British Columbians Split on Banning Gas-Powered Leaf Blowers

Half of the province’s residents worry “a great deal” or “a fair amount” about noise pollution associated with landscaping.

Vancouver, BC [July 13, 2021] – There is no consensus when residents of British Columbia are asked if the time has come to prohibit the use of a specific type of landscaping equipment, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 38% of British Columbians support their municipality enacting a by-law that would ban the use of gas-powered leaf blowers, while 40% oppose this course of action.

Support for prohibiting gas-powered leaf blowers reaches 48% on Vancouver Island, but drops to 39% in Metro Vancouver, 37% in Northern BC, 32% in Southern BC and 29% in the Fraser Valley.

One third of British Columbians (34%) are in favour of a municipal ban on gas-powered lawn mowers, while more than two-in-five (44%) are opposed.

Opposition to prohibiting gas-powered lawn mowers is strongest among British Columbians aged 55 and over (53%) and drops to 43% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 33% among those aged 18-to-34.

Fewer British Columbians are supportive of prohibiting electric leaf blowers (31%, with 48% opposed) and electric lawn mowers (27%, with 53% opposed) in their municipality.

Half of British Columbians (50%) say they worry about noise pollution associated with the use of landscaping equipment “a great deal” or “a fair amount”, while 44% feel the same way about air pollution.

“More than half of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (54%) and aged 35-to-54 (51%) are concerned about noise pollution from landscaping equipment,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among their counterparts aged 55 and over (45%).”

Almost two-in-five British Columbians (38%) say that a gas-powered lawn mower has been used on their property, while fewer recall the operation of electric lawn mowers (30%), electric leaf blowers (27%), gas-powered leaf blowers (20%) and reel lawn mowers (10%).

Reliance on gas-powered lawn mowers is more prevalent in Northern BC (58%), Southern BC (52%) and Vancouver Island (50%) than in the Fraser Valley (42%) and Metro Vancouver (30%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 18 to June 20, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Liberals Have Eight-Point Lead Over Tories in Canada

Health care is the most important issue facing the country for three-in-ten Canadians, followed by the economy and jobs.

Vancouver, BC [June 17, 2021] – The governing Liberal Party remains ahead of its rivals in Canada’s federal political scene, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 38% of Canadian decided voters would support the Liberal candidate in their constituency if a federal election were held tomorrow, up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March.

The Conservative Party is second with 30% (+2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (=), the Bloc Québécois with 5% (-2), the Green Party also with 5% (-1) and the People’s Party with 1% (=).

The Liberals are ahead of the Conservatives by 15 points among female decided voters (40% to 25%). Among male decided voters, the Liberals are barely ahead of the Conservatives (37% to 35%).

This month, the Liberal Party fares best with decided voters aged 55 and over (41%, with the Conservatives at 36%) and decided voters aged 18-to-34 (40%, with the NDP at 29%). The race is closer among decided voters aged 35-to-54 (36% for the Liberals, and 34% for the Conservatives).

The Liberals remain the most popular federal party among decided voters in Atlantic Canada (49%), Ontario (42%) and Quebec (39%). The Conservatives continue to dominate in Alberta (50%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (also 50%). In British Columbia, the New Democrats are in first place (34%), followed by the Liberals (31%) and the Conservatives (27%).

Half of Canadians (50%, -6) approve of the way Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is handling his duties.

NDP leader Jagmeet Singh posted the same approval rating as Trudeau (50%, +4). The numbers are lower for Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole (34%, +1), Green Party leader Annamie Paul (32%, +2) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (14%, -1).

More than a third of Canadians select Trudeau when asked which one of the main party leaders would make the best prime minister (37%, -3). For the first time, Singh is in second place on this indicator (17%, +5), followed by O’Toole (15%, =), Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (3%, +1), Bernier (3%, +1) and Paul (2%, -1).

Health care is identified as the most important issue facing the country by 29% of Canadians (-4), followed by the economy and jobs (23%, -1), housing, homelessness and poverty (14%, +5), the environment (9%, +2) and COVID-19 (7%, -4).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from June 12 to June 14, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Makaristos

Little Momentum as British Columbia Drivers Ponder Electric Cars

Residents of Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley are more likely to say that their next vehicle will be electric.

Vancouver, BC [June 1, 2021] – Over the past two years, there has been a negligible increase in the proportion of drivers in British Columbia who acknowledge that their next car will probably be electric, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 53% of British Columbians who drive their own cars say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that the next vehicle they acquire for themselves or their household will be electric, up two points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2019.

Male drivers are more likely to lean towards acquiring an electric vehicle (56%) than their female counterparts (51%). Three-in-five drivers aged 35-to-54 (60%) are likely to buy an electric vehicle, along with 57% of those aged 18-to-34 and 47% of those aged 55 and over.

Drivers who voted for the BC Green Party in last year’s provincial election are more likely to be seriously considering an electric vehicle (66%) than those who cast ballots for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (56%) or the BC Liberals (51%).

“There are some major regional differences when it comes to the appetite of drivers in British Columbia for electric vehicles,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 59% of those who reside in Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley foresee their next vehicle being electric, fewer feel the same way in Southern BC (42%), Vancouver Island (also 42%) and Northern BC (41%).”

More than a quarter of drivers in British Columbia say they are less likely to purchase an electric vehicle because they are too expensive when compared to non-electric options (27%, +3) and because they fear becoming stranded if they cannot find a charging station (also 27%, +3).

More than one-in-five drivers are also worried about not having enough places to charge the vehicle in the areas where they usually drive (23%, -2) and not having a place to charge the vehicle where they currently live (22%, +2). Only 6% of drivers (-1) are deterred by the “feel” of the vehicle compared with a non-electric option.

While only 22% of drivers who reside in the Fraser Valley say that a perceived lack of charging stations would make them less likely to purchase an electric vehicle in the future, the proportion rises to 24% in Metro Vancouver, 25% in Vancouver Island, 28% in Southern BC and 35% in Northern BC.

The Government of British Columbia has passed legislation to ensure that, by the year 2040, all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province will be “zero emission.” As was the case in 2019, 70% of residents are in favour of this decision.

A majority of British Columbians (51%, +2) think the goal established by the provincial government on the issue of “zero emission” vehicles is “achievable”, while 36% (-6) believe it is “not achievable.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 23 to May 25, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 
Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 
 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Six Communities Endorse South Fraser Community Rail Project

Almost four-in-five residents say they are likely to rely on the service for work or leisure, including 81% of those who drive a vehicle.

Vancouver, BC [May 20, 2021] – A proposal to reactivate a rail corridor for daily passenger service using hydrogen powered trains is very popular among residents of six British Columbia municipalities, a new Research Co. poll conducted on behalf of the South Fraser Community Rail Society has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of residents of six provincial communities, 88% of respondents say they support the South Fraser Community Rail project.

At least three-in-four respondents in each community are in favour of the project, including 93% in Abbotsford, 89% in Chilliwack, 85% in North Delta, 83% in North Surrey, 82% in the Township of Langley and 76% in the City of Langley.

The South Fraser Community Rail project would rely on a publicly owned 99 km operating corridor (known as the Interurban Corridor) available with passenger rights saved and protected by a previous provincial government at no cost for its use between the Pattullo Bridge SkyTrain Station and the City of Chilliwack.

The South Fraser Community Rail project would connect 16 cities and communities, eight First Nations communities, 14 post-secondary Institutions, Industrial Parks and the Abbotsford International Airport.

Almost four-in-five respondents in the six communities (78%) say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to rely on the service once it becomes operational—including 88% of those who commute using public transit and 81% of those who drive to school or work.

In the survey, only 32% of respondents think the Express Bus being used on the Highway 1 corridor from Chilliwack to the Carvolth Exchange in Langley fits the needs of the community and no other public transit alternative is required at this time.

Nine-in-ten respondents who have taken the Express Bus on Highway 1 (90%) support the South Fraser Community Rail project.

More than half of respondents say they are more likely to support the project because it will be good for the environment since it relies on a Hydrogen propulsion system, with zero greenhouse gas emissions (56%) and because it would allow for a commute time of 90 minutes from Chilliwack to the Pattulo Bridge—a significantly quicker commute time than the 135 minutes plus transfer time to cover the same distance with existing transit services (53%).

Practically half of respondents say they are more likely to support the project because one South Fraser Community Rail train would potentially remove 160 vehicles from Highway 1 (49%) and because the project will take three years to implement—a significantly quicker delivery timeframe than any other potential option (also 49%).

More than two-in-five respondents (44%) say they are more likely to support the project because it will cost an estimated $1.38 billion for 99 km —significantly less expensive than any other Inter-regional transit option.

Almost nine-in-ten respondents (87%) believe there must be a reactivated environmentally friendly Interurban passenger rail transit option while Highway 1 is currently being widened in stages.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 5 to May 8, 2021, among a representative sample of 800 adults in North Delta, North Surrey, City of Langley, Township of Langley, Abbotsford and Chilliwack. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Vancouverites Back Temporary Bike Lane in Stanley Park

Almost two thirds of Vancouver residents support having separated bike lanes in the city.

Vancouver, BC [May 18, 2021] – The authorization of a temporary bike lane on Park Drive in Stanley Park has been met with approval by a majority of City of Vancouver residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative municipal sample, almost three-in-five Vancouverites (59%) think allowing the temporary bike lane until the end of October 2021 is a “very good” or “good” idea, while 29% deem it a “bad” or “very bad” idea.

Agreement with the temporary bike lane in Stanley Park is highest among women (62%), people aged 18-to-34 (69%) and Downtown residents (64%).

Majorities of Vancouverites whose weekday commute involves cycling (79%), using public transit (75%) or driving (53%) are also in favour of the decision made by the Vancouver Park Board.

Almost two thirds of Vancouver residents (64%) say they support having separated bike lanes in the city, down five points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November 2019.

Residents aged 18-to-34 are more likely to support having separated bike lanes in Vancouver (67%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (54%) and aged 55 and over (47%).

Majorities of Vancouverites of European (68%), South Asian (65%) and East Asian descent (58%) are in favour of having separated bike lanes in the city.

Just over two-in-five Vancouverites (41%, +1) think the city currently has the right number of separated bike lanes—including 38% of Downtown residents, 41% of those who live East of Main Street and 43% of those who reside West of Main Street.

Almost three-in-ten residents (28%, -2) believe there are now too many separated bike lanes and some should be removed, while more than one-in-five (22%, +1) say there are not enough separated bike lanes and more should be added.

“Cycling infrastructure remains a polarizing issue for Vancouverites of different generations,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 19% of residents aged 18-to-34 think the city currently has too many separated bike lanes, the proportion rises to 32% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 36% among those aged 55 and over.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 5 to May 7, 2021, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Agree with Supreme Court on Carbon Tax Decision

More than three-in-five Canadians (62%) say they are personally concerned about climate change.

Vancouver, BC [April 9, 2021] – The recent ruling by the Supreme Court of Canada that upheld the federal government’s carbon tax plan is supported by a majority of the country’s residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 57% of Canadians agree with the court’s decision, while 29% disagree and 13% are undecided.

The Supreme Court stated that the federal government is free to impose minimum pricing standards due to the threat posed by climate change. 

Support for the Supreme Court’s ruling is highest in Quebec (64%), followed by British Columbia (58%), Atlantic Canada (also 58%), Ontario (57%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (50%) and Alberta (47%).

Across the country, 45% of Canadians say that the carbon tax has negatively affected the finances of their household. This includes majorities of men (51%), Albertans (58%) and Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election (65%).

Canadians are divided on whether the introduction of a carbon tax has led people to be more mindful of their carbon consumption and change their behaviour. While 42% of Canadians believe this to be the case, 44% disagree and 15% are not sure.

“The notion of a carbon tax modifying the habits of Canadians is more prevalent among those who voted for the Liberals (71%) and the New Democrats (70%) in the last federal election,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 32% of Canadians who voted for the Conservatives share this point of view.”

The survey provided respondents with a list of 10 different environmental issues. More than three-in-five Canadians say they are personally concerned about four different matters: air pollution (64%), the pollution of rivers, lakes and reservoirs (62%), global warming or climate change (also 62%) and the pollution of drinking water (61%).

Fewer Canadians are personally concerned about six other environmental issues: the contamination of soil and water by toxic waste (53%), the extinction of plant and animal species (52%), deforestation or the clearance of naturally occurring forests (51%), the loss of tropical rain forests (50%), the depletion of fish stocks through overfishing (44%) and the maintenance of the supply of fresh water for household needs (also 44%).

Almost half of Canadians (47%) think the federal government is not paying enough attention to the environment—a proportion that rises to 54% among Atlantic Canadians and 50% among both Quebecers and British Columbians.

Similar proportions of Canadians also think their provincial government (51%) and their municipal government (48%) are not focusing on the environment as much as they should.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on April 2 and April 3, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Liberals Stay Ahead as Conservative Support Falls in Canada

Two-in-five Canadians think Justin Trudeau would make the best Prime Minister, as Erin O’Toole drops to 15% on this question.

Vancouver, BC [March 18, 2021] – Public support for the governing Liberal Party remains stable in Canada since the end of last year, while fewer voters are willing to cast a ballot for the Conservative Party, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 37% of decided voters in Canada would back the Liberal candidate in their constituency if a federal election were held tomorrow, unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2020.

The Conservatives are in second place with 28% (-3), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (=), the Bloc Québécois with 7% (=), the Green Party with 6% (+3) and the People’s Party with 1% (=).

The Liberals hold a three-point edge over the Conservatives among male decided voters (34% to 31%). Among female decided voters, the Liberals are also first (40%), with the Conservatives and New Democrats tied at 24%.

Support for the Liberal Party is strongest among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (41%, with the NDP in second place with 27%). The governing party is also ahead among decided voters aged 35-to-54 (35%, with the Conservatives at 30%) and aged 55 and over (37% to 29%).

More than two-in-five decided voters in Atlantic Canada (46%), Quebec (43%) and Ontario (42%) are currently backing the Liberals, while the Conservatives are leading in Alberta (46%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (41%). In British Columbia, the New Democrats are slightly ahead of the Liberals (31% to 29%), with the Conservatives in third place (26%).

The approval rating for Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau stands at 56% this month (+1) and is higher among women (60%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (67%).

A third of Canadians (33%, -2) are satisfied with the performance of Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole, a proportion that jumps to 47% among Albertans.

“In September 2020, Canadians were divided in three identical groups when assessing O’Toole’s performance as leader,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Since then, disapproval has risen by 12 points to 46%, and the level of undecideds has fallen from 33% to 21%.”

Since December, the approval rating for NDP leader Jagmeet Singh remains stable (46%, =). The numbers improved for Green Party leader Annamie Paul (30%, +5) and fell slightly for People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (15%, -2).

Trudeau maintains a sizeable advantage over his rivals when Canadians are asked who would make the best prime minister of the country (40%, +1). O’Toole is a distant second on this question with 15% (-7), followed by Singh (12%, -1), Paul (3%, +1), Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (2%, =) and Bernier (2%, -1).

A third of Canadians (33%, +5) believe health care is the most important issue facing the country today, followed by the economy and jobs (24%, -3), COVID-19 (11%, -4), housing, homelessness and poverty (9%, =) and the environment (7%, +1).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from March 13 to March 15, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Say Horses Are Not Food, Reject Exports to Asia

Only 16% knew that Canadian horses have been exported for slaughter and human consumption in Japan and South Korea.

Vancouver, BC [February 18, 2021] – The export of Canadian horses for slaughter and human consumption abroad is rejected by a large majority of Canadians, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, two thirds of Canadians (67%) oppose this practice, while 22% support it and 12% are undecided.

Opposition to the export of Canadian horses for slaughter and human consumption abroad is highest among women (76%). Significant majorities of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (65%), aged 35-to-54 (66%) and aged 55 and over (68%) also hold unfavourable views.

On a regional basis, Alberta posts the highest level of aversion to this practice (74%), followed by Atlantic Canada (73%), Ontario (70%), British Columbia (66%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 66%) and Quebec (62%).

Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election are slightly more likely to oppose the export of Canadian horses for slaughter and human consumption abroad (69%) than those who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (66%) and the Liberal Party (63%)

Since 2013, more than 30,000 Canadian horses have been exported for slaughter and human consumption in Japan and South Korea. 

More than four-in-five Canadians (84%) were unaware of this fact before taking the survey—a proportion that rises to 86% among women, 88% among Canadians aged 35-to-54 and 88% among Atlantic Canadians.

When asked a separate question about food sources, only 27% of Canadians consider it appropriate for humans to consume horses, while 65% deem this as inappropriate and 8% are undecided.

In stark contrast, at least three-in-four Canadians think chickens (88%), pigs (79%), turkeys (75%) and cattle (also 75%) are suitable food sources for humans.

Majorities of Canadians also think that the consumption of six other animals is appropriate: ducks (71%), sheep (69%), fish (68%), goats (64%), rabbits (58%) and geese (also 58%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from February 11 to February 13, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Western Canadians Support Banning Single-Use Plastics

Majorities of residents of the four Canadian provinces say they are relying on reusable bags when shopping for groceries.

Vancouver, BC [January 12, 2021] – The federal government’s plan to curb the use of single-use plastics in Canada is supported by most residents of the four western provinces, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative provincial samples, 82% of British Columbians, 78% of Manitobans, 71% of Albertans and 69% of Saskatchewanians support the proposal.

The federal plan calls for as ban on grocery checkout bags, straws, stir sticks, six-pack rings, plastic cutlery and food takeout containers made from hard-to-recycle plastics.

Support for the ban on single-use plastics is highest among British Columbians who voted for the BC Green Party in the 2020 provincial election (91%), as well as those who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) in the most recent provincial democratic processes held in Saskatchewan (90%) and Alberta (86%).

In British Columbia, more than three-in-four respondents to this survey (77%) say they rely on their own re-usable bag when shopping for groceries—a proportion that rises to 80% among those aged 35-to-54.

Majorities of residents of Alberta (69%), Saskatchewan (64%) and Manitoba (60%) are also using their own bags when they shop for groceries, instead of bags provided by the stores.

More than half of British Columbians (54%) say they go out of their way to recycle—such as holding on to bottles and cans until they can be placed into a proper recycling bin—“all of the time”. The proportion for this particular behaviour is slightly lower in Saskatchewan (50%), Manitoba (48%) and Alberta (46%).

One-in-four British Columbians (26%) say they limit hot water usage in their home—taking shorter showers or running the washing machine or dishwasher with full loads only—“all of the time”, compared to 19% in both Alberta and Saskatchewan and 17% in Manitoba.

Other behaviours are not as widely embraced across Western Canada. While 13% of British Columbians and 11% of Albertans say they unplug electrical devices in their home—such as TVs, computers and cell phone chargers—when they are not in use “all of the time”, only 5% of Saskatchewanians and 4% of Manitobans follow the same course of action.

Fewer than one-in-ten residents of each province say they buy biodegradable products or eat organic or home-grown foods “all of the time.”

“Western Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to be keeping an eye on hot water usage in their homes,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, those aged 18-to-34 have been quicker to adopt biodegradable products.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from January 4 to January 6, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia, 600 adults In Alberta, 600 adults in Saskatchewan and 600 adults in Manitoba. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in each province. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for British Columbia and +/- 4.0 percentage points for Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Liberals Stay Ahead in Canada as Trudeau’s Rating Improves

Health care (28%, +3) is regarded as the most important issue facing the country, followed by the economy and jobs (27%, -2).

Vancouver, BC [December 17, 2020] – The governing Liberal Party maintains the upper hand in Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 37% of decided voters would support the Liberal candidate in their riding if a federal election were held today, down one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September.

The Conservative Party is second with 31% (-1), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (+3), the Bloc Québécois with 7% (-1), the Green Party with 3% (=) and the People’s Party with 1% (=).

The Liberals are nine points ahead of the Conservatives among female decided voters (38% to 29%) and hold a three-point edge among male decided voters (36% to 33%).

The Conservatives are the most popular federal party in Alberta (51%) and in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (48%). The Liberals are ahead in Atlantic Canada (44%), Quebec (45%, with the Bloc at 35%) and Ontario (37%). In British Columbia, the New Democrats and the Conservatives are essentially tied (34% and 33% respectively), with the Liberals at 29%.

Health care is regarded as the most important issue facing the country by 28% of Canadians (+3), followed by the economy and jobs (27%, -2), COVID-19 (15%), housing, homelessness and poverty (9%, -3) and the environment (6%, -1).

“Concerns about health care are more prevalent among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (30%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (29%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Those aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be preoccupied with the economy and jobs (36%).”

The approval rating for Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is 55%, up five points since September, while 40% of Canadians disapprove of his performance (-5).

Trudeau’s rating is highest in Atlantic Canada (60%), followed by Ontario (59%), British Columbia (58%), Quebec (55%), Manitoba and Saskatchewan (42%) and Alberta (37%).

Just over one third of Canadians (35%, +2) approve of the way Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole has handled his duties, while 38% (+4) disapprove—including 45% of Quebecers.

Almost half of Canadians (46%, +2) approve of the performance of Jagmeet Singh as leader of the NDP. The numbers are lower for Green Party leader Annamie Paul (25%) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (17%, +3).

Trudeau remains ahead of all other leaders when Canadians are asked who would make the best prime minister of the country (39%, +1), followed by O’Toole (22%, -1), Singh (13%, =), Bernier (3%, +1), Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (2%, -1) and Paul (2%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 12 to December 14, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Opposition NDP Edges Ahead of Governing UCP in Alberta

Almost two thirds of the province’s residents (65%) oppose the introduction of a provincial sales tax (PST).

Vancouver, BC [December 7, 2020] – The New Democratic party (NDP) holds the upper hand in Alberta’s political scene, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 43% of decided voters would cast a ballot for the opposition NDP if a provincial election were held today, while 40% would support the governing United Conservative Party (UCP).

The Alberta Party is third with 9%, followed by the Green Party (2%), the Liberal party (also 2%) and the Wildrose Independence Party (also 2%).

The NDP holds a 10-point lead over the UCP among female decided voters (46% to 36%), while the governing party is ahead among male voters (43% to 41%).

The UCP is the top choice for decided voters aged 55 and over (48% to 38%) while the NDP leads among those aged 18-to-34 (45% to 36%) and those aged 35-to-54 (42% to 39%).

The NDP has a sizeable lead in Edmonton (55% to 30%), while the UCP is slightly ahead in Calgary (44% to 42%) and holds a substantial advantage in the rest of the province (49% to 32%).

“The United Conservative Party is holding on to 74% of its voters from the 2019 election,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Some former UCP voters are currently looking at supporting the New Democrats (11%), the Alberta Party (7%) and the Wildrose Independence Party (5%).”

Across the province, just over two-in-five Albertans (42%) approve of the way Premier and UCP leader Jason Kenney is handling his duties while half (50%) disapprove. Residents are split when assessing the performance of official opposition and NDP leader Rachel Notley (Approve 45%, Disapprove 46%). 

The approval ratings are significantly lower for Green Party leader Jordan Wilkie (16%), interim Wildrose Independence Party leader Paul Hinman (also 16%) and Alberta Party interim leader Jacquie Fenske (15%).

The economy and jobs is identified as the most important issue facing the province by 43% of Albertans, followed by health care (27%), government accountability (7%), COVID-19 (6%) and energy and pipelines (4%).

When asked about the possible introduction of a provincial sales tax (PST) given Alberta’s fiscal challenges, almost two thirds of residents (65%) voiced opposition to the idea, while 28% supported it.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 2 to December 4, 2020, among 600 adults in Alberta. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Alberta. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.0 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Want Ottawa to Focus on Environmental Issues

More than three-in-five of the province’s residents are “personally concerned” about global warming or climate change.

Vancouver, BC [November 17, 2020] – Residents of British Columbia are not particularly satisfied with the way the federal government has handled environmental issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, 41% think the federal government is not paying enough attention to the environment.

Women (45%) and British Columbians aged 55 and over (47%) are more likely to feel that Ottawa has not done enough on the environment.  

Smaller proportion of British Columbians believe their municipal governments (38%) and the provincial government in Victoria (35%) are not focusing as much on the environment as they should. 

When asked specifically about 10 different environmental problems, at least three-in-five British Columbians said they are personally concerned about five of them: the pollution of rivers, lakes and reservoirs (66%), air pollution (65%), the pollution of drinking water (also 65%), global warming or climate change (63%) and the contamination of soil and water by toxic waste (60%).

“Concerns about climate change in British Columbia are more prevalent among women (67%) and residents aged 55 and over (also 67%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) or the BC Green Party in last month’s provincial election are also more likely to be personally worried about global warming (72% each) than those who supported the BC Liberals (52%).”

Majorities of British Columbians are also personally concerned about deforestation (58%), the extinction of plant and animal species (also 58%), the depletion of fish stocks through overfishing (also 58%), the loss of tropical rain forests (55%) and the maintenance of the supply of fresh water for household needs (also 55%).

Almost two thirds of British Columbians (64%) say that the carbon tax that was implemented in July 2008 across the province has not negatively affected the finances of their  household.

More than a third of British Columbians (37%) think the introduction of the carbon tax in the province has led people to be more mindful of their carbon consumption and change their behaviour—a proportion that rises to 53% among those aged 18-to-34 and 52% among residents of Northern BC.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 29 to October 31, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: James Wheeler

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half in BC, Three-in-Four in Alberta Agree with Pipeline Expansion

Majorities of Albertans and British Columbians are disappointed with the way the federal government has handled this issue.

Vancouver, BC [November 10, 2020] – Just over half of British Columbians and practically three-in-four Albertans want to carry on with the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative provincial samples, 52% of British Columbians and 74% of Albertans agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the project.

“There is a higher level of support for the pipeline’s expansion from residents aged 55 and over in both British Columbia (60%) and Alberta (83%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Agreement with the federal government’s decision is lower among those aged 18-to-34 In each province (44% in BC, 68% in Alberta).”

In British Columbia, agreement with the pipeline expansion has dropped by four points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in December 2019

Opposition to the project fell by six points in British Columbia (from 35% to 29%) , while the proportion of undecided respondents increased from 10% last year to 18% now.

More than half of residents of each Canadian province (59% in Alberta and 54% in British Columbia) are disappointed with the way the federal government has handled the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion. These groups include 66% of Green Party voters in British Columbia and 70% of United Conservative Party voters in Alberta.

While two-in-five British Columbians (40%) want the provincial government to do anything necessary to ensure that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion does not happen, the proportion of Albertans who feel the same way about the actions of their own provincial administration stands at 22%.

Only 17% of Albertans believe the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of the province’s residents. The proportion is significantly higher in British Columbia (44%).

Two thirds of British Columbians (68%) and four-in-five Albertans (79%) believe the Trans Mountain Pipeline will create hundreds of jobs for residents of each province.

More than a third of Albertans (34%) and British Columbians (38%) believe gas prices will be lower now that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion has been re-approved.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 29 to October 31, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia, and an online study conducted from November 2 to November 4, 2020, among 700 adults in Alberta. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia and Alberta. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for British Columbia and +/- 3.4 percentage points for Alberta, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables for British Columbia here, our data tables for Alberta here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Saskatchewan Party Keeps Sizeable Edge in Provincial Election

More than three-in-five likely voters in the province approve of the way Premier Scott Moe has handled his duties

Vancouver, BC [October 25, 2020] – The Saskatchewan Party remains ahead of all challengers in the Prairie Province’s election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 56% of decided voters would cast a ballot for the Saskatchewan Party candidate in their constituency or have already done so in Advance Voting or through the mail, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted earlier this month.

The New Democratic Party (NDP) is in second place with 38%, up two points since the start of the campaign. There was no movement for the other contending parties, with the Green Party at 2%, the Progressive Conservative Party also at 2%, the Liberal Party at 1% and the Buffalo Party also at 1%.

On a regional basis, the New Democrats have a four-point edge over the Saskatchewan Party in Regina among decided voters (50% to 46%). The Saskatchewan Party leads in Saskatoon (53% to 42%) and in the rest of the province (68% to 23%).

About one-in-five decided voters who will be casting their ballot tomorrow in Saskatchewan (18%) say they may change their mind about which party or candidate to support, while 82% are certain of their choice.

At the end of the campaign, almost half of decided voters in Saskatchewan (47%) acknowledge that their main motivation is a party’s ideas and policies. The party’s leader is a distant second with 24%, followed by a desire for change (10%), the party’s candidate in the riding (9%), a desire for stability (7%) and disgust with other contending candidates (3%).

More than three-in-five likely voters (61%, -4) approve of the performance of Premier and Saskatchewan Party leader Scott Moe, while one third (33%, +5) disapprove. 

The rating for Official Opposition and NDP leader Ryan Meili improved by three points to 48%. The numbers are significantly lower for Green leader Naomi Hunter (22%), Progressive Conservative leader Ken Grey (17%), Liberal leader Robert Rudachyk (16%) and Buffalo leader Wade Sira (15%).

The leaders of Saskatchewan’s two main parties reach the end of the campaign with a negative momentum score: -9 for Moe (17% say their opinion of the incumbent premier has improved, while 26% say it has worsened) and -4 for Meilli (23% say their opinion of the opposition leader has improved, while 27% say it has worsened).

On the “Best Premier” question, Moe remains in first place with 51% (+2), followed by Meilli with 29% (+8). The other party leaders are in single digits.

As was the case at the start of the campaign, more than a third of likely voters (35%, =) say the economy and jobs is the most important issue facing Saskatchewan, followed by heath care (31%, +3), crime and public safety (7%, +2), housing, poverty and homelessness (also 7%, +2) and COVID-19 (also 7%, +2).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 23 to October 25, 2020, among 500 likely voters in Saskatchewan, including 456 decided voters in the 2020 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Saskatchewan. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.4 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 4.6 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

New Democrats Headed for Outright Victory in British Columbia

Almost half of likely voters in the province pick John Horgan as the best person to head the provincial government.

Vancouver, BC [October 23, 2020] – The BC New Democratic Party (NDP) stands to make significant gains in British Columbia’s provincial election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 50% of decided voters in British Columbia would cast a ballot for the BC NDP candidate in their constituency or have already done so in Advance Voting or through the mail. This represents a two-point increase for the New Democrats since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in early October.

The BC Liberals remain in second place with 35%, followed by the BC Green Party with 13% and the BC Conservative Party with 2%.  

The New Democrats maintain a nine-point lead over the BC Liberals among decided male voters (48% to 39%) and have a 21-point advantage among decided female voters (52% to 31%).

The BC NDP is also ahead of the main opposition party among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (54% to 29%), decided voters aged 35-to-54 (49% to 36%) and decided voters aged 55 and over (47% to 40%).

Only 11% of decided voters who will be casting their ballot tomorrow say they may change their mind about which party or candidate to support, while 89% are certain of their choice.

Almost half of decided voters in British Columbia (47%) say a party’s ideas and policies is the main motivator for their choice in this provincial election. This includes 66% of BC Green voters and 51% of BC NDP voters, but just 37% of those who will support the BC Liberals.

Other factors cited by decided voters are the party’s leader (22%), the party’s candidate in the riding (11%), a desire for stability (9%), a desire for change (7%) and disgust with other contending candidates (4%).

On the eve of the election, more than three-in-five likely voters (62%, -3) approve of the way Premier and BC NDP leader John Horgan is handling his duties, while 33% disapprove.

There was no change in the approval rating for BC Liberals leader Andrew Wilkinson since early October (40%), while BC Greens leader Sonia Furstenau improved markedly to 46% (+13).

Furstenau posts a momentum score of +13 (27% of likely voters say their opinion of her has improved since the start of the campaign, while 14% say it has worsened). The numbers are also in positive territory for Horgan (+2), while Wilkinson’s score is -21 (with 36% of likely voters reporting a worsening opinion of the BC Liberals leader).

When asked who would make the best premier of the province, Horgan remains on top with the endorsement of almost half of likely voters (48%, +1), followed by Wilkinson with 24% (-3) and Furstenau with 12% (+6).

While 81% of likely voters who supported the BC NDP in the 2017 ballot feel Horgan is the best person to act as British Columbia’s head of government, only 53% of BC Liberal voters in the last election feel the same way about Wilkinson.

The issue landscape did not shift dramatically in the final week of the campaign. One-in-four likely voters (25%, =) say the economy and jobs is their main preoccupation right now, followed by housing, poverty and homelessness (23%, -2) and health care (also 23%, =). 

Fewer likely voters mentioned COVID-19 (13%, +5), the environment (7%, =), crime and public safety (4%, =), education (2%, +1), accountability (1%, -2), and energy (also 1%, +1) as the top issue facing the province.

As has been the case throughout the past five weeks, likely voters aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be concerned about housing, homelessness and poverty (33%), while those aged 35-to-54 gravitate towards the economy and jobs (29%) and those aged 55 and over select health care (28%).

At least two-in-five likely voters pick Horgan over Wilkinson as the best party leader to handle health care (49% to 22%), the economy and jobs (43% to 31%), education (42% to 22%), housing, poverty and homelessness (40% to 22%) and accountability (40% to 25%), 

On the issue of handling the COVID-19 pandemic, likely voters in British Columbia choose Horgan over Wilkinson by a 3-to-1 margin (53% to 17%). The incumbent premier is also ahead of the opposition leader on two other matters: crime and public safety (38% to 30%) and energy (32% to 25%). 

Furstenau extended her lead as the best leader to manage the environment (44%, +11), with Horgan at 24% and Wilkinson at 14%.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on October 22 and October 23, 2020, among 750 likely voters in British Columbia, including 705 decided voters in the 2020 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.6 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 3.7 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by Adi kavazovic

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Appetite for Electric Vehicles Higher in the U.S. Than Canada

Price and the fear of becoming stranded are the major deterrents for motorists pondering a switch to a “carbon free” ride.

Vancouver, BC [October 22, 2020] – Vehicle owners in the United States are more likely to predict that their next car will be electric than their Canadian counterparts, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples of non-electric vehicle owners, 51% of American respondents and 42% of Canadian respondents say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that the next vehicle they acquire for themselves or their household will be electric.

“There is a significant gender gap on both North American countries when it comes to embracing the concept of electric vehicles,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Male non-electric vehicle owners are more likely to foresee an electric car in their future (48% in Canada and 68% in the United States) than their female counterparts (37% in Canada and 30% in the United States).”

In Canada, non-electric vehicle owners aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be considering a switch (61%) than those aged 35-to-54 (44%) and those aged 55 and over (37%).

In the United States, non-electric vehicle owners aged 35-to-54 are more likely to foresee a change in the future (78%) than those aged 18-to-34 (69%) and those aged 55 and over (21%).

When asked about specific issues that may make the purchase of an electric vehicle less likely, about three-in-five respondents in Canada (61%) say that the price is too expensive compared to non-electric options.

A majority of non-electric vehicle owners in Canada are fearful of becoming stranded if they cannot find a charging station (55%) and are worried about not having enough places to charge the vehicle in the areas where they usually drive (also 55%).

Fewer Canadian non-electric vehicle owners cited not having a place to charge the vehicle where they currently live (47%) and the “feel” of the vehicle compared to a non-electric one (14%).

In the United States, more than half of non-electric vehicle owners mentioned the fear of becoming stranded (53%) and price (51%) as the biggest hindrances to making a future purchase. 

More than two-in-five American respondents (45%) are concerned about a shortage of places to charge the vehicle where they usually drive, 37% lack a charging spot where they currently live, and 27% worried about the “feel” of an electric vehicle. 

The idea of the “feel” of the vehicle being a deal-breaker in the purchase of an electric car was more prevalent among non-electric vehicle owners who identify with the Republican Party in the United States (35%) and those who reside in the Canadian province of Alberta (23%).

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among representative samples of 797 adult non-electric vehicle owners in Canada and 804 adult non-electric vehicle owners in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for each country, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables for Canada here, our data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Steady National Lead for Biden as United States Election Nears

The main influences for American likely voters are party platforms, discussions with family and discussions with friends.

Vancouver, BC [October 21, 2020] – Joe Biden stands to capture a majority of the national vote in this year’s presidential election in the United States, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of likely voters, 53% of decided voters would cast a ballot for the Democratic Party nominee or have already done so, while 45% would support Republican Party incumbent Donald Trump.

Support for both Jo Jorgensen of the Libertarian Party and Howie Hawkins of the Green Party remains at 1%.

The popular vote forecast is practically unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September.

Biden holds 19-point leads over Trump among female decided voters (57% to 38%) and decided voters aged 18-to-34 (58% to 37%). The race is closer among male decided voters (50% to 48%), decided voters aged 35-to-54 (51% to 46%) and decided voters aged 55 and over (52% to 47%).

White decide voters are evenly split among the two main candidates(48% for Biden, 48% for Trump), while the level of support for the Democratic nominee is higher with Hispanic / Latino decided voters (58%) and African American decided voters (92%).

Across the country, 11% of decided voters who supported Trump in the 2016 presidential election are voting for Biden this year. Only 3% of decided voters who backed Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in 2016 are casting a ballot for Trump in 2020.

Almost two-in-five likely voters in the United States (39%) say their primary motivation when selecting who to back in the presidential election is the candidate’s ideas and policies, followed by the candidate’s political party (20%), a desire for stability (15%), disgust with other candidates (14%) and a desire for change (13%).

More than half of likely voters believe Biden is the best candidate to handle five issues: the environment (54%), race relations (53%), health care (52%), education (51%) and COVID-19 (also 51%).

The former Vice President holds the upper hand over the current President on nine other topics: government accountability (Biden 49%, Trump 34%), foreign policy (Biden 48%, Trump 38%), immigration (Biden 48%, Trump 38%), job creation (Biden 47%, Trump 41%), crime (Biden 46%, Trump 37%), the economy (Biden 45%, Trump 42%), managing the deficit (Biden 44%, Trump 35%), energy and oil (Biden 44%, Trump 39%) and national defense (Biden 44%, Trump 42%). 

Almost two thirds of likely voters in the United States (64%) say party platforms are “very influential” or “moderately influential” in their decision to support candidates in this year’s election, while 51% mention discussions with family and 48% mention cite discussions with friends.

Fewer American likely voters are swayed by endorsements from non-governmental organizations (44%), campaign ads on radio and television (43%), endorsements from unions (40%), endorsements from trade associations (39%), interaction with candidates on social media (also 39%), interaction with other people on social media (38%) and endorsements from newspapers (also 38%).

“More than half of Republican likely voters (54%) say campaign ads on radio and television are influential in their decision to support candidates,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among Democrats (45%) and Independents (28%).”

Sizeable majorities of American likely voters express confidence in the people responsible for conducting elections in their state being able to oversee the entire process (83%), enforce social distancing at polling stations (82%) and ensure that there is no fraudulent activity with mailed ballots (78%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 16 to October 18, 2020, among 1,035 likely voters in the United States and 973 decided voters in the 2020 presidential election. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.0 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 3.1 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Saskatchewan Party Ahead of NDP in Provincial Election

Practically half of likely voters in the province say Scott Moe is their preferred leader to serve as head of government.

Vancouver, BC [October 11, 2020] – The Saskatchewan Party holds a sizeable advantage in the electoral campaign currently underway in the Prairie Province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 58% of decided voters in Saskatchewan would cast a ballot for the candidate of the governing party in their constituency.

The New Democratic Party (NDP) is in second place with 36%, followed by the Green Party with 2%, the Progressive Conservative Party also with 2%, the Liberal Party with 1% and the Buffalo Party also with 1%.

The race is currently tight in Regina, where the Saskatchewan Party and the NDP are virtually tied among decided voters (49% and 47% respectively). The governing party is ahead in Saskatoon (54% to 41%) and in the rest of the province (65% to 25%).

Practically four-in-five decided voters in Saskatchewan (79%) say they are certain of their current choice, while 21% say they may change their mind before Election Day on Oct. 26.

The primary motivation for decided voters in Saskatchewan is a party’s ideas and policies (38%), followed by the party’s leader (32%), the candidate in the riding (10%), a desire for stability (also 10%), a desire for change (7%) and disgust with other contending candidates (3%).

“Decided voters who plan to support the Saskatchewan Party are more likely to say that their main motivation is the leader (41%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, those who plan to cast a ballot for the NDP are more likely to cite ideas and policies (42%).”

Almost two thirds of the province’s likely voters (65%) are satisfied with the way Premier and Saskatchewan Party leader Scott Moe has handled his duties, while 28% are not and 7% are undecided.

Likely voters are divided in their assessment of Official Opposition and NDP leader Ryan Meili (Approve 45%, Disapprove 44%). The rating is lower for Progressive Conservative leader Ken Grey (35%), Green leader Naomi Hunter (32%), Liberal leader Robert Rudachyk (31%) and Buffalo leader Wade Sira (25%).

On the “Best Premier” question, Moe holds a commanding lead over Meili (49% to 21%). The other four party leaders are in single digits.

More than a third of likely voters in Saskatchewan (35%) believe the economy and jobs is the most important issue facing the province, followed by heath care (28%), the environment (8%) and crime and public safety (5%).

Moe holds the upper hand over Meili as the best leader to handle eight issues: energy (46% to 19%), the economy and jobs (45% to 24%), crime and public safety (42% to 19%), accountability (41% to 22%), the environment (40% to 19%), health care (39% to 30%), education (39% to 24%) and housing, poverty and homelessness (38% to 23%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 8 to October 10, 2020, among 500 likely voters in Saskatchewan, including 447 decided voters in the 2020 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Saskatchewan. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.4 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 4.6 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by Tintaggon.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Lead for New Democratic Party Increases in British Columbia

John Horgan is ahead of Andrew Wilkinson as the best leader to handle the five most important issues for voters in the province.

Vancouver, BC [October 8, 2020] – The BC New Democratic Party (NDP) has extended its advantage in British Columbia’s provincial electoral campaign, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 48% of decided voters in British Columbia would cast a ballot for the BC NDP candidate in their constituency, up four points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in late September.

The BC Liberals remain in second place with 36% (-1), followed by the BC Green Party with 13% (=) and the BC Conservative Party with 2% (-3). 

The BC NDP holds a nine-point edge over the BC Liberals among decided male voters (47% to 38%) and a 16-point lead among decided female voters (49% to 33%).

The New Democrats are also ahead of the BC Liberals among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (45% to 31%), decided voters aged 35-to-54 (46% to 33) and decided voters aged 55 and over (44% to 34%).

Just under one-in-four decided voters (23%) say they may change their mind and support another party’s candidate in the election scheduled for Oct. 24. Supporters of the BC Liberals and the BC NDP are less likely to consider a switch (15% and 20% respectively) than those who plan to vote for the BC Greens (29%).

When asked about the main factor that motivates their selection, 43% of decided voters cite the party’s ideas and policies, while 21% focus mostly on the party’s leader and 14% concentrate on the party’s candidate in the riding. Fewer decided voters in British Columbia are swayed by a desire for stability (11%), a desire for change (10%) or disgust with other contending candidates (4%).

The approval rating for Premier and BC NDP leader John Horgan stands at 65% (-1). The numbers are lower for BC Liberals leader Andrew Wilkinson (40%, +1) and BC Greens leader Sonia Furstenau (33%, -4).

Horgan’s campaign momentum is balanced, with 24% of likely voters in British Columbia saying their opinion of him has improved and 24% stating that it has worsened. In contrast, Wilkinson has a negative momentum score (Improved 16%, Worsened 26%) as does Furstenau (Improved 12%, Worsened 16%).

On the preferred premier question, almost half of likely voters in British Columbia (47%, +3) select Horgan, with Wilkinson at 27% (=) and Furstenau at 6% (-1).

As was the case last month, likely voters in British Columbia are primarily preoccupied with housing, poverty and homelessness (25%, +1), the economy and jobs (also 25%, +4) and health care (23%, -3). Other issues mentioned by likely voters are COVID-19 (8%, -3), the environment (7%, =), crime and public safety (4%, -4), accountability (3%, =), education (1%, =) and energy (1%, +1).

When asked which leader is better suited to handle specific issues, Horgan holds sizeable leads over Wilkinson on COVID-19 (52% to 20%), health care (48% to 24%), education (42% to 23%), the economy and jobs (42% to 30%), housing, poverty and homelessness (40% to 23%), accountability (37% to 28%), crime and public safety (37% to 30%) and energy (34% to 27%).

On the environment, Furstenau is in first place (33%), followed by Horgan with 29% and Wilkinson with 18%.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 5 to October 7, 2020, among 750 likely voters in British Columbia, including 698 decided voters in the 2020 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.6 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 3.7 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by James Wheeler

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

BC NDP Ahead of Rivals as Campaign Starts in British Columbia

John Horgan has a 17-point lead over Andrew Wilkinson when voters are asked who would make the Best Premier.

Vancouver, BC [September 24, 2020] – As British Columbia prepares for a unique electoral campaign in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic, the governing New Democratic Party (NDP) is in first place, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 44% of decided voters in British Columbia would support the BC NDP candidate in their constituency in the election scheduled for October 24. The BC NDP has gained three points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May.

The BC Liberals are in second place with 37% (+4), followed by the BC Green Party with 13% (-3) and the BC Conservative Party with 4% (-5). 

The BC NDP holds a 12-point lead among decided female voters (47% to 35%). The race is significantly closer among decided male voters (41% for the BC NDP and 39% for the BC Liberals).

The BC Liberals are six-points ahead of the BC NDP in Southern BC (43% to 37%). 

The BC Green Party has its best numbers among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (22%, with the BC NDP at 38%) and in Vancouver Island (22%, with the BC NDP at 50%).

Two thirds of British Columbians (67%, -6) approve of the way Premier and BC NDP leader John Horgan is handling his duties, while one-in-four (25%, +7) disapprove.

Since May, the approval rating for BC Liberals leader Andrew Wilkinson dropped by nine points to 39%. Recently selected BC Green Party leader Sonia Furstenau holds similar numbers (37%), while the rating is significantly lower for BC Conservative Party leader Trevor Bolin (23%, -12).

When likely voters are asked who would make the Best Premier of British Columbia, more than two-in-five (44%) select Horgan, while 27% choose Wilkinson. Furstenau and Bolin are in single digits (7% and 2% respectively) and 21% are undecided.

More than one-in-four likely voters (26%, -2) think health care is the most important issue facing the province. Housing, poverty and homelessness is a close second at 24% (+7), followed by the economy and jobs (21%, =), COVID-19 (11%, -10), crime and public safety (8%, +6) and the environment (7%, +3).

“At the start of the provincial campaign, the most pressing concerns of voters in British Columbia vary greatly depending on age,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Housing, poverty and homelessness is especially important for those aged 18-to-34 (29%), while the economy and jobs is top of mind for those aged 35-to-54 (26%) and health care is paramount for those aged 55 and over (29%).”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 21 to September 23, 2020, among 750 likely voters in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.6 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by James Wheeler

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca