Quebec Leads Canada in Time Spent Making Dinner at Home

British Columbians are more likely to have dinner in front of a television set than residents of other Canadian provinces.

Vancouver, BC [July 5, 2019] – Most Canadians devote less than an hour to prepare dinner at home, but residents of Quebec are more likely to spend longer in the kitchen every night, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 60% of Canadians say they spend anywhere from 31 to 60 minutes preparing dinner for themselves and others in their household on an average weekday. 

Three-in-ten Canadians (30%) spend less than 30 minutes in the kitchen making dinner—a proportion that rises to 38% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan and 33% in Alberta.

“Canadian men are significantly more likely than Canadian women to devote as little time in the kitchen as possible,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 24% of female respondents say they spend less than half an hour making dinner each night, the proportion jumps to 36% among male respondents.”

While only 10% of Canadians devote more than 60 minutes to preparing dinner at home on an average weekday, the proportion rises to 20% in Quebec.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (71%) acknowledge having relied on frozen entrees cooked in the oven to prepare dinner at home in the past month, while three-in-five (60%) consumed frozen entrees cooked in the microwave.

Canadians report that 51% of the dinners they had at home over the course of the past month took place at the dining room, with no television. The remaining 49% of dinners happened at a different part of the home, with the television on.

The percentage of meals that occurred in the dining room is highest in Quebec (60%) and lowest in British Columbia (42%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 31 to June 3, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Flag, Armed Forces and Economy Make Canadians Proudest

Only two-in-five respondents in the country say they are proud of the Canadian justice system.

Vancouver, BC [June 28, 2019] – Three institutions and features of Canadian life are more likely to elicit feelings of pride among the country’s citizens, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, at least four-in-five Canadians say they are proud of the Canadian flag (93%), the Canadian Armed Forces (89%) and the Canadian economy (80%).

At least seven-in-ten Canadians are proud of the health care system (77%), hockey (72%) and the state of democracy in Canada.

“Men are significantly more likely than women (83% to 71%) to say that the health care system makes them proud,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “And while 90% of Ontarians are proud of the health care system, the rating plummets to 59% in Alberta and 58% in Quebec.”

More than half of Canadians say they are proud of multiculturalism (66%, including 73% in British Columbia), Indigenous culture (56%, including 63% in British Columbia) and bilingualism (55%, including 64% in Quebec).

The lowest ranked institutions and features included in this survey are the monarchy (47%), Parliament (45%) and the Canadian justice system (40%).

The monarchy has its highest rating in Alberta (57%) and its lowest in Quebec (22%). Parliament fares particularly poorly in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (31%), while fewer than three-in-ten British Columbians (27%) are proud of Canada’s justice system.

When the findings are compared to a similar online survey conducted in 2008, four institutions and features show the largest improvement on a Canada-wide basis: 

  • Parliament (from 32% in 2008 to 45% in 2019).
  • The state of democracy in Canada (from 57% in 2008 to 70% in 2019)
  • The Canadian economy (from 62% in 2008 to 80% in 2019).
  • The health care system (from 50% in 2008 to 77% in 2019).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 31 to June 3, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Support More Action on Child Care

Nine-in-ten consider the investments to build a quality affordable child care system as “very important” or “moderately important.”

Vancouver, BC [June 13, 2019] – In an online survey of a representative provincial sample, 76% of British Columbians think the province should move more quickly to achieve the established goals of more affordable parent fees, more spaces, and better wages and education for those who work in child care settings, a new Research Co. poll conducted on behalf of the $10aDay Child Care Plan has found.

When parents who currently have a child enrolled in child care were asked about their experience, 64% said the current government investments are having a positive impact on their situation.

There is still more to be done, as 70% of parents report that their return to work was delayed because of lack of access to child care.

“British Columbians of all ages, regions and political allegiances agree that children, parents and employers benefit when there’s access to quality affordable child care,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co.

Two thirds of British Columbians (66%) believe the provincial government should continue to put a priority on public funding for child care, to make it more affordable and available for families. 

“Some parents are experiencing benefits of new investments in child care, but many families are still struggling when it comes to cost, finding a licensed space, and educators are still earning low wages—BC need further investments,” says Sharon Gregson, spokesperson for the $10aDay Child Care Plan.

Across the province, almost two-in-five parents who currently have a child in child care (38%) say they waited at least five months before a space became available for their child. Three-in-four parents (76%) say the cost of child care has put a financial strain on their families.

Four-in-five British Columbians (81%) believe that, when child care is affordable and available to parents, more mothers work and pay taxes. An even larger proportion of residents (86%) agree with the notion that having children today costs a lot more than it did 40 years ago.

About the $10aDay Child Care Plan

Since 2011, supporters across the province have advanced the $10aDay Child Care Plan as the solution to BC’s child care chaos calling for parent fees of no more than $10aDay, access to licensed spaces for all families who choose child care, and fair wages for early childhood educators.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 9 to May 12, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Sharon Gregson, $10aDay Child Care Plan.
[c] 604.505.5725
[e] info@10aday.ca

Canadians Are Comfortable Online, But Some Worries Remain

Seven-in-ten have received “scam” emails, and almost two thirds are concerned about someone hacking their devices.

Vancouver, BC [June 11, 2019] – While a large proportion of Canadians have embraced the Internet for banking and shopping, there are still lingering concerns about identity theft, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 87% of Canadians say they are comfortable accessing banking information online, and 86% feel the same way about shopping for goods and services online.

Just over four-in-five Canadians (82%) say they are comfortable commenting on online forums that require their email address, and 73% are comfortable making a charitable donation online.

“As expected, younger residents are less likely to have qualms about performing specific tasks on the Internet,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However, more than a third of Canadians aged 55 and over say they are not comfortable making charitable donations online.”

Over the past couple of months, 64% of Canadians have worried about somebody hacking into their own computer or smartphone. 

More than seven-in-ten Canadians have been concerned recently about computers and technology being used to invade their privacy (71%) and having their personal information stolen over the Internet (72%).

British Columbians (79%), Women (77%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (74%) are more likely to say they have worried about having their personal information stolen online.

Across the country, 72% of Canadians say they have received an email—sometimes referred to as the “Nigerian Scam”—offering them money for assistance or help, and 62% have received a “phishing” email, where somebody tried to acquire information by masquerading as a trustworthy entity.

One-in-five Canadians (20%) say their email address has been hacked at some point, and 4% say hackers took control of their social media platform.

Two-in-five Canadians (39%) say their computer became infected with a virus while they were browsing the Internet. Men are more likely to have acquired a virus online than women (44% to 34%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 31 to June 3, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Fewer Than Half of British Columbians Have an Emergency Kit

Three-in-four residents think an earthquake strong enough to damage buildings is “likely” to occur in the next 50 years.

Vancouver, BC [May 22, 2019] – Many British Columbians expect to face a destructive earthquake, but most have not assembled an emergency kit, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 76% of British Columbians say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that an earthquake strong enough to damage buildings will occur in the province in the next 50 years.

When asked about their level of concern about specific emergencies they might face, British Columbians place “a fire” (79%), “an earthquake” (68%), “high winds” (65%) and “intense rainfall” (61%) at the top of the list.

Fewer than three-in-five British Columbians are worried about being personally affected by “a flood” (57%), “heavy snowfall” (56%), “a toxic spill” (55%), “a terrorist attack” (54%), “a tsunami” (46%) or “a landslide” (also 46%).

Only 46% of British Columbians acknowledge having purchased or prepared an emergency kit with supplies they might need in case of an emergency.

“In spite of the high level of concern expressed about an earthquake affecting the province, more than half of British Columbians have not put together an emergency kit,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents aged 35-to-54 are doing better on this particular matter (55% have an emergency kit) than those aged 18-to-34 (45%) and those aged 55 and over (39%).”

Across the province, two-in-five residents (39%) have prepared an emergency plan that includes how to get in touch with family or friends in case of an emergency, and just over a third (35%) have established a meeting place with family or friends in case of an emergency.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 2 to May 5, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca