Slower Cars on Residential Streets Still Welcome in British Columbia

Almost three-in-five respondents would like to see speed limits reduced to 30 km/h on all residential streets in their municipality.

Vancouver, BC [June 15, 2021] – Public support for a reduction of the speed limit on residential streets remains high across British Columbia, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 61% of British Columbians say they would “definitely” or “probably” like to see the speed limit reduced to 30 km/h on all residential streets in their municipality, while keeping the speed limit on arterial and collector roads at 50 km/h.

This represents a three-point increase in support for this policy since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2019.

“Almost two thirds of British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (64%) support establishing a lower speed limit on residential streets,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of residents aged 18-to-34 (62%) and aged 55 and over (57%) share the same view.”

In 2019, Vancouver City Council unanimously passed a motion to establish a pilot project that will see the speed limit reduced to 30 km/h on select residential streets in the city. The pilot project started earlier this year in the Grandview-Woodland neighbourhood.

As was the case two years ago, two thirds of British Columbians (66%) think Vancouver’s pilot project is a “very good” or “good idea”, while 22% deem it “bad” or “very bad.”

Just under two-in-five British Columbians (39%, -3) admit to witnessing a car that they perceive is circulating above the current speed limit on the street where they live “at least once a day”, while only 16% claim this “never” happens.

Residents of the Fraser Valley are more likely to report seeing cars speeding on their street on a daily basis (45%) than those who live in Vancouver Island (42%), Northern BC (41%), Metro Vancouver (37%) and Northern BC (35%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from June 6 to June 8, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Question the Effectiveness of Housing Taxes

The provincial government’s measures remain popular, but fewer residents think they will actually make housing more affordable.  

Vancouver, BC [June 8, 2021] – While sizeable proportions of British Columbians remain supportive of specific housing policies implemented by the current provincial government, residents are evenly split on whether they will lead to properties becoming more reasonably priced, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 42% of British Columbians think the actions of the provincial government will be effective in making housing more affordable in British Columbia, down 15 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in June 2020.  

More than two-in-five British Columbians (43%, +12) believe the government’s housing actions will be ineffective, while 16% (+4) are undecided.   Seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%, -7) agree with the government’s decision to implement a “speculation tax” in specific urban areas targeting foreign and domestic homeowners who pay little or no income tax in the province, and those who own second properties that are not long-term rentals.  

Public support for the “speculation tax” reaches 77% among British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the 2020 provincial election, 73% among those who supported the BC Green Party and 67% among those who cast ballots for the BC Liberals.  

Three-in-four of the province’s residents endorse the decision to increase the foreign buyers tax from 15% to 20% (75%, -4) and to expand the foreign buyers tax to areas located outside of Metro Vancouver (also 75%, -4).  

More than two thirds of British Columbians agree with the introduction of a tax of 0.2% on the value of homes between $3 million and $4 million, and a tax rate of 0.4% on the portion of a home’s value that exceeds $4 million (69%, -7) and with the decision to increase the property transfer tax from 3% to 5% for homes valued at more than $3 million. The 5% portion only applies to the value greater than $3 million (67%, -5).  

New Zealand passed legislation that effectively banned most foreigners from purchasing real estate in the country. There are exceptions for foreigners who hold residency status in New Zealand, as well as citizens from Australia and Singapore, due to existing free trade agreements.  

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (72%, -6) would like to see similar legislation implemented in Canada in order to ban most foreigners from purchasing real estate in the country.  

Support for this type of legislation is highest among women (75%), British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (74%), residents of Northern BC (90%) and BC NDP voters (78%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on June 1 and June 2, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Support Paid Leave for Couples After Miscarriage

Across the country, 13% of Canadians say themselves or their partner have experienced a miscarriage.

Vancouver, BC [June 4, 2021] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians are in favour of allowing people who have experienced a pregnancy loss to have paid time off from work, a new Research Co. poll has found.

New Zealand’s Parliament recently voted to pass legislation that would allow couples who go through a miscarriage or stillbirth to have three days of paid leave.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 78% of Canadians support enacting similar legislation in Canada, while only 10% are opposed and 13% are undecided.

Support for allowing paid leave to people who experience a pregnancy loss reaches 80% among women, 81% among Canadians aged 55 and over, and 83% among British Columbians.

Across the country, 13% of Canadians say themselves or their partner have experienced a miscarriage, defined as the loss of a pregnancy before 20 weeks of gestation. In addition, about one-in-five say they know a family member (19%) or a friend (18%) who went through this complication.

Fewer Canadians have faced two other setbacks. Just under one-in-ten (8%) report that themselves or their partner experienced infertility, or trying to get pregnant for at least a year with no success, and 3% endured a stillbirth, defined as the loss of a pregnancy after 20 weeks of gestation.

Most Canadians who have experienced miscarriage and/or stillbirth say they received enough information and support from their family (70%) and their friends (66%). The numbers are lower for their family doctor or general practitioner (58%) and their workplace (41%).

Three-in-ten Canadians (30%) who endured a miscarriage or stillbirth state that their family doctor did not provide enough information and support after the loss, while one-in-four (24%) feel the same way about their workplace.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 17 to May 19, 2021, among 1,000 Canadian adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Little Momentum as British Columbia Drivers Ponder Electric Cars

Residents of Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley are more likely to say that their next vehicle will be electric.

Vancouver, BC [June 1, 2021] – Over the past two years, there has been a negligible increase in the proportion of drivers in British Columbia who acknowledge that their next car will probably be electric, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 53% of British Columbians who drive their own cars say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that the next vehicle they acquire for themselves or their household will be electric, up two points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2019.

Male drivers are more likely to lean towards acquiring an electric vehicle (56%) than their female counterparts (51%). Three-in-five drivers aged 35-to-54 (60%) are likely to buy an electric vehicle, along with 57% of those aged 18-to-34 and 47% of those aged 55 and over.

Drivers who voted for the BC Green Party in last year’s provincial election are more likely to be seriously considering an electric vehicle (66%) than those who cast ballots for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (56%) or the BC Liberals (51%).

“There are some major regional differences when it comes to the appetite of drivers in British Columbia for electric vehicles,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 59% of those who reside in Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley foresee their next vehicle being electric, fewer feel the same way in Southern BC (42%), Vancouver Island (also 42%) and Northern BC (41%).”

More than a quarter of drivers in British Columbia say they are less likely to purchase an electric vehicle because they are too expensive when compared to non-electric options (27%, +3) and because they fear becoming stranded if they cannot find a charging station (also 27%, +3).

More than one-in-five drivers are also worried about not having enough places to charge the vehicle in the areas where they usually drive (23%, -2) and not having a place to charge the vehicle where they currently live (22%, +2). Only 6% of drivers (-1) are deterred by the “feel” of the vehicle compared with a non-electric option.

While only 22% of drivers who reside in the Fraser Valley say that a perceived lack of charging stations would make them less likely to purchase an electric vehicle in the future, the proportion rises to 24% in Metro Vancouver, 25% in Vancouver Island, 28% in Southern BC and 35% in Northern BC.

The Government of British Columbia has passed legislation to ensure that, by the year 2040, all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province will be “zero emission.” As was the case in 2019, 70% of residents are in favour of this decision.

A majority of British Columbians (51%, +2) think the goal established by the provincial government on the issue of “zero emission” vehicles is “achievable”, while 36% (-6) believe it is “not achievable.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 23 to May 25, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 
Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 
 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Vaccine Rollout Opinions Improve in Some Canadian Provinces

Almost two thirds of respondents think the goal to inoculate every willing Canadian by the end of September 2021 will be attained.

Vancouver, BC [May 28, 2021] – The perceptions of Canadians on the way COVID-19 vaccination efforts are advancing have improved markedly this month, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 57% of Canadians are satisfied with the procurement of COVID-19 vaccine doses from the federal government, up nine points since a similar survey conducted in March 2021.

Majorities of Canadians are also content with the vaccination plans and phases outlined by their province (61%, +7) and with the pace of vaccination efforts in their province (58%, +10).

“The same regional differences that we currently see across Canada when it comes to COVID-19 management are also present on the vaccine rollout,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While more than three-in-five residents of Quebec (69%) and British Columbia (62%) are satisfied with the pace of vaccination efforts, only 48% of those in Ontario and Alberta feel the same way.”

In December 2020, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) stated that it expected to have enough COVID-19 vaccine doses to inoculate every willing Canadian by the end of September 2021.  

Almost two thirds of Canadians (65%) believe the vaccination goal outlined by the PHAC will be attained, up 20 points since a similar survey completed in February 2020.  

This month, 83% of Canadians say they have already been vaccinated against COVID-19, or plan to have a first shot when it becomes available to them, while 13% will “definitely” or “probably” not get inoculated—including 20% of those who voted for Conservative Party candidates in the 2019 federal election.  

More than four-in-five Canadians (84%, +1) agree with regulations that require all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask while inside.  

Three-in-four Canadians (75%, -2) say they wear a mask every time they go out, a proportion thar rises to 82% among women and 80% among Canadians aged 55 and over.  

Sizeable proportions of Canadians continue to endorse specific measures to deal with COVID-19, including keeping the border with the United States closed to non-essential travel (80%, -3) and placing all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period (79%, -3). In addition, 74% (=) would prohibit non-essential travel from one province to another and 67% (-1) would prohibit non-essential travel inside provinces.  

Just under a third of Canadians say they are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection (30%, +1) and acknowledge they are overeating or eating more than usual at home (29%, +4).  

Fewer Canadians admit to losing their temper more than usual at home (20%, including 28% of those aged 18-to-34), having a bath or shower less often than before the pandemic (16%, -1), not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection (15%, -4), drinking more alcohol than usual at home (13%, -1) and brushing their teeth less often than before the pandemic (11%, but rising to 21% among Albertans).  

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 17 to May 19, 2021, among 1,000 Canadian adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Views on Governments Falter as Canadians See Pandemic’s End

Ontarians and Albertans are the least likely to express confidence in the measures implemented by their provincial administrations.

Vancouver, BC [May 25, 2021] – For the first time since the start of the pandemic, a majority of Canadians believe the most vicious moments of COVID-19 have passed, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 55% of Canadians think the worst of the COVID-19 outbreak is behind us, up eight points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in March.

Conversely, 27% of Canadians think the worst of the pandemic is ahead of us, down six points in two months.

Just over half of Canadians (51%) are satisfied with how the federal government has managed the pandemic, unchanged since March. The numbers are similar for provincial governments (52%, -1) and municipal governments (55%, +1).

Among the four most populous provinces, the satisfaction rating remains below the 50% threshold in Ontario (42%, -3) and Alberta (34%, -3). More than three-in-five residents of British Columbia (62%, -3) and Quebec (61%, +3) are content with how their governments have managed COVID-19.

 

Almost half of Canadians (46%) think the measures that are currently in place in their province to deal with COVID-19 are correct for the situation. While three-in-ten (29%) believe the measures do not go far enough, one-in-five (19%) claim they go too far.

“Residents of Ontario and Alberta are more likely to be dissatisfied with the measures implemented to deal with COVID-19,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Just over a third of residents in each jurisdiction endorse the course of action outlined by their provincial governments.”

Canadians were also asked about the level of confidence they have in their provincial government to handle specific tasks.

Majorities of respondents trust their provincial administration to release accurate (61%) and complete (56%) information about COVID-19 cases and hospitalization rates to the media and the public.

Most Canadians also trust their provincial administrations to respond to a natural disaster (60%), establish public health guidelines and restrictions (58%) and ensure the sustainability of the health care system (55%). Fewer respondents (43%) express confidence in their provincial government to spend tax dollars wisely.

On the matter of establishing public health guidelines, the level of confidence is highest in British Columbia (66%), followed by Quebec (63%), Atlantic Canada (also 63%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (58%), Ontario (52%) and Alberta (45%).

Across the country, 84% of Canadians believe that COVID-19 is “definitely” or “probably” a real threat, while 12% disagree with this assessment.

Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election are more likely to be skeptical of the threat posed by COVID-19 (20%) than those who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP) (11%) or the Liberal Party (8%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 17 to May 19, 2021, among 1,000 Canadian adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Six Communities Endorse South Fraser Community Rail Project

Almost four-in-five residents say they are likely to rely on the service for work or leisure, including 81% of those who drive a vehicle.

Vancouver, BC [May 20, 2021] – A proposal to reactivate a rail corridor for daily passenger service using hydrogen powered trains is very popular among residents of six British Columbia municipalities, a new Research Co. poll conducted on behalf of the South Fraser Community Rail Society has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of residents of six provincial communities, 88% of respondents say they support the South Fraser Community Rail project.

At least three-in-four respondents in each community are in favour of the project, including 93% in Abbotsford, 89% in Chilliwack, 85% in North Delta, 83% in North Surrey, 82% in the Township of Langley and 76% in the City of Langley.

The South Fraser Community Rail project would rely on a publicly owned 99 km operating corridor (known as the Interurban Corridor) available with passenger rights saved and protected by a previous provincial government at no cost for its use between the Pattullo Bridge SkyTrain Station and the City of Chilliwack.

The South Fraser Community Rail project would connect 16 cities and communities, eight First Nations communities, 14 post-secondary Institutions, Industrial Parks and the Abbotsford International Airport.

Almost four-in-five respondents in the six communities (78%) say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to rely on the service once it becomes operational—including 88% of those who commute using public transit and 81% of those who drive to school or work.

In the survey, only 32% of respondents think the Express Bus being used on the Highway 1 corridor from Chilliwack to the Carvolth Exchange in Langley fits the needs of the community and no other public transit alternative is required at this time.

Nine-in-ten respondents who have taken the Express Bus on Highway 1 (90%) support the South Fraser Community Rail project.

More than half of respondents say they are more likely to support the project because it will be good for the environment since it relies on a Hydrogen propulsion system, with zero greenhouse gas emissions (56%) and because it would allow for a commute time of 90 minutes from Chilliwack to the Pattulo Bridge—a significantly quicker commute time than the 135 minutes plus transfer time to cover the same distance with existing transit services (53%).

Practically half of respondents say they are more likely to support the project because one South Fraser Community Rail train would potentially remove 160 vehicles from Highway 1 (49%) and because the project will take three years to implement—a significantly quicker delivery timeframe than any other potential option (also 49%).

More than two-in-five respondents (44%) say they are more likely to support the project because it will cost an estimated $1.38 billion for 99 km —significantly less expensive than any other Inter-regional transit option.

Almost nine-in-ten respondents (87%) believe there must be a reactivated environmentally friendly Interurban passenger rail transit option while Highway 1 is currently being widened in stages.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 5 to May 8, 2021, among a representative sample of 800 adults in North Delta, North Surrey, City of Langley, Township of Langley, Abbotsford and Chilliwack. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Vancouverites Back Temporary Bike Lane in Stanley Park

Almost two thirds of Vancouver residents support having separated bike lanes in the city.

Vancouver, BC [May 18, 2021] – The authorization of a temporary bike lane on Park Drive in Stanley Park has been met with approval by a majority of City of Vancouver residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative municipal sample, almost three-in-five Vancouverites (59%) think allowing the temporary bike lane until the end of October 2021 is a “very good” or “good” idea, while 29% deem it a “bad” or “very bad” idea.

Agreement with the temporary bike lane in Stanley Park is highest among women (62%), people aged 18-to-34 (69%) and Downtown residents (64%).

Majorities of Vancouverites whose weekday commute involves cycling (79%), using public transit (75%) or driving (53%) are also in favour of the decision made by the Vancouver Park Board.

Almost two thirds of Vancouver residents (64%) say they support having separated bike lanes in the city, down five points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November 2019.

Residents aged 18-to-34 are more likely to support having separated bike lanes in Vancouver (67%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (54%) and aged 55 and over (47%).

Majorities of Vancouverites of European (68%), South Asian (65%) and East Asian descent (58%) are in favour of having separated bike lanes in the city.

Just over two-in-five Vancouverites (41%, +1) think the city currently has the right number of separated bike lanes—including 38% of Downtown residents, 41% of those who live East of Main Street and 43% of those who reside West of Main Street.

Almost three-in-ten residents (28%, -2) believe there are now too many separated bike lanes and some should be removed, while more than one-in-five (22%, +1) say there are not enough separated bike lanes and more should be added.

“Cycling infrastructure remains a polarizing issue for Vancouverites of different generations,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 19% of residents aged 18-to-34 think the city currently has too many separated bike lanes, the proportion rises to 32% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 36% among those aged 55 and over.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 5 to May 7, 2021, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Money and Health Worries Are Making Canadians Lose Sleep

Three-in-five Canadians (60%) fall below the recommended sleep guidelines on weekdays or workdays.

Vancouver, BC [May 11, 2021] – Canadians who are having a difficult time falling asleep at night have two major concerns on their minds, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 43% of Canadians say financial matters made it harder for them to fall asleep at night over the past month, while 36% mention health.

Since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in December 2019, the proportion of Canadians who found it challenging to fall asleep on account of financial matters fell by six points, while those worried about health increased by seven points.

One third of Canadians (32%, =) had a hard time falling asleep on account of relationship and family concerns, while fewer were worried about work (24%, +1), Canadian politics and issues (10%< +4) and international politics and issues (9%, +3).

“More than two-in-five Canadians aged 55 and over (44%) had no trouble falling asleep over the past month,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers drop dramatically among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (23%) and aged 18-to-34 (17%).”

Millennials are significantly more likely to have a difficult time falling asleep due to financial matters (53%) and work (42%) than Baby Boomers (31% and 7% respectively).

Health Canada guidelines recommend sleeping from 7 to 9 hours a night. Across the country, 60% of Canadians are sleeping for fewer than 7 hours on weekdays or workdays, down four points since 2019. Just under half of Canadians (49%, -2) are sleeping for fewer than 7 hours on a weekend or non-workday.

There is little change since 2019 on the feeling Canadians have after waking up each morning. Almost one-in-five respondents (18%, +1) say they are “very well rested” after a typical night’s sleep on a weekday or workday, and a majority (52%, -1) are “moderately well rested.” 

About a third of women (33%), Canadians aged 35-to-54 (34%), Atlantic Canadians (also 34%) and residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 34%) deem themselves “not too well rested” or “not well rested at all” when a new workday or weekday arrives.

After a typical night’s sleep on a weekend or non-workday, the proportion of Canadians who claim to feel “very well rested” or “moderately well rested” remains at 75%.

Just over two-in-five Canadians (41%, +2) continue to say that they have a difficult time falling asleep at least 3 days a week. A slightly smaller proportion (35%, -1) find it difficult to slumber for 1 or 2 days each week, while one-in-four (24%, -1) never have problems. 

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from May 1 to May 3, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Endorse “Vaccine Passports” for Mass Gatherings

Majorities of residents think the concept is a “good idea” for sporting events, concerts, plays and movies.

Vancouver, BC [May 7, 2021] – More than half of Canadians are in favour of a “Vaccine Passport” that would allow crowds to assemble during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 57% of Canadians think it is a good idea to rely on a “Vaccine Passport” to be able to go to live sporting events as a spectator.

“Vaccine Passports” would essentially amount to “Proof of Vaccination” certificates for people who have been inoculated against COVID-19.

“Almost three-in-five residents of British Columbia, Alberta and Ontario (59%) support the concept to be put in place for live sporting events,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than half of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (57%), Quebec (56%) and Atlantic Canada (51%) concur.”

Majorities of Canadians are also in favour of “Vaccine Passports” for people to be able to go to live concerts as a spectator (56%) and to be able to go to the theatre or cinema (55%).

The “Vaccine Passport” is more popular when Canadians are asked about trips in three different iterations. Almost two thirds of respondents (64%) believe the concept is a good idea for travel to other countries, while 54% endorse it for trips to other Canadian provinces and 54% for travel inside their own province.

Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election are more likely to support the use of a “Vaccine Passport” for trips inside their own province (63%) than those who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (54%) and the Conservative Party (53%).

While two thirds of Canadians aged 55 and over (66%) are in favour of “Vaccine Passports” for travel to other Canadian provinces, the level of support drops to 57% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 56% among those aged 18-to-34.

The level of support is slightly lower—although still a majority—for the use of “Vaccine Passports” to be able to visit a gym or fitness facility (54%) and to be able to work at an office (52%).

Canadians who voted for the Conservatives in 2019 are less likely to support the concept of “Vaccine Passports” for offices (49%) than those who voted for the New Democrats (55%) and the Liberals (61%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from May 1 to May 3, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Comfortable Banking and Shopping Online

More than half of the province’s residents have been targeted by “phishing” and scam emails.

Vancouver, BC [May 4, 2021] – While most British Columbians are having little trouble taking part in specific activities online, practically half are worried about the possibility of their devices being hacked, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 87% of British Columbians claim to be “very” or “moderately” comfortable shopping and accessing banking information online.

Fewer of the province’s residents express the same level of comfort when making charitable donations online (73%) or commenting on an online forum that requires their email address (54%).

More than three-in-four British Columbians are accessing banking information (88%), visiting websites or blogs (87%), looking for deals on websites (79%) and using an instant messaging service (77%) at least a few times per month.

Fewer of the province’s residents are also looking for directions and/or maps to get to a destination (69%), purchasing goods from a website (60%), using the Internet to place telephone calls (60%) posting on social media (59%) or uploading pictures or videos to the Internet (50%) at least a few times per month.

More than half of British Columbians (53%) have worried “frequently” or “occasionally” over the past couple of months about having their personal information stolen over the Internet (53%). Similar proportions of residents are concerned about computers and technology being used to invade their privacy (52%) and somebody hacking into their own computer or smartphone (49%).

Fewer than one-in-four British Columbians (23%) say they have only one email address, while 41% have two and 35% have three or more. 

Three in five British Columbians (61%) say they have received “phishing” emails, where somebody attempts to acquire personal information by masquerading as a trustworthy entity. More than half (54%) received an email offering them money for their help and assistance, in what is usually referred to as the “Nigerian scam.” 

Fewer of the province’s residents acknowledge that their computer became infected with a virus while they were browsing the Internet (31%) or had their email address or social media platform hacked (15% each).

Across the province, 62% of British Columbians say they have typed their name on Google to see what has been posted about them on the Internet—including 65% of women and 72% of Vancouver Islanders.

More than half of British Columbians who Googled themselves (55%) claim that the information they found was accurate, while 13% say it was inaccurate (13%). One third (32%) did not find any information about themselves.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from April 20 to April 22, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canada’s Moral Compass Relatively Unchanged Since 2020

Almost two thirds of Canadians (65%) believe physician-assisted death is “morally acceptable.”

Vancouver, BC [April 30, 2021] – While many Canadians continue to have no moral qualms when assessing issues such as divorce or contraception, opinions are noticeably different on matters such as polygamy or infidelity, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample asked Canadians whether they considered 21 different issues as “morally acceptable” or “morally wrong.”

More than seven-in-ten Canadians think divorce (77%, up six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2020), contraception (76%, +1) and sexual relations between an unmarried man and woman (72%, +2) are “morally acceptable.”

More than half of Canadians consider five other issues as “morally acceptable”: having a baby outside of marriage (69%, +1), physician-assisted death (65%, +3), sexual relations between two people of the same sex (62%, +1), abortion (57%, +1), gambling (also 57%, +7) and medical research using stem cells obtained from human embryos (55%, +6).

“Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election are more likely to express moral reservations about specific issues related to human interaction,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Tory voters are significantly below the national average on accepting sexual relations between two people of the same sex (54%).”

More than three-in-ten Canadians believe the death penalty (39%, -1), buying and wearing clothing made of animal fur (38%, +6), prostitution (33%, =) and pornography (31%, -5) are “morally acceptable.”

While almost half of residents of Alberta (48%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (46%) believe the death penalty is “morally acceptable”, the proportion drops in British Columbia (38%), Quebec (37%), Atlantic Canada (also 37%) and Ontario (36%).

As was the case last year, Canadian men are more likely to say that prostitution and pornography are “morally acceptable” (40% and 39% respectively) than their female counterparts (27% and 24% respectively).

Fewer than one-in-four Canadians believe eight other issues are “morally acceptable”: medical testing on animals (24%, +2), using illegal drugs (20%, -1), cloning animals (19%, =), polygamy (19%, +2), suicide (18%, -4), married men and/or women having an affair (18%, +4), cloning humans (12%, +2) and paedophilia (5%, +2).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from April 16 to April 18, 2021 among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Five Americans Want Obamacare to Remain in Place

By a 2-to-1 margin, Americans would prefer to establish a national, publicly funded healthcare system.

Vancouver, BC [April 27, 2021] – A majority of Americans believe the Affordable Care Act should continue to exist, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The U.S. Supreme Court is scheduled to rule on the validity of the Affordable Care Act—sometimes referred to as Obamacare—in the next few months. 

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 61% of Americans say they would prefer for the Affordable Care Act to remain in place, while 28% would like to see the legislation repealed.

While 83% of Democrats and 60% of Independents support keeping the Affordable Care Act, only 41% of Republicans concur.

Almost three-in-five Americans (59%) agree with the United States moving to establish a national, publicly funded healthcare system, similar to the ones that currently exist in Canada and some European countries, while 30% disagree and 12% are not sure.

Support for this type of system is highest among men (65%), Americans aged 18-to-34 (67%), and residents of the West (70%).

“Seven-in-ten Americans who voted for Joe Biden last year (70%) are in favour of a move towards a national, publicly funded healthcare system,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Americans who voted for Donald Trump last year are deeply divided on this topic, with 45% agreeing and 47% disagreeing.”

Three-in-four Americans (75%) say they are “very confident” or “moderately confident” that America’s healthcare system would be there to provide the help and assistance that they would need if they had to face an unexpected medical condition or disease.

In addition, 71% of Americans say the healthcare system currently meets their needs and the needs of their family—a proportion that rises to 75% among men, 73% among Americans aged 55 and over and 76% among residents of the Northeast.

More than half of Americans (53%) approve of Joe Biden’s performance as president, while 42% disapprove and 5% are undecided.

Biden’s numbers are significantly high among Democrats (85%) but drop to 55% among Independents and to 21% among Republicans.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from April 23 to April 25, 2021, among 1,000 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Fake News and Racism Prevalent in Canada’s Social Media Feeds

More than one-in-four users say they posted something on social media that they deleted after thinking it over twice.

Vancouver, BC [April 23, 2021] – The past two years have not brought a significant change in the amount of offensive content Canadians encounter on their social media feeds, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of social media users, 27% of Canadian respondents say they found racist content or comments on their feed in the past year, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September 2019.

Slightly smaller proportions of Canadian social media users found content or comments offensive to people with disabilities (20%, =) or homophobic content (19%, -2) on their feed over the past 12 months.

“Only 17% of Canadian social media users aged 55 and over say they were exposed to racist content in the past year,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The problem is more prevalent among those aged 35-to-54 (24%) and those aged 18-to-34 (39%).” 

More than a quarter of Canadian social media users (27%, +6) say they posted something on social media over the past year that they deleted after thinking it over twice—including 30% of women and 38% of British Columbians.

While 23% of Canadian social media users reported someone for offensive content or comments, the proportion rises to 34% among those aged 18-to34.

Almost two-in-five Canadians (39%) say they found links to stories on current affairs that were obviously false (sometimes referred to as “Fake News”) on their feed in the past 12 months.

Social media users in Ontario are more likely to report being exposed to “Fake News” (47%) than their counterparts in British Columbia (39%), Atlantic Canada (36%), Alberta (33%), Quebec (also 33%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (32%).

Seven-in-ten Canadian social media users (71%, +1) claim is difficult to discern which accounts are real and which ones are fake, including 78% of those aged 55 and over.

Majorities of Canadian social media users are also in favour of banning “anonymous” accounts to only allow people to comment and post if they use their real name and likeness (69%, +1) and bringing an end to “creeping” by always allowing users to see who has viewed their profiles, photos and posts (65%, +5).

Three-in-five social media users (60%, -3) think politicians who have a social media account should not be able to block users from engaging with them.

Support for the notion of politicians not blocking social media users is highest in British Columbia (62%), followed by Alberta (61%), Ontario (also 61%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (60%), Atlantic Canada (also 60%) and Quebec (56%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from April 16 to April 18, 2021, among 845 adult social media users in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.4 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Remain Supportive of Marijuana Legalization

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians are in favour of legalizing other substances, such as cocaine, heroin and fentanyl.

Vancouver, BC [April 20, 2021] – Most Canadians hold favourable views on the legalization of cannabis in the country, but a sizeable proportion of consumers is not acquiring the product at licensed retailers, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 64% of Canadians agree with marijuana being legal in Canada, while 28% disagree and 7% are undecided.

Men (68%), Canadians aged 18-to-34 (71%) and Atlantic Canadians (74%) are more likely to voice agreement with the legal status of cannabis in the country.

The level of support for making other substances readily available for consumers is significantly smaller. Only 16% of Canadians believe the time is right to legalize powder cocaine. Similar proportions feel the same way about heroin (15%), ecstasy (14%), fentanyl (also 14%), crack cocaine (13%) and methamphetamine or “crystal meth” (also 13%). 

Just over half of Canadians (51%) say they have not consumed marijuana in the country. Almost two-in-five (38%) say they tried cannabis before it became legal in October 2018, while 11% only used it after legalization.

Canadians who have consumed marijuana after legalization where asked where they bought their product. Just under two-in-five (38%) say they acquired “all” of their cannabis at a licensed retailer. 

Three-in-ten Canadian marijuana consumers (31%) say they bought “some” or “all” of their product at a licensed retailer, while 20% say “none” of it came from a licensed retailer.

“There are some significant generational differences in the behaviour of marijuana consumers in Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Those aged 18-to-34 are more likely to say that all of their cannabis was bought at a licensed retailer, while the numbers drop significantly among those aged 55 and over.”

More than tree-in-five Canadians (61%) think companies should be able to administer “drug tests” to any employee now that marijuana is legal, even if they do not operate machinery (such as pilots, truck drivers or crane operators). 

Support for these “drug tests” is highest in Atlantic Canada (70%), followed by Saskatchewan and Manitoba (66%), Alberta (63%), British Columbia (61%), Quebec (60%) and Ontario (57%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on April 11 and April 12, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Inching Closer to a True Work-Life Balance

More than a third of employed residents of the province (35%, -7 since 2019) say work has put a strain on their relationships.

Vancouver, BC [April 16, 2021] – The number of employed British Columbians who feel they are doing a good job managing their jobs and their leisure time has increased over the past two years, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 41% of employed British Columbians claim to have achieved a perfect balance between work and lifestyle, up eight points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in April 2019.

Conversely, 45% of employed British Columbians (-8) think work has become more important than lifestyle, while only 10% (-2) believe lifestyle is taking precedence over work.

“While the province-wide numbers may point to an improvement for the workforce of British Columbia, some generational differences prevail,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 32% of those aged 55 and over are putting their careers ahead of everything else, compared to 47% among those aged 35-to-54 and 50% among those aged 18-to-34.”

Almost two-in-five employed British Columbians (39%, -2) believe it is harder for them to achieve a work-life balance than it was for their parents, while 16% (-3) think this task is now easier.

More than a third of employed British Columbians (35%, -12) say they had to stay late after work in the past six months, while just under three-in-ten (28%, +3) had to take a work-related call on their mobile phone while they were with family or friends.

One in four employed British Columbians were compelled to reply to a work-related e-mail while they were with family or friends (24%, -4) or had to work from home on a weekend (24%, =). 

Slightly fewer employed British Columbians had to work from home at night (22%, +1) or missed a “lifestyle” engagement (like a virtual or live family gathering or leisure activity) because they had to work (17%, -12).

Across the province, 35% of British Columbians acknowledge that their work has put a strain on their relationships with family and friends, down seven points since April 2019.

Employed British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are significantly more likely to admit that their relationships are suffering because of their jobs (48%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (37%) and aged 55 and over (15%). 

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from April 3 to April 6, 2021, among 650 adults in British Columbia who are employed full time or part time. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Than Half of British Columbians Using Apps to File Their Taxes

Almost three-in-five residents (57%) say they dislike having to pay the Provincial Sales Tax (PST).

Vancouver, BC [April 13, 2021] – Most British Columbians will file their taxes by themselves, but with the help of software or apps, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 52% of British Columbians intend to use this method during this fiscal year.

Just over one-in-five British Columbians (21%) will file their taxes through an accountant or firm, while 13% plan to rely on a tax preparation company and 11% will file by themselves, but without requiring any software or apps.

“The pandemic has not changed the way British Columbians file their taxes,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There are minimal fluctuations when we compare this year’s methods to what respondents did in 2020.”

Half of British Columbians (50%) think the provincial income tax they pay is too high, while 41% consider it adequate. 

Women (58%), British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (63%) and residents of Northern BC (66%) are more likely to feel that the provincial income tax is too high.

A higher proportion of the province’s residents think three other taxes are currently too high: the Goods and Services Tax (GST) (51%), the federal income tax (55%) and the Provincial Sales Tax (57%).

Almost three-in-five British Columbians (57%) say they dislike having to pay the PST, while 37% do not mind and 5% are not sure.

The level of animosity from British Columbians is lower for paying the GST (56%), the provincial income tax (48%) and the federal income tax (46%).

While only 41% of British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in last year’s provincial election dislike having to pay the provincial income tax, the proportion rises to 46% among those who voted for the BC Greens and 49% among those who voted for the BC Liberals.

Almost two thirds of British Columbians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election (65%) say they dislike paying the federal income tax. The proportion falls to 44% among federal NDP voters and to 40% among Liberal voters.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from March 19 to March 21, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Agree with Supreme Court on Carbon Tax Decision

More than three-in-five Canadians (62%) say they are personally concerned about climate change.

Vancouver, BC [April 9, 2021] – The recent ruling by the Supreme Court of Canada that upheld the federal government’s carbon tax plan is supported by a majority of the country’s residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 57% of Canadians agree with the court’s decision, while 29% disagree and 13% are undecided.

The Supreme Court stated that the federal government is free to impose minimum pricing standards due to the threat posed by climate change. 

Support for the Supreme Court’s ruling is highest in Quebec (64%), followed by British Columbia (58%), Atlantic Canada (also 58%), Ontario (57%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (50%) and Alberta (47%).

Across the country, 45% of Canadians say that the carbon tax has negatively affected the finances of their household. This includes majorities of men (51%), Albertans (58%) and Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election (65%).

Canadians are divided on whether the introduction of a carbon tax has led people to be more mindful of their carbon consumption and change their behaviour. While 42% of Canadians believe this to be the case, 44% disagree and 15% are not sure.

“The notion of a carbon tax modifying the habits of Canadians is more prevalent among those who voted for the Liberals (71%) and the New Democrats (70%) in the last federal election,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 32% of Canadians who voted for the Conservatives share this point of view.”

The survey provided respondents with a list of 10 different environmental issues. More than three-in-five Canadians say they are personally concerned about four different matters: air pollution (64%), the pollution of rivers, lakes and reservoirs (62%), global warming or climate change (also 62%) and the pollution of drinking water (61%).

Fewer Canadians are personally concerned about six other environmental issues: the contamination of soil and water by toxic waste (53%), the extinction of plant and animal species (52%), deforestation or the clearance of naturally occurring forests (51%), the loss of tropical rain forests (50%), the depletion of fish stocks through overfishing (44%) and the maintenance of the supply of fresh water for household needs (also 44%).

Almost half of Canadians (47%) think the federal government is not paying enough attention to the environment—a proportion that rises to 54% among Atlantic Canadians and 50% among both Quebecers and British Columbians.

Similar proportions of Canadians also think their provincial government (51%) and their municipal government (48%) are not focusing on the environment as much as they should.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on April 2 and April 3, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Satisfaction with COVID-19 Management Falls Across Canada

Fewer than half of Ontarians and Albertans are content with the way their provincial governments have handled the pandemic.

Vancouver, BC [April 5, 2021] – The proportion of Canadians who are pleased with the way the federal government has managed the pandemic has dropped to the lowest level recorded, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 51% of Canadians are satisfied with the way the federal government has dealt with COVID-19, down seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January.

A slightly higher proportion of Canadians are content with how their municipal governments (54%, -6) and their own provincial government (53%, -5) have handled the pandemic.

British Columbia continues to have the highest level of satisfaction among the four most populous provinces (65%, -7), followed by Quebec (58%, -7). The rating is significantly lower for Ontario (45%, -8) and Alberta (37%, +3).

Almost half of Canadians (47%, +14) think the worst of the pandemic is “definitely” or “probably” behind us, while one third (33%, -17) believe the worst of COVID-19 is “definitely” or “probably” ahead of us.

Practically four-in-five Canadians (79%, +5) are either already vaccinated against COVID-19 or will “definitely” or “probably” be inoculated when they get the chance, while 14% (-2) would not and 8% (-1) are not sure.

In December 2020, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) stated that it expected to have enough COVID-19 vaccine doses to inoculate every willing Canadian by the end of September 2021.

This month, half of Canadians (50%, +5 since a similar Research Co. survey completed in February) think the September vaccination goal set by the PHAC will be attained, while almost two-in-five (38%, -8) believe it will not be reached.

Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election are significantly more likely to think that the federal government’s vaccination goal will be attained (66%) than those who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (48%) and the Conservative Party (35%).

A majority of Canadians (54%, +3) are content with the vaccination plans and phases outlined by their province. The level of satisfaction on this matter is highest in Quebec (64%, +11), followed by Atlantic Canada (63%, +9), British Columbia (57%, +1), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (53%, -4), Alberta (46%, +4) and Ontario (44%, -1).

The results are lower when Canadians are asked about the pace of vaccination efforts in their province. Almost half of Canadians (48%, +7) are satisfied, while 41% (-8) are dissatisfied.

Quebec also has the highest level of satisfaction on the pace of vaccination efforts (60%, +14), followed by Atlantic Canada (56%, +14), British Columbia (50%, +5), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (46%, +6), Alberta (45%,+8) and Ontario (37%, +3).

Almost half of Canadians (48%, +2) are content with the procurement of vaccines from the federal government, while 43% (=) are not. 

While sizeable proportions of Canadians continue to voice support for specific travel restrictions, the proportions are lower this month than in January.

More than four-in-five Canadians are in favour of keeping the border with the United States closed to non-essential travel (83%, -5) and placing all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period (82%, -8).

In addition, 74% of Canadians (-6) are in favour of forbidding non-essential travel from one province to another, and 66% (-6) agree with prohibiting non-essential travel inside their own province.

More than four-in-five Canadians (83%, -5) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside.

There is a slight drop in the proportion of Canadians who are wearing a mask every time they go out (77%, -4). Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to always be taking this measure (83%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (77%) and aged 18-to-34 (72%). 

Across the country, 29% of Canadians (=) are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection, while 19% (-2) are not ordering food from restaurants at all for the same reason.

Compared to January, fewer Canadians report overeating (25%, -5) or drinking alcohol more often at home (14%, -4). Almost one-in-five (18%, +1) admit that they are losing their temper more often.

One-in-ten Canadians (10%, =) continue to acknowledge that they are brushing their teeth less often than before COVID-19, while 17% (-1) are having showers or baths less often.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted on March 29 and March 30, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Support Boycotting the Beijing Winter Olympics

Almost half of Canadians think it is “not safe” to hold the Summer Olympics in Tokyo, Japan, later this year.

Vancouver, BC [April 1, 2021] – More than half of Canadians believe the country’s athletes should not take part in the 2022 Winter Olympics over China’s human rights record, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 54% of Canadians think the country should boycott the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing, while 24% believe it should not and 21% are not sure.

The 2022 Winter Olympics will be held in Beijing, China, in February of next year. Over the past few months, there have been calls for athletes and Olympic Committees around the world to boycott the games.

Support for a Canadian boycott of the next Winter Olympics is highest among men (57%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (61%), but also encompasses 51% of women, 53% of Canadians aged 18-to-34 and 50% of Canadians aged 35-to-54.

“The highest level of support for keeping Canadian athletes out of the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics is observed in Quebec (59%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is slightly lower in Alberta (56%), Ontario (54%), British Columbia (53%), Atlantic Canada (51%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (50%).”

Majorities of Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (62%), the Liberal Party (59%) and the Conservative Party (57%) in the 2019 federal election are in favour of a Canadian boycott of the 2022 Winter Olympics.

Support for a boycott of the Beijing Winter Olympics reaches 49% among Canadians of East Asian descent. Majorities of respondents who describe their ancestry as European (56%) or South Asian (67%) are also in agreement.

The 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, Japan, were postponed to 2021 on account of the COVID-19 pandemic. The organizers have decided that only spectators from Japan will be allowed to attend the event this year. Almost two thirds of Canadians (65%) support this decision, while 18% are opposed and 16% are not sure.

Almost half of Canadians (49%) think it is “not safe” to hold the Summer Olympics in Tokyo later this year—including 52% of women and 55% of Canadians aged 55 and over.

In a survey conducted by Research Co. in December 2020, 19% of Canadians held a positive opinion of China and 71% held a positive opinion of Japan. 

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on March 27 and March 28, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca