Most Canadians and Americans Agree on Climate Change Fight

62% of Canadians and 51% of Americans personally believe global warming is a “major crisis.”

Vancouver, BC [June 26, 2020] – Most Canadians and Americans would consent to providing larger fiscal contributions to their governments in order to combat global warming, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 60% of Canadians and 54% of Americans say they are willing to pay higher taxes in order to adequately deal with climate change.

More than three-in-five Canadians (64%) and a majority of Americans (53%) believe global warming is a fact and is mostly caused by emission from vehicles and industrial facilities.

About one-in-four respondents in the two countries (23% in Canada and 25% in the United States) think climate change is a fact and is mostly caused by natural changes.

Only 7% of Canadians and 14% of Americans believe global warming is a theory that has not yet been proven—including 12% of Conservative Party voters in the 2019 Canadian federal election and 26% of Republican Party supporters in the United States.

About three-in-five Canadians (62%) and half of Americans (51%) describe global warming as a “major crisis”, including 70% of those aged 18-to-34 in Canada and 54% of those aged 55 and over in the United States.

When asked about specific actions that could be taken now to deal with climate change, most Canadians and Americans feel companies and corporations (75% and 59% respectively), governments (69% and 56%) and individuals and consumers (64% and 55%) should be doing more.

Residents of both countries are also supportive of actions to mitigate climate change in the future from companies and corporations (76% in Canada and 61% in the United States), governments (71% and 58%) and individuals and consumers (66% and 55%).

Parents of children under the age of 18 were asked about the effect of conversations about climate change with their kids. Two thirds of Canadian parents (67%) and more than half of American parents (54%) say they are recycling more after chatting with their children about climate change.

Smaller proportions of parents in Canada and the United States say they are driving less than usual (38% and 32% respectively) and taking shorter showers (34% and 31%) after chatting with their kids about global warming.

Methodology:

Results are based on online studies conducted from June 1 to June 3, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our full Canadian dataset here, our full American dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Americans Prefer Biden Over Trump on Seven Policy Issues

A third of Americans consider Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris and Amy Klobuchar as “good choices” for Vice President.

Vancouver, BC [June 3, 2020] – Prospective Democratic Party nominee Joe Biden remains ahead of incumbent Donald Trump of the Republican Party with five months to go before the United States presidential election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 51% of decided voters in the United States (+1 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in April) would support Biden, while 46% (+2) would vote for Trump. Libertarian Party nominee Jo Jorgensen garners the backing of 2% of decided voters.

In 2016, Trump received 46% of the popular vote, two points behind Hillary Clinton (48%). Trump secured 306 votes in the Electoral College to Clinton’s 232.

Trump currently holds an 11-point lead over Biden among White decided voters (54% to 43%). Sizeable proportions of African American (83%) and Hispanic / Latino decided voters (67%) are planning to vote for Biden.

“Compared to what we reported on in April, there is significant movement among Independent voters,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “At this stage of the campaign, 15% of these voters are undecided, and among those who choose a candidate, Biden is nearly tied with Trump (47% to 45%).”

Most viewers of CNN and MSNBC / CNBC would vote for Biden (74% and 78% respectively), while more than seven-in-ten Fox News watchers (72%) would cast a ballot for Trump.

Biden is regarded by a plurality of Americans as the presidential candidate best suited to deal with seven policy issues:

  • The environment (46%).
  • Health care (45%).
  • Race relations (44%).
  • Education (also 44%).
  • Foreign policy (42%).
  • Government accountability (40%).
  • COVID-19 (also 40%).

Trump is ahead on three issues:

  • Job creation (43%).
  • The economy (also 43%).
  • National defense (41%).

The two contenders are virtually tied on four other issues:

  • Crime (Biden 38%, Trump 37%).
  • Managing the deficit (both at 36%).
  • Energy and oil (Biden 38%, Trump 37%).
  • Immigration (Biden 40%, Trump 39%).

When Americans are asked about nine characteristics that people may find in politicians, Biden has a higher score than Trump on eight items:

  • Being able to unite America and not divide it (47% to 30%).
  • Being in touch with the problems ordinary Americans face in their daily lives (47% to 35%).
  • Generally agreeing with respondents on issues they care about (45% to 40%).
  • Being able to bring the kind of change America needs (45% to 42%).
  • Being able to deal with labour unions effectively in the event of a dispute (45% to 41%).
  • Sharing the values of respondents (44% to 34%).
  • Being a good speaker and communicator (42% to 33%).
  • Being honest and trustworthy (42% to 32%).

Trump holds the upper hand on only one trait:

  • Being a good economic manager (47%, with Biden at 39%).

Biden has said he intends to choose a woman as his running mate. Across the United States, 40% of respondents think Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren would be a “good choice” for Vice President, followed by California Senator Kamala Harris at 39%, Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar at 35%, former Georgia Congresswoman Stacey Abrams at 29% and New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand at 26%.

More than three-in-five Democrats thin Warren (64%) and Harris (62%) would be good choices for the party’s ticket in 2020, while almost half feel the same way about Klobuchar (48%) and Abrams (46%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on June 1 and June 2, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our datasets here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Canadians Hold Mixed Feelings About Trudeau’s Performance

The Liberal Party holds a nine-point advantage over the Conservative Party across the country.

Vancouver, BC [May 8, 2020] – Canadians are divided in their assessment of the first four and a half years of Justin Trudeau’s tenure as prime minister, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 48% of Canadians think Trudeau has performed “about the same” as they expected. Similar proportions of Canadians believe Trudeau has been “better” than they envisioned (24%) or “worse” than they anticipated (25%).

“More than a third of Canadians aged 55 and over (36%) believe Trudeau has been worse than they expected,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Significantly fewer Canadians aged 35-to-54 (21%) and 18-to-34 (18%) feel the same way.”

Two-in-five Canadians (41%) believe Trudeau has accomplished “little” as head of government. Comparable quantities of Canadians believe he has achieved “much” (24%) or that it is “too early” to judge his accomplishments (also 24%) since he took office in November 2015.

While 40% of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in last year’s federal election believe Trudeau as accomplished “much” since becoming prime minister, the proportion falls to 27% among those who cast ballots for New Democratic Party (NDP) candidates and to just 6% among those who supported the Conservative Party.

Respondents to this survey were also asked to evaluate if 10 different issues are better, the same, or worse now than six years ago, when Stephen Harper served as Canada’s prime minister.

At least one-in-five Canadians believe that four issues are better now: Canada’s reputation in the world (30%), Canada’s role in global affairs (25%), the environment (21%) and ethics and accountability (20%).

Fewer Canadians believe there has been an improvement on public safety (19%), health care (also 19%), national unity (18%), the Canadian economy (16%), taxation (13%) and national defence (11%).

If a federal election were held today, the governing Liberals would garner the backing of 39% of decided voters. The Conservatives are in second place with 30%, followed by the New Democrats with 17%, the Green Party with 7%, the Bloc Québécois with 5%, and the People’s Party with 1%.

The Liberals are particularly popular in Ontario (44%), Quebec (40%) and British Columbia (39%). The Conservatives are ahead in Alberta (45%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (38%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 1 to May 3, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Jeangagnon

Most British Columbians Agree with Building Coastal GasLink

Seven-in-ten residents believe the project will create hundreds of jobs in the province.

Vancouver, BC [March 17, 2020] – British Columbians are in favour of carrying on with the construction of the Coastal GasLink pipeline by a 2-to-1 margin, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 61% of British Columbians agree with building the Coastal GasLink pipeline, while 30% disagree.

Support for the continuation of the project is highest among men (68%), British Columbians aged 55 and over (69%) and residents of Vancouver Island (67%).

“More than half of British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the last provincial election (56%) want to build the Coastal GasLink pipeline,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “A similar proportion of BC Green Party voters agree (53%), but support is highest among those who cast ballots for the BC Liberals in 2017 (75%).”

Seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%) have followed news related to the Coastal GasLink pipeline “very closely” or “moderately closely” over the past two months.

Almost half of British Columbians (48%) agree with the actions that have been taken by the Wet’suwet’en elected band council in connection with the Coastal GasLink pipeline. The rating is slightly lower for the actions of the Government of British Columbia (44%) and the Government of Canada (41%).

Fewer than two-in-five British Columbians agree with the actions of the people who have participated in protests (38%), the Wet’suwet’en Hereditary Chiefs (37%) and the people who have participated in road blockades (33%).

When asked if the provincial government should do anything necessary to ensure that the Coastal GasLink pipeline does not happen, 38% of British Columbians agreed and 53% disagreed.

Half of British Columbians (50%) disagree with the notion of the Coastal GasLink pipeline threatening the health and safety of residents, and 70% believe the project will create hundreds of jobs.

Three-in-five British Columbians (61%) support the development of LNG in the province, while 25% are opposed.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 4 to March 7, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

BC’s Three Biggest Cities Get Satisfactory Grades on Most Issues

Vancouver posts the highest score on dealing with transportation, while Burnaby is ahead on handling crime.

Vancouver, BC [January 29, 2020] – More than two thirds of residents of Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby are pleased with the way their municipal governments have handled three specific issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative samples in the three cities, 79% of residents say their municipal administration has done a “very good” or “good” job in providing sanitation services.

In addition, 70% of residents are satisfied with how parks and recreation facilities are being managed, and 69% think their municipal government is enhancing their overall quality of life.

More than three-in-five residents of Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby are also content with what their municipal governments are doing to protect the environment (66%), promote tourism (65%), foster artistic and cultural activities (also 65%) and manage development and growth (63%).

At least half of residents are satisfied with the way Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby are dealing with transportation (57%), dealing with crime (54%), making City Hall work in a transparent and unbiased fashion (52%), handling the city’s finances (52%) and engaging with regular people (50%).

“There are some subtle differences between the three cities when it comes to public safety,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 60% of Burnaby residents endorse the performance of their administration, the proportion falls to 54% in Vancouver and 52% in Surrey.”

The lowest ranked issue across all three cities is dealing with homelessness and poverty (44%). Satisfaction with this file rises to 52% in Surrey, but is lower in Vancouver (42%) and Burnaby (39%).

The assessment of City of Vancouver residents on many services has increased markedly since a Research Co. survey conducted in October 2018, particularly on managing development and growth (from 24% to 62%), dealing with crime (from 44% to 54%) and protecting the environment (from 55% to 64%).

A similar situation is observed in Surrey, where the current administration has a higher ranking than the previous one on issues such as promoting tourism (from 39% to 64%), dealing with transportation (from 24% to 57%) and enhancing quality of life (from 36% to 68%).

The approval rating for the three mayors is very similar: 52% for Vancouver’s Kennedy Stewart, 51% for Burnaby’s Mike Hurley and 50% for Surrey’s Doug McCallum.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 2 to January 6, 2020, among 1,200 adults in Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age and gender in each municipality. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 2.8 percentage points for each municipality, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views of Pipeline Expansion in British Columbia Remain Stable

Two thirds believe the project will create hundreds of jobs, but fewer than two-in-five expect lower gas prices.

Vancouver, BC [December 18, 2019] – After six months that included a federal election, the perceptions of British Columbians on pipeline expansion did not go through a severe fluctuation, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 56% of British Columbians agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion, while 35% disagree and 10% are undecided.

“There has been practically no change in the way British Columbians feel about this project,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Our survey from June also showed 56% of British Columbians agreeing with the re-approval of the project.”

More than seven-in-ten residents of Southern BC (74%) and Northern BC (71%) are in favour of the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion. Support for the course of action authorized by the federal government is lower in the Fraser Valley (59%), Metro Vancouver (51%) and Vancouver Island (49%).

There is a sizeable gender gap on this question. While two thirds of men (66%) agree with the pipeline expansion, only 46% of women concur.

Two thirds of British Columbians (68%, -5 since May) expect the Trans Mountain Pipeline to create hundreds of jobs for British Columbians—an argument that resonates especially well with 81% of those who voted for the BC Liberals in the 2017 provincial election.

Three-in-five British Columbians (59%, unchanged) say they are disappointed with the way the federal government has handled the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion. 

More than two-in-five British Columbians (45%, -1) believe the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of British Columbians. Voters who cast ballots for the BC Green Party (64%) and the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (59%) in 2017 are more likely to have this point of view.

Across the province, 40% of British Columbians (-1) believe the provincial government should do anything necessary to ensure that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion does not happen—including 45% of women, 51% of residents aged 18-to-34, and 63% of BC Green Party voters in 2017.

The notion of gas prices being lower in British Columbia now that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion has been re-approved is convincing for just over a third of British Columbians (37%, -2).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 4 to December 7, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Gas Prices Stirring New Behaviours in British Columbia Drivers

Just under one-in-five drivers in the province have gone to the United States with the sole purpose of purchasing cheaper fuel.

Vancouver, BC [December 11, 2019] – A significant proportion of drivers in British Columbia are taking steps to deal with the cost of fuel in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, half of drivers in British Columbia (51%) say they have purchased gas for their vehicle in their community even if the tank was not near empty because prices were suddenly lower.

Drivers in Vancouver Island (56%) are more likely to have purchased gas after they noticed a drop in prices.

Two-in-five drivers in the province (39%) say they have purchased less gas for their vehicle in their community—or did not fill up the entire tank—because prices were suddenly higher.

Almost half of drivers in the Fraser Valley (47%) have chosen not to completely fill up because of inflated gas prices.

Just under one-in-five drivers in British Columbia (18%) say they have driven to the United States with the sole purpose of purchasing cheaper gas for their vehicle.

“Two-in-five drivers who reside in the Fraser Valley (40%) say they have visited the United States only to get gas in the past year” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “They have been joined by one-in-five (21%) drivers in Metro Vancouver.”

The Government of British Columbia recently introduced legislation to compel oil and gas companies to disclose supply and pricing data. More than four-in-five British Columbians (85%) support this legislation, including 90% of residents aged 55 and over.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 27 to November 29, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Vancouverites Remain Supportive of Plastic Reduction Plan

More than three-in-four  residents agree with banning the use of foam cups and take-out containers.

Vancouver, BC [November 27, 2019] – A majority of Vancouver residents continue to favour specific guidelines to reduce the use of plastics in the city, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative municipal sample, almost four-in-five Vancouverites (78%) are in favour of banning the distribution of single-use plastic utensils, unless they are directly requested by customers—down six points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2018.

In June 2018, Vancouver City Council voted to enact prohibitions on the use of specific plastic items as part of its “Zero Waste 2040” strategy. The full details of by-laws related to plastic straws, plastic bags, disposable cups and disposable utensils are expected to be released by November 30.

A ban on all expanded polystyrene foam (or “thermal”) cups and take-out containers will come into effect on January 1, 2020. More than three-in-four Vancouverites (76%, -9) agree with this course of action.

“Public support for the ban on foam cups and take-out containers is highest (87%) among Vancouverites aged 55 and over,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Sizeable majorities of residents aged 18-to-34 (72%) and 35-to-54 (73%) are also in favour of this prohibition.”

A ban on the distribution of single-use plastic straws, with appropriate exemptions for health care needs, is backed by 77% of Vancouverites (-8).

More than four-in-five Vancouverites (83%, -10) believe it would be a “good” idea to require restaurants and coffee shops to provide recycling options for the disposable cups they give out.

Almost two thirds of residents (65%, +11) think it would be a good idea to ban the distribution of disposable cups altogether, while three-in-five (60%, +5) say customers should pay an additional fee for the disposable cups they require when purchasing a beverage.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 12 to November 15, 2019, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Majorities of Canadians Oppose Trophy Hunting and Fur Trade

More than half of residents are also against using animals in rodeos and keeping animals in zoos or aquariums.

Vancouver, BC [November 22, 2019] – Sizeable proportions of Canadians voice opposition to two practices related to human interaction with animals, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than four-in-five Canadians (85%) are opposed to hunting animals for sport and three-in-four (75%) are against killing animals for their fur.

Opposition to the fur trade is highest in Ontario (81%) and British Columbia (79%), but also includes most residents of Atlantic Canada (75%), Quebec (74%), Alberta (also 74%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (61%).

Almost three-in-five Canadians (59%) are opposed to using animals in rodeos. More than half (52%) are against keeping animals in zoos or aquariums.

Residents of Alberta are evenly divided when it comes to the use of animals in rodeos (Agree 49%, Disagree 49%). In Manitoba and Saskatchewan, respondents are more likely to endorse the practice (50%) than to be against it (43%).

Majorities in Atlantic Canada (67%), Quebec (65%), British Columbia (62%) and Ontario (59%) are opposed to using animals in rodeos, as well as 67% of women and 64% of Canadians aged 18-to-34.

Conversely, 75% of Canadians are in favour of eating animals and two thirds (65%) are in favour of hunting animals for meat.

“Canadians hold very different views on the issue of hunting depending on whether the practice will lead to sustenance,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In both cases, the level of animosity towards hunting is higher among women than men.”

The Canadian Football League (CFL) is organizing a rodeo as part of this year’s Grey Cup festivities in Calgary.

Across the country, 35% of Canadians agree with this decision by the CFL, while 46% disagree and 19% are undecided.

Opposition to the idea of holding a rodeo as part of the Grey Cup weekend is highest in British Columbia (53%) and Quebec (51%). 

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 10 to November 13, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Dietmar Rabich

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two Thirds of British Columbians Unaffected by Carbon Tax

Residents are divided on whether the goal of making people more mindful of their carbon consumption has been achieved.

Vancouver, BC [November 6, 2019] – Most British Columbians believe the provincial carbon tax—originally implemented on July 1, 2008—has not been detrimental to their domestic assets, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 66% of British Columbians believe that the provincial carbon tax has not negatively affected the finances of their household, while one-in-five (21%) think it has.

Men (28%) are more likely to believe that the carbon tax has negatively affected their household finances than women (15%). Residents aged 18-to-34 are also more likely to have an adverse opinion on this issue (26%) than those aged 35-to-54 (20%) and those aged 55 and over (15%).

When asked if they think the introduction of the carbon tax in British Columbia has led people to be more mindful of their carbon consumption, residents of the province are deeply divided.

While 45% of British Columbians believe the carbon tax has led people to change their behaviour, 44% disagree and 13% are undecided.

“Residents of Northern BC (63%) are more likely to believe that the carbon tax has made residents more mindful,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are significantly lower in the Fraser Valley (45%), Southern BC (44%), Metro Vancouver (43%) and Vancouver Island (42%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 25 to October 28, 2019, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error — which measures sample variability — is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Want Ottawa to Do More on Environment

Air pollution, the pollution of rivers lakes and reservoirs, and global warming are the main concerns for residents.

Vancouver, BC [October 4, 2019] – A sizeable proportion of British Columbians is disappointed with the way the federal government has dealt with environmental issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, 45% of respondents believe that the federal government in Ottawa has not paid enough attention to the environment.

About three-in-ten British Columbians (29%) think Ottawa has paid the right amount of attention to the environment, while 17% believe it has focused too much on this issue.

“The level of criticism towards the federal government on environmental issues is decidedly higher among two groups of British Columbians,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of residents aged 55 and over (55%) and women (53%) think Ottawa should be paying more attention to the environment.”

The rating is slightly better for the two other levels of government, with 43% of British Columbians thinking their provincial and municipal administrations are not paying enough attention to the environment.

While more than half of residents of the Fraser Valley (52%) think their municipal governments have not done enough on the environmental front, the rating is lower in Metro Vancouver (44%), Vancouver Island (42%), Southern BC (39%) and Northern BC (36%).

When asked about their personal concerns about environmental problems, a majority of British Columbians mentioned air pollution (58%), the pollution of rivers, lakes and reservoirs (57%), global warming or climate change (55%) and the pollution of drinking water (55%).

Other issues that have British Columbians personally concerned are the contamination of soil and water by toxic waste (50%), deforestation and the clearance of naturally occurring forests (46%), the extinction of plant and animal species (45%), the depletion of fish stocks through overfishing (also 45%), the loss of tropical rain forests (44%) and the maintenance of the supply of fresh water for household needs (41%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 26 to September 29, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Metro Vancouverites Consider Working Conditions for Ride-Hailers

Sizeable majorities of residents would also limit the number of cars on the road and call for more wheelchair accessible vehicles.

Vancouver, BC [October 2, 2019] – As Metro Vancouver prepares to welcome ride-hailing companies, many residents appear concerned over the working conditions of drivers, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, three-in-four residents (75%) think British Columbia should require ride-hailing drivers and taxi drivers to be paid a minimum wage, as well as benefits such as overtime and vacation pay.

“Men (78%) and Metro Vancouverites aged 35-to-54 (76%) are more likely to call for ride-hailing policies similar to what the State of California is currently pondering,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents who voted for any of the three major parties in the last provincial election are in agreement on this matter as well.”

Seven-in-ten Metro Vancouverites (71%) think ride-hailing companies should devote 17% of their fleet to wheelchair accessible vehicles. Support for this measure is highest among women (72%) and residents aged 55 and over (80%).

Almost two thirds of Metro Vancouverites (64%) think the provincial government should limit the number of ride-hailing cars on the road—including 68% of men and 72% of residents of the City of Vancouver.

Across Metro Vancouver, 42% of residents believe ride-hailing companies should be allowed to operate in British Columbia, if they compete on an equal footing with taxis.

A smaller proportion (39%) believe ride-hailing companies should be allowed to operate in British Columbia without reservations, while only 6% of Metro Vancouverites would ban ride-hailing in the province.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 20 to September 23, 2019, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.7 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Unfamiliar with “The Pact for a Green New Deal”

More than half of Canadians (54%) believe putting a price on carbon emissions is a sensible policy.

Vancouver, BC [August 2, 2019] – A large proportion of Canadians are unaware of a recent policy proposal related to environmental issues, but some of its key messages clearly resonate with the public, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, only three-in-ten Canadians (30%) say they are “very familiar” or “moderately familiar” with “The Pact for a Green New Deal.”

“The Pact for a Green New Deal” is calling for Canada to move away from fossil fuels, cut carbon emissions in half by 2030, protect jobs, promote green transportation and deal with economic inequality. The non-partisan policy proposal was launched in Canada in May 2019.

Almost three-in-five Canadians (59%) disagree with the idea of Canada taking no action on climate change unless other countries, which have higher carbon emissions, take major steps as well. The level of disagreement with inaction is highest among women (61%), Canadians aged 55 and over (62%) and those who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2015 federal election (65%).

More than three-in-five Canadians (62%) believe the Canadian economy must move away from oil and gas—a proportion that includes 68% of Quebecers and 67% of British Columbians.

A majority of Canadians (54%) believe putting a price on carbon emissions is a sensible policy. Majorities of Quebecers (66%), British Columbians (56%) and Atlantic Canadians (53%) agree with this notion, while the proportion is lower in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (48%), Ontario (47%) and Alberta (36%).

“There are some clear regional differences on environmental and energy issues across Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the four provinces where provincial governments have expressed dissatisfaction with the federal carbon tax, support for this type of policy is lower than in the rest of the country.”

When asked which political party is better equipped to implement “The Pact for a Green New Deal”, 26% of Canadians select the governing Liberal Party, while 23% pick the Green Party. 

Perceptions are lower for the Conservative Party (19%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (11%), and one-in-five Canadians (20%) select no party. 

Across the country, 60% of Canadians (unchanged since a Research Co. survey conducted in December 2018) think global warming (or climate change) is a fact and is mostly caused by emissions from vehicles and industrial facilities.

Just over one-in-five Canadians (21%, +6) think global warming (or climate change) is a fact and is mostly caused by natural changes, while 8% (-10) say global warming (or climate change) as a theory that has not yet been proven.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from July 15 to July 17, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most British Columbians Agree with Ottawa’s Pipeline Decision

Three-in-five residents are unconvinced that the re-approved expansion will bring lower gas prices to the province.

Vancouver, BC [July 3, 2019] – A majority of British Columbians believe the federal government made the right call in re-approving the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion, but a similar proportion voice dissatisfaction with Ottawa’s overall performance on this file, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 56% of British Columbians (+4 since May 2018) agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the pipeline expansion.

One third of British Columbians (33%) disagree with the decision, and 11% are undecided.

Agreement with Ottawa’s course of action is highest among men (66%), British Columbians aged 55 and over (also 66%), residents of the Southern Interior (67%) and BC Liberal voters in the 2017 provincial election (72%).

Almost three-in-five British Columbians (59%) say they are disappointed with the way the federal government has handled the expansion. 

“As expected, dissatisfaction with the way Ottawa handled this issue is practically universal among strong opponents (95%) and moderate opponents (73%) of the project,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But 50% of British Columbians who moderately or strongly support the expansion are also unhappy with the federal government.”

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (71%) think the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline will create hundreds of local jobs. 

Respondents are evenly divided on whether the pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of British Columbians, with 46% agreeing with the statement and 44% disagreeing with it. Two-in-five (41%) believe the provincial government should do anything necessary to ensure that the expansion does not happen.

Only 30% of British Columbians recall seeing advertisements in favour of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion over the past few weeks. Among those who were exposed to the ads, 32% said they made them “more likely” to support the expansion.

Only 39% of British Columbians think gas prices will be lower in the province now that the expansion has been re-approved—one of the key messages of the ad campaign undertaken by the Government of Alberta. Three-in-five residents (61%) either disagree with this thought (33%) or are not sure (28%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from June 22 to June 26, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Drivers in British Columbia Are Considering Electric Vehicles

Seven-in-ten residents agree with the goal of making all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province “zero emission” by 2040.

Vancouver, BC [May 31, 2019] – A significant proportion of car drivers in British Columbia would consider acquiring a “zero emission” vehicle in the future, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 51% of British Columbians who drive their own vehicles say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that the next vehicle they acquire for themselves or their household will be electric.

Majorities of drivers in Metro Vancouver (55%) and Vancouver Island (52%) are likely to consider a “zero emission” vehicle as their next purchase. The proportion is lower in the Fraser Valley (43%), Southern BC (40%) and Northern BC (37%)

When asked about specific issues that might make them less likely to purchase an electric vehicle, 24% of drivers say that they are too expensive when compared to non-electric vehicles, 24% fear becoming stranded if they cannot find a charging station, and 23% say they do not have enough places to charge the vehicle in the areas where they usually drive.

“There are some significant regional differences when the concerns of potential electric vehicle owners are analyzed,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than a third of drivers who reside in Southern BC (35%) and Northern BC (45%) claim they lack places to charge electric vehicles, compared to just 20% among those who live in Metro Vancouver.”

Earlier this year, the Government of British Columbia passed legislation to ensure that, by the year 2040, all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province will be “zero emission.” Seven-in-ten residents (70%) agree with this decision, while 21% disagree and 10% are undecided.

Almost half of British Columbians (49%) believe the goal established by the provincial government on “zero emission” vehicles is “achievable”, while 42% think it is “not achievable.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 20 to May 22, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca