month (6%) or a month from now (12%), while 31% believe their daily routines will come back two months from now (15%) or three months from now (16%).  

“Across the country, residents of Quebec (55%) and Ontario (54%) are more hopeful of a return to normalcy early in the summer,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents of Atlantic Canada and the western provinces are decidedly more skeptical.”  

More than seven-in-ten Canadians (73%) say they would “definitely” or “probably” take a vaccine against COVID-19 if it ultimately becomes available—including 78% of men, 76% of those aged 18-to-34 and 79% of those in Atlantic Canada.  

When asked about their personal experience during the COVID-19 outbreak, almost half of Canadians (47%) say they are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection and two-in-five (40%) say they are not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection.  

About one-in-seven Canadians (14%) acknowledge wearing a mask every time they go out, including 19% of residents of Ontario and British Columbia and 22% of those aged 18-to-34.  

Three-in-ten Canadians (29%) admit to overeating at home, while smaller proportions acknowledge losing their temper more than usual (18%) and drinking more alcohol (13%).  

Practically two thirds of Canadians (65%) expect most people to maintain their current precautions on hygiene after the COVID-19 outbreak ends. The same proportion (65%) foresee most companies keeping their current hygiene precautions as well.  

One-in-five Canadians (21%) expect more people to consider adopting vegetarian or vegan diets after the COVID-19 outbreak ends—a proportion that rises to 26% in British Columbia.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 13 to April 15, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Canadians Expect to Work from Home More After COVID-19

More than three-in-five (63%) believe more companies will phase out business travel in favour of teleconferencing.  

Vancouver, BC [April 17, 2020] – The way Canadian workers are currently dealing with the COVID-19 outbreak will have repercussions on how we conduct business in the future, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 73% of Canadians think more people will “definitely” or “probably” work from home than before once the COVID-19 outbreak ends.  

In addition, 63% of Canadians expect more companies to phase out business travel in favour of teleconferencing.  

“Many Canadians believe some of the current features of their job will remain in place once offices are fully operational again,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Two thirds of Atlantic Canadians (67%) and Quebecers (also 67%) believe meetings that do not require travel will become the norm.”  

Canadians who are currently working from home instead of their regular office were asked about specific issues they are facing as they fulfill their duties during the COVID-19 outbreak.  

Almost two thirds of Canada’s “provisional home workers” (65%) hope they would like to be able to work from home more often after the COVID-19 outbreak has passed—a proportion that jumps to 72% among men and 76% among those aged 55 and over.  

Across the country, 62% of “provisional home workers” say working from home has been easier than they originally thought, but almost half (46%) are having a difficult time working due to the distractions at home.  

Home distractions are a big concern for “provisional home workers” in British Columbia (55%), while only 23% of those in Atlantic Canada feel the same way.  

Two thirds of “provisional home workers” in Canada (67%) say they miss interacting with other people at their regular office, and a smaller proportion (44%) miss commuting to their workplace.  

“Provisional home workers” in Quebec are more likely to say their miss their daily commute (50%), followed by those who reside in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (47%), Ontario (44%), British Columbia (43%), Atlantic Canada (39%) and Alberta (38%).  

Four-in-five “provisional home workers” (80%) feel their company trusts they are doing their work from home, and almost seven-in-ten (69%) believe their company is perfectly equipped for them to carry on with their duties from home.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 9 to April 11, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Miss Family, Friends and Travel Most During COVID-19

More than three-in-five Canadians are paying attention to the news more often than they did before the outbreak.

Vancouver, BC [April 3, 2020] – As Canadians remain mostly confined to their homes on account of the COVID-19 outbreak, more than two-in-five are finding it challenging to relinquish personal contact with family and friends, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 45% of Canadians say it has been hard to give up seeing family members in person during the outbreak.  

A similar proportion of Canadians (44%) say it has been difficult to give up seeing friends in person, while 41% find it hard to not be able to travel.  

“Albertans are more likely to say that being away from family members during the COVID-19 outbreak has been difficult (49%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than half of British Columbians (53%) feel the same way about being away from friends.”  

More than a third of Canadians say it has been hard to abandon dining out in restaurants (38%) and being able to attend entertainment events, such as concerts, plays or movies (36%).  

A smaller proportion of Canadians (32%) say it has been difficult to be without live sports—a proportion that rises to 41% among Canadian men.  

Just over half of Canadians with children aged 14 or younger  (51%) say it has been easy having their kids at home all day on account of the COVID-19 outbreak, while 44% say the experience has been difficult.  

When asked about specific activities, more than three-in-five Canadians (61%) say they are following the news—either reading, listening to or watching—more often than they did a few weeks ago.  

More than a third of Canadians say they are participating more regularly in entertainment activities that involve electronics (such as tablets, smartphones or video game consoles) (41%), streaming content online (such as movies or television shows) (40%) and communicating with relatives (36%).  

Slightly smaller proportions of Canadians are exercising at home (30%), reading books (27%), participating in entertainment activities that do not involve electronics (such as board games or puzzles) (20%), ordering food in (14%) and exercising outside their home (10%) more often than before.  

One-in-four Canadians who profess a religion (25%) say they are praying more regularly now than they did before, including 29% of women and 36% of those aged 18-to-34.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 21 to March 22, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Most in Canada and U.S. Friendly to Breastfeeding in Public

Agreement is lowest among Canadians who voted for the Conservatives and Americans who identify as Republican.

Vancouver, BC [March 20, 2020] – Sizeable majorities of Canadians and Americans have no problem with women breastfeeding in specific public spaces, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 82% of Canadians and 74% of Americans think women should have the right to breastfeed a baby in a park.

Most residents of the two countries believe women should be allowed to breastfeed a baby in a shopping mall (78% in Canada and 71% in the United States), in a restaurant (74% in Canada and 65% in the United States) and in a public transit vehicle (71% in Canada and 68% in the United States).

Conversely, more than one-in-five Canadians are not sympathetic to breastfeeding in public transit vehicles (23%) and at restaurants (21%), while fewer believe the practice should be allowed in shopping malls (16%) and parks (12%).

In the United States, at least one-in-five Americans voice opposition to breastfeeding in each of the four locations: restaurants (28%), public transit vehicles (27%), shopping malls (23%) and parks (20%).

“While most Canadians and Americans preserve the right of women to breastfeed in public, there are some nuances when it comes to opposition,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Some Americans are more likely to resist the practice inside a restaurant, while some Canadians are more hesitant about it happening inside a public transit vehicle.”

Among Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in last year’s federal election, the level of opposition climbs to 31% for breastfeeding in a public transit vehicle.

In the United States, at least a third of those who identify as Republicans are against breastfeeding inside a public transit vehicle (33%) and a restaurant (36%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 7 to February 9, 2020, among 1,000 Canadian adults, and an online study conducted from February 6 to February 8, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each study, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full Canadian dataset here, our full American dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca