Most British Columbians Agree with Ottawa’s Pipeline Decision

Three-in-five residents are unconvinced that the re-approved expansion will bring lower gas prices to the province.

Vancouver, BC [July 3, 2019] – A majority of British Columbians believe the federal government made the right call in re-approving the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion, but a similar proportion voice dissatisfaction with Ottawa’s overall performance on this file, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 56% of British Columbians (+4 since May 2018) agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the pipeline expansion.

One third of British Columbians (33%) disagree with the decision, and 11% are undecided.

Agreement with Ottawa’s course of action is highest among men (66%), British Columbians aged 55 and over (also 66%), residents of the Southern Interior (67%) and BC Liberal voters in the 2017 provincial election (72%).

Almost three-in-five British Columbians (59%) say they are disappointed with the way the federal government has handled the expansion. 

“As expected, dissatisfaction with the way Ottawa handled this issue is practically universal among strong opponents (95%) and moderate opponents (73%) of the project,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But 50% of British Columbians who moderately or strongly support the expansion are also unhappy with the federal government.”

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (71%) think the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline will create hundreds of local jobs. 

Respondents are evenly divided on whether the pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of British Columbians, with 46% agreeing with the statement and 44% disagreeing with it. Two-in-five (41%) believe the provincial government should do anything necessary to ensure that the expansion does not happen.

Only 30% of British Columbians recall seeing advertisements in favour of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion over the past few weeks. Among those who were exposed to the ads, 32% said they made them “more likely” to support the expansion.

Only 39% of British Columbians think gas prices will be lower in the province now that the expansion has been re-approved—one of the key messages of the ad campaign undertaken by the Government of Alberta. Three-in-five residents (61%) either disagree with this thought (33%) or are not sure (28%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from June 22 to June 26, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Drivers in British Columbia Are Considering Electric Vehicles

Seven-in-ten residents agree with the goal of making all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province “zero emission” by 2040.

Vancouver, BC [May 31, 2019] – A significant proportion of car drivers in British Columbia would consider acquiring a “zero emission” vehicle in the future, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 51% of British Columbians who drive their own vehicles say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that the next vehicle they acquire for themselves or their household will be electric.

Majorities of drivers in Metro Vancouver (55%) and Vancouver Island (52%) are likely to consider a “zero emission” vehicle as their next purchase. The proportion is lower in the Fraser Valley (43%), Southern BC (40%) and Northern BC (37%)

When asked about specific issues that might make them less likely to purchase an electric vehicle, 24% of drivers say that they are too expensive when compared to non-electric vehicles, 24% fear becoming stranded if they cannot find a charging station, and 23% say they do not have enough places to charge the vehicle in the areas where they usually drive.

“There are some significant regional differences when the concerns of potential electric vehicle owners are analyzed,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than a third of drivers who reside in Southern BC (35%) and Northern BC (45%) claim they lack places to charge electric vehicles, compared to just 20% among those who live in Metro Vancouver.”

Earlier this year, the Government of British Columbia passed legislation to ensure that, by the year 2040, all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province will be “zero emission.” Seven-in-ten residents (70%) agree with this decision, while 21% disagree and 10% are undecided.

Almost half of British Columbians (49%) believe the goal established by the provincial government on “zero emission” vehicles is “achievable”, while 42% think it is “not achievable.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 20 to May 22, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Five British Columbians Grow or Cultivate Plants at Home

More than half of the province’s home gardeners focus primarily on ornamental plants, while 29% are mostly growing food.

Vancouver, BC [May 17, 2019] – A majority of British Columbians can be safely described as home gardeners, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, three-in-five British Columbians (59%) say they currently grow or cultivate plants in their home, either indoors or outdoors.

The largest incidence of home gardeners is observed among British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (64%), residents of Northern BC (68%) and BC Green Party voters in the 2017 provincial election (70%).

More than half of the province’s home gardeners (56%) say they focus mostly on plants for ornamental purposes, while three-in-ten (29%) prefer to grow or cultivate plants for consumption, such as vegetables, fruits and herbs.

“There are some age discrepancies when it comes to the type of plants British Columbia’s home gardeners are interested in,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Growing plants that can be consumed is more popular among those aged 18-to-34 (53%), but less so among those aged 35-to-54 (31%) and those aged 55 and over (21%).”

One-in-four of British Columbia’s home gardeners (25%) say they spend less than $50 each year on gardening tools, plants and/or seeds. 

About two-in-five of British Columbia’s home gardeners (39%) allocate $50 to $100 a year for gardening, while more than a third (36%) spend more than $100 annually.

A majority of the province’s home gardeners (58%) say the plants they grow or cultivate are “about the same as most” in their neighbourhood, while 26% consider them “better” and 11% believe they are “worse.”

British Columbia’s home gardeners aged 18-to-34 (35%), men (30%) and those who reside in Southern BC (29%) are more likely to claim that their own plants are better than the ones grown by their neighbours.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 2 to May 5, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Love Coffee, Few Are Keen Travel Mug Users

A third of British Columbians who consume coffee outside of their home never bring their own travel mug to the coffee shop.

Vancouver, BC [May 9, 2019] – Many British Columbians enjoy coffee when they are away from home, but only about one-in-five rely on travel mugs “all of the time”, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, only one-in-five British Columbians (20%) say they never have coffee outside of their home in a regular week.

About three-in-ten British Columbians (29%) have one or two cups of coffee outside of their home in a week, while a similar proportion (30%) consumes three to six cups. 

More than one-in-five British Columbians (22%) drink seven or more cups of coffee outside of their home each week.

A third of British Columbians who consume coffee outside of their home (34%) say they never bring their own travel mug to the coffee shop, while about half (46%) say they do this “only a few times” or “some of the time.” 

Only 19% of British Columbians who consume coffee outside of their home “always” rely on their travel mug when they visit a coffee shop.

“Three-in-five female coffee drinkers in the province (60%) acknowledge using their travel mug at a coffee shop at least a few times,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Among men, the proportion of travel mug users is actually higher, at 71%.”

Among British Columbians who consume coffee outside of their home, the favourite venue to visit is Tim Hortons (43%), followed by Starbucks (31%).

When asked about which stores they never visit, 20% of British Columbians who consume coffee outside of their home mentioned Tim Hortons, while 18% selected Starbucks. About a third (34%) say they do not have a place they would never go to in order to get coffee.

Almost two thirds of British Columbians who consume coffee outside of their home (65%) say they are part of a loyalty program (where they may receive merchandise, rewards, coupons, or free products) at their favourite coffee shop.

Membership in loyalty programs is higher among British Columbians who select Starbucks as their favourite coffee shop (77%) than among those who picked Tim Hortons (65%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 2 to May 5, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Four-in-Five Canadians Support Resource Development Projects

The majority of Canadians (61%) say they are tired of nothing getting built in the country.

Vancouver, BC [March 12, 2019] – A significant proportion of Canadians and British Columbians are in favour of resource development projects, a new Research Co. poll conducted on behalf of LNG Canada—a liquefied natural gas project currently under construction in Kitimat, B.C.—has found.

In the online survey of representative samples, 79% of Canadians and 71% of British Columbians express support for resource development projects. In addition, 61% of respondents across the country and 51% of those located in the westernmost province agree they are “tired of nothing getting built” in Canada and British Columbia—a proportion that rises to 67% in northern B.C.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) believe the “national economy will suffer if we can’t build resource projects.” In British Columbia, 63% feel this way about the possible effect on the provincial economy, including 74% of those in northern B.C.

More than half of Canadians (54%) believe the country’s reputation “is harmed by protests against resource development projects.” In British Columbia, 52% express the same sentiment about the effect of protests against resource development projects, and fewer than a quarter (23%) think it’s possible to have unanimous support for resource development projects. 

“When asked what would make them more likely to support resource development projects, a majority of British Columbians (57%) want assurances that the impact on the environment is limited,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Other important considerations are guaranteeing that Canadians will get the first opportunity to work on the project (53%) and providing training and apprenticeship opportunities for young Canadians (46%).”

Seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%) foresee a positive economic impact from LNG Canada’s liquefied natural gas export project in Kitimat, B.C., which is scheduled to deliver its first LNG cargo before mid-next decade. Broken down by region, over half of Vancouver Island residents (56%), two thirds of Metro Vancouverites (67%) and 86% of those in northern B.C. anticipate a positive economic impact from the project.

“LNG Canada has received significant support from First Nations at the facility and along the shipping route, as well as from northern communities overall,” says Susannah Pierce, LNG Canada’s Director, External Relations. “We are committed to these supporters. A project like ours is vital to the creation of training, employment and contracting opportunities, and we’re pleased to see that British Columbians and Canadians recognize the importance of resource projects as drivers of the Canadian economy.”

The poll also revealed that at least three-in-five Canadians have a positive opinion of four energy sources: wind (80%), hydropower (76%), natural gas (69%) and geothermal (61%). Canadians are divided on oil, with 43% having positive views and 46% having a negative opinion. The lowest ranked energy source for Canadians is coal, with 24% of residents expressing a positive view. 

Three-in-five Canadians (60%) believe Canada has a responsibility to “export natural gas to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) in other countries.” LNG exported from LNG Canada’s facility can displace the use of coal for power generation, reducing global GHGs by 60 to 90 mtpa, which is the equivalent of all GHGs produced in British Columbia annually.

In the online survey of representative samples, 79% of Canadians and 71% of British Columbians express support for resource development projects. In addition, 61% of respondents across the country and 51% of those located in the westernmost province agree they are “tired of nothing getting built” in Canada and British Columbia—a proportion that rises to 67% in Northern B.C.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) believe the “national economy will suffer if we can’t build resource projects.” In British Columbia, 63% feel this way about the possible effect in the provincial economy, including 74% of those in northern B.C.

More than half of Canadians (54%) believe the country’s reputation “is harmed by protests against resource development projects”. In British Columbia, 52% express the same sentiment about the effect of protests against resource development projects, and fewer than a quarter (23%) think it’s possible to have unanimous support for resource development projects. 

“When asked what would make them more likely to support resource development projects, a majority of British Columbians (57%) want assurances that the impact in the environment is limited,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Other important considerations are guaranteeing that Canadians will get the first opportunity to work on the project (53%) and providing training and apprenticeship opportunities for young Canadians (46%).”

Seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%) foresee a positive economic impact from LNG Canada’s liquefied natural gas export project in Kitimat, B.C., which is scheduled to deliver first LNG cargo mid-next decade. Broken down by region, over half of Vancouver Island residents (56%), two thirds of Metro Vancouverites (67%) and 86% of those in northern B.C. anticipate a positive economic impact from the project.

“LNG Canada has received significant support from First Nations at the facility and along the shipping route, as well as from northern communities overall,” says Susannah Pierce, LNG Canada’s Director, External Relations. “We are committed to these supporters. A project like ours is vital to the creation of training, employment and contracting opportunities, and we’re pleased to see that British Columbians and Canadians recognize the importance of resource projects as drivers of the Canadian economy.”

The poll also revealed that at least three-in-five Canadians have a positive opinion of four energy sources: wind (80%), hydropower (76%), natural gas (69%) and geothermal (61%). Canadians are divided on oil, with 43% having positive views and 46% having a negative opinion. The lowest ranked energy source for Canadians is coal, with 24% of residents expressing a positive view. 

Three-in-five Canadians (60%) believe Canada has a responsibility to “export natural gas to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) in other countries.” LNG exported from LNG Canada’s facility can displace the use of coal for power generation, reducing global GHGs by 60 to 90 mtpa, which is the equivalent of all GHGs produced in British Columbia annually.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 21 to February 24, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada; and an online study conducted from February 16 to February 18, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada and British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for the sample of Canadians and +/- 3.5 percentage points for the sample of British Columbians, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full Canada data set here, our full British Columbia data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

LNG Canada Media Relations
[c] 604.761.5529
[e] media@lngcanada.ca