Three-in-Four Canadians Would Take a COVID-19 Vaccine

Satisfaction with how provincial governments have handled the pandemic increased to 75% across the country.

Vancouver, BC [July 7, 2020] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians would welcome the idea of inoculation against COVID-19, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-four Canadians (75%) would take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available, up two points since a similar survey conducted in April.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) say they are satisfied with the way the federal government has handled the COVID-19 outbreak, up one point since May. The same proportion (70%) are satisfied with the performance of their municipal administrations during the pandemic.

Satisfaction with the way provincial governments have managed COVID-19 increased by 11 points to 75% across Canada. The rating improved in the four most populous provinces: British Columbia, (83%, +14), Ontario (76%, +23), Quebec (69%, +3) and Alberta (62%, +6).

The proportion of Canadians who say they wear a mask every time they go out has increased dramatically, from 14% in May to 48% in late June.

“There is a big gender gap when it comes to wearing protective masks outside the home,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While more than half of women in Canada (57%) are not leaving their home without a mask, only 39% of men are partaking in the same behaviour.”

Two-in-five Canadians (40%, -7) are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection, and about one-in-four (23%, -17) say they are not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection.

The proportion of Canadians who acknowledge eating more than usual at home remained at 29%, while 18% (+5) are drinking more at home and 16% (-2) are losing their temper more often.

Across the country, only 37% of Canadians expect to be able to attend or host a large social gathering before December, while fewer believe they will be able to shake the hand of a person who is not at their home (33%), attend a live sporting event (26%) or travel abroad (21%).

Half of Canadians (49%, +25 since May) believe the worst of the COVID-19 outbreak is “behind us”—a proportion that rises to 57% in Quebec.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 26 to June 28, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Flag First, Monarchy Last in List of What Makes Canadians Proud

The proportion of Canadians who say the monarchy makes them proud fell by seven points since 2019.

Vancouver, BC [July 3, 2020] – The perceptions of Canadians on specific institutions and features of the country went through noticeable changes over the past year, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than four-in-five Canadians (82%) say they are proud of the Canadian flag. This represents an 11-point decrease since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2019.

More than seven-in-ten Canadians express pride in the health care system (75%, -2), the Canadian Armed Forces (74%, -15) and multiculturalism (71%, +5).

More than three-in-five Canadians say they are proud of the state of democracy in Canada (66%, -4), hockey (64%, -8) indigenous culture (62%, +6) and bilingualism (61%, +6).

“Compared to last year, there are significant fluctuations in the way Canadians feel about features and institutions of the country that elicit inclusiveness and togetherness,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There is a deeper appreciation this year for multiculturalism, Indigenous culture and bilingualism than what we saw in 2019.”

Just over half of Canadians express pride in the Canadian justice system (55%, +15), the Canadian economy (53%, -27), Parliament (53%, +8) and the monarchy (40%, -7).

The monarchy is once again the lowest rated item on this list. Women (45%) and British Columbians (50%) are more likely to say that this particular institution elicits feelings of pride than men (35%) and Quebecers (31%).

Quebec posts the highest rating of any region for bilingualism (71%) and the lowest for the health care system (61%).

Two thirds of Ontarians and British Columbians (67% each) say that indigenous culture elicits feelings of pride, followed by residents of Atlantic Canada (60%), Quebec (58%), Alberta (56%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (55%).

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be proud of multiculturalism (77%) than those aged 35-to-54 (70%) and those aged 55 and over (66%).

There are some major differences along political lines on two items. Large majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election say they are proud of Parliament (72%) and the Canadian justice system (66%).

Significantly fewer Canadians who cast ballots for the Conservative Party and the New Democratic Party (NDP) feel the same way about Parliament (41% and 42% respectively) and the Canadian justice system (54% and 43% respectively).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 26 to June 28, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Endorse Speed-on-Green Cameras on Roads

Three other types of automated speed enforcement are also backed by a majority of the province’s residents.

Vancouver, BC [June 30, 2020] – For the third year in a row, most British Columbians are in favour of relying on red light cameras to capture speeding vehicles, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 70% of British Columbians approve of the use of speed-on-green intersection cameras, while 24% disapprove and 5% are undecided.

Support for speed-on-green cameras is highest among women (74%), British Columbians aged 55 and over (77%) and residents of Vancouver Island (74%). Most voters who supported the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (76%), the BC Liberals (74%) and the BC Green Party (65%) in the last provincial election are also in agreement.

Speed-on-green cameras are red light cameras that also capture vehicles that are speeding through intersections. Public backing for the use of this specific type of automated speed enforcement stood at 70% in a Research Co. survey conducted in 2018 and 68% in a poll conducted in 2019.

“British Columbians have been consistent in their overall analysis of automated speed enforcement,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the specific case of speed-on-green cameras, there is little difference between drivers (70%) and non-drivers (71%).”

Automated speed enforcement works by using cameras or sensors to pick up a vehicle speeding. A ticket is then issued to the owner of the vehicle. Driver’s license points are not issued as the driver of the vehicle cannot be identified.

More than two thirds of British Columbians also approve of the use of two other types of automated speed enforcement: fixed speed cameras, or cameras that stay in one location and measure speed as a vehicle passes (71%, +2 since 2019) and mobile speed cameras, which can be moved from place to place and measure speed as a vehicle passes (68%, +5 since 2019).

Almost three-in-five British Columbians (58%, +6 since 2019) are in favour of point-to-point speed enforcement, which uses cameras at two or more distant points on a road. The average speed of vehicles that pass between points is calculated and tickets are issued to vehicles whose average speed over the distance was excessive.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 13 to June 15, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians and Americans Agree on Climate Change Fight

62% of Canadians and 51% of Americans personally believe global warming is a “major crisis.”

Vancouver, BC [June 26, 2020] – Most Canadians and Americans would consent to providing larger fiscal contributions to their governments in order to combat global warming, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 60% of Canadians and 54% of Americans say they are willing to pay higher taxes in order to adequately deal with climate change.

More than three-in-five Canadians (64%) and a majority of Americans (53%) believe global warming is a fact and is mostly caused by emission from vehicles and industrial facilities.

About one-in-four respondents in the two countries (23% in Canada and 25% in the United States) think climate change is a fact and is mostly caused by natural changes.

Only 7% of Canadians and 14% of Americans believe global warming is a theory that has not yet been proven—including 12% of Conservative Party voters in the 2019 Canadian federal election and 26% of Republican Party supporters in the United States.

About three-in-five Canadians (62%) and half of Americans (51%) describe global warming as a “major crisis”, including 70% of those aged 18-to-34 in Canada and 54% of those aged 55 and over in the United States.

When asked about specific actions that could be taken now to deal with climate change, most Canadians and Americans feel companies and corporations (75% and 59% respectively), governments (69% and 56%) and individuals and consumers (64% and 55%) should be doing more.

Residents of both countries are also supportive of actions to mitigate climate change in the future from companies and corporations (76% in Canada and 61% in the United States), governments (71% and 58%) and individuals and consumers (66% and 55%).

Parents of children under the age of 18 were asked about the effect of conversations about climate change with their kids. Two thirds of Canadian parents (67%) and more than half of American parents (54%) say they are recycling more after chatting with their children about climate change.

Smaller proportions of parents in Canada and the United States say they are driving less than usual (38% and 32% respectively) and taking shorter showers (34% and 31%) after chatting with their kids about global warming.

Methodology:

Results are based on online studies conducted from June 1 to June 3, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our full Canadian dataset here, our full American dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Lockdown Exposes Areas Where Canadian Couples Are Struggling

Men get significantly lower grades from their partners on cooking meals, taking care of children and keeping the home clean.

Vancouver, BC [June 23, 2020] – While most Canadians who live with their spouse or partner appear happy with the way their significant others have behaved during the COVID-19 pandemic, there are certain aspects where men are faring worse than women, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of adults in Canada who live with a spouse or partner, 69% say they “strongly approve” of the performance of their significant other, while 22% “moderately approve.”

“Ontario (66%), Quebec (64%) and British Columbia (also 64%) are the regions of Canada with the lowest proportion of men and women who strongly approve of their spouses of partners,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are significantly higher in Alberta (75%), Atlantic Canada (80%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (83%).”

The level of “strong approval” of a spouse or partner is higher from men (73%) than women (65%). Both genders currently have the same level of “strong disapproval” (6%).

A majority of Canadians who are living with a spouse or partner say they are “very satisfied” with the way their significant other has handled eight issues:

  • Personal hygiene (69%)
  • Taking care of pets (57%)
  • Cooking meals (56%)
  • Taking care of children (55%)
  • Keeping the home clean and tidy (54%)
  • Overall attitude and demeanour (also 54%)
  • Making decisions about what to do (53%)
  • Providing emotional support when they need it (also 53%).

While 62% of men are “very satisfied” with their spouse or partner on keeping the home clean and tidy, the proportion drops to 46% when women answer the same question. In addition, 64% of men are “very satisfied” with their partner when it comes to cooking meals, but just 48% of women concur.

A similar gap is observed on taking care of children, with just 46% of women saying they are “very satisfied” with their partners—compared to 63% when men are asked.

On all eight issues, the level of strong satisfaction is higher among Canadians who have lived with their current spouse or partner for more than 10 years.

Almost half of Canadians who are living with a spouse or partner (46%) say the experience of the COVID-19 pandemic has made them grow closer as a couple. A similar proportion (47%) report no change in their relationship, while 6% say they have become more distant.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 8 to June 17, 2020, among 796 adults in Canada who live with a spouse or partner. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Would Ban Foreigners from Owning Real Estate

More than seven-in-ten residents endorse the housing taxes implemented by the current provincial government.

Vancouver, BC [June 18, 2020] – More than three-in-four British Columbians are in favour of implementing a regulation that would forbid most foreigners from purchasing real estate in Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 78% of British Columbians support having legislation similar to the one currently in place in New Zealand, while 15% are opposed and 7% are undecided.

New Zealand passed legislation that bans most foreigners from purchasing real estate in the country. There are exceptions for foreigners who hold residency status in New Zealand, as well as citizens from Australia and Singapore, due to existing free trade agreements.

“The notion of forbidding most foreigners from owning real estate in Canada is popular among all demographics in British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The groups that voice the highest level of support for this change are residents of Vancouver Island (88%) and those aged 35-to-54 (also 88%).”

Public support for specific policies related to housing that were implemented by the current Government of British Columbia remains strong across the province.

Almost four-in-five British Columbians (79%) agree with the decisions to increase the foreign buyers tax from 15% to 20% and to expand the foreign buyers tax to areas located outside of Metro Vancouver.

Similarly high proportions of British Columbians agree with the implementation of the “speculation tax” in specific urban areas targeting foreign and domestic homeowners who pay little or no income tax in the province, and those who own second properties that are not long-term rentals (77%) and the introduction of a tax of 0.2% on the value of homes between $3 million and $4 million, and a tax rate of 0.4% on the portion of a home’s value that exceeds $4 million (76%).

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (72%) agree with the decision to increase the property transfer tax from 3% to 5% for homes valued at more than $3 million. The 5% portion only applies to the value greater than $3 million.

Across the province, 57% of British Columbians think the actions of the current provincial government will be “effective”, in making housing more affordable—an eight-point increase since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2019.

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians who voted for the BC Green Party in the 2017 provincial election (72%) expect the actions of the provincial government to be effective in the area of housing affordability. This perception is more common among those who cast ballots for the BC Liberals (81%) and the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (87%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 13 to June 15, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

COVID-19 Significantly Affects Exercise Routines in Canada

The proportion of Canadians who meet the recommended guidelines for physical activity fell to 29% during the pandemic.

Vancouver, BC [June 16, 2020] – Half of Canadians are having a tougher time exercising due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians say their physical activity routines were affected by the lockdown and they had to avoid specific actions.

A third of Canadians (33%) say they had to stop going to a gym or community centre since the start of the pandemic, while one-in-five (21%) had to stop going to a pool for swimming.

More than one-in-ten Canadians say they had to stop participating in an organized sports league (15%), had to stop going to a yoga studio (13%) or had to stop participating in pick-up sports that are not part of a league (12%).

“More than half of men in Canada (53%) say their exercise routine had to be modified because of the lockdown,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of Canadians who live in Ontario (56%), British Columbia (54%) and Alberta (51%) were affected.”

Just over two-in-five Canadians (42%) took action in order to exercise differently during the COVID-19 pandemic—including 45% of women, 48% of Ontarians and 70% of those aged 18-to-34.

One-in-four Canadians (25%) say they followed workouts or routines online, while 17% took up a sport that does not require equipment, such as running or jogging.

Smaller proportions of Canadians acquired weightlifting equipment (12%) or cardio machines (9%) for their home.

The poll also asked Canadians about their exercise routines before and after the COVID-19 pandemic.

Across the country, 36% of Canadians acknowledged meeting the Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines—accumulating at least two and a half hours of moderate- to vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity per week—every week before the pandemic started.

The proportion of Canadians who were able to meet the guidelines was higher among Canadians aged 18-to-34 (38%), Canadians aged 35-to-54 (also 38%), Ontarians (also 38%), Albertans (37%) and British Columbians (36%).

When asked about their physical activity after the pandemic began, only 29% of Canadians acknowledged that they have met the guidelines every week.

The proportion of Canadians who are able to currently meet the exercise guidelines dropped in Ontario (from 38% to 30%), Alberta (from 37% to 31%), British Columbia (from 36% to 29%) and Quebec (from 33% to 24%).

More than one-in-four Canadians (27%) say they never meet the recommended guidelines for physical activity. up from 23% before the lockdown.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 8 to June 10, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Contemplate COVID-19 Government Bailouts

Most residents support helping agri-food companies, individual municipalities, retailers and news organizations.

Vancouver, BC [June 11, 2020] – British Columbians have a clear idea of which businesses and corporations affected by the COVID-19 pandemic should receive financial assistance from governments, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, almost three-in-four British Columbians (73%) think agri-food companies should “definitely” or “probably” be eligible for a government bailout.

A bailout entails providing financial assistance to a corporation that otherwise would fail or become bankrupt.

Most of the province’s residents are also supportive of providing financial assistance to individual municipalities (70%), retailers (67%) and news organizations (57%).

“A government bailout for individual municipalities is more popular among British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (78%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However, majorities of residents aged 18-to-34 (65%) and aged 55 and over (67%) also favour this course of action.”

While 63% of men are in favour of providing financial assistance to news organizations, the proportion drops to 53% among women.

More than two-in-five British Columbians are in favour of allowing airlines (49%), taxi companies (also 49%) and film and entertainment companies (45%) to be eligible for government bailouts.

The level of support for governmental financial assistance is lower for ride-hailing companies (39%), individual sports franchises (38%) and professional sports leagues (34%).

Across British Columbia, men are more likely to endorse the notion of bailing out individual sports franchises (46%) and professional sports leagues than women (29% and 26% respectively.

Residents of Metro Vancouver are more likely than those in other areas of the province to endorse financial assistance for news organizations (63%), airlines (56%) and film and entertainment companies (50%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 5 to June 7, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Ten Canadians Have Gained Weight During Pandemic

Only 41% of respondents say they follow the recommendations of Canada’s Food Guide “all the time” or “most of the time.”

Vancouver, BC [June 9, 2020] – The COVID-19 pandemic has changed some of the eating and food preparation habits of Canadians, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 31% of Canadians say they have personally gained weight during the pandemic, while 52% report no change and 14% say they have lost weight.

Women (33%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (36%) are more likely to acknowledge weight gain during the pandemic.

While two thirds of Canadians (66%) are “very familiar” or “moderately familiar” with Canada’s Food Guide, only 41% say they follow the document’s recommendations “all the time” or “most of the time” when choosing what to eat in an average week.

“Half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (50%) are paying attention to the recommendations of Canada’s Food Guide,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Smaller proportions of Canadians aged 35-to-54 (42%) and aged 55 and over (34%) are following the same course of action.”

Across the country, 36% of Canadians say they prepare dinner for themselves and others in their household in less than 30 minutes—up six points since a similar Research Co. survey completed in June 2019.

Most Canadians (56%, -4) are in the kitchen for 31 to 60 minutes on an average weeknight, while 8% (-2) devote more than an hour to making dinner,

Three-in-ten Canadians (29%) say they are baking desserts—such as cakes or cookies—at home more often than they did before the COVID-19 pandemic. One-in-five (21%) bake bread at home more often now than a few months ago.

Residents of Ontario are more likely to be baking bread at home more often than residents of other regions (27%), while Albertans are more likely to be baking homemade desserts (35%).

While most Canadians do not report a significant change to their consumption of six different foods since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, there are some nuances.

Almost one-in-five Canadians (15%) are eating less fish and shellfish, and 15% report eating less meat. Conversely, 24% of Canadians say they are eating both fruits and vegetables more often than before the pandemic began.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 1 to June 3, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Some British Columbians Perceive More Crime in Their Community

Since March, one-in-four residents of East Asian and South Asian descent have endured racial slurs or insults.

Vancouver, BC [June 4, 2020] – Almost two-in-five British Columbians believe that delinquency has risen where they live, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 38% of British Columbians say the level of criminal activity in their community has increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. A similar proportion (37%) report no change, while 13% think crime has decreased.

Men (49%) and Metro Vancouverites (47%)—as well as residents of East Asian and South Asian descent (55% and 50% respectively)—are more likely to claim that criminality has risen during the pandemic.

“More than half of British Columbians who voted for the BC Liberals in the 2017 provincial election (52%) believe crime has increased recently in their community,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “About a third of those who cast ballots for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (32%) and the BC Green Party (29%) concur with this assessment.”

When asked about specific law-breaking experiences since March, one-in-five British Columbians (20%) say someone attempted to extort them in an email or text message—a proportion that rises to 24% in Metro Vancouver.

Other instances of crime endured by the province’s residents include someone breaking into their workplace or office (16%), someone attempting to extort them by phone (also 16%), someone breaking into or stealing something from their car (15%) and someone breaking into or stealing something from their home (14%).

Across the province, 11% of residents say someone directed racial slurs or insults at them since March. While only 7% of residents of European descent acknowledge that this happened to them, the proportion rises to 24% among those of East Asian and South Asian descent.

There are some remarkable differences among specific groups. More than seven-in-ten residents of Vancouver Island (73%), Southern BC (79%) and Northern BC (92%) have not experienced any of these problems during the COVID-19 pandemic. The proportion is significantly lower in the Fraser Valley (55%) and Metro Vancouver (42%).

When asked about the factors that are to blame for the current situation regarding criminal activity in their communities, British Columbians primarily cite addiction and mental health issues (43%), gangs and the illegal drug trade (38%), poverty and inequality (36%) and an inadequate court system (32%).

Fewer British Columbians place “a great deal” of blame on lack of values and the improper education of youth (28%), bad economy and unemployment (28%), insufficient policing and lack of resources to combat crime (27%) and immigrants and minorities (19%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from May 8 to May 17, 2020, among 1,600 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Credit Card Purchases Increase Dramatically in Canada

Half of Canadians say they expect to utilize biometrics to buy things within the next decade.

Vancouver, BC [May 26, 2020] – Canadians are relying heavily on their credit cards to pay for things during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, Canadians say they used a credit card to complete 50% of their purchases over the past month, a 26-point increase since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in February 2019.

Three-in-ten purchases from Canadians (31%, -3) were finalized through a debit card. Across the country, 12% of purchases were conducted with a cheque (+9), 4% with an e-transfer or through a smartphone, and only 3% (-28) with cash.

Residents of British Columbia and Quebec report that 53% of their purchases over the past month were conducted through a credit card. The proportion is lower in Ontario (51%), Alberta (45%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (44%) and Atlantic Canada (40%).

Canadian women report that about a third of their transactions (34%) involved a debit card, compared to 27% for Canadian men.

“These numbers outline a drastic transformation from 2019, and show that the COVID-19 lockdown has decidedly altered the way Canadians are buying things,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This change in behaviour is also leading many Canadians to believe that biometrics will be required to complete purchases in the near future.”

In February 2019, only 8% of Canadians said they expected to rely on biometrics (such as iris scans, fingerprints or palm recognition) to make purchases within the next 10 years.

This month, more than half of Canadians (58%) believe people will use biometrics to buy things in the next decade, a 50-point increase since last year.

Across the country, half of Canadians (50%) say they would like to see people utilizing biometrics to make purchases in their lifetimes, while 35% disagree and 15% are undecided.

British Columbians and Ontarians are more likely to personally welcome the use of biometrics for buy things in their lifetimes (54% and 53% respectively) than residents of Quebec (48%), Atlantic Canada (47%), Alberta (46%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (41%).

Photo Credit: Tony Webster 

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 18 to May 20, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Hesitant About Life Without COVID-19 Vaccine

Most residents are willing to visit barbershops and restaurants, but the proportion drops for public transit, gyms and music venues.

Vancouver, BC [May 21, 2020] – A significant proportion of British Columbians are unwilling to partake in specific activities unless a vaccine against COVID-19 is available, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, more than half of British Columbians say they would not attend a live sporting event as a spectator (61%) or a music venue (59%) before there is a vaccine against COVID-19.

At this stage, more than half of British Columbians are willing to visit a community centre (60%) as well as a gym or fitness facility (53%).

“More than half of women in British Columbia (54%) say they would not set foot inside a gym or fitness facility before they can have access to a COVID-19 vaccine,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, most men (60%) say they would have no problem visiting these venues.”

There is a split among residents on the issue of public transit usage. Across the province, 57% of British Columbians are willing to ride on a bus without a COVID-19 vaccine, while 43% would not do so. In addition, 55% would ride on SkyTrain, while 45% would not.

Men are more likely than women to say they would be willing to ride a bus (63% to 52%) and ride on SkyTrain (60% to 50%) before a COVID-19 vaccine is accessible.

Fewer than a third of British Columbians say they would not visit restaurants, pubs or bars where people can only eat indoors (32%), libraries (29%), restaurants, pubs or bars where people eat outside (also 29%) and barbershops or salons (27%) without a COVID-19 vaccine.

British Columbians aged 55 and over are more likely to have no reservations about going to a restaurant patio (72%) or to a restaurant that only offers food indoors (64%).

British Columbians of European descent are more likely to say that they would visit an indoor restaurant before a COVID-19 vaccine is available (76%) than those of East Asian (69%) and South Asian (57%) heritage.

At least three-in-five British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (60%) and aged 55 and over (64%) say they are not willing to visit a music venue without a COVID-19 vaccine. The proportion is lower among those aged 35-to-54 (54%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 15 to May 17, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most British Columbians Favour Reopening the Economy Slowly

Residents aged 35-to-54, as well as those who have experienced job losses in their household, would prefer a quicker renewal.

Vancouver, BC [May 14, 2020] – More than three-in-five British Columbians favour a cautious approach for a return to economic activity during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 62% of British Columbians believe we should reopen the economy slowly and ensure that COVID-19 infection rates remain low.

Conversely, more than a third of British Columbians (35%) believe we should reopen the economy quickly and ensure that no more jobs are lost due to COVID-19.

“There is an impressive gender gap when British Columbians ponder the pace of easing restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic ,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While three-in-four women (76%) call for a cautious approach, fewer than half of men (48%) concur.”

More than four-in-five British Columbians aged 55 and over (68%) are in favour of a gradual return to economic activity in the province, a view shared by 64% of those aged 18-to-34 and 44% of those aged 35-to-54.

The COVID-19 pandemic has directly affected British Columbians in different ways. More than two-in-five of the province’s residents (42%) say they have been unable to visit relatives who live in their municipality, and more than a third (35%) say someone in their household applied for the federal Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB).

In addition, 32% of British Columbians say someone in their household was laid off, 32% are working from home instead of at their regular workplace, and 24% have taken care of children in their household while schools are closed.

British Columbians aged 35-to-54 are more likely to report that someone in their household has applied for the CERB (47%) and to be working at home (51%) than their younger and older counterparts.

Majorities of British Columbians who have taken care of children in their household (58%), are working from home instead of at their regular workplace (53%) and who have had someone in the household lose a job (52%) are in favour of reopening the economy quickly and avoid more job losses due to the pandemic.

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (72%) approve of the provincial government’s plan to resume economic activity— including 81% of BC Liberal voters in 2017, 75% of BC Green Party voters and 72% of BC New Democratic Party (NDP) voters.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 8 to May 11, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Split on “Family Bubbles” During COVID-19 Pandemic

While 82% would take advantage of an opportunity to expand their social circle, only 44% believe the concept is a good idea.

Vancouver, BC [May 12, 2020] – Fewer than half of Canadians agree with the notion of allowing two households a chance to socialize and interact during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 44% of Canadians believe the “family bubbles” are a good idea, while 35% disagree and 21% are undecided.

The “two-household bubble” or “family bubble” concept was originally introduced last month in New Brunswick as an effort to reduce social isolation.

There are some drastic discrepancies across the country when Canadians ponder this concept. While two thirds of Quebecers (68%) think the “family bubbles” are a good idea, the proportion of residents who feel the same way drops to 40% in Ontario, 39% in British Columbia, 37% in Atlantic Canada, 25% in Alberta and 18% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

If their province allowed it, more than four-in-five Canadians (82%) say they would take advantage of the opportunity to have a “family bubble”—including 84% of those aged 55 and over, 83% of those aged 18-to-34 and 77% of those aged 35-to-54.

However, while 50% of Canadians say they know exactly which household they would ask to become part of their “family bubble”, 37% disagree and 13% are not sure.

“There is a significantly large proportion of Canadians who would jump at the chance to expand their social circle during the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However, most are not entirely convinced that this is the right course of action at this time, and half are currently unable to select who to join.”

Canadians are not particularly optimistic of two particular milestones happening before the end of the summer.

Only 41% of Canadians expect people to go to the office and not work from home anymore before the end of August, and just 31% foresee being able to attend or host a large social gathering during the same period.

Across the country, 48% of Canadians expect things in their city or town to go back to the way they were before the COVID-19 outbreak in January 2021 or later.

Only 11% of Canadians believe a return to normalcy will happen before the end of August, Including 17% of those aged 18-to-34 and 17% of Quebecers.

More than two thirds of Canadians (68%) believe the worst is “definitely” or “probably” ahead of us when it comes to the COVID-19 outbreak—a four-point drop since Research Co. asked this question for the first time in March 2020.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 4 to May 6, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Hold Differing Views on Easing COVID-19 Restrictions

While most agree with the plans outlined by their province, few think certain services should be available this month.  

Vancouver, BC [May 6, 2020] – While most Canadians endorse the proposals of their respective provincial administrations to restart the economy during the COVID-19 pandemic, significantly fewer believe that restaurants, barber shops or gyms should be open to the public in May, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 53% of Canadians agree with their provincial government’s plan to ease restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic, while 39% disagree and 8% are undecided.  

There is a noteworthy disparity on this question, with only 6% of Canadians saying they “strongly agree” with their provincial administration’s proposals, and 21% saying they “strongly disagree” with it.  

In spite of the high level of support for current plans to ease restrictions, few Canadians are eager to see a quick return to particular activities.  

Only 28% of Canadians would allow coffee shops to open for dine-in service before the end of May. Similar proportions of Canadians would consent to allowing barber shops and salons to open (26%) and allowing restaurants to open for dine-in service (25%).  

“Many Canadians are not quite ready to partake in some of the activities that they abandoned as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic ,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than two thirds believe that it would be unwise to return to dine-in service at coffee shops and restaurants before the end of this month.”  

Only one-in-five Canadians believe movie theatres (20%) and gyms, fitness facilities and community centres (also 20%) should open before the end of May. Fewer residents (13%) would allow live sporting events in the next few weeks.  

Even as most residents of the country remain under lockdown, one third of Canadians (34%) observed aggressive behaviour among shoppers inside stores over the past month. One-in-five (20%) witnessed aggressive behaviour among drivers on the road and 9% among pedestrians on the street.  

Residents of British Columbia were more likely to witness aggressive behaviour inside stores (43%), while Ontarians were more likely to observe aggressive behaviour on the road (26%).  

When Canadians are asked to select four emotions they may have right now about the COVID-19 outbreak, 66% choose “sadness” while 64% pick “fear.” About a third (32%) feel “anger” and 27% say “angst.”  

Women are significantly more likely to feel “sadness” than men (74% to 58%), while men are more likely to experience “disgust” (22% to 17%) when thinking of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 27 to April 29, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca