Metro Vancouverites Consider Working Conditions for Ride-Hailers

Sizeable majorities of residents would also limit the number of cars on the road and call for more wheelchair accessible vehicles.

Vancouver, BC [October 2, 2019] – As Metro Vancouver prepares to welcome ride-hailing companies, many residents appear concerned over the working conditions of drivers, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, three-in-four residents (75%) think British Columbia should require ride-hailing drivers and taxi drivers to be paid a minimum wage, as well as benefits such as overtime and vacation pay.

“Men (78%) and Metro Vancouverites aged 35-to-54 (76%) are more likely to call for ride-hailing policies similar to what the State of California is currently pondering,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents who voted for any of the three major parties in the last provincial election are in agreement on this matter as well.”

Seven-in-ten Metro Vancouverites (71%) think ride-hailing companies should devote 17% of their fleet to wheelchair accessible vehicles. Support for this measure is highest among women (72%) and residents aged 55 and over (80%).

Almost two thirds of Metro Vancouverites (64%) think the provincial government should limit the number of ride-hailing cars on the road—including 68% of men and 72% of residents of the City of Vancouver.

Across Metro Vancouver, 42% of residents believe ride-hailing companies should be allowed to operate in British Columbia, if they compete on an equal footing with taxis.

A smaller proportion (39%) believe ride-hailing companies should be allowed to operate in British Columbia without reservations, while only 6% of Metro Vancouverites would ban ride-hailing in the province.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 20 to September 23, 2019, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.7 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Vancouverites Open to Changes in Single-Family Zoning

A sizeable majority supports a city-wide plan that makes all of Vancouver more affordable and accessible.

Vancouver, BC [June 21, 2019] – A majority of residents of the City of Vancouver would welcome a modification in existing zoning regulations, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative city-wide sample, 71% of Vancouverites think the city should allow the construction of duplexes, fourplexes, townhouses, and 3-4 storey apartments in neighbourhoods where now only single-family homes are permitted.

In addition, about three-in-four Vancouverites think the city should continue its practice of preserving heritage buildings even if it prevents the construction of new rental housing (74%) and are in favour of building more temporary modular housing for the homeless (also 74%).

When asked about specific projects that could be undertaken in their immediate neighbourhood, 28% of Vancouverites say they are not opposed to any type of building.

Fewer than one-in-ten Vancouverites voice opposition to new single-family homes (9%), townhouses (8%), fourplexes (also 8%) and duplexes (6%) in their immediate neighbourhood, and fewer than one-in-five feel the same way about 6-storey rental buildings (19%), 6-storey condo buildings (18%), 4-storey rental buildings (14%) and 4-storey condo buildings (12%).

More than a third of residents are opposed to having a new 20-storey rental (38%) or 20-storey condo building (38%) in their immediate neighbourhood. Three-in-ten (31%) feel the same way about temporary modular housing.

“Opposition to having condos and rental buildings in the neighbourhood is directly related to size,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There is definitely more resistance from residents in all areas of the city when it comes to pursuing larger projects.”

More than three-in-five Vancouverites (63%) say they favour a city-wide plan that emphasizes future growth and allows more people to afford and live in all parts of the city.

Significantly smaller proportions of residents are unsure about the city-wide planning process (19%) or voice support for protecting neighbourhoods from changing in the future (9%) or call for growth in some parts of the city, while keeping theirs intact (also 9%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 8 to April 20, 2019, among 606 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.0 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Metro Vancouver Commutes Pleasant, But Three-in-Ten Suffer

A majority of commuters (51%) would be willing to make less money if they can get a job that is closer to their home.

Vancouver, BC [May 14, 2019] – Metro Vancouverites who have to get to school or work on weekdays report different experiences from their commute, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two thirds of commuters in Metro Vancouver (68%) describe their weekday commute as “pleasant”, while three-in-ten (29%) consider it “annoying.”

While half of commuters in Metro Vancouver (49%) report no major changes in their trips to school or work compared to five years ago, 20% consider their commute “better” now, while 25% think it is “worse.”

“The mode of transportation plays a role in defining the perceptions of Metro Vancouver’s commuters,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Those who drive to school or work are more likely to say that their commute is now worse than in 2014 (31%) than those who take public transit (19%),” 

Commuters who say their trips to school or work are “very” or “moderately” pleasant are primarily satisfied with being in control of the entertainment (19%), dealing with traffic that is usually manageable (15%) and getting things done on the way, such as reading the paper or answering e-mails (14%).

Conversely, the aspects that frustrate annoyed commuters are traffic (28%), dealing with bad drivers (20%) and overcrowding at public transit vehicles (16%).

Four-in-five commuters in Metro Vancouver (81%) say living close to their workplace is important to them, and 78% concede that they would work from home more often if they could to avoid commuting.

Three-in-four commuters in Metro Vancouver (75%) would choose a prospective employer based on where the office they would work at is located. More than half would seriously consider moving from their current home if they changed jobs and had a longer commute (55%) and would be willing to make less money if they can get a job that is closer to their home (51%).

Commuters are divided on the issue of paying for tolls on roads and bridges if it guaranteed a shorter time to get to school or work, with 48% disagreeing with this course of action and 43% agreeing with it.

Almost half of commuters (48%) say their ideal choice to get to school or work would be to drive, while 28% would prefer to take public transit, 14% would walk and 7% would bike.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 29 to May 1, 2019, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Making Ends Meet is Difficult for Metro Vancouver Parents

Two-in-five parents think it is “likely” that their children will move away for their current municipality due to the high cost of living.

Vancouver, BC [February 19, 2019] – As British Columbia observes “Family Day”, a considerable proportion of parents in Metro Vancouver report experiencing anxiety over several issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of parents in Metro Vancouver, three-in-five (61%) say it is currently difficult to “make ends meet” for them and their families.

In the City of Vancouver, 79% of parents report that “making ends meet” is currently hard, compared to 52% in Surrey and 57% in other Metro Vancouver municipalities.

One third of parents (34%) say they have experienced housing-related stress and financial-related stress “occasionally” or “frequently” over the past year. 

A slightly smaller proportion of parents (31%) have endured work-related stress and family-related stress.

Half of parents in Metro Vancouver (50%) say it is “very difficult” or “moderately difficult” to save money in a bank account under the current circumstances, and 45% feel the same way about paying for day-to-day expenses.

Just over a third of Metro Vancouver parents (35%) have found it hard to pay for child care, while 14% say it is challenging to pay for transportation.

Across Metro Vancouver, 42% of parents say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that their children will have to move away from the municipality where they currently live due to the high cost of living.

“The views on the future vary greatly depending on where families currently reside,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While most parents in Surrey and other smaller municipalities expect their children to settle nearby, more than half of those in Vancouver believe their children will have to eventually relocate.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 3 to February 5, 2019, among 631 adult parents of children aged 0 to 18 in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Metro Vancouverites Ponder Best Way to Enjoy Granville Island

While 44% would turn the venue into a pedestrian zone, 61% say they would visit more often if parking were easier.

Vancouver, BC [January 8, 2019] – Granville Island remains a popular destination for Metro Vancouverites, but there is no clear consensus on whether personal vehicles should be allowed inside the venue, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 22% say they have gone to Granville Island six times or more over the past two years, while 42% have visited two to five times.

Among those who have visited the venue, 29% say their main reason was to go shopping at the Public Market, while 25% went sightseeing. Other reasons cited by visitors to Granville Island are going for a meal ort snack (17%), going to an Arts and Culture performance (16%) or shopping at a store that is not located inside the Public Market (5%).

Respondents were provided with three statements about the future of Granville Island. Metro Vancouverites are almost evenly split on whether the venue should be turned into a pedestrian zone where no personal vehicles would be allowed (44% agree with this idea, and 47% disagree).

Three-in-five Metro Vancouverites (61%) say they would visit Granville Island more often if it were easier to find a parking spot, and a majority (58%) disagrees with making all parking spaces at the venue paid.

“Residents of the City of Vancouver are decidedly more likely to support the notion of a car-free Granville Island,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But more than three-in-five of those who live in Surrey and other Metro Vancouver municipalities say they would actually make the trip to Granville Island more often if it were easier to find a place to park their vehicles.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 25, 2018, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca