Most British Columbians Agree with Building Coastal GasLink

Seven-in-ten residents believe the project will create hundreds of jobs in the province.

Vancouver, BC [March 17, 2020] – British Columbians are in favour of carrying on with the construction of the Coastal GasLink pipeline by a 2-to-1 margin, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 61% of British Columbians agree with building the Coastal GasLink pipeline, while 30% disagree.

Support for the continuation of the project is highest among men (68%), British Columbians aged 55 and over (69%) and residents of Vancouver Island (67%).

“More than half of British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the last provincial election (56%) want to build the Coastal GasLink pipeline,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “A similar proportion of BC Green Party voters agree (53%), but support is highest among those who cast ballots for the BC Liberals in 2017 (75%).”

Seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%) have followed news related to the Coastal GasLink pipeline “very closely” or “moderately closely” over the past two months.

Almost half of British Columbians (48%) agree with the actions that have been taken by the Wet’suwet’en elected band council in connection with the Coastal GasLink pipeline. The rating is slightly lower for the actions of the Government of British Columbia (44%) and the Government of Canada (41%).

Fewer than two-in-five British Columbians agree with the actions of the people who have participated in protests (38%), the Wet’suwet’en Hereditary Chiefs (37%) and the people who have participated in road blockades (33%).

When asked if the provincial government should do anything necessary to ensure that the Coastal GasLink pipeline does not happen, 38% of British Columbians agreed and 53% disagreed.

Half of British Columbians (50%) disagree with the notion of the Coastal GasLink pipeline threatening the health and safety of residents, and 70% believe the project will create hundreds of jobs.

Three-in-five British Columbians (61%) support the development of LNG in the province, while 25% are opposed.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 4 to March 7, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

BC’s Three Biggest Cities Get Satisfactory Grades on Most Issues

Vancouver posts the highest score on dealing with transportation, while Burnaby is ahead on handling crime.

Vancouver, BC [January 29, 2020] – More than two thirds of residents of Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby are pleased with the way their municipal governments have handled three specific issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative samples in the three cities, 79% of residents say their municipal administration has done a “very good” or “good” job in providing sanitation services.

In addition, 70% of residents are satisfied with how parks and recreation facilities are being managed, and 69% think their municipal government is enhancing their overall quality of life.

More than three-in-five residents of Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby are also content with what their municipal governments are doing to protect the environment (66%), promote tourism (65%), foster artistic and cultural activities (also 65%) and manage development and growth (63%).

At least half of residents are satisfied with the way Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby are dealing with transportation (57%), dealing with crime (54%), making City Hall work in a transparent and unbiased fashion (52%), handling the city’s finances (52%) and engaging with regular people (50%).

“There are some subtle differences between the three cities when it comes to public safety,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 60% of Burnaby residents endorse the performance of their administration, the proportion falls to 54% in Vancouver and 52% in Surrey.”

The lowest ranked issue across all three cities is dealing with homelessness and poverty (44%). Satisfaction with this file rises to 52% in Surrey, but is lower in Vancouver (42%) and Burnaby (39%).

The assessment of City of Vancouver residents on many services has increased markedly since a Research Co. survey conducted in October 2018, particularly on managing development and growth (from 24% to 62%), dealing with crime (from 44% to 54%) and protecting the environment (from 55% to 64%).

A similar situation is observed in Surrey, where the current administration has a higher ranking than the previous one on issues such as promoting tourism (from 39% to 64%), dealing with transportation (from 24% to 57%) and enhancing quality of life (from 36% to 68%).

The approval rating for the three mayors is very similar: 52% for Vancouver’s Kennedy Stewart, 51% for Burnaby’s Mike Hurley and 50% for Surrey’s Doug McCallum.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 2 to January 6, 2020, among 1,200 adults in Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age and gender in each municipality. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 2.8 percentage points for each municipality, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views of Pipeline Expansion in British Columbia Remain Stable

Two thirds believe the project will create hundreds of jobs, but fewer than two-in-five expect lower gas prices.

Vancouver, BC [December 18, 2019] – After six months that included a federal election, the perceptions of British Columbians on pipeline expansion did not go through a severe fluctuation, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 56% of British Columbians agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion, while 35% disagree and 10% are undecided.

“There has been practically no change in the way British Columbians feel about this project,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Our survey from June also showed 56% of British Columbians agreeing with the re-approval of the project.”

More than seven-in-ten residents of Southern BC (74%) and Northern BC (71%) are in favour of the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion. Support for the course of action authorized by the federal government is lower in the Fraser Valley (59%), Metro Vancouver (51%) and Vancouver Island (49%).

There is a sizeable gender gap on this question. While two thirds of men (66%) agree with the pipeline expansion, only 46% of women concur.

Two thirds of British Columbians (68%, -5 since May) expect the Trans Mountain Pipeline to create hundreds of jobs for British Columbians—an argument that resonates especially well with 81% of those who voted for the BC Liberals in the 2017 provincial election.

Three-in-five British Columbians (59%, unchanged) say they are disappointed with the way the federal government has handled the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion. 

More than two-in-five British Columbians (45%, -1) believe the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of British Columbians. Voters who cast ballots for the BC Green Party (64%) and the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (59%) in 2017 are more likely to have this point of view.

Across the province, 40% of British Columbians (-1) believe the provincial government should do anything necessary to ensure that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion does not happen—including 45% of women, 51% of residents aged 18-to-34, and 63% of BC Green Party voters in 2017.

The notion of gas prices being lower in British Columbia now that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion has been re-approved is convincing for just over a third of British Columbians (37%, -2).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 4 to December 7, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Gas Prices Stirring New Behaviours in British Columbia Drivers

Just under one-in-five drivers in the province have gone to the United States with the sole purpose of purchasing cheaper fuel.

Vancouver, BC [December 11, 2019] – A significant proportion of drivers in British Columbia are taking steps to deal with the cost of fuel in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, half of drivers in British Columbia (51%) say they have purchased gas for their vehicle in their community even if the tank was not near empty because prices were suddenly lower.

Drivers in Vancouver Island (56%) are more likely to have purchased gas after they noticed a drop in prices.

Two-in-five drivers in the province (39%) say they have purchased less gas for their vehicle in their community—or did not fill up the entire tank—because prices were suddenly higher.

Almost half of drivers in the Fraser Valley (47%) have chosen not to completely fill up because of inflated gas prices.

Just under one-in-five drivers in British Columbia (18%) say they have driven to the United States with the sole purpose of purchasing cheaper gas for their vehicle.

“Two-in-five drivers who reside in the Fraser Valley (40%) say they have visited the United States only to get gas in the past year” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “They have been joined by one-in-five (21%) drivers in Metro Vancouver.”

The Government of British Columbia recently introduced legislation to compel oil and gas companies to disclose supply and pricing data. More than four-in-five British Columbians (85%) support this legislation, including 90% of residents aged 55 and over.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 27 to November 29, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Vancouverites Remain Supportive of Plastic Reduction Plan

More than three-in-four  residents agree with banning the use of foam cups and take-out containers.

Vancouver, BC [November 27, 2019] – A majority of Vancouver residents continue to favour specific guidelines to reduce the use of plastics in the city, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative municipal sample, almost four-in-five Vancouverites (78%) are in favour of banning the distribution of single-use plastic utensils, unless they are directly requested by customers—down six points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2018.

In June 2018, Vancouver City Council voted to enact prohibitions on the use of specific plastic items as part of its “Zero Waste 2040” strategy. The full details of by-laws related to plastic straws, plastic bags, disposable cups and disposable utensils are expected to be released by November 30.

A ban on all expanded polystyrene foam (or “thermal”) cups and take-out containers will come into effect on January 1, 2020. More than three-in-four Vancouverites (76%, -9) agree with this course of action.

“Public support for the ban on foam cups and take-out containers is highest (87%) among Vancouverites aged 55 and over,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Sizeable majorities of residents aged 18-to-34 (72%) and 35-to-54 (73%) are also in favour of this prohibition.”

A ban on the distribution of single-use plastic straws, with appropriate exemptions for health care needs, is backed by 77% of Vancouverites (-8).

More than four-in-five Vancouverites (83%, -10) believe it would be a “good” idea to require restaurants and coffee shops to provide recycling options for the disposable cups they give out.

Almost two thirds of residents (65%, +11) think it would be a good idea to ban the distribution of disposable cups altogether, while three-in-five (60%, +5) say customers should pay an additional fee for the disposable cups they require when purchasing a beverage.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 12 to November 15, 2019, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca