Most Non-European British Columbians Have Faced Discrimination

Just under one-in-four respondents have endured poor customer service and verbal harassment on account of their ethnicity.

Vancouver, BC [September 13, 2019] – A significant proportion of British Columbians who described their ethnicity as non-European have experienced discrimination in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians who described their ethnicity as non-European, a third of respondents (33%) say they have experienced “a significant amount” (11%) or a “moderate amount” (22%) of discrimination on account of their ethnicity.

“Only 19% of respondents aged 55 and over say they have experienced ethnic-based discrimination in British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is higher among those aged 18-to-34 (33%) and those aged 35-to-54 (also 33%).”

More than three-in-five British Columbians who described their ethnicity as non-European (62%) say they have personally experienced one of 11 different incidents on account of their ethnicity.

About one-in-four respondents say they have endured poor customer service (24%) and verbal harassment (23%) on account of their ethnicity.

Other experiences reported by British Columbians who described their ethnicity as non-European are being the subject of racist jokes (17%), being mocked or ridiculed because of their ethnicity (16%), unfair treatment in the workplace (also 16%), and loss of potential employment opportunity (16%).

More than one-in-ten respondents also report facing denial of facilities or accommodation (12%), exclusion from social groups within work (11%), exclusion from social groups within school (also 11%) and denial of goods or services (also 11%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 6 to September 9, 2019, among 391 adults in British Columbia who described their ethnicity as non-European. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 4.0 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Than Half of British Columbians Have Boycotted a Company

Half of “boycotters” say they disagreed with how an organization or establishment pays or treats its employees.

Vancouver, BC [September 11, 2019] – A majority of British Columbians admit to having voluntarily abstained from using, buying or dealing with an organization of establishment, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 55% of British Columbians say that, over the course of their lives, they have boycotted an organization or establishment.

Women (58%), British Columbians aged 55 and over (59%) and Vancouver Islanders (62%) are more likely to say that they have boycotted a company.

Half of British Columbians who have actively participated in a boycott (50%) point to disagreements with how employees of a specific organization of establishment were paid or treated.

Other reasons cited for boycotts include disagreements over environmental practices (43%), disagreements over the ownership of an organization or establishment (37%) and disagreements with animal welfare practices (33%).

“Women in British Columbia are significantly more likely to have boycotted a company for labour (56%) or animal welfare reasons (42%) than men (44% and 23% respectively),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Boycotts originating from a disagreement with ownership are more common in Metro Vancouver (41%).”

More than two-in-five British Columbians (43%) say they research the environmental practices of companies before purchasing a product or service “all the time” or “some of the time”. 

Slightly smaller proportions of British Columbians also look into a company’s social practices (39%) and labour practices (37%) before making a purchase.

When it comes to their recent experiences as consumers, more than a third of British Columbians say they review a company’s social, environmental, labour and/or investment practices when shopping for groceries (41%), clothing or shoes (40%), household goods (39%), cleaning products (also 39%), a vehicle (38%), dinner at a restaurant (37%) and electronics (36%).

Across the seven recent consumer experiences tested, British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are significantly more likely to review a company’s practices than their older counterparts.

While only 27% of British Columbians aged 55 and over review a company’s social, environmental, labour and/or investment practices when shopping for clothing or shoes, the proportion climbs to 44% among those aged 35-to-54 and 58% among those aged 18-to-34.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

BC Parents Partial to Kids Pursuing Medicine and Engineering

Almost two thirds of parents would try to discourage their children from seeking a career in politics.

Vancouver, BC [September 4, 2019] – Parents in British Columbia are more enthusiastic about their children pursuing a career in medicine or engineering than in politics, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of parents who have a child enrolled in K-12 in British Columbia, nine-in-ten respondents (91%) say they would “definitely” or “probably” try to encourage their child to become a doctor or nurse.

A similarly high proportion of parents in British Columbia (89%) would attempt to encourage their child to become an engineer.

Almost three-in-five parents in British Columbia (59%) would try to encourage their child to pursue a career path as a police officer.

More than half of parents in the province would try to steer their child to become a professional athlete (56%) or an arts performer (52%).

Conversely, fewer than three-in-ten parents in British Columbia (28%) would “definitely” or “probably” try to encourage their child to become a politician. 

“Almost two thirds of parents in British Columbia (65%) say they would attempt to discourage their children from pursuing a career in politics,” says Mario Canseco, President at Research Co. “The proportion is highest among parents in Vancouver Island (69%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 20 to May 28, 2019, among 700 parents in British Columbia who have a child enrolled in Kindergarten, Elementary School (Grades 1 to 7) or High School (Grades 8 to 12). The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

If Forced to Relocate, Almost Half of Albertans Would Pick BC

Just over one-in-four British Columbians would select Alberta as the province to resettle.

Vancouver, BC [August 27, 2019] – A significant proportion of Albertans would welcome relocating to British Columbia if circumstances called for a move, a new two-province Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative provincial samples, 47% of Albertans say they would choose British Columbia if they had to move out of Alberta and live in any other region of Canada.

Ontario and Saskatchewan are tied as the second Canadian destination for Albertans with 11% each, followed by Nova Scotia at 4%.

“A majority of Edmontonians (53%) would choose British Columbia if they were compelled to move away from Alberta,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But more than two-in-five Calgarians (45%) and residents of other parts of Alberta (42%) are willing to join them.”

In British Columbia, 26% of residents say they would move to Alberta if they had to leave British Columbia and resettle in a different Canadian province. 

Ontario is second in the minds of British Columbians with 16%, followed by Nova Scotia with 8%. One third of residents (33%) are undecided about which province they would move to.

While more residents of Metro Vancouver express a preference to resettle in Ontario (24%) than in Alberta (20%), all other regions of the province select Alberta first, including 33% of those in Northern BC and 32% of those in the Fraser Valley.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from July 23 to July 25, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia and 700 adults in Alberta. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia and Alberta. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for the British Columbia sample and +/- 3.7 percentage points for the Alberta sample, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Large Majorities of Canadians Endorse Poutine, Pineapple on Pizza

Fewer than a third of residents would consume prairie oysters, shark fin soup, cod tongues and scrunchions.

Vancouver, BC [August 23, 2019] – Two delicacies perfected in Quebec and Ontario are attractive choices for a large majority of Canadians, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, practically four-in-five Canadians (79%) said they would “definitely” or “probably” eat poutine.

Poutine is particularly popular among Quebecers (84%) and Canadians aged 35-to-54 (87%).

About two thirds of Canadians (66%) said they would “definitely” or “probably” eat pizza with pineapple, while three-in-five (60%) would eat a plant-based hamburger patty.

“More than two thirds of women (69%) and three quarters of British Columbians (76%) would eat a pizza with pineapple,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The dish is not as popular among Quebecers (57%).”

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to say they would consume a plant-based hamburger patty (67%) than those aged 35-to-54 (62%) and those aged 55 and over (52%).

Canadians are evenly divided on whether they would eat a steak with ketchup, with 48% acknowledging they would try it and 48% saying they would not.

Men (54%) are significantly more likely than women (41%) to say they would eat a steak with ketchup.

Other culinary creations were less accepted across the country. Just 26% of Canadians would “definitely” or “probably” eat prairie oysters, while one-in-five (20%) would consume shark fin soup.

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians would try two Atlantic delicacies: cod tongues (18%) and scrunchions (16%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from July 15 to July 17, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca