Three-in-Four Canadians Back Temporary Ban on Vaping Products

A majority of residents would also support prohibiting flavoured vaping products.

Vancouver, BC [November 13, 2019] – A large proportion of Canadians support enacting a temporary prohibition on the sale and distribution of e-cigarettes, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-four Canadians (74%) would agree with their province implementing a vaping ban similar to the one that was recently enacted in Massachusetts.

Support for a temporary ban on all vaping products is high across all regions of the country, from 71% in Alberta to 77% in Atlantic Canada.

On Sept. 24, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker decreed a temporary four-month ban on all vaping products in the American state, following cases of lung damage associated with the use of e-cigarettes.

Just over one-in-ten Canadians (11%) say they used an electronic cigarette in the past year. The proportion is higher among those aged 18-to-34 (17%) and British Columbians (16%).

More than four-in-five Canadians (85%, -6 since a Research Co. survey conducted in 2018) want vaping products that contain nicotine to display a warning, similar to the one used for tobacco products. 

In addition, 73% of Canadians (-3) call for the use of e-cigarettes to be restricted to areas where smoking is currently allowed, and a majority (57%) want all flavoured vaping products to be banned 

Half of Canadians (50%, unchanged) say they would not consider dating a person who used electronic cigarettes—including 54% of British Columbians.

Canadians aged 55 and over (57%) are more likely to say they would shun a dating prospect because of vaping. The proportion is lower among Canadians aged 35-to-54 and 18-to-34 (47% each).

“When it comes to vaping and dating, there is no gender gap across Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Equal proportions of men and women say they wold not consider courting a vaper.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 21 to October 23, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Metro Vancouverites Angered by Litterers and Lazy Dog Owners

Other frustrations include drivers who use hand-held cell phones and those who park in handicapped spots without a decal.

Vancouver, BC [November 8, 2019] – At least seven-in-ten residents of Metro Vancouver are angry after witnessing four specific illegal behaviours, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 73% of residents say they become upset when they see a person littering and when dog owners decide not to pick up dog waste.

Animosity towards negligent dog owners rises with age, from 70% and 72% among Metro Vancouverites aged 18-to-34 and 35-to-54 respectively, to 82% among those aged 55 and over.

More than two thirds of Metro Vancouver residents are also angry when they see someone using a hand-held cell phone when driving (72%), parking in a handicapped spot without a decal (70%) and throwing cigarette butts on the ground (67%).

Two other driving violations make more than three-in-five Metro Vancouverites upset: speeding on a municipal road or street (65%) and not wearing a seatbelt when driving a car or riding in a car (61%).

Women are more likely to become upset after witnessing a driver speeding (71%) or a person inside a car who is not wearing a seatbelt (66%) than men (59% and 55% respectively). 

Smoking in a patio, or within 5 metres of doorways, open windows, or air intakes has been illegal in British Columbia for more than a decade. A majority of Metro Vancouverites (59%) are angry when they witness this particular behaviour.

“Residents of the City of Vancouver are more likely to become enraged by the actions of smokers,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion of Vancouverites who are upset is higher than in other municipalities when it comes to people lighting up in places other than designated areas.”

Fewer than half of Metro Vancouverites are angered after witnessing four other behaviours: riding a bicycle on the sidewalk (46%), riding a bicycle without a helmet (45%), watering the lawn outside permitted hours (40%) and jaywalking (38%).

Almost three-in-four Metro Vancouverites (73%) consider that most of the residents of their city “definitely” or “probably” follow existing laws and by-laws, while one-in-five (21%) believe most people “definitely” or “probably” do not.

Residents of Vancouver are more likely to deem most inhabitants as law-abiding (80%) than those who live in Burnaby (70%), Surrey (68%) and the remaining municipalities (72%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 24 to October 27, 2019, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.7 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Split on Moving Every Halloween to Saturday

More than half of Canadians think it is inappropriate to change the skin colour of an adult or a child as part of a costume.

Vancouver, BC [October 30, 2019] – Canadians are divided on whether Halloween should always be observed on a weekend, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 41% of Canadians agree with moving Halloween to the last Saturday of October, while 43% disagree and 16% are undecided.

There is a petition circulating in the United States that calls for Halloween to be moved to the last Saturday of October, instead of being observed every year on the same day (October 31).

Men are more likely to support observing Halloween on a Saturday than women (46% to 35%). Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to support the move (46%) than those aged 35-to-54 (38%) and those aged 55 and over (39%).

“While most Quebecers (53%) welcome the idea of observing Halloween on Saturdays, the rest of the country is not as excited,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The lowest level of support for the proposed modification is observed in British Columbia (31%).”

Respondents to this survey were also asked about five specific types of costumes that children or adults could wear for Halloween.

More than half of Canadians believe that two types of children’s costumes are inappropriate: those who represent an ethnic stereotype (57%) and those that change the colour of the child’s skin (51%).

Almost half of Canadians (47%) believe costumes where a child carries toy or replica weapons are inappropriate, while smaller proportions appear troubled by costumes that refer to a culture that is not the child’s own (38%) or that represent a social stereotype, such as a jailbird or vagabond (33%).

When asked about the same types of costumes for adults, the results are similar. Majorities of Canadians say it is inappropriate to wear a costume that represents an ethnic stereotype (59%) or one that changes the colour of the adult’s skin (53%).

Almost half of Canadians (49%) find fault with a costume where an adult carries toy or replica weapons, more than two-in-five (44%) feel the same way about costumes that refer to a culture that is not the adult’s own, and 36% believe it is inappropriate to were a costume that represents a social stereotype.

On a regional basis, respondents in Quebec (44%) are the least likely to believe that a costume that changes the colour of an adult’s skin is inappropriate for Halloween. 

The proportion of Canadians who disagree with this type of costume for an adult is higher in Atlantic Canada (50%), Manitoba and Saskatchewan (56%), Alberta (57%), British Columbia (also 57%) and Ontario (58%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 21 to October 23, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Edmonton Eskimos Franchise Name OK for Most Canadians

Younger Canadians are more likely to feel the name is unacceptable than their older counterparts.

Vancouver, BC [October 23, 2019] – Most Canadians see no problem with the current name of the Canadian Football League (CFL) franchise that plays in Edmonton, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 60% of Canadians say they believe the name of the Edmonton Eskimos is acceptable, while 23% consider it unacceptable.

The same proportion of Canadians (60%) think the name of the Chilliwack Chiefs of the British Columbia Hockey League (BCHL) is acceptable.

In 2017, 57% of Canadians thought the franchise name of the Edmonton Eskimos was acceptable and 21% found it unacceptable.

“There is a pronounced generational gap when Canadians are asked about the current name of Edmonton’s CFL franchise,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 67% of Canadians aged 55 and over see no problem with the name, the proportion drops to 60% among those aged 35-to-54 and 49% among those aged 18-to-34.”  

More than three-in-five Canadians believe the names of three other North American professional sports franchises are acceptable: the Atlanta Braves of Major League Baseball (MLB) (66%), the Chicago Blackhawks of the National Hockey League (NHL) (65%) and the Kansas City Chiefs of the National Football League (NFL) (62%).

A majority of respondents also regard the MLB’s Cleveland Indians (57%) and the NFL’s Washington Redskins (54%) as acceptable names for a professional sports franchise.

The highest level of rejection for a franchise name is observed for the Washington Redskins, with 29% of Canadians saying the moniker is unacceptable—a proportion that rises to 38% among respondents aged 18-to-34.

Photo Credit: tewarianuj

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 24 to September 26, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Some Marijuana Users in British Columbia Shun Licensed Retailers

Across the province, 24% of consumers say they have not acquired any cannabis at a licensed retailer.

Vancouver, BC [October 18, 2019] – A year after marijuana became legal in Canada, only a third of cannabis users in British Columbia are acquiring their product exclusively at licensed retailers, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, only 33% of British Columbians who have consumed marijuana since legalization say that “all” of their cannabis was acquired at a licensed retailer.

About one-in-five marijuana consumers in British Columbia (19%) say “most” of their cannabis was obtained at a licensed retailer, and 14% acknowledge that “some” of it was purchased this way.

One-in-four marijuana consumers in British Columbia (24%) say that “none” of the cannabis they have used since legalization has been acquired at a licensed retailer—including 37% of consumers aged 55 and over.

Across the province. 44% of residents say they consumed marijuana in Canada before it became legal, while 43% have never tried it. 

In April, only 6% of British Columbians said they had consumed marijuana only after it became legal,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Now, the proportion has risen to 13%, including more than one-in-five residents aged 18-to-34 (22%).”

As was the case in a Research Co. survey conducted six months ago, more than three-in-five British Columbians (63%) agree with marijuana being legal in Canada, while 29% disagree.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (70%) and residents of Northern BC (67%) are more likely to endorse the legal status of marijuana.

When asked to review the decisions that the provincial government has taken to enable the legal sale of marijuana in British Columbia, four-in-five residents (81%) agree with prohibiting the use of marijuana on school properties and in vehicles.

Sizeable majorities of residents also agree with establishing 19 years as the legal age to purchase, sell or consume marijuana in the province (73%), restricting marijuana smoking to areas where tobacco smoking is allowed (74%), authorizing adults to grow up to four cannabis plants per household, as long as the plants are not visible from public spaces off the property, and home cultivation is banned in homes used as day-cares (60%), and establishing the Liquor Distribution Branch (LDB) as the wholesale distributor of non-medical marijuana in British Columbia (56%)

Two thirds of British Columbians (67%, +7 since April) think companies that operate in the province should be able to administer “drug tests” to any employee now that marijuana is legal.

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians disagree with legalizing ecstasy (72%), heroin (76%), powder cocaine (77%), crack cocaine (79%), methamphetamine or “crystal meth” (also 79%) and fentanyl (also 79%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 7 to October 10, 2019, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error — which measures sample variability — is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca