Canadian Desire to Drop Monarchy Reaches Historic Level

Only 22% of Canadians would prefer to have Prince Charles becoming King after Queen Elizabeth II dies or abdicates.

Vancouver, BC [March 1, 2021] – The proportion of Canadians who express a wish to no longer have a monarch has reached the highest level recorded in the past 12 years, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 45% of Canadians say that, thinking of Canada’s constitution, they would prefer to have an elected head of state, up 13 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in February 2020.

One-in-four Canadians (24%, -3) would rather see Canada remaining a monarchy, while 19% (-9) do not care either way and 13% (=) are undecided.

“In four previous national surveys conducted from 2009 to 2020 using this same question, support for an elected head of state had never surpassed the 40% mark across Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Men (51%), Canadians aged 35-to-54 (46%), Quebecers (57%) and Liberal Party voters in 2019 (50%) are more likely to be in favour of having an elected head of state in the country.”

When asked about who should succeed Queen Elizabeth II after she dies or abdicates, more than a third of Canadians (35%, =) select Prince William to ascend the throne, while 22% (-3) would prefer to see Prince Charles—the first in line—as monarch.

Among Canadians who would prefer for the monarchy to continue, Prince William is the preferred future King over Prince Charles (47% to 39%).

Just under half of Canadians (49%, -3) think Canada will “definitely” or “probably” be a monarchy two decades from now, while 31% (+4) believe the country will have an elected head of state by 2041.

Residents of Ontario (53%) and Atlantic Canada (51%) are more likely to predict that Canadians will be able to elect a head of state in the next twenty years than their counterparts in Alberta (49%), British Columbia (48%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 48%) and Quebec (44%).

Compared to 2020, there is little fluctuation in the perceptions of Canadians on selected members of the Royal Family. Seven-in-ten (70%, +1) hold a favourable view of Queen Elizabeth II, and similarly high proportions feel the same way about Prince William (67%, +4) and Prince Harry (66%, +2).

A majority of Canadians have a favourable opinion of Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge (64%, =), Meghan, Duchess of Sussex (54%, -2) and Prince Philip (51%, +3).

As has been the case for the past three years, the lowest favourability ratings on this question are posted by Prince Charles (41%, -3) and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall (30%, -2).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from February 21 to February 23, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadian Dog Owners Rely Primarily on Breeders and Shelters

Dog owners in British Columbia are more likely to have acquired a pet for recreational purposes, such as exercising or walking more.

Vancouver, BC [February 26, 2021] – Canadian dog owners cite companionship as the main reason for having a pet in their home, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 33% of Canadians say they currently have a dog in their home, including 41% of those aged 18-to-34 and 40% of Albertans.

Almost half of Canadian dog owners (47%) have had a pet in their home for five years or more. Just over one-in-ten (11%) have been dog owners for less than a year.

More than seven-in-ten Canadian dog owners (71%) say they decided to get a pet for companionship, while 42% acknowledge acting because a family member wanted one.

More than a third of Canadian dog owners (37%) were looking for fun and entertainment in a pet, while 28% wanted one for recreational purposes (such as exercising or walking more) and 14% got the animal for protection.

Dog owners in British Columbia are more likely to say that they acquired a pet for recreational purposes (42%), while dog owners in Alberta are more likely to cite protection (23%). 

There are some significant differences in the way Canadian dog owners acquired their pets. More than two-in-five (43%) got them directly from a breeder, including 56% of those who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election.

More than one-in-four Canadian dog owners (27%) adopted or rescued their pet from a shelter, including 42% of those who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) in the last federal ballot.

Significantly fewer Canadian dog owners purchased their pet at a store (13%, but rising to 30% in Quebec) or received it as a gift (10%, but rising to 24% in Atlantic Canada).

“Female Canadian dog owners are more likely to have visited a shelter to get their pet (30%) than men (24%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, while 21% of men bought their dog at a pet store, only 6% of women took the same course of action.”

Across the country, 97% of Canadian dog owners claim to be “very satisfied” or “moderately satisfied” with their dog, and 80% say their pet has been spayed or neutered.

More than three-in-four Canadian dog owners (76%) believe it is unacceptable to physically discipline a dog—including 86% of women and 85% of those aged 55 and over.

A final question defined the soul as “the immaterial essence, animating principle, or actuating cause of an individual life.” Across the country, 85% of Canadian dog owners say that their dog has a soul, while 7% disagree and 7% are not sure.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from February 18 to February 20, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Still Shun Activities Without COVID-19 Vaccine

Almost two thirds of the province’s residents think the economy’s reopening should happen slowly to ensure low infection rates.

Vancouver, BC [February 23, 2020] – Almost two thirds of British Columbians balk at the prospect of attending a concert or game before being inoculated against COVID-19, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 65% of British Columbians say they would not be comfortable attending a live sporting event as spectators without a COVID-19 vaccine, up four points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2020.

An equally high proportion of British Columbians (64%, +5) are not ready to attend a concert at a music venue, including 66% of those who reside in Metro Vancouver.

Three-in-five British Columbians (60%, +13) say they would not visit a gym or fitness facility unless they have been inoculated against COVID-19.

“Across the province, 41% of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 say they would be willing to go to the gym right now or if the venue is regularly cleaned and there is enough room to physically distance,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 33% of those aged 35-to-54 and 22% of those aged 55 and over share the same view.”

One third of British Columbians say they would not go to three different venues unless they are vaccinated against COVID-19: a library (33%, +4), a barbershop or salon (also 33%, +6) or dinner at a patio (also 33%, +4). A slightly larger proportion of the province’s residents (35%, +3) would not visit a restaurant to eat indoors if they have not been vaccinated.

A majority of the province’s residents (51%, +11) are not willing to go to a Community Centre without being inoculated against COVID-19, while almost half would not ride the bus (46%, +3) or rely on SkyTrain (also 46%, +1).

Almost two thirds of British Columbians (64%, +2 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2020) think we should reopen the economy slowly and ensure that COVID-19 infection rates remain low, while three-in-ten (29%, -6) would prefer to reopen the economy quickly and ensure that no more jobs are lost due to the pandemic.

Women (67%) and British Columbians aged 55 and over (74%) are more likely to suggest that any eventual economic reopening should be done gradually.

Across the province, 73% of residents of Vancouver Island call for a slow reopening of the economy, along with 67% of those in Northern BC, 64% of those in Metro Vancouver and 56% of those who reside in both Southern BC and the Fraser Valley.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from February 14 to February 16, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Say Horses Are Not Food, Reject Exports to Asia

Only 16% knew that Canadian horses have been exported for slaughter and human consumption in Japan and South Korea.

Vancouver, BC [February 18, 2021] – The export of Canadian horses for slaughter and human consumption abroad is rejected by a large majority of Canadians, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, two thirds of Canadians (67%) oppose this practice, while 22% support it and 12% are undecided.

Opposition to the export of Canadian horses for slaughter and human consumption abroad is highest among women (76%). Significant majorities of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (65%), aged 35-to-54 (66%) and aged 55 and over (68%) also hold unfavourable views.

On a regional basis, Alberta posts the highest level of aversion to this practice (74%), followed by Atlantic Canada (73%), Ontario (70%), British Columbia (66%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 66%) and Quebec (62%).

Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election are slightly more likely to oppose the export of Canadian horses for slaughter and human consumption abroad (69%) than those who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (66%) and the Liberal Party (63%)

Since 2013, more than 30,000 Canadian horses have been exported for slaughter and human consumption in Japan and South Korea. 

More than four-in-five Canadians (84%) were unaware of this fact before taking the survey—a proportion that rises to 86% among women, 88% among Canadians aged 35-to-54 and 88% among Atlantic Canadians.

When asked a separate question about food sources, only 27% of Canadians consider it appropriate for humans to consume horses, while 65% deem this as inappropriate and 8% are undecided.

In stark contrast, at least three-in-four Canadians think chickens (88%), pigs (79%), turkeys (75%) and cattle (also 75%) are suitable food sources for humans.

Majorities of Canadians also think that the consumption of six other animals is appropriate: ducks (71%), sheep (69%), fish (68%), goats (64%), rabbits (58%) and geese (also 58%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from February 11 to February 13, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Stealthy Thermostat Fiddling Continues in Some Canadian Homes

Women are more likely to change the temperature at home without telling their spouse or significant other than men.

Vancouver, BC [February 12, 2021] – Half of Canadians who are cohabiting with a spouse or partner claim that setting the temperature at home is a joint effort, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians who are married or live with a significant other say that both partners are equally in charge of setting the thermostat.

Similar proportions of respondents say the responsibility for setting the temperature at home is theirs alone (26%) or in the hands of their spouse or partner (23%).

“The idea of an equal partnership for managing the thermostat is more prevalent in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (61%), Alberta (58%), Atlantic Canada (56%) and British Columbia (53%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer than half of Ontarians (46%) and Quebecers (41%) behave in the same fashion.”

Since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November 2018, there is a 19-point increase in the proportion of Canadians who are cohabiting with a spouse or partner who say setting the temperature is a joint effort.

Two-in-five Canadians who are married or live with a significant other (39%, +9) admit that they change the temperature at home without telling their spouse or partner “all of the time” or “most of the time”.

Women are more likely to touch the home thermostat without telling their spouse or partner “all of the time” or “most of the time” (45%) than men (34%).

Conversely, 28% of men say they “never” fiddle with the home thermostat without informing their spouse or partner, compared to 22% of women.

More than a third of Canadians (37%, -4) acknowledge that their energy and heating use at home has increased over the past few weeks. Only 13% (-2) report that it has decreased, while 45% (+7) say it has not changed.

Residents of British Columbia are more likely to state that their home energy and heating use has increased (44%), followed by those who reside in Alberta (40%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 40%), Ontario (39%), Quebec (28%) and Atlantic Canada (also 28%).

There are some shifts in the preferred temperature of homes when compared to 2018. Just over one-in-ten Canadians (12%, +3) typically set their thermostat at 18C or lower.

A third of residents (33%, +5) select 19C or 20C, while two-in-five (39%, -1) choose 21C or 22C and 10% (+4) set the temperature at 23C or higher.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from February 1 to February 3, 2021, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

COVID-19 Impacts Dining Behaviours Across British Columbia

Millennials and Metro Vancouverites are more likely to be relying on apps to have food delivered to their homes.

Vancouver, BC [February 9, 2021] – British Columbians are not ordering food delivered to their homes as often as they did a year ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 32% of British Columbians say they order food that is delivered to their homes once every two weeks or more often, down 14 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in February 2020.

More than half of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (54%) are having food delivered to their homes at least once every fortnight, compared to 37% among those aged 35-to-54 and 10% among those aged 55 and over.

In a poll conducted by Research Co. in January 2021, 21% of Canadians—and 19% of British Columbians—said they are not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection from COVID-19.

Just under half of British Columbians (45%, -1) order food that they pick up themselves from a restaurant at least once every fortnight. 

Three-in-ten British Columbians (30%) dine out at a restaurant at least once every two weeks, down from 55% in 2020.

While 27% of British Columbians say they are ordering food delivered to their home more often than last year, a similar proportion (28%) is partaking on this option less than before.

“The momentum for the food delivery business in British Columbia is being driven primarily by Millennials,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 42% of residents aged 18-to-34 say they are ordering food for their homes more often, only 31% of those aged 35-to-54 and 13% of those aged 55 and over are joining them.”

One third of Metro Vancouverites (34%) are ordering food for their homes more often than last year. The Fraser Valley is a close second on this indicator (29%), followed by Vancouver Island (18%), Northern BC (15%) and Southern BC (13%).

Over the past year, more than a third of British Columbians relied on three different methods to have food delivered to their home: a phone call to a specific restaurant (39%, -4 since February 2020), online through the website of a restaurant or chain (37%, -1) and using an app on their phone, such as DoorDash, Uber Eats or Skip The Dishes (36%, +4).

While two thirds of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 have used an app to order food in the past year (65%), the proportion drops to 39% among those aged 35-to-54 and 13% among those aged 55 and over.

On a regional basis, Metro Vancouverites relied primarily on apps to order food over the past year (47%). In the other four regions, the most favoured method is a phone call to a specific restaurant: 58% in Northern BC, 45% in the Fraser Valley, 39% in Southern BC and 37% in Vancouver Island.

More than half of British Columbians (54%) say they always leave a tip for the delivery person or courier who brings food to their home, including 57% of women, 58% of British Columbians aged 35-to-54 and 66% of Vancouver Islanders.

Only 28% of British Columbians say they always leave a tip or donation for the restaurant—an option that can be accessed in some applications at the time deliveries are finalized—while 34% never do this.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from February 1 to February 3, 2021, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Divided Over Vaccine Rollout and Expectations

Fewer than one-in-four respondents believe the vaccines developed in Russia, China and India are safe for them.

Vancouver, BC [February 4, 2021] – Canadians are split on the notion that every resident of the country who wants to have a vaccine against COVID-19 will be able to get one in the timeline specified by the federal government, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In December 2020, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) stated that it expected to have enough COVID-19 vaccine doses to inoculate every willing Canadian by the end of September 2021.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 45% of Canadians believe this goal will be attained, while 46% think it will not be attained.

“More than half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (53%) expect everyone in the country to be vaccinated in the next eight months,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer Canadians aged 35-to-54 (46%) and aged 55 and over (37%) have the same optimism.”

About three-in-four Canadians (74%) say they would take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available to them, while 18% would not and 8% are undecided. These proportions are consistent with what Research Co. has found in surveys conducted in September 2020November 2020 and January 2021.

Canadians are divided in their assessment of various aspects of the COVID-19 vaccine rollout. While 46% say they are satisfied with the procurement of vaccine doses from the federal government, 43% are not.

Canadians who supported the Conservative Party in the 2019 election are particularly critical of the federal government, with 65% saying they are dissatisfied with the procurement of vaccine doses—compared to 44% for those who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) and 30% for those who voted for the Liberal Party.

More than half of Canadians (51%) are satisfied with the vaccination plans and phases outlined by their province. 

While majorities of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (57%), British Columbia (56%), Atlantic Canada (54%) and Quebec (53%) are satisfied with this aspect of the vaccine rollout, the proportion is lower in Ontario (45%) and Alberta (42%).

Across the country, 41% of Canadians say they are satisfied with the pace of vaccination efforts in their province, 49% are dissatisfied. 

The level of satisfaction with the pace of vaccination efforts is highest in Quebec (46%), followed by British Columbia (45%), Atlantic Canada (42%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (40%), Alberta (37%) and Ontario (34%).

Health authorities around the world have allowed the emergency use of nine vaccines against COVID-19. When this survey was conducted, Canada had only allowed two vaccines: the Pfizer–BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine and the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. 

More than two thirds of Canadians consider the Moderna (69%) and Pfizer (67%) vaccines as “safe” for them personally. These two vaccines are considered “not safe” by 12% and 15% of Canadians respectively.

Almost half of Canadians (48%) feel the Oxford-Astra Zeneca COVID-19 vaccine is “safe” for them personally, while 16% consider it “not safe” and 35% are not sure.

Fewer than one-in-four Canadians deem six other vaccines as “safe” for them: the KeeGam-COVID-Vac (Sputnik V) from Russia (20%), the EpiVacCorona from Russia (also 20%), the BBV152 (Varat Biotech) from India (also 20%), the CoronaVac (Sinovac) from China (18%), the Ad5-nCoV (Cansino Biologics) from China (17%) and the BBIBP-CorV (Sinopharm) from China (15%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from January 30 to February 1, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Life Getting Noisier for More Than a Quarter of Canadians

Three-in-ten respondents say they were bothered at home by unnecessary noise from vehicles over the past year.

Vancouver, BC [February 2, 2021] – More than one-in-four Canadians believe their surroundings are noisier now than they were a year ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 27% of Canadians say their city or town has become noisier over the past year.

Similar proportions of Canadians believe their home (28%) and their street (23%) are noisier now than they were a year ago.

Women (28%), Canadians aged 18-to-34 (33%), British Columbians (31%) and respondents of South Asian descent (36%) are more likely to feel that the city or town where they live is noisier now than in early 2020.

When asked about specific sounds that have bothered them at home over the past year, at least one-in-five Canadians mention unnecessary noise from vehicles (such as motorcycles and cars revving up) (30%), dogs barking (24%), loud people outside their home (20%) and car alarms (also 20%).

Fewer Canadians report being disturbed by 10 other noises at home: yard work (such as lawnmowers and leaf blowers) (19%), yelling or screaming at a nearby home (18%), loud music playing inside a vehicle (also 18%), power tools (such as electric saws and sanders) (also 18%), loud music at a nearby home (17%), fireworks (16%), a loud gathering or party at a nearby home (15%), drivers honking the horn excessively (12%), home alarms (9%) and cats meowing (5%).

“More than three-in-four Canadians aged 18-to-34 (78%) say that they were bothered by outside noises when they were at home,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion drops to 65% among those aged 35-to-54 and 60% among those aged 55 and over.”

Over the past year, more than one-in-ten Canadians (12%) wore earplugs or earmuffs to mitigate noise while inside their home—including 19% of those aged 18-to-34 and 14% of Ontarians.

Smaller proportions of Canadians acquired hardware to mitigate noise while inside their home (such as noise cancelling headphones or earphones) (7%), reported noise concerns to the police (5%) or moved away from their previous home because of noise (4%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from January 24 to January 26, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Would Ban Non-Essential Travel During Pandemic

Practically three-in-four of the country’s residents say they will “definitely” or “probably” take a COVID-19 vaccine.

Vancouver, BC [January 25, 2021] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians believe it would be wise to impose travel restrictions inside and across provinces during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 80% of Canadians agree with prohibiting non-essential travel from one province to another. 

In addition, 72% of Canadians are in favour of prohibiting non-essential travel inside their own province—a proportion that rises to 78% among those aged 55 and over and 81% among those who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election.

During the holiday season, some elected politicians travelled outside of their home province in contravention of a federal public health guidance to avoid all non-essential travel.

Three-in-five Canadians (61%) think this is a very serious offence and want elected politicians who travelled during the holiday season to resign from their legislatures or face a recall vote.

Nine-in-ten Canadians (90%) are in favour of placing all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period and a similarly high proportion (88%) would keep the border with the United States closed to non-essential travel.

While 51% of Canadians agree with allowing K-12 students to go back to in-class learning in their province, 39% disagree with this course of action.

Almost three-in-four Canadians (74%, +1 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November) say they will “definitely” or “probably” take a vaccine against COVID-19, while 16% (+2) would not and 9% (-4) are not sure.

Almost nine-in-ten Canadians (88%) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside. Slightly fewer respondents (81%) say they wear a mask every time they leave their home.

Across the country, 58% of Canadians (-5) are satisfied with the way the federal government has managed the COVID-19 pandemic. Similar proportions of residents are content with the performance of their provincial governments (58%, -6) and their municipal governments (60%, -2).

Satisfaction with the way provincial administrations have handled the pandemic is highest in British Columbia (72%, +2), followed by Quebec (65%, -3), Ontario (53%, -15) and Alberta (34%, -12).

When it comes to personal behaviours to prevent infection, about three-in-ten Canadians (29%) say they clean the groceries they buy and 21% do not order food from restaurants at all.

This month saw increases in the proportion of Canadians who say they are overeating or eating more than usual at home (30%, +9), drinking alcohol more often (18%, +6) and losing their temper more often (17%, +2).

In addition, 18% of Canadians (+5) are having baths or showers less often than before the pandemic and one-in-ten (10%, +3) are brushing their teeth less often.

Half of Canadians (50%, -14) believe the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic is “definitely” or “probably” ahead of us, while 33% (+11) think the worst is “definitely” or “probably” behind us.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from January 18 to January 20, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Support Pandemic Ban on In-Person Worship

Only 12% of the province’s residents think the current fine of $2,300 for those who break the rules is “too high.”

Vancouver, BC [January 22, 2021] – The provincial government’s decision to forbid in-person worship services across British Columbia on account of the COVID-19 pandemic is endorsed by a sizeable majority of residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 81% of British Columbians agree with the prohibition, while 13% disagree and 6% are not sure.

In November 2020, the provincial health officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry, banned all in-person faith-related gatherings in an effort to curb the spread of COVID-19.

Churches, temples, mosques, synagogues and gurdwaras can only hold services for special occasions—such as baptisms, weddings and funerals—and with 10 people or fewer in attendance.

Support for the decision to forbid in-person worship services is slightly higher among women (84%) than men (77%). Majorities of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (81%), aged 35-to-54 (75%) and aged 55 and over (85%) also agree with the government’s course of action.

“Four-in-five British Columbians who describe themselves as Christian (81%) believe the government made the right decision in banning in-person worship during the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support for the regulation is also high among residents who are atheist (87%), agnostic (75%) or who profess no religion (79%).” 

Some churches in British Columbia have been issued $2,300 tickets for holding in-person worship services in contravention of provincial orders. 

Two-in-five British Columbians (40%) believe the fine is “about right”, while a similar proportion (39%) deem it “too low.” Only 12% of the province’s residents feel the fine is “too high.”

While one-in-four residents of Northern BC (25%) believe the current monetary penalty is “too high”, the proportion drops 16% in the Fraser Valley and Southern BC, 11% in Metro Vancouver and 6% in Vancouver Island.

British Columbians of European descent are more likely to think that the $2,300 fine for holding in-person worship services is “too low” (43%) than those who described their ancestry as East Asian (37%), South Asian (30%) or First Nations, Métis or Inuit (26%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from January 16 to January 18, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Streaming Options Gain Ground Among Canadian Music Listeners

The proportion of Canadians who listen to music on a streaming service grew from 32% in 2019 to 40% in 2021.

Vancouver, BC [January 19, 2021] – While radio remains the most favoured choice for Canadians who want to listen to music, streaming platforms have gained prominence across the country over the past two years, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 66% of Canadians say they listened to music on a regular radio over the past week, down three points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March 2019.

Two-in-five Canadians (40%, +8 since 2019) listened to music on a streaming service over the past seven days, while three-in-ten (30%, -1) listened to music stored in a computer or a phone.

Fewer Canadians listened to music on an LP record, cassette or CD (16%, -5) or on satellite radio (12%, -3) over the past week.

“Canadians aged 55 and over prefer to listen to music on the radio (70%) than on a streaming service (28%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, those aged 18-to-34 are more likely to stream (64%) than to listen to the radio (53%).”

While one-in-five Canadians (20%) paid to access a music streaming service in the last month, the proportion rises to 40% among those aged 18-to-34.

Fewer Canadians paid for and downloaded a song online (11%) or bought a compact disc or LP record (10%) in the last month.

When asked if they think that, in this day and age, music creators are being fairly compensated for their work, Canadians are almost evenly split. While 40% believe they are (-11 since 2019), (41%, +8) believe they are not.

A majority of Canadians aged 18-to-34 think music creators are being fairly compensated right now (54%), compared to 42% among those aged 35 to 54 and 32% among those aged 55 and over.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from January 9 to January 11, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Four Canadians Back Medical Assistance in Dying Rules

Almost three-in-five respondents personally think the practice should be permitted, but only under specific circumstances.

Vancouver, BC [January 15, 2021] – The regulations that allow people in Canada to seek medical assistance in dying under specific conditions are endorsed by a large majority of the country’s residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 76% of Canadians support the practice under the current guidelines specified by the federal government:

  • Being eligible for health services funded by the federal government, or a province or territory (or during the applicable minimum period of residence or waiting period for eligibility).
  • Being at least 18 years old and mentally competent.
  • Having a grievous and irremediable medical condition.
  • Making a voluntary request for medical assistance in dying that is not the result of outside pressure or influence.
  • Giving informed consent to receive medical assistance in dying.

Support for the regulations to seek medical assistance in dying is high across all groups, but the measure is particularly accepted among Canadians aged 55 and over (82%).

At least four-in-five residents of Alberta (84%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (80%) are in favour of the current guidelines to seek medical assistance in dying, along with 79% of British Columbians, 77% of Quebecers, 74% of Ontarians and 74% of Atlantic Canadians.

When asked about their personal feelings on this issue, almost three-in-five Canadians (58%) believe medical assistance in dying should be allowed, but only under specific circumstances. 

Only one-in-five Canadians (20%) would always allow the practice regardless of who requests it, while one-in-ten (11%) would never permit it.

“Majorities of Canadians who voted for each of the three major parties in the last federal election are personally in favour of permitting medical assistance in dying under specific circumstances,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This includes 64% of those who voted for the Liberal Party and 58% of those who voted for either the Conservative Party or the New Democratic Party (NDP).”

Just over two-in-five Canadians (43%) say they are satisfied with the regulations that are currently in place in Canada to deal with the issue of medical assistance in dying, while 26% are dissatisfied and 31% are undecided.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from January 9 to January 11, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Western Canadians Support Banning Single-Use Plastics

Majorities of residents of the four Canadian provinces say they are relying on reusable bags when shopping for groceries.

Vancouver, BC [January 12, 2021] – The federal government’s plan to curb the use of single-use plastics in Canada is supported by most residents of the four western provinces, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative provincial samples, 82% of British Columbians, 78% of Manitobans, 71% of Albertans and 69% of Saskatchewanians support the proposal.

The federal plan calls for as ban on grocery checkout bags, straws, stir sticks, six-pack rings, plastic cutlery and food takeout containers made from hard-to-recycle plastics.

Support for the ban on single-use plastics is highest among British Columbians who voted for the BC Green Party in the 2020 provincial election (91%), as well as those who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) in the most recent provincial democratic processes held in Saskatchewan (90%) and Alberta (86%).

In British Columbia, more than three-in-four respondents to this survey (77%) say they rely on their own re-usable bag when shopping for groceries—a proportion that rises to 80% among those aged 35-to-54.

Majorities of residents of Alberta (69%), Saskatchewan (64%) and Manitoba (60%) are also using their own bags when they shop for groceries, instead of bags provided by the stores.

More than half of British Columbians (54%) say they go out of their way to recycle—such as holding on to bottles and cans until they can be placed into a proper recycling bin—“all of the time”. The proportion for this particular behaviour is slightly lower in Saskatchewan (50%), Manitoba (48%) and Alberta (46%).

One-in-four British Columbians (26%) say they limit hot water usage in their home—taking shorter showers or running the washing machine or dishwasher with full loads only—“all of the time”, compared to 19% in both Alberta and Saskatchewan and 17% in Manitoba.

Other behaviours are not as widely embraced across Western Canada. While 13% of British Columbians and 11% of Albertans say they unplug electrical devices in their home—such as TVs, computers and cell phone chargers—when they are not in use “all of the time”, only 5% of Saskatchewanians and 4% of Manitobans follow the same course of action.

Fewer than one-in-ten residents of each province say they buy biodegradable products or eat organic or home-grown foods “all of the time.”

“Western Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to be keeping an eye on hot water usage in their homes,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, those aged 18-to-34 have been quicker to adopt biodegradable products.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from January 4 to January 6, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia, 600 adults In Alberta, 600 adults in Saskatchewan and 600 adults in Manitoba. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in each province. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for British Columbia and +/- 4.0 percentage points for Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Positive Perceptions on China Plummet to New Low in Canada

Two-in-five Canadians hold favourable views on the United States, up 10 points since July 2020.

Vancouver, BC [January 8, 2021] – Just under one-in-five Canadians currently have a favourable view of the People’s Republic of China, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, only 19% of Canadians hold a positive opinion of China, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in July 2020. Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%, +3) hold negative views on this particular country.

One-in-four Atlantic Canadians (25%) have a favourable opinion of China. The rating is lower in Quebec (23%), British Columbia (20%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (19%), Ontario (16%) and Alberta (13%).

“Canadians aged 55 and over are the least likely to currently have a positive view of China (16%)”, says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are slightly higher among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (19%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (25%).”

At least three-in-five Canadians currently have favourable views on seven different nations: the United Kingdom (78%, +5), Italy (75%, +6), Germany (72%, +5), Japan (71%, +1), France (71%, +1), Mexico (61%, +7) and South Korea (60%, -1).

Just over two-in-five Canadians hold a positive opinion of India (44%, +7) and the United States (42%, +10).

Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election are more likely to have a favourable view of India (54%) than those who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP) (44%) or the Conservative Party (35%).

In Canada, positive views on the United States are highest among men (47%), Albertans (54%) and those who voted for the Conservatives in the last federal ballot (61%).

Significantly fewer women (36%), Quebecers (37%) and British Columbians (36%) hold a favourable opinion on the United States, along with Canadians who voted for the Liberals (38%) or the New Democrats in 2019 (24%) 

Fewer than a third of Canadians have a positive view of five other countries: Venezuela (31%, -2), Russia (26%, =), Saudi Arabia (23%, +3), Iran (15%, -2) and North Korea (12%, -1).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 14 to December 16, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views on Safety in British Columbia Unchanged Since 2019

Four-in-five residents support enacting municipal bans on handguns and military-style assault weapons.

Vancouver, BC [January 5, 2021] – The perceptions of British Columbians on the possibility of being affected by criminal activity have not gone through a significant fluctuation over the past year and a half, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two thirds of British Columbians (68%) say they would feel “very safe” or “moderately safe” walking alone in their own neighbourhood after dark—unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2019.

More than seven-in-ten residents of the Fraser Valley (72%) and Metro Vancouver (71%) say they would feel safe walking alone in their own neighbourhood after dark, compared to 67% in Southern BC and 56% in both Vancouver Island and Northern BC.

Just over two-in-five British Columbians (41%, +1 since August 2019) say they fear becoming victims of a crime in their community “a great deal” or “a fair amount”, while almost three-in-five (58%) do not.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to fear becoming victims of crime (53%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (46%) and aged 55 and over (33%).

When asked about the current situation regarding crime in their community, more than a third of British Columbians blame addiction and mental health issues (45%) and gangs and the illegal drug trade (38%).

Smaller proportions of the province’s residents point the finger at poverty and inequality (26%), an inadequate court system (26%), lack of values and the improper education for youth (24%),  a bad economy and unemployment (19%), insufficient policing and a lack of resources to combat crime (16%) and immigrants and minorities (9%).

In April, 27% of British Columbians suggested that insufficient policing was one of the factors to blame for criminal activity in their community,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In December, only 16% feel the same way.” 

Four-in-five British Columbians (80%, +1 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in September 2018) support enacting a ban on handguns within the limits of their municipality, while a slightly higher proportion (83%, -3) would prohibit military-style assault weapons.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 14 to December 16, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca