Almost Three-in-Five Vancouver Voters Want a Ward System

Majorities also support establishing tougher guidelines for residents who want to become candidates for public office.

Vancouver, BC [June 21, 2022] – More voters in the City of Vancouver are in favour of changing the way they elect their councillors, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample, 58% of likely voters in the City of Vancouver (+6 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2020) would move to a “ward system” (where councillors can be elected in specific constituencies) and abandon the currently used “at-large system” (where voters select 10 councillors).

Support for the implementation of a “ward system” in Vancouver is high among likely voters who reside in the East Side (57%), the West Side (58%) and Downtown (60%).

Majorities of voters who cast ballots for Kennedy Stewart (66%), Ken Sim (63%) or Shauna Sylvester (56%) in the 2018 Vancouver mayoral election are in favour of a “ward system.”

In order to run for office in the City of Vancouver, candidates are currently required to present the signatures of 25 nominators. More than three-in-five likely voters (62%, +2) believe this number should be raised to 100 signatures in future elections.

“Voters of all ages believe it is time to raise the bar for aspiring municipal politicians in Vancouver,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of likely voters aged 18-to-34 (60%), aged 35-to-54 (62%) and aged 55 and over (65%) believe candidates must secure at least 100 signatures if they want their name to appear on the ballot.”

In addition, candidates who wish to run for office in the City of Vancouver are currently required to pay a $100 deposit, which is refunded after the election. More than half of likely voters (54%, -1) think this number should be raised to $500 in future elections.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 7 to June 9, 2022, among 400 municipal likely voters in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty. 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Than Half of Vancouver Voters Would Abolish Park Board

Almost three-in-five respondents support changing zoning laws to allow up to six strata title units on a standard lot.

Vancouver, BC [June 17, 2022] – Public confidence in the only elected Park Board in Canada has eroded considerably over the past year and a half, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample, 52% of likely voters in the City of Vancouver think the Board of Parks and Recreation should be eliminated, and that public parks and the public recreation system should be placed under the jurisdiction of City Council.

“In November 2020, only 44% of municipal likely voters in Vancouver favoured the elimination of the Board of Parks and Recreation,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This month, the proportion has reached 52%.”

Public support for abolishing Vancouver’s Park Board is highest among likely voters who reside Downtown (63%), followed by those who live in the West Side (52%) and the East Side (45%).

Vancouverites who voted for Kennedy Stewart or Ken Sim in the 2018 mayoral election are significantly more likely to endorse the abolition of the Board of Parks and Recreation (61% and 60% respectively) than those who cast a ballot for Shauna Sylvester  (43%).

Just over half of likely voters in Vancouver (51%, +5) believe it would be worthwhile to explore the idea of amalgamating all of the municipalities in Metro Vancouver, like they did in Toronto or Montreal.

Two thirds of Vancouverites who voted for Stewart in 2018 (67%) support exploring the concept of amalgamation, compared to just under half of those who cast a ballot for Sim (49%).

Almost three-in-five likely voters in Vancouver (58%, +5) are in favour of changing zoning laws to allow property owners to build up to six strata title units on a standard lot, provided the new building is no taller than an average home.

Majorities of Vancouver’s likely voters who currently rent or own their primary residence support a change in zoning laws (65% and 54% respectively).

Seven-in-ten likely voters in the City of Vancouver (71%, -10) are in favour of the plan to extend the Skytrain Millennium Line (currently under construction to Arbutus) to the University of British Columbia (UBC) campus at Point Grey.

Public support for the proposed SkyTrain extension is strongest among likely voters who reside Downtown (75%), followed by those who live in the East Side (72%) and the West Side (67%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 7 to June 9, 2022, among 400 municipal likely voters in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty. 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Separated Bike Lanes Remain Particularly Popular in Vancouver

About a third of residents believe that some of the existing paths should be removed, but two-in-five endorse the status quo.

Vancouver, BC [May 27, 2022] – Two thirds of residents of the City of Vancouver are satisfied with the existence of dedicated cycling infrastructure, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative municipal sample, 66% of Vancouverites support having separated bike lanes in the city, up two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2021.

“Vancouver’s cycling infrastructure is accepted by sizeable majorities of residents who bike (82%) or take public transit (79%) on weekdays,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Most Vancouverites who drive (59%) are also in favour of the separated bike lanes.”

Just over half of Vancouverites of East Asian descent (54%) support the city’s separated bike lanes. The rating is higher among the city’s residents of South Asian (70%) and European (71%) ancestry.

About a third of Vancouverites (32%, +4) believe there are too many separated bike lanes in the city and some should be removed, while just under one-in-five (19%, -3) say there are not enough separated bike lanes and more should be added.

Two-in-five residents of Vancouver (40%, -1) think the current number of bike lanes is correct—a proportion that rises to 46% among women, 48% among Vancouverites aged 18-to-34 and 43% among residents of the West side.

The Vancouver Park Board approved a temporary bike lane on Park Drive in Stanley Park until the Summer of 2022. More than three-in-five Vancouverites (63%, +4) think this is a “good idea”, while 24% (-5) consider the decision a “bad idea.”

Vancouverites who bike to school or work are extremely supportive of the temporary bike lane in Stanley Park (86%), along with those who rely on public transit to commute (69%).

While 32% of drivers in Vancouver consider the approval of a bike lane on Park Drive as a “bad idea”, more than half (57%) say it is a “good idea.”

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 17 to May 19, 2022, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Metro Vancouverites Ponder Guidelines for Municipal Votes

More than half are against “corporate votes”, non-resident electors and allowing residents aged 16 and 17 to cast ballots.  
 
Vancouver, BC [December 23, 2021] – More than three-in-five residents of Metro Vancouver believe it is time to end the regulation that allows people who do not reside in a municipality to vote in local elections if they own property there, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 63% of residents agree with eliminating non-residency property electors and only letting residents of a city vote in municipal elections.  
 
Majorities of Metro Vancouverites disagree with the notion of allowing “corporate voting” by giving businesses the ability to vote in municipal elections (56%) and with letting Canadians aged 16 and 17 cast ballots in municipal elections (51%).  
 
The idea of allowing adult Permanent Residents of Canada to vote in municipal elections is endorsed by more than seven-in-ten Metro Vancouverites (71%), while only 22% disagree and 7% are undecided.  
 
Three-in-ten Metro Vancouverites (31%) identify housing as the most important issue facing their municipality right now, followed by COVID-19 (24%), property taxes (10%), climate change (7%), drug overdoses (6%) and crime (5%).
 
“While concerns about housing are particularly high in Burnaby (45%), this is also the main preoccupation for residents of Vancouver (31%) and Surrey (24%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Drug overdoses are a salient issue in Vancouver (9%) while crime is a significant worry in Surrey (12%).”  
 
The approval rating for Vancouver Mayor Kennedy Stewart stands at 57%, up six points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in January 2020. The numbers are stable for Burnaby Mayor Mike Hurley (51%, =), while Surrey Mayor Doug McCallum has seen his rating drop from 50% at the start of 2020 to 30% in the last month of 2021.  
 
Across Metro Vancouver, 42% of residents believe their current mayor deserves re-election, while 37% disagree and 20% are undecided.  
 
Almost half of residents of Burnaby (48%) and Vancouver (47%) are currently willing to re-elect Hurley and Stewart respectively. In Surrey, only 28% think McCallum deserves a new term in office while 59% disagree.
 
Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from December 17 to December 19, 2021, among 1,200 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Metro Vancouver Drivers Reject Paying to Park on the Street

Seven-in-ten drivers say it is harder to find a parking spot in their municipality when they need one.  
 
Vancouver, BC [December 14, 2021] – A sizeable majority of drivers in Metro Vancouver reject the notion of having to pay to park their cars on residential streets overnight, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative sample, almost two thirds of drivers in Metro Vancouver (64%) think it is a “bad idea” to charge a fee to vehicle owners who park their cars on residential streets overnight.  
 
“More than three-in-five drivers in Surrey (62%) and Vancouver (61%) are not in favour of an overnight residential parking fee,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the rest of the Metro Vancouver region, 67% of drivers are opposed.”  
 
A majority of drivers in Metro Vancouver (51%) say they have a garage and park their vehicle there, while 22% rely on a shared parkade. Just over one-in-ten (13%) say they have a garage, but do not park their vehicle inside it—including 16% of men and 15% of those who reside in Surrey.  
 
Seven-in-ten drivers in Metro Vancouver (70%) say it is harder now to find a parking spot in their municipality when they need one, down 11 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2018.  
 
Over the past two years, 27% of drivers in Metro Vancouver acknowledge having received a parking ticket. Similar proportions of citations have been issued by municipalities (17%, -1) and by parking management companies (15%, -5).  
 
Drivers in Vancouver are significantly more likely to report getting a parking ticket of any kind (40%, +12) than their counterparts in Surrey (22%, -11) and in other Metro Vancouver municipalities (20%, -13).  
 
When asked how they dealt with the last parking ticket they were issued by a municipality, two thirds of offending drivers (68%, -8) say they paid quickly to get a discount, while 26% (+15) covered the full amount days later and 6% (-7) never paid it.  
 
The situation is similar for tickets issued by a parking management company, with a majority of offending drivers (56%, +5) paying quickly, three-in-ten (30%,+15) covering the full amount later and 15% (-19) admitting to never paying the fine.  
 
Drivers aged 55 and over who receive a parking ticket are significantly more likely to pay the fine early, whether the citation was issued by a municipality (86%) or by a parking management company (65%).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 27 to November 29, 2021, among 521 adults in Metro Vancouver who drive to school or work on weekdays. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.3 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Vancouverites Back Temporary Bike Lane in Stanley Park

Almost two thirds of Vancouver residents support having separated bike lanes in the city.

Vancouver, BC [May 18, 2021] – The authorization of a temporary bike lane on Park Drive in Stanley Park has been met with approval by a majority of City of Vancouver residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative municipal sample, almost three-in-five Vancouverites (59%) think allowing the temporary bike lane until the end of October 2021 is a “very good” or “good” idea, while 29% deem it a “bad” or “very bad” idea.

Agreement with the temporary bike lane in Stanley Park is highest among women (62%), people aged 18-to-34 (69%) and Downtown residents (64%).

Majorities of Vancouverites whose weekday commute involves cycling (79%), using public transit (75%) or driving (53%) are also in favour of the decision made by the Vancouver Park Board.

Almost two thirds of Vancouver residents (64%) say they support having separated bike lanes in the city, down five points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November 2019.

Residents aged 18-to-34 are more likely to support having separated bike lanes in Vancouver (67%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (54%) and aged 55 and over (47%).

Majorities of Vancouverites of European (68%), South Asian (65%) and East Asian descent (58%) are in favour of having separated bike lanes in the city.

Just over two-in-five Vancouverites (41%, +1) think the city currently has the right number of separated bike lanes—including 38% of Downtown residents, 41% of those who live East of Main Street and 43% of those who reside West of Main Street.

Almost three-in-ten residents (28%, -2) believe there are now too many separated bike lanes and some should be removed, while more than one-in-five (22%, +1) say there are not enough separated bike lanes and more should be added.

“Cycling infrastructure remains a polarizing issue for Vancouverites of different generations,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 19% of residents aged 18-to-34 think the city currently has too many separated bike lanes, the proportion rises to 32% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 36% among those aged 55 and over.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 5 to May 7, 2021, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Vancouverites Support Zoning Law Changes, SkyTrain to UBC

More than half of likely voters would abandon the “at-large system” and move to a “ward system” to elect councillors.

Vancouver, BC [November 20, 2020] – More than half of likely voters in the City of Vancouver are in favour of a proposal to modify zoning laws, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of likely voters in the City of Vancouver, 53% of respondents support changing zoning laws to allow property owners to build up to six strata title units on a standard lot, provided the new building is no taller than an average home.

Support for this modification is highest among women (55%) and likely voters aged 35-to-54 (53%), those who voted for independent candidate Kennedy Stewart in the 2018 mayoral election (56%) and those who voted for Non-Partisan Association (NPA) candidate Ken Sim (also 56%).

Four-in-five likely voters in the City of Vancouver (81%) support extending the Skytrain Millennium Line (currently under construction to Arbutus) to the University of British Columbia (UBC) campus at Point Grey. This includes sizeable majorities of respondents in the West Side (78%), East Side (81%) and Downtown (86%).

When asked about specific issues related to municipal elections in the City of Vancouver, 52% of likely voters think the “at-large system” (where voters select 10 councillors) should be abandoned and replaced by a “ward system” (where councillors can be elected in specific constituencies).

“Majorities of likely voters aged 18-to-34 (60%) and aged 35-to-54 (55%) favour a ward system to elect councillors in the City of Vancouver,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support drops to 39% among likely voters aged 55 and over.”

Three-in-five likely voters (60%) would like to see candidates running for office in the City of Vancouver presenting the signatures of 100 nominators, instead of the current threshold of 25. In addition, 55% of likely voters think anyone who wants to run for public office in municipal elections should pay a $500 deposit to register, instead of the current one of $100.

Just under half of likely voters (46%) think it would be worthwhile to explore the idea of amalgamating all of the municipalities in Metro Vancouver, like they did in Toronto or Montreal. The notion of reviewing the possibility of amalgamation is more popular among men (49%) and likely voters aged 18-to-34 (48%).

Likely voters are divided on the idea of eliminating the Board of Parks and Recreation and placing public parks and the public recreation system under the jurisdiction of City Council. Across the city, 44% of likely voters agree with this idea, while 48% disagree.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 9 to November 12, 2020, among 400 municipal likely voters in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: James Wheeler

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Metro Vancouverites Ponder Bailouts for Tourism Sector

More than three-in-five agree with restaurants, cafés and bars being eligible for government-funded assistance.  

Vancouver, BC [May 1, 2020] – Residents of Metro Vancouver hold differing views on which businesses and corporations that are tied to the tourism industry should be buttressed with taxpayer money as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative sample, 78% of Metro Vancouverites believe that restaurants, cafés and bars that employ fewer than 10 people should be eligible for a government bailout.  

More than half of Metro Vancouverites would also consent to offer financial assistance to restaurants, cafés and bars that employ more than 10 people (76%), individual boutiques and stores (71%) and retail outlets that are part of a chain with five or more stores in the country (51%).  

“Metro Vancouverites appear particularly concerned with the pandemic leading to job losses in the restaurant sector,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 16% of residents believe small eateries should not receive financial assistance, and just 18% feel the same way about venues that employ more than 10 people.”  

At least two-in-five Metro Vancouverites believe taxi companies (47%), airlines (45%) and cruise ship operators (40%) should be eligible for a government-funded bailout.  

Residents of Vancouver and Surrey are more likely to favour government-funded assistance for airlines (47% and 46% respectively) than those who live in Burnaby (37%).  

Just over a third of Metro Vancouverites would consider a bailout for ride-hailing companies (35%), and just 27% would include Airbnb hosts on the same list.  

More than half of residents of Vancouver and Surrey (51%) are against ride-hailing companies being eligible for a government bailout, along with 46% of those in Burnaby and 58% of those who reside in other Metro Vancouver municipalities.  

Across Metro Vancouver, men are more likely than women to reject the notion of government assistance for Airbnb hosts (68% to 59%).  

While 53% of Metro Vancouverites aged 18-to-34 are opposed to bailing out Airbnb hosts, the proportion climbs to 69% among those aged 55 and over and 74% among those aged 35-to-54.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 24 to April 26, 2020, among 800 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

BC’s Three Biggest Cities Get Satisfactory Grades on Most Issues

Vancouver posts the highest score on dealing with transportation, while Burnaby is ahead on handling crime.

Vancouver, BC [January 29, 2020] – More than two thirds of residents of Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby are pleased with the way their municipal governments have handled three specific issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative samples in the three cities, 79% of residents say their municipal administration has done a “very good” or “good” job in providing sanitation services.

In addition, 70% of residents are satisfied with how parks and recreation facilities are being managed, and 69% think their municipal government is enhancing their overall quality of life.

More than three-in-five residents of Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby are also content with what their municipal governments are doing to protect the environment (66%), promote tourism (65%), foster artistic and cultural activities (also 65%) and manage development and growth (63%).

At least half of residents are satisfied with the way Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby are dealing with transportation (57%), dealing with crime (54%), making City Hall work in a transparent and unbiased fashion (52%), handling the city’s finances (52%) and engaging with regular people (50%).

“There are some subtle differences between the three cities when it comes to public safety,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 60% of Burnaby residents endorse the performance of their administration, the proportion falls to 54% in Vancouver and 52% in Surrey.”

The lowest ranked issue across all three cities is dealing with homelessness and poverty (44%). Satisfaction with this file rises to 52% in Surrey, but is lower in Vancouver (42%) and Burnaby (39%).

The assessment of City of Vancouver residents on many services has increased markedly since a Research Co. survey conducted in October 2018, particularly on managing development and growth (from 24% to 62%), dealing with crime (from 44% to 54%) and protecting the environment (from 55% to 64%).

A similar situation is observed in Surrey, where the current administration has a higher ranking than the previous one on issues such as promoting tourism (from 39% to 64%), dealing with transportation (from 24% to 57%) and enhancing quality of life (from 36% to 68%).

The approval rating for the three mayors is very similar: 52% for Vancouver’s Kennedy Stewart, 51% for Burnaby’s Mike Hurley and 50% for Surrey’s Doug McCallum.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 2 to January 6, 2020, among 1,200 adults in Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age and gender in each municipality. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 2.8 percentage points for each municipality, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

End of Free Parking at Granville Island Splits Metro Vancouverites

More than a third of recent visitors (35%) arrived by public transit, while 45% travelled to Granville Island in their own vehicles.

Vancouver, BC [December 27, 2019] – The decision to eliminate free parking at Granville Island is causing different reactions among residents of Metro Vancouver, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 33% of residents say they are “less likely” to go to Granville Island after the cancellation of free parking from 11:00 am to 6:00 pm. More two-in-five (42%) say this decision will not affect their plans, and one-in-five (19%) are now “more likely” to visit.

“Two-in-five Metro Vancouverites who drive to Granville Island (40%) claim to be less likely to visit under the new parking regime,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However, more than half of them (58%) say they will not be deterred by this new regulation.”

Almost one-in-five Metro Vancouverites (18%) have been to Granville Island six times or more over the past two years, while 42% have been visited two to five times.

While more than one third of recent visitors to Granville Island (35%) relied on public transit to get there, a higher proportion (45%) arrived in their own vehicle. This includes 38% of residents of the City of Vancouver, as well as majorities of visitors from Surrey (55%), Burnaby (56%) and other municipalities in the Lower Mainland (52%).

The main reason to visit Granville Island continues to be shopping at the Public Market (56%, up seven points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November 2018), followed by sightseeing (20%) and getting a meal or snack (19%).

Other reasons cited for visiting Granville Island are shopping at a store that is not located inside the Public Market (13%) and going to an Arts and Culture performance (9%). 

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 9 to December 12, 2019, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.7 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Seven-in-Ten Vancouverites Happy with Separated Bike Lanes

Men and residents aged 55 and over are more likely to believe that the city currently has too many separated bike lanes.

Vancouver, BC [December 13, 2019] – More than two thirds of City of Vancouver residents appear satisfied with bike infrastructure, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative municipal sample, practically seven-in-ten Vancouverites (69%) support having separated bike lanes in the city, while 25% are opposed and 5% are undecided.

“It is not surprising to see 90% of Vancouverites who commute to school or work on a bike express support for this type of infrastructure,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “We also see that majorities of Vancouverites who commute by taking public transit (79%) and driving (69%) are also in favour of having separated bike lanes.”

Across the city, 40% of residents believe Vancouver currently has the right number of separated bike lanes. In addition, 30% of Vancouverites think there are too many separated bike lanes and some should be removed, and 21% feel there are not enough separated bike lanes and more should be added.

About a third of Vancouverites aged 55 and over (33%) and aged 35-to-54 (32%) believe that the city has too many separated bike lanes at this stage. The proportion is significantly lower among residents aged 18-to-34 (24%).

Men are also more likely to believe that some separated bike lanes should be removed than women (36% and 24% respectively).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 12 to November 15, 2019, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Vancouverites Remain Supportive of Plastic Reduction Plan

More than three-in-four  residents agree with banning the use of foam cups and take-out containers.

Vancouver, BC [November 27, 2019] – A majority of Vancouver residents continue to favour specific guidelines to reduce the use of plastics in the city, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative municipal sample, almost four-in-five Vancouverites (78%) are in favour of banning the distribution of single-use plastic utensils, unless they are directly requested by customers—down six points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2018.

In June 2018, Vancouver City Council voted to enact prohibitions on the use of specific plastic items as part of its “Zero Waste 2040” strategy. The full details of by-laws related to plastic straws, plastic bags, disposable cups and disposable utensils are expected to be released by November 30.

A ban on all expanded polystyrene foam (or “thermal”) cups and take-out containers will come into effect on January 1, 2020. More than three-in-four Vancouverites (76%, -9) agree with this course of action.

“Public support for the ban on foam cups and take-out containers is highest (87%) among Vancouverites aged 55 and over,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Sizeable majorities of residents aged 18-to-34 (72%) and 35-to-54 (73%) are also in favour of this prohibition.”

A ban on the distribution of single-use plastic straws, with appropriate exemptions for health care needs, is backed by 77% of Vancouverites (-8).

More than four-in-five Vancouverites (83%, -10) believe it would be a “good” idea to require restaurants and coffee shops to provide recycling options for the disposable cups they give out.

Almost two thirds of residents (65%, +11) think it would be a good idea to ban the distribution of disposable cups altogether, while three-in-five (60%, +5) say customers should pay an additional fee for the disposable cups they require when purchasing a beverage.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 12 to November 15, 2019, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Metro Vancouverites Angered by Litterers and Lazy Dog Owners

Other frustrations include drivers who use hand-held cell phones and those who park in handicapped spots without a decal.

Vancouver, BC [November 8, 2019] – At least seven-in-ten residents of Metro Vancouver are angry after witnessing four specific illegal behaviours, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 73% of residents say they become upset when they see a person littering and when dog owners decide not to pick up dog waste.

Animosity towards negligent dog owners rises with age, from 70% and 72% among Metro Vancouverites aged 18-to-34 and 35-to-54 respectively, to 82% among those aged 55 and over.

More than two thirds of Metro Vancouver residents are also angry when they see someone using a hand-held cell phone when driving (72%), parking in a handicapped spot without a decal (70%) and throwing cigarette butts on the ground (67%).

Two other driving violations make more than three-in-five Metro Vancouverites upset: speeding on a municipal road or street (65%) and not wearing a seatbelt when driving a car or riding in a car (61%).

Women are more likely to become upset after witnessing a driver speeding (71%) or a person inside a car who is not wearing a seatbelt (66%) than men (59% and 55% respectively). 

Smoking in a patio, or within 5 metres of doorways, open windows, or air intakes has been illegal in British Columbia for more than a decade. A majority of Metro Vancouverites (59%) are angry when they witness this particular behaviour.

“Residents of the City of Vancouver are more likely to become enraged by the actions of smokers,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion of Vancouverites who are upset is higher than in other municipalities when it comes to people lighting up in places other than designated areas.”

Fewer than half of Metro Vancouverites are angered after witnessing four other behaviours: riding a bicycle on the sidewalk (46%), riding a bicycle without a helmet (45%), watering the lawn outside permitted hours (40%) and jaywalking (38%).

Almost three-in-four Metro Vancouverites (73%) consider that most of the residents of their city “definitely” or “probably” follow existing laws and by-laws, while one-in-five (21%) believe most people “definitely” or “probably” do not.

Residents of Vancouver are more likely to deem most inhabitants as law-abiding (80%) than those who live in Burnaby (70%), Surrey (68%) and the remaining municipalities (72%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 24 to October 27, 2019, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.7 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Metro Vancouverites Consider Working Conditions for Ride-Hailers

Sizeable majorities of residents would also limit the number of cars on the road and call for more wheelchair accessible vehicles.

Vancouver, BC [October 2, 2019] – As Metro Vancouver prepares to welcome ride-hailing companies, many residents appear concerned over the working conditions of drivers, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, three-in-four residents (75%) think British Columbia should require ride-hailing drivers and taxi drivers to be paid a minimum wage, as well as benefits such as overtime and vacation pay.

“Men (78%) and Metro Vancouverites aged 35-to-54 (76%) are more likely to call for ride-hailing policies similar to what the State of California is currently pondering,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents who voted for any of the three major parties in the last provincial election are in agreement on this matter as well.”

Seven-in-ten Metro Vancouverites (71%) think ride-hailing companies should devote 17% of their fleet to wheelchair accessible vehicles. Support for this measure is highest among women (72%) and residents aged 55 and over (80%).

Almost two thirds of Metro Vancouverites (64%) think the provincial government should limit the number of ride-hailing cars on the road—including 68% of men and 72% of residents of the City of Vancouver.

Across Metro Vancouver, 42% of residents believe ride-hailing companies should be allowed to operate in British Columbia, if they compete on an equal footing with taxis.

A smaller proportion (39%) believe ride-hailing companies should be allowed to operate in British Columbia without reservations, while only 6% of Metro Vancouverites would ban ride-hailing in the province.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 20 to September 23, 2019, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.7 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Vancouverites Open to Changes in Single-Family Zoning

A sizeable majority supports a city-wide plan that makes all of Vancouver more affordable and accessible.

Vancouver, BC [June 21, 2019] – A majority of residents of the City of Vancouver would welcome a modification in existing zoning regulations, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative city-wide sample, 71% of Vancouverites think the city should allow the construction of duplexes, fourplexes, townhouses, and 3-4 storey apartments in neighbourhoods where now only single-family homes are permitted.

In addition, about three-in-four Vancouverites think the city should continue its practice of preserving heritage buildings even if it prevents the construction of new rental housing (74%) and are in favour of building more temporary modular housing for the homeless (also 74%).

When asked about specific projects that could be undertaken in their immediate neighbourhood, 28% of Vancouverites say they are not opposed to any type of building.

Fewer than one-in-ten Vancouverites voice opposition to new single-family homes (9%), townhouses (8%), fourplexes (also 8%) and duplexes (6%) in their immediate neighbourhood, and fewer than one-in-five feel the same way about 6-storey rental buildings (19%), 6-storey condo buildings (18%), 4-storey rental buildings (14%) and 4-storey condo buildings (12%).

More than a third of residents are opposed to having a new 20-storey rental (38%) or 20-storey condo building (38%) in their immediate neighbourhood. Three-in-ten (31%) feel the same way about temporary modular housing.

“Opposition to having condos and rental buildings in the neighbourhood is directly related to size,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There is definitely more resistance from residents in all areas of the city when it comes to pursuing larger projects.”

More than three-in-five Vancouverites (63%) say they favour a city-wide plan that emphasizes future growth and allows more people to afford and live in all parts of the city.

Significantly smaller proportions of residents are unsure about the city-wide planning process (19%) or voice support for protecting neighbourhoods from changing in the future (9%) or call for growth in some parts of the city, while keeping theirs intact (also 9%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 8 to April 20, 2019, among 606 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.0 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Metro Vancouver Commutes Pleasant, But Three-in-Ten Suffer

A majority of commuters (51%) would be willing to make less money if they can get a job that is closer to their home.

Vancouver, BC [May 14, 2019] – Metro Vancouverites who have to get to school or work on weekdays report different experiences from their commute, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two thirds of commuters in Metro Vancouver (68%) describe their weekday commute as “pleasant”, while three-in-ten (29%) consider it “annoying.”

While half of commuters in Metro Vancouver (49%) report no major changes in their trips to school or work compared to five years ago, 20% consider their commute “better” now, while 25% think it is “worse.”

“The mode of transportation plays a role in defining the perceptions of Metro Vancouver’s commuters,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Those who drive to school or work are more likely to say that their commute is now worse than in 2014 (31%) than those who take public transit (19%),” 

Commuters who say their trips to school or work are “very” or “moderately” pleasant are primarily satisfied with being in control of the entertainment (19%), dealing with traffic that is usually manageable (15%) and getting things done on the way, such as reading the paper or answering e-mails (14%).

Conversely, the aspects that frustrate annoyed commuters are traffic (28%), dealing with bad drivers (20%) and overcrowding at public transit vehicles (16%).

Four-in-five commuters in Metro Vancouver (81%) say living close to their workplace is important to them, and 78% concede that they would work from home more often if they could to avoid commuting.

Three-in-four commuters in Metro Vancouver (75%) would choose a prospective employer based on where the office they would work at is located. More than half would seriously consider moving from their current home if they changed jobs and had a longer commute (55%) and would be willing to make less money if they can get a job that is closer to their home (51%).

Commuters are divided on the issue of paying for tolls on roads and bridges if it guaranteed a shorter time to get to school or work, with 48% disagreeing with this course of action and 43% agreeing with it.

Almost half of commuters (48%) say their ideal choice to get to school or work would be to drive, while 28% would prefer to take public transit, 14% would walk and 7% would bike.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 29 to May 1, 2019, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Making Ends Meet is Difficult for Metro Vancouver Parents

Two-in-five parents think it is “likely” that their children will move away for their current municipality due to the high cost of living.

Vancouver, BC [February 19, 2019] – As British Columbia observes “Family Day”, a considerable proportion of parents in Metro Vancouver report experiencing anxiety over several issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of parents in Metro Vancouver, three-in-five (61%) say it is currently difficult to “make ends meet” for them and their families.

In the City of Vancouver, 79% of parents report that “making ends meet” is currently hard, compared to 52% in Surrey and 57% in other Metro Vancouver municipalities.

One third of parents (34%) say they have experienced housing-related stress and financial-related stress “occasionally” or “frequently” over the past year. 

A slightly smaller proportion of parents (31%) have endured work-related stress and family-related stress.

Half of parents in Metro Vancouver (50%) say it is “very difficult” or “moderately difficult” to save money in a bank account under the current circumstances, and 45% feel the same way about paying for day-to-day expenses.

Just over a third of Metro Vancouver parents (35%) have found it hard to pay for child care, while 14% say it is challenging to pay for transportation.

Across Metro Vancouver, 42% of parents say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that their children will have to move away from the municipality where they currently live due to the high cost of living.

“The views on the future vary greatly depending on where families currently reside,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While most parents in Surrey and other smaller municipalities expect their children to settle nearby, more than half of those in Vancouver believe their children will have to eventually relocate.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 3 to February 5, 2019, among 631 adult parents of children aged 0 to 18 in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Metro Vancouverites Ponder Best Way to Enjoy Granville Island

While 44% would turn the venue into a pedestrian zone, 61% say they would visit more often if parking were easier.

Vancouver, BC [January 8, 2019] – Granville Island remains a popular destination for Metro Vancouverites, but there is no clear consensus on whether personal vehicles should be allowed inside the venue, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 22% say they have gone to Granville Island six times or more over the past two years, while 42% have visited two to five times.

Among those who have visited the venue, 29% say their main reason was to go shopping at the Public Market, while 25% went sightseeing. Other reasons cited by visitors to Granville Island are going for a meal ort snack (17%), going to an Arts and Culture performance (16%) or shopping at a store that is not located inside the Public Market (5%).

Respondents were provided with three statements about the future of Granville Island. Metro Vancouverites are almost evenly split on whether the venue should be turned into a pedestrian zone where no personal vehicles would be allowed (44% agree with this idea, and 47% disagree).

Three-in-five Metro Vancouverites (61%) say they would visit Granville Island more often if it were easier to find a parking spot, and a majority (58%) disagrees with making all parking spaces at the venue paid.

“Residents of the City of Vancouver are decidedly more likely to support the notion of a car-free Granville Island,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But more than three-in-five of those who live in Surrey and other Metro Vancouver municipalities say they would actually make the trip to Granville Island more often if it were easier to find a place to park their vehicles.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 25, 2018, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Metro Vancouver Drivers Say It Is Harder to Find Parking Spots

Drivers aged 35-to-54 are more likely to say they ignore parking tickets than those aged 18-to-34 and those aged 55 and over.

Vancouver, BC [December 18, 2018] – A sizeable proportion of drivers in Metro Vancouver think it is tougher to find parking spots in the region, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites who drive to school or work on weekdays, four-in-five (81%) say it is “moderately harder” or “much harder” to find a parking spot in their municipality when they need one.

Across Metro Vancouver, 18% of drivers say they have received a parking ticket from a municipality over the past two years, while 20% have received a ticket from a parking management company.

While 76% of drivers say they quickly paid the fine from the last parking ticket they received from a municipality, only 51% of those who received a ticket from a parking management company behaved in the same fashion.

In addition, while 13% of drivers say they never paid the fine from the last ticket issued by a municipality, the proportion jumps to 34% for tickets issued by a parking management company.

“Some drivers are clearly not taking parking tickets seriously,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This is particularly significant among drivers aged 35-to-54, who are more likely to say they never pay any type of parking fine, compared with their younger and older counterparts.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 25, 2018, among 513 adults in Metro Vancouver who drive to school or work on weekdays. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.3 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Increasing Rental Stock a Priority for Metro Vancouverites

More than three-in-four believe Canada should consider banning most foreigners from purchasing real estate.

Vancouver, BC [November 26, 2018] – Many residents of Metro Vancouver believe more rental units should be made available in the next three years, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, three-in-five (57%) think we need to build more rental units than we did over the three-year period that ended in 2017.

From 2015 to 2017, there were 75,000 new housing units built in Metro Vancouver. Approximately 23 per cent of them were for rental use.

One third of Metro Vancouverites (34%) would like to see more than 75,000 units built in the region over the next three years, while 27% would keep the same pace and 19% believe we should build less.

New Zealand recently passed legislation that bans most foreigners from purchasing real estate in the country. There are exceptions for foreigners who hold residency status in New Zealand, as well as citizens from Australia and Singapore, due to existing free-trade agreements.

Across Metro Vancouver, 77% of residents would support having similar legislation in Canada, that would ban most foreigners from purchasing real estate in the country.

“Metro Vancouverites are of three minds when assessing the current housing crisis,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The most supported proposition is a ban on foreign owners, and while a majority would like to see an increase in rental properties, the appetite for increasing the pace of construction is not as high.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 25, 2018, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca