British Columbians Support More Action on Child Care

Nine-in-ten consider the investments to build a quality affordable child care system as “very important” or “moderately important.”

Vancouver, BC [June 13, 2019] – In an online survey of a representative provincial sample, 76% of British Columbians think the province should move more quickly to achieve the established goals of more affordable parent fees, more spaces, and better wages and education for those who work in child care settings, a new Research Co. poll conducted on behalf of the $10aDay Child Care Plan has found.

When parents who currently have a child enrolled in child care were asked about their experience, 64% said the current government investments are having a positive impact on their situation.

There is still more to be done, as 70% of parents report that their return to work was delayed because of lack of access to child care.

“British Columbians of all ages, regions and political allegiances agree that children, parents and employers benefit when there’s access to quality affordable child care,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co.

Two thirds of British Columbians (66%) believe the provincial government should continue to put a priority on public funding for child care, to make it more affordable and available for families. 

“Some parents are experiencing benefits of new investments in child care, but many families are still struggling when it comes to cost, finding a licensed space, and educators are still earning low wages—BC need further investments,” says Sharon Gregson, spokesperson for the $10aDay Child Care Plan.

Across the province, almost two-in-five parents who currently have a child in child care (38%) say they waited at least five months before a space became available for their child. Three-in-four parents (76%) say the cost of child care has put a financial strain on their families.

Four-in-five British Columbians (81%) believe that, when child care is affordable and available to parents, more mothers work and pay taxes. An even larger proportion of residents (86%) agree with the notion that having children today costs a lot more than it did 40 years ago.

About the $10aDay Child Care Plan

Since 2011, supporters across the province have advanced the $10aDay Child Care Plan as the solution to BC’s child care chaos calling for parent fees of no more than $10aDay, access to licensed spaces for all families who choose child care, and fair wages for early childhood educators.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 9 to May 12, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Sharon Gregson, $10aDay Child Care Plan.
[c] 604.505.5725
[e] info@10aday.ca

Canadians Are Comfortable Online, But Some Worries Remain

Seven-in-ten have received “scam” emails, and almost two thirds are concerned about someone hacking their devices.

Vancouver, BC [June 11, 2019] – While a large proportion of Canadians have embraced the Internet for banking and shopping, there are still lingering concerns about identity theft, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 87% of Canadians say they are comfortable accessing banking information online, and 86% feel the same way about shopping for goods and services online.

Just over four-in-five Canadians (82%) say they are comfortable commenting on online forums that require their email address, and 73% are comfortable making a charitable donation online.

“As expected, younger residents are less likely to have qualms about performing specific tasks on the Internet,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However, more than a third of Canadians aged 55 and over say they are not comfortable making charitable donations online.”

Over the past couple of months, 64% of Canadians have worried about somebody hacking into their own computer or smartphone. 

More than seven-in-ten Canadians have been concerned recently about computers and technology being used to invade their privacy (71%) and having their personal information stolen over the Internet (72%).

British Columbians (79%), Women (77%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (74%) are more likely to say they have worried about having their personal information stolen online.

Across the country, 72% of Canadians say they have received an email—sometimes referred to as the “Nigerian Scam”—offering them money for assistance or help, and 62% have received a “phishing” email, where somebody tried to acquire information by masquerading as a trustworthy entity.

One-in-five Canadians (20%) say their email address has been hacked at some point, and 4% say hackers took control of their social media platform.

Two-in-five Canadians (39%) say their computer became infected with a virus while they were browsing the Internet. Men are more likely to have acquired a virus online than women (44% to 34%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 31 to June 3, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Fewer Than Half of British Columbians Have an Emergency Kit

Three-in-four residents think an earthquake strong enough to damage buildings is “likely” to occur in the next 50 years.

Vancouver, BC [May 22, 2019] – Many British Columbians expect to face a destructive earthquake, but most have not assembled an emergency kit, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 76% of British Columbians say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that an earthquake strong enough to damage buildings will occur in the province in the next 50 years.

When asked about their level of concern about specific emergencies they might face, British Columbians place “a fire” (79%), “an earthquake” (68%), “high winds” (65%) and “intense rainfall” (61%) at the top of the list.

Fewer than three-in-five British Columbians are worried about being personally affected by “a flood” (57%), “heavy snowfall” (56%), “a toxic spill” (55%), “a terrorist attack” (54%), “a tsunami” (46%) or “a landslide” (also 46%).

Only 46% of British Columbians acknowledge having purchased or prepared an emergency kit with supplies they might need in case of an emergency.

“In spite of the high level of concern expressed about an earthquake affecting the province, more than half of British Columbians have not put together an emergency kit,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents aged 35-to-54 are doing better on this particular matter (55% have an emergency kit) than those aged 18-to-34 (45%) and those aged 55 and over (39%).”

Across the province, two-in-five residents (39%) have prepared an emergency plan that includes how to get in touch with family or friends in case of an emergency, and just over a third (35%) have established a meeting place with family or friends in case of an emergency.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 2 to May 5, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Five British Columbians Grow or Cultivate Plants at Home

More than half of the province’s home gardeners focus primarily on ornamental plants, while 29% are mostly growing food.

Vancouver, BC [May 17, 2019] – A majority of British Columbians can be safely described as home gardeners, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, three-in-five British Columbians (59%) say they currently grow or cultivate plants in their home, either indoors or outdoors.

The largest incidence of home gardeners is observed among British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (64%), residents of Northern BC (68%) and BC Green Party voters in the 2017 provincial election (70%).

More than half of the province’s home gardeners (56%) say they focus mostly on plants for ornamental purposes, while three-in-ten (29%) prefer to grow or cultivate plants for consumption, such as vegetables, fruits and herbs.

“There are some age discrepancies when it comes to the type of plants British Columbia’s home gardeners are interested in,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Growing plants that can be consumed is more popular among those aged 18-to-34 (53%), but less so among those aged 35-to-54 (31%) and those aged 55 and over (21%).”

One-in-four of British Columbia’s home gardeners (25%) say they spend less than $50 each year on gardening tools, plants and/or seeds. 

About two-in-five of British Columbia’s home gardeners (39%) allocate $50 to $100 a year for gardening, while more than a third (36%) spend more than $100 annually.

A majority of the province’s home gardeners (58%) say the plants they grow or cultivate are “about the same as most” in their neighbourhood, while 26% consider them “better” and 11% believe they are “worse.”

British Columbia’s home gardeners aged 18-to-34 (35%), men (30%) and those who reside in Southern BC (29%) are more likely to claim that their own plants are better than the ones grown by their neighbours.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 2 to May 5, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Metro Vancouver Commutes Pleasant, But Three-in-Ten Suffer

A majority of commuters (51%) would be willing to make less money if they can get a job that is closer to their home.

Vancouver, BC [May 14, 2019] – Metro Vancouverites who have to get to school or work on weekdays report different experiences from their commute, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two thirds of commuters in Metro Vancouver (68%) describe their weekday commute as “pleasant”, while three-in-ten (29%) consider it “annoying.”

While half of commuters in Metro Vancouver (49%) report no major changes in their trips to school or work compared to five years ago, 20% consider their commute “better” now, while 25% think it is “worse.”

“The mode of transportation plays a role in defining the perceptions of Metro Vancouver’s commuters,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Those who drive to school or work are more likely to say that their commute is now worse than in 2014 (31%) than those who take public transit (19%),” 

Commuters who say their trips to school or work are “very” or “moderately” pleasant are primarily satisfied with being in control of the entertainment (19%), dealing with traffic that is usually manageable (15%) and getting things done on the way, such as reading the paper or answering e-mails (14%).

Conversely, the aspects that frustrate annoyed commuters are traffic (28%), dealing with bad drivers (20%) and overcrowding at public transit vehicles (16%).

Four-in-five commuters in Metro Vancouver (81%) say living close to their workplace is important to them, and 78% concede that they would work from home more often if they could to avoid commuting.

Three-in-four commuters in Metro Vancouver (75%) would choose a prospective employer based on where the office they would work at is located. More than half would seriously consider moving from their current home if they changed jobs and had a longer commute (55%) and would be willing to make less money if they can get a job that is closer to their home (51%).

Commuters are divided on the issue of paying for tolls on roads and bridges if it guaranteed a shorter time to get to school or work, with 48% disagreeing with this course of action and 43% agreeing with it.

Almost half of commuters (48%) say their ideal choice to get to school or work would be to drive, while 28% would prefer to take public transit, 14% would walk and 7% would bike.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 29 to May 1, 2019, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca