Canadians, Hockey Fans Agree on Banning Head Shots

Two thirds of Canadians and three-in-four hockey fans believe the game would be “better off” if this regulation is implemented.  

Vancouver, BC [January 14, 2022] – A significant proportion of Canadians and hockey fans are ready to take a significant step to make the professional game safer, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 80% of Canadians—and 89% of self-described “hockey fans”—support banning heads shots in professional hockey.  

“At least four-in-five residents of British Columbia (83%), Ontario (81%), Quebec (also 81%) and Atlantic Canada (80%) are in favour of a head shot ban in professional hockey,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “They are joined by 75% of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba and 68% of Albertans.”  

When asked about a ban on fighting in professional hockey, Canadians favour the idea by a 2-to-1 margin (60% to 29%). Hockey fans are divided, with 49% opposing this course of action and 46% supporting it.  

The idea of banning fights in professional hockey is particularly popular in Quebec (69%). Majorities in Ontario (59%), British Columbia (57%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 57%), Atlantic Canada (55%) and Alberta (51%) are also supportive.  

Two thirds of Canadians (66%) and three-in-four hockey fans (74%) believe hockey would be better off if heads shots are banned from the professional game.  

The numbers are lower for a ban on fighting, with 43% of Canadians and 28% of hockey fans thinking this regulation would be beneficial.  

More than half of Canadians (52%) rate the efforts of the National Hockey League (NHL) in looking after the safety of its players as “very good” or “good”—a proportion that rises to 76% among fans.  

More than a quarter of Canadians (27%) think professional hockey has become a more violent sport over the past five years. Women (29%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (31%) are more likely to believe that the sport is now more violent.  

One-in-five Canadians (20%) say they would encourage their kids to avoid playing hockey as a result of recent violent incidents in the sport. The same proportion (20%) would refrain from buying products from companies that sponsor professional hockey, while one-in-four (25%) would watch fewer hockey games than they currently do.  

Methodology:  Results are based on an online study conducted from December 15 to December 17, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and here, and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Belief in Astrology and Other Concepts Falls in Canada

Only 14% of Canadians say they currently pay attention to astrology, while 58% claim to have never followed it.  
 
Vancouver, BC [January 4, 2022] – Fewer Canadians believe in astrology than two years ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 32% of Canadians believe in the concept of studying the movements and relative positions of celestial objects to make observations about human affairs and terrestrial events, down four points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2019.  
 
Two-in-five Albertans (40%, +13) say they believe in astrology, along with 34% of British Columbians (+3) and 31% of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (+3). The numbers are lower in Ontario (38%, -4), Atlantic Canada (30%, -7) and Quebec (22%, -14).  
 
“While belief in astrology is down at the national level, there is significant growth among Canada’s youngest adults,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (55%, +6) believe in the concept, compared to 36% among those aged 25-to-54 (-1) and 23% among those aged 55 and over (-4).”  
 
When asked about their behaviour, 14% of Canadians (-6) say they currently pay attention to astrology—a proportion that includes 26% of those aged 18-to-34, 18% of Ontarians and 16% of women.  
 
Larger proportions of Canadians say they used to pay attention to astrology at some point in their lives (28%, +1) or claim to have never paid attention to it (58%, +4).  
 
The proportion of Canadians who believe in three other concepts is also lower than it was in 2019. Just under one third of the country’s residents (32%, -1) believe in haunted houses, or buildings being inhabited by spirits of dead people.  
 
Belief in haunted houses is highest in British Columbia (38%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (37%) and Alberta (36%), and lower in Ontario (32%), Atlantic Canada (30%) and Quebec (24%).  
 
Fewer than three-in-ten Canadians (28%, -3) believe in clairvoyance, or the ability to gain information about an object, person, location or physical event through extrasensory perception.  
 
Women are more likely to believe in clairvoyance (35%) than men (21%).  
 
More than one-in-four Canadians (26%, -5) believe in mediumship, or mediating communication between living human beings and spirits of dead people.  
 
While almost half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 believe in mediumship (48%), the proportion drops to 30% among those aged 35-to-54 and 16% among those aged 55 and over.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 15 to December 17, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

British Columbians Still Back Proposed Ban on Single-Use Plastics

Three-in-four of the province’s residents say they rely on their own re-usable bags to transport groceries out of a store.  
 
Vancouver, BC [December 31, 2021] – Public support remains high in British Columbia for the federal government’s plan to reduce plastic use across Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 82% of British Columbians are in favour of banning single-use plastics, unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2021.
 
The federal government’s proposed regulation focuses on items such as grocery checkout bags, straws, stir sticks, six-pack rings, plastic cutlery and food takeout containers made from hard-to-recycle plastics. Several municipalities in British Columbia have already implemented their own guidelines for specific items, such as grocery checkout bags.  
 
Just over three-in-four British Columbians (76%, -1) acknowledge relying on their own reusable bag to transport groceries out of a store after purchasing them. Significantly smaller proportions of the province’s residents use bags provided by the store, either made out of paper (11%) or plastic (9%).  
 
“There is a generational gap in the adoption of reusable bags in British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Practically nine-in-ten residents aged 55 and over (88%) are already using their own bags at grocery stores, compared to 73% among those aged 35-to-54 and 62% among those aged 18-to-34.”  
 
Just over half of British Columbians (51%, -3) say they go out of their way to recycle “all of the time”, such as holding on to bottles and cans until they can be placed into a proper recycling bin. Once again, this behaviour is more common among the province’s residents aged 55 and over (66%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (50%) and aged 18-to-34 (32%).  
 
More than three-in-five residents of Vancouver Island (65%) and Northern BC (63%) claim to go out of their way to recycle “all of the time.” The proportion is lower in Southern BC (58%), the Fraser Valley (57%) and Metro Vancouver (44%).  
 
One-in-five British Columbians (20%, -6) acknowledge limiting hot water usage in their home “all the time” by taking shorter showers or running washing machines or dishwashers with full loads only.  
 
Fewer British Columbians say they unplug electrical devices in their home—such as TVs, computers and cell phone chargers—when they are not in use (12%, -1), buy biodegradable products (5%, -2) or eat organic or home-grown foods (also 5%, -2) “all of the time.”
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 21 to December 23, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Half of Canadians Expect Fun, Not Stressful, Holiday Season

“Merry Christmas” is still the preferred greeting, but “Happy Holidays” is gaining ground among the youngest adults.  

Vancouver, BC [December 21, 2021] – Compared to last year, more Canadians think the holiday season will be a time of joy and excitement, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians say they expect this time of the year to be “more fun than stressful”, up 19 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2020.  

Only 27% of Canadians (-10) believe this holiday season will be “more stressful than fun”, while 24% (+9) are undecided.  

“Majorities of Quebecers (53%) and Ontarians (51%) expect the current holiday season to be more fun than stressful,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower in Alberta (46%) and British Columbia (41%).”  

More than three-in-five Canadians (62%, -6) state that “Merry Christmas” is their preferred greeting for the season, while 20% (+6) say “Happy Holidays” is their favourite.  

Significant majorities of Canadians of all age groups favour “Merry Christmas“ as a greeting. “Happy Holidays” is more popular with Canadians aged 18-to-34 (24%) than among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (21%) and 55 and over (14%).  

When Canadians are asked about six components of their lives, majorities say that “family” (78%, -2) and “friends” (54%, =) are “very important” to them personally.  

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%) say “country” is “very important” to them, down 10 points since 2020. Fewer of the country’s residents feel the same way about  “career” (29%, =), “religion” (22%, -2) and “affluence” (11%, =).  

Practically half of Canadians (49%, -3) say they are “very” or “moderately” spiritual—a proportion that rises to 52% among women, 53% among those aged 55 and over and 53% among Albertans.  

Across Canada, almost one-in-five residents (18%) say they are “atheist” or “agnostic”, including 23% of Ontarians and 24% of British Columbians. Half of Canadians (50%, -6) describe themselves as Christian.  

One third of Canadians (33%, +3) say they never attend religious services. The proportion rises to 35% in Quebec and 38% in British Columbia.  

When asked about specific delicacies that are usually enjoyed during the holiday season, at least half of Canadians say they like turkey (84%), cranberry sauce (64%), Brussels sprouts (62%), fruit cake (56%), egg nog (54%) and mince pies (50%). Fewer Canadians express a preference for plum pudding (43%) and mulled wine (34%).  

There is a marked gender gap when Canadians ponder egg nog, with 60% of men saying they like the beverage compared to only 48% of women. In fact, Canadian women are more likely to “definitely dislike” egg nog (32%) than to “definitely like” it (27%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 8 to December 10, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Views on Pandemic Worsen Considerably Across Canada

Only 47% of Canadians think the worst of COVID-19 is “behind us”, down 18 points since November.  

Vancouver, BC [December 17, 2021] – Fewer than half of Canadians are optimistic about the future ramifications of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 47% of Canadians say that the worst of the pandemic is “behind us”, down 18 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November.  

A third of Canadians (33%, +12) believe the worst of COVID-19 is “ahead of us”, while 20% (+5) are not sure.  

“More than half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (55%) and aged 35-to-54 (52%) believe that the pandemic will not worsen,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 37% of those aged 55 and over feel the same way.”  

Across the country, 85% of Canadians (=) consider COVID-19 as a real threat.

There is little movement in the level of satisfaction that Canadians express when asked to rate the way their municipal (64%, +1), federal (63%, +1) and provincial governments (62%, +3) have dealt with the pandemic.  

More than two thirds of residents of Quebec (72%, -4) and British Columbia (68%, +6) believe that their provincial administrations have handled COVID-19 well. The rating is stagnant in Ontario (56%, =). Alberta continues to hold the lowest numbers among the four most populous provinces, but saw its standing improve markedly, from 29% in December to 42% this month.  

More than four-in-five Canadians (83%, +2) are in favour of requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside. Just over three-in-four Canadians (76%, +6) say they wear a mask every time they go out.  

The notion of allowing K-12 students to go back to in-class learning is supported by 69% of Canadians (-5).  

Sizeable proportions of Canadians continue to support the use of a “vaccine passport” for specific endeavours, including travel to other countries (73%, -1 since November), to go to the theatre or cinema (72%, +3), to go to live concerts (also 71%, +1), to go to live sporting events (also 71%, +1), to visit a gym or fitness facility (also 71%, +1), for travel to other Canadian provinces (also 71%, +1), to be able to work at an office (68%, +1) and for travel inside the same province (66%, +1).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 8 to December 10, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Metro Vancouver Drivers Reject Paying to Park on the Street

Seven-in-ten drivers say it is harder to find a parking spot in their municipality when they need one.  
 
Vancouver, BC [December 14, 2021] – A sizeable majority of drivers in Metro Vancouver reject the notion of having to pay to park their cars on residential streets overnight, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative sample, almost two thirds of drivers in Metro Vancouver (64%) think it is a “bad idea” to charge a fee to vehicle owners who park their cars on residential streets overnight.  
 
“More than three-in-five drivers in Surrey (62%) and Vancouver (61%) are not in favour of an overnight residential parking fee,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the rest of the Metro Vancouver region, 67% of drivers are opposed.”  
 
A majority of drivers in Metro Vancouver (51%) say they have a garage and park their vehicle there, while 22% rely on a shared parkade. Just over one-in-ten (13%) say they have a garage, but do not park their vehicle inside it—including 16% of men and 15% of those who reside in Surrey.  
 
Seven-in-ten drivers in Metro Vancouver (70%) say it is harder now to find a parking spot in their municipality when they need one, down 11 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2018.  
 
Over the past two years, 27% of drivers in Metro Vancouver acknowledge having received a parking ticket. Similar proportions of citations have been issued by municipalities (17%, -1) and by parking management companies (15%, -5).  
 
Drivers in Vancouver are significantly more likely to report getting a parking ticket of any kind (40%, +12) than their counterparts in Surrey (22%, -11) and in other Metro Vancouver municipalities (20%, -13).  
 
When asked how they dealt with the last parking ticket they were issued by a municipality, two thirds of offending drivers (68%, -8) say they paid quickly to get a discount, while 26% (+15) covered the full amount days later and 6% (-7) never paid it.  
 
The situation is similar for tickets issued by a parking management company, with a majority of offending drivers (56%, +5) paying quickly, three-in-ten (30%,+15) covering the full amount later and 15% (-19) admitting to never paying the fine.  
 
Drivers aged 55 and over who receive a parking ticket are significantly more likely to pay the fine early, whether the citation was issued by a municipality (86%) or by a parking management company (65%).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 27 to November 29, 2021, among 521 adults in Metro Vancouver who drive to school or work on weekdays. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.3 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Canadians Continue to Back Boycott of Beijing 2022 Winter Games

Two thirds of Canadians (68%) say they refrain from buying products made in China at least some of the time.  

Vancouver, BC [December 9, 2021] – More than half of Canadians think the country’s athletes should avoid taking part in the next edition of the Winter Olympics, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 56% of Canadians think Canada should boycott the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing over China’s human rights record.  

The level of support for a boycott of the 2022 Winter Olympics is exactly the same as it was in a survey conducted by Research Co. in August 2021.  

“The idea of a Canadian boycott of the Beijing Winter Olympics is more attractive in Ontario (60%), British Columbia (59%) and Quebec (56%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are lower in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (51%), Atlantic Canada (50%) and Alberta (49%).”  

Similar proportions of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (61%), the Conservative Party (59%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (58%) in this year’s federal election are in favour of a boycott of the 2022 Winter Olympics.  

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) are worried about the health and safety of Canadian athletes who participate in the Beijing Winter Olympics, and 45% say they will make a conscious effort to refrain from watching the games.  

Almost three-in-four Canadians (74%) believe athletes who want to protest China’s human rights record during the 2022 Winter Olympics should be able to do so, and a slightly smaller proportion (71%) think the International Olympic Committee (IOC) should not punish those who actually speak out.  

Across the country, 52% of Canadians claim to check labels “all the time” or “most of the time” to see where the products they buy for the home or family were manufactured.  

More than three-in-five Canadians say they never refrain from buying products made in Europe (68%), the United States (62%) and Mexico (56%), while just under half follow the same course of action for goods manufactured in Russia (49%) and India (48%).  

Only 32% of Canadians say they never refrain from buying products manufactured in China, with two thirds of residents (68%) saying they avoid purchasing Chinese goods “all the time” (15%), “most of the time” (20%) or “some of the time” (33%).  

Women (70%), British Columbians (71%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (75%) are more likely to avoid acquiring products manufactured in China at least “some of the time.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 4 to December 6, 2021, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Canadians Are More Interested in Super Bowl Than Grey Cup

More than half of Canadians (55%) say they are fans of the National Hockey League (NHL).  
 
Vancouver, BC [December 7, 2021] – Canadians are more likely to say that they plan to watch the final game of the National Football League (NFL) season than its equivalent for the Canadian Football League (CFL), a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 40% of Canadians say they will “definitely” or “probably” watch the Grey Cup on December 12, while a slight majority (52%) will not.  
 
When Canadians are asked about the Super Bowl—which will take place on February 13, 2022—half (50%) say they intend to tune in while 44% say they will not.  
 
“Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to say they will watch the Grey Cup (45%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (36%) and aged 18-to-34 (39%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The country’s youngest adults are more likely to say they will tune in to the Super Bowl (53%) than those who are middle aged (47%) or older (49%).”  
 
In Saskatchewan and Manitoba, a majority of residents (55%) intend to watch the Grey Cup this Sunday. The proportion is lower in Alberta (43%), Quebec (41%), British Columbia (40%), Ontario (39%) and Atlantic Canada (26%).  
 
A majority of Canadians (55%) say they consider themselves fans of the National Hockey League (NHL), up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September 2020.  
 
More than a third of Canadians (36%, +5) are fans of the NFL. The numbers are lower for the CFL (32%, -1), the National Basketball Association (NBA) (31%, -6), Major League Baseball (MLB) (31%, -2) and Major League Soccer (22%, +1).  
 
Over the past two years, about one-in-five Canadians (19%) say their interest in the NHL has increased. Fewer of the country’s residents report paying more attention to the NBA (12%), the NFL (10%), MLB (8%), the CFL (also 8%) and MLS (also 8%).  
 
The Edmonton CFL franchise changed its name this year from Eskimos to Elks. Just under half of Canadians (46%) agree with this decision, while 28% disagree.  
 
In Alberta, almost half of residents (47%) disagree with changing the name of Edmonton’s CFL franchise, while 40% agree with this modification.  
 
In a survey conducted by Research Co. in September 2019, 60% of Canadians and 71% of Albertans thought the Edmonton Eskimos name was “acceptable” for the CFL franchise.  
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 20 to November 22, 2021, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20..
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Shopping Habits of British Columbians Altered by Pandemic

A majority of the province’s residents aged 18-to-34 acknowledge that they prefer to buy things online instead of in person.  

Vancouver, BC [December 3, 2021] – British Columbians are not visiting restaurants and coffee shops as much as they did before the COVID-19 pandemic, and more than a third are relying on online platforms more often to acquire items and gifts, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, at least three-in-five British Columbians say they are visiting a sit-down restaurant less often than before the pandemic for breakfast (60%), lunch (62%) or dinner (65%).  

Almost two thirds of British Columbians (64%) also acknowledge that they are having a drink at a pub or bar less often than they did two years ago.  

Significant proportions of British Columbians also report visiting coffee shops less often to purchase beverages or snacks to go (40%) or to be enjoyed inside the venue (59%).  

Seven-in-ten British Columbians of East Asian descent (70%) say they are dining out less often than they did before the pandemic. Two thirds of the province’s residents of European (66%) and First Nations origins (also 66%) are also not visiting restaurants for dinner as often as they used to.  

Across the province, 27% of British Columbians say they are buying groceries in person less often now than two years ago. About two-in-five of the province’s residents also say they are going to stores less often than before the pandemic to purchase items for the home or family (38%) or to buy gifts (42%).  

Conversely, 22% of British Columbians say they are purchasing groceries online for home delivery more often than two years ago. More than a third are also relying on online platforms more often now to acquire gifts (36%) or items for the home or family (38%).  

When asked if they prefer buying things online or in person, a majority of British Columbians (54%) express a predilection for in store purchases, while two-in-five (41%) say they would rather use the internet.  

“There are some clear generational differences when British Columbians are asked about how they like to buy things,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Most of the province’s residents aged 18-to-34 (56%) prefer online platforms, those aged 55 and over are fonder of buying things in person (71%) and those aged 35-to-54 are evenly split.”  

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 15 to November 17, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Confidence in Local Drivers Improving Across Canada

The proportion of Canadians who say drivers are “worse” than five years ago has fallen from 50% in 2018 to 39% this year.  
 
Vancouver, BC [November 30, 2021] – The proportion of Canadians who believe drivers in their city or town are getting worse has reached the lowest level recorded over the past four years, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 30% of Canadians say drivers in their city or town are worse now than five years ago, while half (50%) report no change and 10% believe they are better.  
 
“When we first asked this question in 2018, half of Canadians (50%) felt that drivers were worse than in the past,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion has fallen each year, to 47% in 2019, then to 39% in 2020 and now to 30% in 2021.”  
 
At least a third of Canadians who reside in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (35%, -7), British Columbia (34%, -6) and Alberta (33%, -9) believe drivers in their city or town are worse now than five years ago. The proportion is lower among Canadians who live in Ontario (30%, -13), Atlantic Canada (25%, -14) and Quebec (24%, -8).  
 
Canadians aged 55 and over are more critical of drivers in their city or town, with 36% believing that the situation is worse now than five years ago, compared to 32% among those aged 35-to-54 and 21% among those aged 18-to-34.  
 
The survey also tracks the incidence of six specific occurrences on the country’s roads. A majority of Canadians (55%, +1) report seeing a driver not signalling before a turn over the past month, a proportion that climbs to 62% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.  
 
Almost two-in-five Canadians (38%, +2) witnessed a driver not stopping at an intersection and a third (32%, -1) saw a driver turning right or left from an incorrect lane, including 37% of British Columbians.
 
Fewer than three-in-ten Canadians (28%, +2) experienced a close call, or having to slam the brakes or steer violently to avoid a collision. In addition, 41% of Canadians (+3) say they saw a car taking up two or more stops at a parking lot, including a majority of Albertans (51%).  
 
Just over half of Canadians (51%, -5) say that there are specific groups or people in their city or town who are worse drivers than others.  
 
The top four responses among Canadians who blamed a specific group for bad driving behaviours are “young” (32%, -11), “elderly” (21%, -4), “Asian (16%, -1) and “immigrant” (6%, +1).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 20 to November 22, 2021, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20..
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Most British Columbians Will Avoid Travel During Holiday Season

More than four-in-five of the province’s residents are concerned about travellers not following COVID-19 protocols.  

Vancouver, BC [November 26, 2021] – Many residents of British Columbia acknowledge that they are not going to go on a trip in the next few weeks, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 56% of British Columbians say they do not plan to take a holiday—or spend at least one night away from their current location—in the next three months.  

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to say that they intend to travel during this holiday season (56%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (45%) and aged 55 and over (34%).  

Significant proportions of British Columbians are uneasy about relying on specific forms of transportation at this point. Fewer than half of the province’s residents (46%) say they are willing to travel on a ferry right now—a proportion that rises to 58% among residents of Vancouver Island.  

At least one-in-four British Columbians are willing to take an airplane flight to another province (36%), an airplane flight within British Columbia (32%), a trip by car to the United States (27%) or a bus trip shorter than 3 hours (25%).  

Fewer British Columbians are willing to take a railway trip (23%), an airplane fight to a different continent (22%), an airplane flight to the United States (21%), a bus trip longer than 3 hours (16%) or a trip on a cruise ship (11%).  

“More than a third of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (35%) say they would have no problem taking a trip by car to the United States,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion drops to 26% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 22% among those among those aged 55 and over.”  

When asked about possible problems that may arise during travel, more than four-in-five British Columbians (83%) say they are “very concerned” or “moderately concerned” about travellers not following COVID-19 protocols.  

At least three-in-four British Columbians say they are worried about three other issues: facing delays due to COVID-19 restrictions (78%), losing money due to cancellations (77%) and getting infected with COVID-19 during a trip (75%).  

Concerns about travellers not following COVID-19 protocols and getting infected with COVID-19 during a trip are higher among British Columbians who have a child under the age of 12 in their household (85% and 79% respectively).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 15 to November 17, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Two Thirds of Canadians Endorse Vaccine Passports in Offices

Only 9% of Canadians say they do not plan to get vaccinated against COVID-19, unchanged since September.  

Vancouver, BC [November 19, 2021] – More Canadians are in favour of implementing “vaccine passports” in order to allow employees to return to the country’s workplaces, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 67% of Canadians think it is a “good idea” to rely on COVID-19 “Proof of Vaccination” certificates for people to be able to work at an office.  

“In May 2021, when we first asked about COVID-19 vaccine certificates, just over half of Canadians (52%) were in favour of their use in offices,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support grew to 63% in September 2021 and once again this month to 67%.”  

Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to welcome “vaccine passports” in the workplace (77%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (66%) and aged 18-to-34 (59%).  

Support for the use of COVID-19 “Proof of Vaccination” certificates is highest in Quebec (73%), followed by British Columbia (70%), Ontario (68%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 68%), Alberta (64%) and Atlantic Canada (58%).  

Just over four-in-five Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in this year’s federal election (81%) are in favour of using “vaccine passports” in offices, along with 73% of those who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP), 64% of those who supported the Conservative Party and 58% of those who supported the Green Party. Only 19% of Canadians who voted for the People’s Party agree with this course of action.  

More than two thirds of Canadians continue to endorse the use of “vaccine passports” for people to go to live concerts as spectators (70%, +2), to go to live sporting events as spectators (also 70%, +4), to visit a gym or fitness facility (also 70%, +3) and to go to the theatre or cinema (69%, +3).  

Sizeable proportions of Canadians are also in favour of relying on  “Proof of Vaccination” certificates for travel to other countries (74%, +1), for travel to other Canadian provinces (70%, +2) and for travel inside the same province (65%, +3).  

Across the country, seven-in-ten Canadians (70%, -1) say they wear a mask every time the leave their home. As has been the case throughout the pandemic, women (74%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (81%) are more likely to be observing this guideline.  

There is little movement on some of the habits that Canadians may have developed as a result of the pandemic. More than one-in-ten Canadians say they are losing their temper more than usual at home (15%, =), having a bath or shower less often (14%, +2), drinking more alcohol than usual at home (13%, =), not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection (12%, -2) or brushing their teeth less often than before the pandemic (6%, -1).  

More than one-in-five Canadians continue to clean the groceries they buy to prevent infection (23%, +2) and admit to overeating or eating more than usual at home (22%, -1).  

Only 9% of Canadians (unchanged since September) say they do not plan to get inoculated against COVID-19, while 89% (+1) have already done so or intend to do so.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 8 to November 10, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

COVID-19 Ratings Improve for Most Governments in Canada

Almost two thirds of Canadians believe the worst of the pandemic is now behind us.
 
Vancouver, BC [November 15, 2021] – The views of Canadians on the way various levels of government have managed the COVID-19 pandemic are better now than they were two months ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 62% of Canadians say they are satisfied with the way the federal government has dealt with the pandemic, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September 2021.  
 
“More than three-in-five of residents of Quebec (70%), Atlantic Canada (68%) and Ontario (64%) are happy with the performance of the federal government on COVID-19,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are lower in British Columbia (58%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (54%) and Alberta (43%).”  
 
The satisfaction rating for municipal governments stands at 63% (+3) and rises to 70% among Canadians aged 55 and over.  
 
Almost three-in-five Canadians (59%, +3) are satisfied with how their provincial government is managing COVID-19. Among the four most populous provinces, Quebec has the highest rating this month (76%, +9), followed by British Columbia (62%, -4), Ontario (56%, +6) and Alberta (29%, +3).
 

Across the country, 65% of Canadians think the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic is behind us, up 17 points since September 2021.  
 
Residents of Quebec are the most likely to believe that the pandemic will not worsen (72%), followed by those who live in Ontario (68%), Alberta (62%), Atlantic Canada (60%), British Columbia (57%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 57%).  
 
As was the case two months ago, more than four-in-five Canadians (85%, +1) believe COVID-19 is a real threat, while 13% (+1) disagree with this assessment.  
 
Sizeable proportions of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (93%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (92%), the Green Party (86%) and the Conservative Party (75%) in the last federal election consider COVID-19 as a real threat. Only 27% of those who cast ballots for the People’s Party concur.  
 
Almost three-in-four Canadians (74%, +3) are in favour of allowing K-12 students to go back to in-class learning in their province.  
 
Just over four-in-five Canadians (81%, -3) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside.  
 
Only 32% of People’s Party voters endorse the mask mandate, compared to 72% of Green voters, 76% of Conservative voters, 80% of NDP voters and 89% of Liberal voters.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 8 to November 10, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Canadians Hearing and Uttering Fewer Swear Words Than in 2019

Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely than their younger counterparts to say that they never alter the way they speak.  

Vancouver, BC [November 11, 2021] – Compared to two years ago, fewer adults in Canada say they are having conversations with people who swear, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 64% of Canadians say they hear their friends swear “frequently” or “occasionally” when they are engaged in conversation, down four points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in April 2019.  

About half of Canadians say they listen to swear words “frequently” or “occasionally” when talking to strangers (50%, -5), relatives (49%, -5) and co-workers (48%, -4).  

When asked about their own use of swear words, almost half of Canadians (49%, -3) say they rely on this kind of language “frequently” or “occasionally” when they are conversing with friends.  

Fewer Canadians say they swear “frequently” or “occasionally” when chatting with relatives (36%, -4), co-workers (31%, -3) and strangers (17%, -6).  

Just over two-in-five residents of British Columbia (41%) say they “never” swear during conversations with relatives. The proportion is lower in Alberta (37%), Ontario (33%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (30%), Quebec (27%) and Atlantic Canada (26%).  

Ontario is home to the highest proportion of residents who “never” utter swear words around co-workers (45%), followed by Alberta (44%), British Columbia (41%), Quebec (40%), Atlantic Canada (39%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (38%).  

“More than half of Canadians who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP) and the Conservative Party in the last federal election (52% and 51% respectively) say they swear frequently or occasionally when chatting with friends,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion drops to 46% among those who voted for the Liberal Party.”  

Across the country, more than a third of Canadians (36%, -2) claim to always alter the way they speak to make sure they do not swear in public—including 39% of women.  

Practically half of Canadians (49%, +1) acknowledge that they sometimes alter the way they speak so as not to swear in front of certain people—a proportion that reaches 62% among those aged 18-to-34.

Only 14% of Canadians say they never alter the way they speak and do not worry if a curse word comes out—including 18% of Atlantic Canadians, 18% of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba and 17% of Canadians aged 55 and over.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 1 to November 3, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Perceptions of Public Safety Wobble in British Columbia

Compared to late 2020, fewer residents of the province say they would feel safe walking alone in their neighbourhood after dark.  
 
Vancouver, BC [November 9, 2021] – The views of British Columbians on specific indicators related to criminal activity have become more dire during 2021, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, almost half of British Columbians (48%) say they fear becoming victims of crime in their community “a great deal” or “a fair amount”, up six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2020.  
 
Fear of crime is highest in Metro Vancouver (54%), followed by Northern BC (49%), the Fraser Valley (41%), Vancouver Island (also 41%) and Southern BC (32%).  
 
Across the province, 63% of British Columbians say they would feel “very safe” or “moderately safe” walking alone in their own neighbourhood after dark, down five points since 2020.  
 
“Practically three-in-four men in British Columbia (74%) say they would feel safe strolling through their neighbourhood at night,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 53% of women share the same point of view.”  
 
More than two-in-five British Columbians (44%, up two points since November 2020) say the level of criminal activity in their community has increased in the past four years—a proportion that rises to 53% in Southern BC and 54% in Vancouver Island.  
 
Over the past four years, one-in-five British Columbians (20%, -1) have been victims of a crime involving the police (such as an assault or a car break-in) in their community.  
 
Almost half of British Columbians (48%, +3) believe addiction and mental health issues are to blame “a great deal” for the current situation regarding crime in their community, while almost two-in-five (38%, =) point the finger at gangs and the illegal drug trade.  
 
Fewer British Columbians place “most of the blame” for criminal activity on poverty and inequality (31%, +5), an inadequate court system (30%, +4), lack of values and improper education for youth (27%, +3), a bad economy and unemployment (20%, +1), insufficient policing and a lack of resources to combat crime (also 20%, +4) and immigrants and minorities (9%, =).  
 
Sizeable proportions of British Columbians remain supportive of enacting a ban on military-style assault weapons (84%, +2) and a ban on handguns (79%, -1) within the limits of their municipality.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 1 to November 3, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

The Opioid Crisis is a Major Problem for Almost Half of Canadians

More than three-in-four Canadians believe more action is needed on education and awareness, as well as drug rehabilitation.  

Vancouver, BC [November 5, 2021] – The level of concern expressed by Canadians about the opioid crisis has increased over the past year, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 45% of Canadians describe the current situation related to the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in their community as “a major problem”, up six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September 2020.  

More than half of British Columbians (58%) and Albertans (55%) refer to the current state of affairs as ”a major problem.”  

Canadians are not overly satisfied with the actions of elected politicians on this file. Just over a third of Canadians (34%, -1) believe Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the federal government are doing a “very good” or “good” coming up with solutions to deal with the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs.  

Premiers and provincial governments have a slightly better rating on this question (39%, -4), with a higher level of satisfaction reported in British Columbia (43%, +7) than in Ontario (35%, -6), Quebec (34%, -10) and Alberta (28%, -19).  

Fewer Canadians are satisfied with the job their mayors and councils (37%, -3), their own Member of Parliament (33%, -5) and their own members of provincial legislatures (33%, -6) are doing to come up with solutions to deal with the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs.  

“The preoccupation of Canadians with the opioid crisis has grown, particularly in Western Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “At the same time, the level of satisfaction with the work of elected officials is stagnant or in a downward trend.”  

More than three-in-four Canadians agree with launching more education and awareness campaigns about drug use (77%, -7) and creating more spaces for drug rehabilitation (76%, -2).  

A majority of Canadians are also in favour of three other ideas: reducing the prescription of opioids by medical professionals (69%, -4), establishing “safe supply” programs where alternatives to opioids can be prescribed by health professionals (61%, -9) and setting up more “harm reduction” strategies, such as legal supervised injection sites (56%, -3).  

A proposal to decriminalize all drugs for personal use remains decidedly more contentious, with 33% of Canadians (-1) saying they favour this idea and 54% (+1) voicing disagreement.  

Support for the decriminalization of all drugs for personal use is highest in Ontario (37%), followed by British Columbia (33%), Atlantic Canada (also 33%), Quebec (31%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (30%) and Alberta (26%).  

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 25 to October 27, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Most British Columbians Think Cullen Commission Was Worth It

Seven-in-ten residents believe the province should establish an Office of the Anti-Corruption Commissioner, like Quebec.  

Vancouver, BC [November 2, 2021] – A majority of residents of British Columbia believe instituting the Commission of Inquiry into Money Laundering in the province was the correct call, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 57% of British Columbians think the provincial government made the right decision in establishing the Cullen Commission.  

More than half of British Columbians (53%) believe we have learned more about why money laundering became a problem in British Columbia due to the Cullen Commission, and a slightly smaller proportion (49%) think have learned more about what to do in the future to curb money laundering in the province.  

The provincial government announced its intention to establish the Commission of Inquiry into Money Laundering in British Columbia in May 2019. The Cullen Commission’s hearings ended in September 2021. A final report is expected to be released in December 2021.  

Just under two-in-five British Columbians (39%) followed the developments of the Cullen Commission “very closely” or “moderately closely”, including 43% of men and 41% of Metro Vancouverites.  

“The activities of the Cullen Commission were not followed intently by a majority of British Columbians,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Still, fewer than one-in-ten of the province’s residents disagree with its establishment.”  

Almost two-in-five British Columbians (39%) believe the previous government headed by the BC Liberals deserves “all of the blame” or “most of the blame” for the current situation related to money laundering in the province, unchanged since a Research Co. poll conducted in August 2018.  

Fewer British Columbians point the finger at other entities for the current situation related to money laundering, including the British Columbia Lottery Corporation (BCLC) (36%, -12), the current federal government headed by the Liberal Party (20%), the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) (19%), the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) (17%, -4) and the current provincial government headed by the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (also 17%, -6).  

The Province of Quebec has established the Office of Anti-Corruption Commissioner “to ensure the coordination of actions to prevent and fight corruption in the public sector, including in contractual matters.”  

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (71%) believe their province should establish an office similar to the one that is currently in place in Quebec. Sizeable majorities of residents who voted for the BC Green Party (85%), the BC NDP (78%) and the BC Liberals (75%) in the 2020 provincial election favour this course of action.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 18 to October 20, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 

Pineapple on Pizza OK for Most Canadians, But Pepperoni is Tops

The proportion of the country’s residents who would consume a plant-based hamburger patty fell by 10 points since 2019.  
 
Vancouver, BC [October 29, 2021] – More than seven-in-ten Canadians have no qualms with using pineapple as a topping for pizza, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 73% of Canadians say they would “definitely” or “probably” eat pizza with pineapple, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in July 2019.  
 
In 1962, cook and businessman Sam Panopoulos of Chatham, Ontario, was the first person to add canned pineapple to a pizza.  
 
“There are some regional disparities when Canadians ponder whether pineapple belongs on a pizza,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The dish is particularly popular in Alberta (90%), followed by British Columbia (83%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (77%), Ontario (76%), Atlantic Canada (72%) and Quebec (55%).”  
 
When Canadians were asked to choose up to three ingredients to design their own pizza, 51% selected pepperoni while 47% opted for mushrooms.  
 
Green pepper was third on the list of preferred pizza toppings (24%), followed by onion (23%), pineapple (20%), sausage (18%) and ham (also 18%).
 
More than three-in-five Canadians (77%, -2) say they would “definitely” or “probably” eat poutine—a proportion that jumps to 82% among Quebecers.  
 
Half of Canadians (50%, -10) say they would consume a plant-based hamburger patty, including 64% of those aged 18-to-34.  
 
The proportion of Canadians who would be willing to eat a steak with ketchup fell from 48% in 2019 to 44% in 2021.  
 
Fewer than a third of Canadians say they would “definitely” or “probably” consume prairie oysters (27%, +1, shark fin soup (21%, +1), cod tongues (19%, +1) and scrunchions (19%, +3).  
 
Residents of Quebec and Ontario are more likely to say they would eat prairie oysters (33% and 30% respectively) than those who live in Alberta (22%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (21%).  
 
Cod tongues and scrunchions are decidedly more popular culinary choices for residents of Atlantic Canada (42% and 35% respectively).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 4 to October 6, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Support for New Winter Olympic Bid Drops in British Columbia

Most residents believe it is impossible for Vancouver to host the 2030 Winter Games without any public or government funds.  

Vancouver, BC [October 25, 2021] – Residents of British Columbia are no longer convinced that an attempt to host the Olympics again should be actively entertained at this point, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 43% of British Columbians think Vancouver should launch a bid to host the Winter Olympics in 2030, down 17 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2020.  

The notion of Vancouver launching a bid to host the Summer Olympics in 2036 is endorsed by 38% of British Columbians, down from 62% in January 2020.  

In January 2020, significant majorities of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (67%) and aged 35-to-54 (59%) were in favour of a new Winter Olympic bid from Vancouver. This month, the proportions have dropped to 52% among those aged 18-to-34 and to 40% among those aged 35-to-54.  

Vancouver hosted the XXI Olympic Winter Games, from February 12 to February 28, 2010.  

“The events of the past couple of years, including the COVID-19 pandemic and the recent experience of Tokyo as a host city, appear to have made British Columbians more skeptical about a new Olympic bid,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Our survey shows that 17% of the province’s residents went from supporters to opponents when asked if Vancouver should host the Winter Olympics again.”  

More than half of British Columbians (53%) think it is impossible for Vancouver to host the 2030 Winter Olympics without any public or government funds. This proportion includes majorities of residents of the province who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (58%), the BC Liberals (53%) and the BC Greens (52%) in last year’s provincial election.  

British Columbians are divided on whether the International Olympic Committee (IOC) made the right decision in staging the Summer Games in Tokyo earlier this year. Similar proportions of respondents agree (45%) or disagree (43%) with the course of action taken by the IOC.  

Almost half of British Columbians (48%) have a positive opinion of the IOC, while more than a third (36%) hold negative views and 17% are not sure.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 18 to October 20, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Andy Liang

Some Canadians Question the Fairness of Hiring Processes

Two thirds want companies to rely on “blind résumés”, where the applicant’s name, gender, age and ethnicity are not included.

Vancouver, BC [October 14, 2021] – A significant proportion of Canadians are not convinced that the process to find a job is entirely impartial, and almost one-in-five say they faced discrimination on a hiring process because of their age, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 51% of Canadians think doing well at a job interview is more important than knowing how to perform at a specific job.

While a majority of Canadians (55%) believe that every person has a fair chance of landing a job in Canada, two-in-five respondents (40%) disagree with this assessment.

Almost half of Canadians (47%) agree with the notion that all Candidates that apply for a position are taken seriously, but a similar proportion (44%) disagrees with this point of view.

More than half of Canadians (53%) think it is not worth applying to jobs that advise that “internal candidates” will be considered—a proportion that rises to 59% among those aged 18-to-34.

“Majorities of Canadians aged 35-to-54 (55%) and aged 55 and over (62%) say they have never encountered discrimination when looking for a job,” says Mario Canseco. President of Research Co. “In stark contrast, only 40% of Canadians aged 18-to-34 report the same experience.”

More than one-in-five Canadians (22%) say they interviewed for a job that ultimately went to an “internal candidate”, while a similar proportion (18%) experienced discrimination in a hiring process because of their age.

More than one-in-ten Canadians claim to have experienced discrimination in a hiring process because of their gender (11%) or due to their ethnicity or national origin (also 11%).

Some companies rely on a technique called “blind résumé” for hiring processes. In a “blind résumé”, personal details such as the applicant’s name, gender, age and ethnicity are not included.

Two thirds of Canadians (67%) think companies in Canada should implement the “blind résumé” technique—including 71% of women and 77% of those aged 18-to-34.

More than half of Canadians (52%) say that people usually got promoted in the companies where they have worked on because of performance and merit, while one third (33%) say promotions happened because their colleagues knew how to deal with company politics.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 4 to October 6, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490