Canadians Want King to Focus on Reconciliation and Environment

More than half of Canadians would have preferred a full holiday to observe and mark the passing of Queen Elizabeth II.

Vancouver, BC [September 22, 2022] – More than two thirds of Canadians think the country’s new head of state should make an effort to address two pressing issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, almost seven-in-ten Canadians (69%) believe King Charles III should advance the cause of reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, while almost three-in-four (74%) want him to commit to reduce the carbon footprint of the entire Royal Family.

More than half of Canadians (55%) say they would have preferred to see Prince William become King of the United Kingdom and the other 14 Commonwealth realms, including Canada.

Women (57%), Canadians aged 35-to-54 (58%) and British Columbians (59%) are more likely to be supportive of William’s ascension to the throne.

When asked about the fact that King Charles III will be featured on coins and bills that will be used in Canada, 56% of Canadians say they do not have a problem with this situation, while one third (34%) disagree.

Animosity towards the presence of King Charles III on Canada’s currency reaches 42% among Canadians aged 18-to-34 and 38% among women.

More than half of Canadians (54%) believe Queen Elizabeth II’s passing should have been observed and marked with a full holiday for everyone, while 9% would have preferred a full holiday for public sector employees only.

Just under three-in-ten Canadians (29%) think a holiday should not have been considered at all—a proportion that jumps to 39% among Conservative Party voters in the 2021 federal election.

Compared to a Research Co. survey conducted in February 2022, the perceptions of Canadians on the country have changed.

More than a third of Canadians (36%) say they would prefer for Canada to have an elected head of state, down 13 points since February. In contrast, just over three-in-ten Canadians (31%, +10) would like for Canada to remain a monarchy, while 24% (+6) do not care either way.

“More than a third of Albertans (42%), Atlantic Canadians (40%) and British Columbians (34%) are supportive of the continuation of the monarchy in Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower in Ontario (31%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (26%) and Quebec (25%).”

The notion of an elected head of state is more prevalent among Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (39%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (also 39%) in the 2021 federal election than among those who cast ballots for the Conservatives (32%).

Positive perceptions of six members of the Royal family have improved since February. Almost half of Canadians (46%, +11) have a favourable view of King Charles III, while just under a third (32%, +5) feel the same way about Queen Consort Camilla.

Just over two thirds of Canadians hold favourable views on William, Prince of Wales (67%, +9) and Catherine, Princess of Wales (also 67%, +7). The rating is lower for Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex (64%, +14) and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex (53%, +9).

A majority of Canadians (52%, +4) believe Canada will still be a monarchy in twenty years, while just over three-in-ten (31%, +1) think the country will have an elected head of state.

Residents of Alberta are significantly more likely to predict Canada remaining a monarchy in 2042 (65%) than their counterparts in Atlantic Canada (60%), Ontario (55%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (51%), British Columbia (45%) and Quebec (also 45%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from September 16 to September 18, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

More in Canada and U.S. Feel Climate Change is Major Crisis

Most Canadians and Americans are willing to pay higher taxes in order to adequately address global warming.

Vancouver, BC [September 13, 2022] – The concerns of residents of Canada and the United States about global warming have increased over the past two years, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 68% of Canadians (+6 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2020) and 60% of Americans (+9) feel that climate change is a “major crisis”.

Almost seven-in-ten Canadians (69%, +5) and three-in-five Americans (60%, +7) think global warming is a fact and is mostly caused by emissions from vehicles and industrial facilities.

About one-in-five respondents in the two countries (20% in Canada and 21% in the United States) believe climate change is a fact and is mostly caused by natural changes. Only 5% of Canadians and 12% of Americans brand global warming as a theory that has not yet been proven.

“Belief in human-made climate change is low among Republicans in the United States (35%) and Conservatives in Canada (47%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are strikingly different among Democrats in the United States (80%) and Liberal Party voters in Canada (82%).”

Majorities of Canadians and Americans (59% and 61% respectively) say they are willing to pay higher taxes to adequately address climate change. Only two other issues come close to this level of acceptance for higher taxation: schools (CAN 57%, USA 64%) and homelessness (CAN 57%, USA 61%).

Fewer Canadians and Americans are willing to pay higher taxes in order to adequately address four other issues: forest fires (55% and 58% respectively), floods (52% and 56% respectively), housing improvements (51% each) and transit improvements (44% and 46% respectively).

Sizeable majorities of Canadians and Americans believe three groups should be doing more now to deal with issues related to climate change that are happening or impacting people directly now: companies and corporations (75% and 70% respectively), governments (69% and 65%) and individuals and consumers (67% and 65%).

Most residents of both countries also believe that more action is required to address issues related to climate change that may happen or impact people directly in the future from companies and corporations (76% in Canada and 70% in the United States), governments (72% and 66% respectively) and individuals and consumers (68% and 65%).

Parents of children under the age of 18 were asked about the effect of conversations they have had with their kids about climate change. Significant proportions of parents in Canada (85%) and the United States (79%) say they are recycling more as a result of these chats.

Practically half of American parents (49%) and a majority of Canadian parents (55%) claim to be driving less, and more than two-in-five (44% in the United States, 47% in Canada) say they are taking shorter showers as a result of conversations about global warming with their children.

Fewer parents in each country acknowledge taking other steps, such as reducing their consumption of meat (CAN 36%, USA 30%), changing the way they voted in a federal election (24% each) or changing the way they voted in a local election (CAN 18%, USA 21%).

Methodology: Results are based on online studies conducted from August 19 to August 21, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Positive Views on TMX Pipeline Rise in BC, Drop Slightly in Alberta

A third of British Columbians (33%) believe the project should be stopped, down eight points since October 2021.

Vancouver, BC [August 5, 2022] – Favourable perceptions on the expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline have increased in British Columbia and remain high in Alberta, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative provincial samples, 51% of British Columbians agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the project, up six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in October 2021.

Practically seven-in-ten Albertans (69%) also agree with the re-approval of the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion, down five points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November 2020.

In British Columbia, residents of Southern BC (66%), Northern BC (61%) and the Fraser Valley (58%) are more likely to hold positive views on the pipeline project. The rating is lower in Metro Vancouver (50%) and Vancouver Island (41%).

In Alberta, sizeable majorities of residents of Edmonton (72%) and Calgary (66%) are in favour of the pipeline expansion, along with 70% of those who live other areas of the province.

“The proportion of British Columbians who want the provincial government to do anything necessary to ensure that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion does not happen dropped from 41% in October 2021 to 33% in July 2022,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In Alberta, 25% of residents (+3) share the same point of view.”

More than half of British Columbians (51%, -4) and three-in-five Albertans (61%, +2) say they are disappointed with the way the federal government has managed the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion.

Significant majorities of Albertans (78%, -1) and British Columbians (71%, +6) believe the Trans Mountain Pipeline will create hundreds of jobs for residents of each province.

Two-in-five British Columbians (40%, -7) think the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of the province’s residents. Just under three-in-ten Albertans (28%, +11) share this point of view.

Fewer than half of residents of the two provinces expect gas prices to be lower now that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion has been re-approved: 40% in Alberta (+6) and 37% in British Columbia (+1).

In November 2016, the federal government rejected a proposal—known as the Enbridge Northern Gateway—to build a new pipeline from Alberta to British Columbia’s north coast, to export oil on tankers to Asian markets.

Just under half of British Columbians (46%, +5) believe it is time to reconsider the Enbridge Northern Gateway proposal, while just over a quarter (27%, -7) disagree.

Support for taking a second look at the Enbridge Northern Gateway is highest in Northern BC (60%), followed by Southern BC (51%), Metro Vancouver (45%), the Fraser Valley (43%) and Vancouver Island (38%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from July 29 to July 31, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia and 800 adults in Alberta. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in each province. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.5 percentage points for each province, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables for British Columbia here, our data tables for Alberta here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 Photo Credit: Codex

Double-Digit Advantage for Ontario’s Progressive Conservatives

Half of Ontarians (50%) approve of the performance of Doug Ford as Premier and PC leader, while 46% disapprove.

Vancouver, BC [June 1, 2022] – Public support for the governing Progressive Conservative Party has increased as the provincial election in Ontario draws near, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Ontarian adults, 39% of decided voters say they will cast a ballot for the Ontario PC candidate in their riding tomorrow or have already done so, up five points since the previous Research Co. poll completed in mid-May.

The Ontario Liberal Party remains in second place with 26% (-3), followed by the Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) with 23% (=), the Ontario Green Party with 6% (-1), the New Blue Party of Ontario with 3% (=) and the Ontario Party with 1% (=).

Since mid-May, the Progressive Conservatives have improved their standing in Ontario among both male decided voters (42%, +5) and female decided voters (37%, +7).

More than two-in-five decided voters aged 35-to-54 (42%) and aged 55 and over (also 42%) intend to back an Ontario PC candidate. The race is closer among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (PC 31%, Liberal 28%, NDP 26%).

“The Progressive Conservatives are keeping 81% of their 2018 voters, while the New Democrats are only maintaining 71% of them,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The Ontario Liberals are only attracting 52% of Ontarians who voted for the federal Liberal Party in last year’s Canadian federal election, as one-in-four of these voters (25%) are planning to vote for Ontario PC candidates tomorrow.”

Half of Ontarians (50%, +4) approve of the way Premier and Ontario Progressive Conservative Party leader Doug Ford has handled his duties.

The rating is lower for Official Opposition and Ontario NDP leader Andrea Horwath (46%, -1) Ontario Liberal Party leader Steven Del Duca (42%, =), Ontario Green Party leader Mike Schreiner (40%, +9), New Blue Party of Ontario leader Jim Karahalios (16%, +3) and Ontario Party leader Derek Sloan (16%, +4).

On the momentum question, Schreiner does particularly well, with 18% of Ontarians (+9 since mid-May) saying their opinion of the Ontario Green Party leader has improved since the electoral campaign started. The needle did not move for Del Duca (20%, =) and smaller gains are seen for Horwath (19%, +2), Ford (also 19%, +3), Karahalios (6%, +2) and Sloan (5%, +2).

More than a third of Ontarians (37%, +4) believe Ford would make the best premier of the province among the six main party leaders. Horwath is a distant second with 21% (-2), followed by Del Duca (19%, -1), Schreiner (7%, +4), Karahalios (2%, =) and Sloan (also 2%, =).

There is little movement on the issue landscape, where the top ranking belongs to housing, poverty and homelessness (26%, =), followed by health care (23%, -2) and the economy and jobs (22%, +2).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on May 31 and June 1, 2022, among 700 Ontario adults, including 659 decided voters in the 2022 provincial election. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points for the entire sample and +/- 3.8 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Josh Evnin

Separated Bike Lanes Remain Particularly Popular in Vancouver

About a third of residents believe that some of the existing paths should be removed, but two-in-five endorse the status quo.

Vancouver, BC [May 27, 2022] – Two thirds of residents of the City of Vancouver are satisfied with the existence of dedicated cycling infrastructure, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative municipal sample, 66% of Vancouverites support having separated bike lanes in the city, up two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2021.

“Vancouver’s cycling infrastructure is accepted by sizeable majorities of residents who bike (82%) or take public transit (79%) on weekdays,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Most Vancouverites who drive (59%) are also in favour of the separated bike lanes.”

Just over half of Vancouverites of East Asian descent (54%) support the city’s separated bike lanes. The rating is higher among the city’s residents of South Asian (70%) and European (71%) ancestry.

About a third of Vancouverites (32%, +4) believe there are too many separated bike lanes in the city and some should be removed, while just under one-in-five (19%, -3) say there are not enough separated bike lanes and more should be added.

Two-in-five residents of Vancouver (40%, -1) think the current number of bike lanes is correct—a proportion that rises to 46% among women, 48% among Vancouverites aged 18-to-34 and 43% among residents of the West side.

The Vancouver Park Board approved a temporary bike lane on Park Drive in Stanley Park until the Summer of 2022. More than three-in-five Vancouverites (63%, +4) think this is a “good idea”, while 24% (-5) consider the decision a “bad idea.”

Vancouverites who bike to school or work are extremely supportive of the temporary bike lane in Stanley Park (86%), along with those who rely on public transit to commute (69%).

While 32% of drivers in Vancouver consider the approval of a bike lane on Park Drive as a “bad idea”, more than half (57%) say it is a “good idea.”

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 17 to May 19, 2022, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Five-Point Lead for Ruling Progressive Conservatives in Ontario

Ontarians are divided when asked if the Liberals and the New Democrats should merge into a single party. 

Vancouver, BC [May 18, 2022] – The Ontario Progressive Conservative Party holds the upper hand in the provincial election campaign, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Ontarians, 34% of decided voters say they will support the Ontario PC candidate in their riding in next month’s provincial ballot.

The Ontario Liberal Party is second with 29%, followed by the Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) with 23%, the Ontario Green Party with 7%, the New Blue Party of Ontario with 3% and the Ontario Party with 1%.

The Progressive Conservatives are particularly popular among men (37%) and Ontarians aged 55 and over (41%). The Liberals are ahead in the 416 region (37%), while the New Democrats post their best numbers in Southwestern Ontario (32%).

Ontarians are divided when assessing the performance of Premier and Ontario Progressive Conservative Party leader Doug Ford. While 46% of the province’s residents approve of the way he has handled his duties, 48% disapprove.

More than two-in-five Ontarians approve of both Official Opposition and Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Andrea Horwath (47%) and Ontario Liberal Party leader Steven Del Duca (42%). The rating is lower for Ontario Green Party leader Mike Schreiner (31%), New Blue Party of Ontario leader Jim Karahalios (13%) and Ontario Party leader Derek Sloan (12%).

The first weeks of the campaign have not yielded a positive momentum score for any of the six main party leaders. One-in-five Ontarians (20%) say their opinion of Del Duca has improved. The numbers are paltrier on this indicator for Horwath (17%), Ford (16%), Schreiner (9%), Karahalios (4%) and Sloan (3%).

A third of Ontarians (33%) say Ford would make the best premier of the province, followed by Horwath (23%), Del Duca (20%), Schreiner (3%), Sloan (2%) and Karahalios (also 2%).

Ontarians identify three issues as the most important ones facing the province: housing, poverty and homelessness (26%), health care (25%) and the economy and jobs (20%).

“Ontarians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to look at housing, homelessness and poverty as the most important challenge (36%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Ontarians aged 55 and over are currently more concerned about health care (32%).”

Ford is perceived as the best leader to manage the economy and jobs (35%), crime and public safety (33%), energy and pipelines (31%) and accountability (29%). Horwath is ahead on being able to handle housing, homelessness and poverty (29%).

There is no clear leader when Ontarians ponder the best person to deal with health care (Horwath 28%, Ford 27%), education (Ford 26%, Del Duca 24%) and the environment (Ford 20%, Horwath 19%, Del Duca 19%, Schreiner 17%).

Ontarians are evenly split when asked if the Ontario Liberal Party and the Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) should merge into a single political party. While 41% of the province’s residents agree with this idea, 43% disagree and 16% are undecided.

Support for a provincial merger of Liberals and New Democrats is strongest in the 416 region (48%), but drops in Eastern Ontario (41%), Northern Ontario (also 41%), Southwestern Ontario (39%) and the 905 region (37%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 15 to May 17, 2022, among 700 Ontario adults, including 602 decided voters in the 2022 provincial election. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points for the entire sample and +/- 4.0 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: DXR

Almost Three-in-Five British Columbia Drivers Ready for Electric Car

More than seven-in-ten of the province’s residents endorse the goal of only selling “zero emission” vehicles by 2040.

Vancouver, BC [May 3, 2022] – The proportion of drivers in British Columbia who are willing to consider the purchase of an electric vehicle has increased since 2020, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 59% of British Columbians who drive their own vehicles claim it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that the next car they buy for themselves or their household will be electric, up six points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2021.

“Significant majorities of drivers in Metro Vancouver (64%) and the Fraser Valley (62%) foresee their next vehicle being electric,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower in Southern BC (54%), Vancouver Island (53%) and Northern BC (36%).”

The Government of British Columbia has passed legislation to ensure that, by the year 2040, all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province will be “zero emission.” More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (73%, +3) endorse this course of action—including 81% of those who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the 2020 provincial election, 76% of those who supported the BC Green Party and 73% of those who cast ballots for the BC Liberals.

More than three-in-four British Columbians aged 18 to 34 (78%) endorse the provincial government’s “zero emission” mandate, along with 75% of those aged 35-to-54 and 69% of those aged 55 and over.

More than half of British Columbians (53%, +2) believe the goal established by the provincial government on the issue of “zero emission” vehicles is “achievable”, while 39% (+3) think it is “not achievable.”

When British Columbians who drive their own cars are asked about issues that would make them less likely to purchase an electric vehicle, 59% say the vehicles are too expensive when compared to non-electric options—a proportion that rises to 66% among those aged 55 and over and to 70% among residents of Vancouver Island.

A majority of British Columbians who drive their own cars (54%) say they fear becoming stranded in an electric vehicle if they cannot find a charging station, and half (50%) are worried about not having enough places to charge the vehicle in the areas where they usually drive.

More than two-in-five British Columbians who drive their own cars (44%) are concerned about not having a place to charge an electric vehicle where they currently live, while 13% cite the “feel” of the vehicle compared with a non-electric option.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 25 to April 27, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Oppose Trophy Hunting, Fur Farming and Rodeos

Across the country, most residents are in favour of eating animals (72%) and hunting animals for sport (62%).  

Vancouver, BC [April 8, 2022] – More than four-in-five Canadians are against hunting animals for sport, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 81% of Canadians are opposed to trophy hunting, down seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September 2020.  

Almost four-in-five Canadians (79%, +3) oppose killing animals for their fur, while more than three-in-five (61%, -1) are against using animals in rodeos.  

In Saskatchewan and Manitoba, 23% of residents are in favour of killing animals for their fur. The proportion is smaller in Quebec (19%), Ontario (17%), Atlantic Canada (16%), Alberta (13%) and British Columbia (11%).  

Almost half of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (46%) and two-in-five Albertans (40%) favour using animas in rodeos, compared to 27% of Ontarians, 26% of British Columbians, 24% of Quebecers and 18% of Atlantic Canadians.  

More than half of Canadians (53%, +2) are opposed to keeping animals in zoos or aquariums, while just under two-in-five (39%) are in favour of this practice.  

There is a significant gender divide on the question about keeping animals in zoos or aquariums. While 46% of men see no problem with this practice, only 34% of women concur.  

Sizeable majorities of Canadians favour hunting animals for meat (62%, -3) and eating animals (72%, -4).  

Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2021 federal election are more likely to support hunting animals for meat (73%) than those who cast ballots for candidates representing the New Democratic Party (NDP) (67%) and the Liberal Party (58%).

“The move towards abandoning the consumption of animals is more popular among women (25%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (29%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “On a regional basis, one-in-four residents of Ontario, Quebec and British Columbia (25% each) are also against eating animals.”

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 1 to April 3, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

What Is Saskatchewan?

Canada’s first crowdsourced poll reveals a province divided, deadlocked and potentially disengaged.  

Vancouver, BC [February 25, 2022] – Last week, Saskatchewan residents, hungry for a new way to inform themselves about their government, community and province, crowdsourced Vancouver’s Research Co. to conduct a poll on their behalf.  

The answer to the question “What is Saskatchewan?”, however, remains fairly elusive.  

An online study conducted from February 19 to February 23, 2022, among a representative sample of 808 adults in Saskatchewan, with a focus on the present and future of the province’s politics, COVID-19 pandemic response and economic conditions, revealed consensus opinion on very little.  

For example, one of the most consistent answers, 1 in 4, was “Not sure”, in response to questions on the necessity of new or rebranded political parties to replace the New Democratic Party (NDP) or the Saskatchewan Party. More than a third of residents (37%) agreed with the statement that “neither of the two major political parties in Saskatchewan truly represent my views.”  

“While support for the Saskatchewan Party amongst all voters remains strong, a significant number of residents feel disengaged when it comes to Saskatchewan’s political future,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Premier Scott Moe’s approval rating stands at 50%, yet 54% of residents agree that his government is not doing enough to deal with the suicide crisis in northern Saskatchewan.”  

Tammy Nicklas-Robert, a Saskatoon, Saskatchewan-based researcher and communications’ consultant, used the GoFundMe platform to crowdsource the Research Co. study as one potential solution to what she sees as mounting frustration in her province due to a collective sense of isolation and powerlessness.  

“When I first floated the idea on social media, I was overwhelmed by the volume and intensity of the response,” says Nicklas-Robert. “What I heard is after two years of the pandemic, Saskatchewan people are feeling isolated, disheartened by what they perceive to be a lack of trustworthy data and facts related to their province’s social, economic and political reality, but also ready to reconnect with like-minded collectives.”  

She points to the result on mask-wearing in Saskatchewan after the mandate drops as evidence that those collectives will emerge. More than three-in-five Saskatchewanians (63%) say they plan to continue wearing a mask or face covering when entering businesses and public venues, even if this is no longer a requirement.  

“When we know how much anger can be triggered in others when they see someone wearing a medical mask, even during a pandemic, those who plan to continue to wear one in public after February 28 will hopefully find some comfort in knowing that they are well within the majority planning to do the same,” she continued.    

More highlights from this study:    

COVID-19  

A majority of Saskatchewan residents (58%) consider COVID-19 as a real threat to them and their familys health and safety. More than a third (36%) think COVID-19 is not a real threat.  

Most of the province’s residents (53%) are satisfied with the way their municipal government has dealt with COVID-19. The rating is lower for the Saskatchewan government (48%) and the federal Liberal government (37%).  

While a majority of Saskatchewanians trust their provincial government to respond to a natural disaster (57%), the trust-level drops on all other issues tested, such as managing the provincial budget (49%), ensuring the sustainability of the health care system (46%) and collaborating with public health and medical professionals to establish health guidelines and restrictions (44%).  

Just over two-in-five residents trust their provincial government to release accurate (43%) and complete (41%) information about COVID-19 cases and hospitalization rates to the media and the public.  

More than half of Saskatchewanians (55%) agree with the provincial governments decision to cancel “Proof of Vaccination” or negative test requirement in order to enter specific businesses and public venues, while two-in-five (40%) disagree with it.  

Residents are evenly divided on the provincial governments decision to end the indoor mask mandate on February 28 (Agree 48%, Disagree 47%).    

The Economy  

Residents are also evenly divided on the state of Saskatchewans economy, with 43% considering it very good” or good” and 45% deeming it bad” or very bad.”  

One-in-four Saskatchewanians (26%) expect the provincial economy to improve over the next six months, while 43% foresee no change and one-in-five (19%) predict a decline.    

Politics  

Half of the province’s residents (50%) approve of Scott Moe’s performance as Premier and Saskatchewan Party leader, while two-in-five (40%) disapprove. The rating is lower for departing Saskatchewan NDP leader Ryan Meili (34%), Progressive Conservative Party leader Glen Leson (17%), Green Party leader Naomi Hunter (15%) and Liberal Party leader Jeff Walters (13%).  

More than half of decided voters in the province (53%) would support the Saskatchewan Party if a provincial election were held today, with the Saskatchewan NDP a distant second with 37%. Support is in single digits for the Buffalo Party (3%), the Green Party (2%), the Progressive Conservative Party (also 2%) and the Liberal Party (1%).  

Almost half of residents (47%) say they would vote for the Saskatchewan Party if Moe is no longer its leader in the next provincial election—including 86% of those who voted for the party in 2020.  

A third of Saskatchewanians (34%) say they plan to vote for the NDP even with a leader other than Meili—including 84% of those who cast ballots for NDP candidates in the last provincial election.  

More than three-in-ten residents believe the province needs a new centre-right political party that is not the Saskatchewan Party (33%) or a new centre-left political party that is not the NDP (32%). More than a third (37%) feel that neither of the two major parties in Saskatchewan truly represent their views.  

A majority of residents (55%) believe the NDP should consider a re-brand before the next election—a proportion that rises to 61% among those who voted for the New Democrats in 2020.  

Just under half of Saskatchewanians believe that the provincial government is doing enough to deal with two pending concerns: the discovery of residential school grave sites (49%) and the future of the oil and gas industry (46%).  

Fewer residents think the provincial government is paying enough attention to the impact of climate change (42%), the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs (30%) and the suicide crisis in northern Saskatchewan (27%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from February 19 to February 23, 2022, among 808 adults in Saskatchewan. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Saskatchewan. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

BC NDP Remains Ahead of BC Liberals in British Columbia

The approval rating for Premier John Horgan stands at 69%, while Kevin Falcon starts his tenure as BC Liberal leader at 38%.  

Vancouver, BC [February 18, 2022] – The BC New Democratic Party (NDP) holds an eight-point advantage over the opposition BC Liberals among decided voters in British Columbia, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 46% of decided voters would cast a ballot for the BC NDP candidate in their constituency if a provincial election were held today.  

The BC Liberals are in second place with 38%, followed by the BC Green Party with 13% and the BC Conservative Party with 2%.  

The BC NDP holds substantial leads over the BC Liberals among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (43% to 36%) and decided voters aged 35-to-54 (48% to 35%). The race is closer among decided voters aged 55 and over (BC NDP 46%, BC Liberals 42%).  

While the two main parties are separated by just three points among male decided voters (BC NDP 44%, BC Liberals 41%), the New Democrats have a substantial lead over the BC Liberals among female decided voters (47% to 35%).  

Almost seven-in-ten British Columbians (69%) approve of the performance of Premier and BC NDP leader John Horgan, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted just before the last provincial election in October 2020.  

The approval rating for Kevin Falcon—who became the leader of the BC Liberals earlier this month—stands at 38%. The indicator is similar for BC Greens leader Sonia Furstenau (36%, -10) and lower for BC Conservative leader Trevor Bolin (19%).  

“British Columbia’s two main party leaders are not having difficulties connecting with their base of support,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Nine-in-ten BC NDP voters in 2020 approve of Horgan (90%), while two thirds of BC Liberal voters in the last provincial ballot approve of Falcon (67%).”  

A third of British Columbians (33%, +10) identify housing, homelessness and poverty as the most important issue facing the province today—a proportion that rises to 41% among those aged 18-to-34.   Health care is second on the list of concerns with 23% (+2), followed by the economy and jobs (16%, -9), the environment (10%, +3), COVID-19 (6%, -7) and crime and public safety (4%, =).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from February 12 to February 14, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Xue Dong

British Columbians Still Back Proposed Ban on Single-Use Plastics

Three-in-four of the province’s residents say they rely on their own re-usable bags to transport groceries out of a store.  
 
Vancouver, BC [December 31, 2021] – Public support remains high in British Columbia for the federal government’s plan to reduce plastic use across Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 82% of British Columbians are in favour of banning single-use plastics, unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2021.
 
The federal government’s proposed regulation focuses on items such as grocery checkout bags, straws, stir sticks, six-pack rings, plastic cutlery and food takeout containers made from hard-to-recycle plastics. Several municipalities in British Columbia have already implemented their own guidelines for specific items, such as grocery checkout bags.  
 
Just over three-in-four British Columbians (76%, -1) acknowledge relying on their own reusable bag to transport groceries out of a store after purchasing them. Significantly smaller proportions of the province’s residents use bags provided by the store, either made out of paper (11%) or plastic (9%).  
 
“There is a generational gap in the adoption of reusable bags in British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Practically nine-in-ten residents aged 55 and over (88%) are already using their own bags at grocery stores, compared to 73% among those aged 35-to-54 and 62% among those aged 18-to-34.”  
 
Just over half of British Columbians (51%, -3) say they go out of their way to recycle “all of the time”, such as holding on to bottles and cans until they can be placed into a proper recycling bin. Once again, this behaviour is more common among the province’s residents aged 55 and over (66%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (50%) and aged 18-to-34 (32%).  
 
More than three-in-five residents of Vancouver Island (65%) and Northern BC (63%) claim to go out of their way to recycle “all of the time.” The proportion is lower in Southern BC (58%), the Fraser Valley (57%) and Metro Vancouver (44%).  
 
One-in-five British Columbians (20%, -6) acknowledge limiting hot water usage in their home “all the time” by taking shorter showers or running washing machines or dishwashers with full loads only.  
 
Fewer British Columbians say they unplug electrical devices in their home—such as TVs, computers and cell phone chargers—when they are not in use (12%, -1), buy biodegradable products (5%, -2) or eat organic or home-grown foods (also 5%, -2) “all of the time.”
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 21 to December 23, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Metro Vancouverites Ponder Guidelines for Municipal Votes

More than half are against “corporate votes”, non-resident electors and allowing residents aged 16 and 17 to cast ballots.  
 
Vancouver, BC [December 23, 2021] – More than three-in-five residents of Metro Vancouver believe it is time to end the regulation that allows people who do not reside in a municipality to vote in local elections if they own property there, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 63% of residents agree with eliminating non-residency property electors and only letting residents of a city vote in municipal elections.  
 
Majorities of Metro Vancouverites disagree with the notion of allowing “corporate voting” by giving businesses the ability to vote in municipal elections (56%) and with letting Canadians aged 16 and 17 cast ballots in municipal elections (51%).  
 
The idea of allowing adult Permanent Residents of Canada to vote in municipal elections is endorsed by more than seven-in-ten Metro Vancouverites (71%), while only 22% disagree and 7% are undecided.  
 
Three-in-ten Metro Vancouverites (31%) identify housing as the most important issue facing their municipality right now, followed by COVID-19 (24%), property taxes (10%), climate change (7%), drug overdoses (6%) and crime (5%).
 
“While concerns about housing are particularly high in Burnaby (45%), this is also the main preoccupation for residents of Vancouver (31%) and Surrey (24%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Drug overdoses are a salient issue in Vancouver (9%) while crime is a significant worry in Surrey (12%).”  
 
The approval rating for Vancouver Mayor Kennedy Stewart stands at 57%, up six points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in January 2020. The numbers are stable for Burnaby Mayor Mike Hurley (51%, =), while Surrey Mayor Doug McCallum has seen his rating drop from 50% at the start of 2020 to 30% in the last month of 2021.  
 
Across Metro Vancouver, 42% of residents believe their current mayor deserves re-election, while 37% disagree and 20% are undecided.  
 
Almost half of residents of Burnaby (48%) and Vancouver (47%) are currently willing to re-elect Hurley and Stewart respectively. In Surrey, only 28% think McCallum deserves a new term in office while 59% disagree.
 
Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from December 17 to December 19, 2021, among 1,200 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Metro Vancouver Drivers Reject Paying to Park on the Street

Seven-in-ten drivers say it is harder to find a parking spot in their municipality when they need one.  
 
Vancouver, BC [December 14, 2021] – A sizeable majority of drivers in Metro Vancouver reject the notion of having to pay to park their cars on residential streets overnight, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative sample, almost two thirds of drivers in Metro Vancouver (64%) think it is a “bad idea” to charge a fee to vehicle owners who park their cars on residential streets overnight.  
 
“More than three-in-five drivers in Surrey (62%) and Vancouver (61%) are not in favour of an overnight residential parking fee,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the rest of the Metro Vancouver region, 67% of drivers are opposed.”  
 
A majority of drivers in Metro Vancouver (51%) say they have a garage and park their vehicle there, while 22% rely on a shared parkade. Just over one-in-ten (13%) say they have a garage, but do not park their vehicle inside it—including 16% of men and 15% of those who reside in Surrey.  
 
Seven-in-ten drivers in Metro Vancouver (70%) say it is harder now to find a parking spot in their municipality when they need one, down 11 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2018.  
 
Over the past two years, 27% of drivers in Metro Vancouver acknowledge having received a parking ticket. Similar proportions of citations have been issued by municipalities (17%, -1) and by parking management companies (15%, -5).  
 
Drivers in Vancouver are significantly more likely to report getting a parking ticket of any kind (40%, +12) than their counterparts in Surrey (22%, -11) and in other Metro Vancouver municipalities (20%, -13).  
 
When asked how they dealt with the last parking ticket they were issued by a municipality, two thirds of offending drivers (68%, -8) say they paid quickly to get a discount, while 26% (+15) covered the full amount days later and 6% (-7) never paid it.  
 
The situation is similar for tickets issued by a parking management company, with a majority of offending drivers (56%, +5) paying quickly, three-in-ten (30%,+15) covering the full amount later and 15% (-19) admitting to never paying the fine.  
 
Drivers aged 55 and over who receive a parking ticket are significantly more likely to pay the fine early, whether the citation was issued by a municipality (86%) or by a parking management company (65%).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 27 to November 29, 2021, among 521 adults in Metro Vancouver who drive to school or work on weekdays. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.3 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Lukewarm Support for Pipeline Expansion in British Columbia

A proposal to reconsider the shelved Enbridge Northern Gateway project is endorsed by 41% of British Columbians.  
 
Vancouver, BC [October 7, 2021] – Public backing for the expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline has dropped in British Columbia over the past year, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 45% of British Columbians agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the project, down seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in October 2020.  
 
Opposition to the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion stands at 34% this month, up five points since 2020 and on par with the numbers reported by Research Co. in December 2019 (35%).  
 
“Most residents of Northern BC (60%) and Southern BC (54%) agree with the federal government’s decision to carry on with the pipeline expansion,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The level of support is currently lower in Metro Vancouver (42%), the Fraser Valley (41%) and Vancouver Island (41%).”  
 
Across the province, practically two thirds of British Columbians (65%, -3) believe the pipeline project will create hundreds of jobs for residents, while more than half (55%, -1) say they are disappointed with the way the federal government has managed this file.  
 
Almost half of British Columbians (47%, +3) think the pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of residents and just over two-in-five (41%, +1) want the provincial government to do whatever is necessary to ensure that the pipeline expansion does not happen.  
 
In November 2016, the federal government rejected a proposal—known as the Enbridge Northern Gateway—to build a new pipeline from Alberta to British Columbia’s north coast, to export oil on tankers to Asian markets.  
 
Just over two-in-five British Columbians (41%) agree with reconsidering the Enbridge Northern Gateway proposal, while one third (34%) disagree and one-in-four (25%) are undecided.  
 
The idea of reviving the Enridge Northern Gateway is more popular among British Columbians who voted for the BC Liberals in the 2020 provincial election (57%) than among those who cast ballots for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (38%) or the BC Green Party (36%).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 1 to October 3, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

All Tied Up as Canadians Prepare to Vote in the Federal Election

Support for both the Liberal Party and the Conservative Party is 32%, while approval of their two leaders is also identical (42%).  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 19, 2021] – Voters in Canada head to tomorrow’s federal election with the two main contending parties enjoying the same level of voter support across the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 32% of decided voters (-2 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted earlier this month) would cast a ballot for the candidate of the Liberal Party in their constituency, while 32% (+2) would support the contender of the Conservative Party.  
 
The New Democratic Party (NDP) is in third place with 19% (-1), followed by the Bloc Québécois with 7% (=), the People’s Party with 6% (+1) and the Green Party with 4% (+1). In addition, 1% of decided voters in the country would vote for a different political party or an independent candidate.  
 

On a regional basis, the Liberals are in first place in Atlantic Canada (42%, with the Conservatives at 27%), Quebec (34%, with the Bloc at 31%) and Ontario (37%, with the Conservatives at 30%).  
 
Conversely, the Conservatives dominate in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (43%, with the NDP at 23%) and Alberta (50%, with the NDP at 21%). In British Columbia, the Conservatives are slightly ahead of the New Democrats (33% to 31%), with the Liberals at 25%.  
 
The Green Party gets its best result in British Columbia (6%, but reaching 14% in its stronghold of Vancouver Island). The People’s Party is particularly prevalent in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (10%) and Alberta (8%).  
 
As the campaign draws to a close, the approval rating for the two main contenders is exactly the same. Just over two-in-five Canadians (42%) approve of the way both Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau and Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole have performed in their jobs. The disapproval rating is higher for Trudeau (53%) than it is for O’Toole (47%).  
 
NDP leader Jagmeet Singh has the highest approval rating (51%, +2), while the numbers are significantly lower for Green Party leader Annamie Paul (24%, +1) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (20%, +5). Since the start of the campaign, one-in-four Canadians report having an improved opinion of both Singh (26%) and O’Toole (25%). The proportions are significantly lower for Trudeau (16%), Paul (10%) and Bernier (also 10%).  
 
Trudeau remains ahead when Canadians are asked which of the five leaders running nationwide campaigns would make the best Prime Minister (31%, -2), followed by O’Toole (27%, +1), Singh (19%, +1), Bernier (7%, +2) and Paul (2%, =).  
 
More than a quarter of Canadians (27%, +4) think health care is the most important issue facing the country. The economy and jobs is second on the list with 22% (=), followed by housing, homelessness and poverty (15%, -1) and the environment (10%, -2).  
 
The COVID-19 pandemic is the most important issue for 8% of Canadians—a proportion that rises to 16% in Alberta.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on September 18 and September 19, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada, and 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for the survey of Canadians and +/- 3.5 percentage points for the survey of British Columbians, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Iouri Goussev

Canadians Pick Trudeau to Manage Pandemic, O’Toole for Jobs

There is no clear leader on two matters: housing, homelessness and poverty, and transportation projects.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 15, 2021] – The incumbent prime minister is the first choice of Canadians to handle issues such as health care and the COVID-19 pandemic, while the leader of the official opposition is preferred for financial and public safety concerns, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
The online survey of a representative national sample asked Canadians to select which one of the five federal party leaders who are running nationwide campaigns is the best person to manage 16 different issues.  
 
More than a third of Canadians (36%) think Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is better suited to handle the COVID-19 pandemic, followed by Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole with 22%, New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Jagmeet Singh with 12%, People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier with 6% and Green Party leader Annamie Paul with 2%.  
 
More than three-in-ten Canadians also pick Trudeau to manage foreign affairs (31%), child care (also 31%) and regulations related to firearms (also 31%).  
 
Earlier in the campaign, Erin O’Toole was tied with Justin Trudeau on the foreign affairs file,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the final week before votes are cast, Trudeau has a five-point lead on this particular issue.”  
 
The Liberal leader is also ahead of all rivals on being the best person to handle immigration (29%), health care (also 29%), the environment (28%), Indigenous issues and reconciliation (27%), seniors care (26%), and racism and discrimination (also 26%).  
 
One third of Canadians (33%) believe O’Toole would be the best leader to manage the economy and jobs, followed by Trudeau with 29%, Singh with 15%, Bernier with 4% and Paul with 2%.  
 
The Conservative leader is in first place on three other issues: crime and public safety (29%), accountability and leadership (27%), and energy and pipelines (also 27%).  
 
There is a tie on two specific concerns. Across the country, 25% of Canadians select either Trudeau or Singh as the best leaders to manage housing, homelessness and poverty. When asked about transportation projects, equal proportions of respondents pick Trudeau and O’Toole (25% each).  
 
Paul gets her best rating on the environment (14%), while Bernier scores highest on the COVID-19 pandemic (6%).  
 
In a survey released by Research Co. this week, health care, the economy and jobs, housing homelessness and poverty, and the environment were identified as the most important issues facing Canada.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 13, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Tobi 87
 
 

Liberals Regain Lead, Conservatives and NDP Drop in Canada

One-in-ten Conservative Party voters from 2019 say they will cast a ballot for the People’s Party in this month’s election.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 14, 2021] – As Canada heads to the final week of campaigning in the 2021 federal election, the governing Liberal Party is ahead of its competitors, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 34% of decided voters in Canada would support the Liberal candidate in their constituency, up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in late August.  
 
The Conservative Party is second with 30% (-2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (-2), the Bloc Québécois with 7% (+1), the People’s Party with 5% (+2) and the Green Party with 3% (-1). In addition, 1% of decided voters in the country would back a different party or an independent candidate.  
 
The Conservatives remain ahead of the Liberals among male voters (36% to 31%) and voters aged 55 and over (35% to 31%). The Liberals hold the upper hand over the Conservatives among female voters (38% to 25%) and voters aged 35-to-54 (39% to 30%). The Liberals are also in first place among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (37%, with the NDP at 27% and the Conservatives at 18%).  
 
In Atlantic Canada, the Liberals remain the most favoured option for voters (40%, with the Conservatives at 34%). In Quebec, the governing party holds an eight-point lead over the Bloc (37% to 29%).  
 
Half of decided voters in Alberta (50%) would support the Conservative candidate in their constituency, along with more than two-in-five (43%) of those who reside in Saskatchewan and Manitoba.  
 
The race remains closely contested in Ontario, where the Liberals are slightly ahead of the Conservatives (37% to 34%) and in British Columbia, where the three main federal parties are virtually tied (30% for the Conservatives, 29% for the New Democrats and 28% for the Liberals).  
 
The People’s Party is benefiting from a higher level of support in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (9%), Alberta (7%) and Ontario (6%). In fact, 10% of Canadians who supported the Conservatives in the 2019 federal election say they will be voting for the People’s Party in 2021.  
 
Almost one-in-four Canadians (23%, -3) think health care is the most important issue facing the country today, followed by the economy and jobs (22%, +2), housing, homelessness and poverty (16%, +1) and the environment (12%, -1).  
 
Across Canada, the NDP’s Jagmeet Singh continues to post the highest approval rating among the five leaders who are running nationwide campaigns (49%, -2), followed by Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau (43%, -2), Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole (40%, -1), Annamie Paul of the Green Party (23%, +2) and Maxime Bernier of the People’s Party (15%, =).  
 
Singh also remains ahead on personal momentum, with 27% of Canadians saying their opinion of him has improved since the start of the campaign. The numbers on this indicator are lower for O’Toole (22%), Trudeau (15%), Paul (12%) and Bernier (8%).  
 
On the “Best Prime Minister” question, Trudeau remains in first place with 33% (+1), followed by O’Toole (26%, =), Singh (18%, -2), Bernier (5%, +2) and Paul (2%, +1).  
 
“A third of Canadian women (33%) feel Justin Trudeau is the best person to manage the federal government, while only one-in-five (19%) select Erin O’Toole,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The race is significantly tighter among male voters on this same question, with Trudeau at 34% and O’Toole at 33%.”
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 13, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Dave Doe
 

Canadians Hold Mixed Views on Which Leader is Best on Issues

Just under one-in-five Canadians (17%) say they intend to vote by mail in this year’s federal election.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 6, 2021] – As the federal election campaign continues, the three main federal party leaders are connecting in different ways with Canadians on the most important issues facing the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, just under a third of Canadians (32%) think Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is the best person to handle crime and public safety.  
 
Trudeau is also the preferred choice of Canadians to manage immigration (30%), health care (29%) and the environment (28%).  
 
Official opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole is the top option for Canadians to handle the economy and jobs (34%), energy and pipelines (32%), and accountability and leadership (27%). O’Toole and Trudeau are tied, with 30% each, when Canadians are asked about the best leader to manage foreign affairs (30%).  
 
New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Jagmeet Singh is the most popular leader to deal with housing, homelessness and poverty (27%), with Trudeau and O’Toole tied at 24%.  
 
Health care is identified as the most important issue facing Canada for 26% of respondents, followed by the economy and jobs with 20%, housing, homelessness and poverty with 15% and the environment with 13%.  
 
The survey also asked Canadians about other characteristics and topics related to the three main federal party leaders. Trudeau emerged as the most popular option to be the Prime Minister in the event of another Quebec referendum (31%) and to represent Canada at the next round of climate change talks (30%).  
 
The incumbent prime minister is also ahead on four personality traits: having a drink with you at the local bar (28%), being on your sports team (also 28%), babysitting your kids or a relative’s kids (25%) and being part of your trivia quiz team (23%, with Singh close behind at 21%).  
 
Singh is practically tied with Trudeau on two of the items tested: having a coffee or tea with you at the local coffee shop (27%, with Trudeau at 26%) and giving you a good recommendation on a book to read (22%, with Trudeau at 21%).  
 
More than three-in-ten Canadians express a preference for O’Toole on three separate matters: negotiating with U.S. President Joe Biden on trade and security issues (34%), being the Prime Minister in the event of a terrorist attack (32%) and negotiating with Russia over Arctic sovereignty (31%).  
 
“There is a theme developing when it comes to the perceptions of Canadians on the three main party leaders,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While Trudeau and Singh score highly on some of the personality traits, like hanging around at a bar or coffee shop, O’Toole has a decisive advantage on foreign policy items.”  
 
This week, there will be two televised debates organized by the Leaders’ Debate Commission. More than two-in-five Canadians (42%) agree with the Commission’s decision to not extend an invitation to these debates to People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier, while 33% disagree and 25% are undecided.  
 
The results are similar when Canadians are asked about the presence of Maverick Party leader Jay Hill on the televised meetings, with 44% agreeing with the decision to leave him out, 27% disagreeing and 29% saying they are not sure.  
 
Almost half of Quebecers (49%) are in favour of the Commission’s decision to leave both Bernier and Hill off the stage.  
 
Across the country, 17% of Canadians say they plan to vote by mail this year—a proportion that includes 30% of British Columbians and 21% of Albertans.  
 
While more than one-in-four Canadians (26%) plan to cast their ballot during Advance Voting from September 10 to September 13, more than two-in-five (44%) intend to vote on Election Day (September 20).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Conservatives Close Gap in Canada as Liberal Lead Disappears

Justin Trudeau’s approval rating fell to 45% (-5 since June), but he is still ahead of Erin O’Toole in the “Preferred PM” question.
 
Vancouver, BC [August 31, 2021] – The federal election in Canada is currently a dead heat between the two most prominent parties in the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 33% of Canadian decided voters would cast a ballot for the candidate of the Liberal Party in their riding, down five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June.
 
The Conservative Party remains in second place with 32% (+2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 22% (+2), the Bloc Québécois with 6% (+1), the Green Party with 4% (-1) and the People’s Party with 3% (+2). Fewer than 1% of decided voters would vote for the Maverick Party, for another party or for an independent candidate.
 
In June, the Liberals were ahead of the Conservatives by 15 points among female decided voters in Canada. This month, the advantage has narrowed to just eight points (36% to 28%). The Tories are now in first place among male decided voters (36% to 31%).
 
The Liberals are still popular among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (34%, followed by the NDP with 29%) and among decided voters aged 35-to-54 (38%, with the Conservatives at 32%). The Tories hold a seven-point advantage over the Liberals among decided voters aged 55 and over (37% to 30%).
 
The Liberals are in first place among decided voters in Atlantic Canada (40%) and Quebec (also 40%). The Conservatives have outright leads in Alberta (49%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (46%).
 
There are close races developing in two Canadian provinces. In Ontario, the Conservatives and the Liberals are essentially tied (36% and 35% respectively). In British Columbia, the Liberals—who were leading in a Research Co. survey conducted in early August—have fallen to third place (28%), with both the Conservatives and the New Democrats at 32%.
 
There is some movement when Canadians are asked about the most important issue facing the country. Health care is first with 26% (-3), followed by the economy and jobs with 20% (-3) and housing, homelessness and poverty with 15% (+1). The environment is fourth on the list with 13% (+6).
 
“While health care remains the dominant issue for Atlantic Canadians and Quebecers, financial matters are crucial for those who reside in Alberta,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “One-in-five Ontarians and British Columbians are worried about housing, but the issue that has seen the biggest gains since June is the environment.”
 
The approval rating for Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau stands at 45% at the end of the month. This is higher than the numbers posted by Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole (41%, +7) and lower than NDP leader Jagmeet Singh (51%, +1).
 
Just over one-in-five Canadians (21%, -11) approve of the way Green Party leader Annamie Paul is handling her duties, while there was no significant movement for People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (15%, +1).
 
When Canadians are asked which one of the five leaders who are running nationwide campaigns would make the best head of government, the incumbent prime minister also lost some ground. Trudeau is in first place with 32% (-5), followed by O’Toole (26%, +11), Singh (20%, +4), Bernier (3%, =) and Paul (1%, -1).
 
Since the start of the campaign, Trudeau posts a negative momentum score (-24, with 39% of Canadians saying their opinion of him has worsened). Paul and Bernier are also in negative territory (-18 and -19 respectively), while O’Toole is even and Singh is at +10 (with 27% of Canadians reporting a better assessment of the current NDP leader).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

British Columbians Feel Trudeau is Better for Province Than Harper

Roughly the same proportion of the province’s residents would be “very upset” with a win for the Liberals or the Conservatives.
 
Vancouver, BC [August 17, 2021] – Most residents of British Columbia believe the tenure of Justin Trudeau as Prime Minister of Canada has been beneficial for the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 54% of British Columbians think the province has been treated “very well” or “well” by Trudeau, while one third (34%) believe it has been treated “poorly” or “very poorly.
 
Respondents are almost evenly split when assessing the effect of the federal government headed by Stephen Harper on British Columbia, with 38% saying he treated the province “very well” or “well” and 42% believing he behaved “poorly” or “very poorly.”
 
“Almost half of British Columbians aged 55 and over (48%) hold a favourable view on the way the current federal government is treating the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Just over a third (35%) feel the same way about the previous federal administration.”
 
Across British Columbia, just over half of residents (51%) say they would be “very upset” if the Conservative Party forms the government again in Ottawa. Animosity towards a Tory administration rises to 53% among Green Party voters in 2019, 68% among Liberal voters and 72% among New Democratic Party (NDP) voters.
 
Just under half of British Columbians (48%) say they would be “very upset” if the Liberals win the next election and remain in power, including 85% of Conservative voters, 61% of Green voters and 54% of NDP voters.
 
Only 35% of British Columbians would be “very upset” if the NDP forms the government for the first time in Ottawa after the next federal election. This includes two thirds of Conservative voters (66%), but significantly lower proportions of those who voted for the Liberals (43%) or the Greens (32%) in 2019.
 
Four of the current ministers in the federal government represent constituencies located in British Columbia and are seeking re-election this year as candidates for the Liberal Party.
 
Minister of National Defence Harjit Sajjan has the best approval rating of the four BC-based federal ministers (37%), followed by Minister of Environment and Climate Change Jonathan Wilkinson (31%), Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion Carla Qualtrough (29%) and Minister of Digital Government Joyce Murray (27%).
 
Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 7 to August 9, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca