Metro Vancouverites Ponder Bailouts for Tourism Sector

More than three-in-five agree with restaurants, cafés and bars being eligible for government-funded assistance.  

Vancouver, BC [May 1, 2020] – Residents of Metro Vancouver hold differing views on which businesses and corporations that are tied to the tourism industry should be buttressed with taxpayer money as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative sample, 78% of Metro Vancouverites believe that restaurants, cafés and bars that employ fewer than 10 people should be eligible for a government bailout.  

More than half of Metro Vancouverites would also consent to offer financial assistance to restaurants, cafés and bars that employ more than 10 people (76%), individual boutiques and stores (71%) and retail outlets that are part of a chain with five or more stores in the country (51%).  

“Metro Vancouverites appear particularly concerned with the pandemic leading to job losses in the restaurant sector,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 16% of residents believe small eateries should not receive financial assistance, and just 18% feel the same way about venues that employ more than 10 people.”  

At least two-in-five Metro Vancouverites believe taxi companies (47%), airlines (45%) and cruise ship operators (40%) should be eligible for a government-funded bailout.  

Residents of Vancouver and Surrey are more likely to favour government-funded assistance for airlines (47% and 46% respectively) than those who live in Burnaby (37%).  

Just over a third of Metro Vancouverites would consider a bailout for ride-hailing companies (35%), and just 27% would include Airbnb hosts on the same list.  

More than half of residents of Vancouver and Surrey (51%) are against ride-hailing companies being eligible for a government bailout, along with 46% of those in Burnaby and 58% of those who reside in other Metro Vancouver municipalities.  

Across Metro Vancouver, men are more likely than women to reject the notion of government assistance for Airbnb hosts (68% to 59%).  

While 53% of Metro Vancouverites aged 18-to-34 are opposed to bailing out Airbnb hosts, the proportion climbs to 69% among those aged 55 and over and 74% among those aged 35-to-54.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 24 to April 26, 2020, among 800 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Canadians Concerned About Savings and Investments

More than a third have worried “frequently” or “occasionally” about their employer running into serious financial trouble.

Vancouver, BC [April 7, 2020] – The proportion of Canadians who are apprehensive about specific economic issues during the COVID-19 outbreak is higher than it was during the global financial crisis of 2008, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Canadians say they have worried “frequently” or “occasionally” about the safety of their savings in the past month.  

Half of Canadians (50%) have worried about the value of their investments over the past four weeks, while slightly fewer have been concerned “frequently” or “occasionally” about unemployment affecting their household (46%), being able to pay mortgage or rent (41%) or their employer running into serious financial trouble (37%).  

Compared to a similar survey conducted in September 2008—as the global financial crisis was developing—the proportion of Canadians who are troubled about the safety of their savings and the value of their investments has increased by 15 points and 12 points respectively.  

“In late September 2008, 51% of Canadians had not worried at all about being able to pay their mortgage or rent,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In early April 2020, only 41% feel the same way.”  

The incidence of specific concerns varies across the country. At this point, Ontarians are the most worried about the safety of savings (59%), Albertans about unemployment affecting their household (52%) and British Columbians about being able to pay mortgage or rent (46%).  

While only one-in-five Canadians aged 55 and over (20%) have worried “frequently” or “occasionally” about their employer running into serious financial trouble, the proportion climbs to 41% among Canadians aged 35-to-54 and 50% among Canadians aged 18-to-34.  

When asked about investments, almost two thirds of Canadians (65%) say they plan to keep their current long-term strategy, while only 12% are planning to change their approach.  

A majority of Canadians (52%) expect the domestic economy to perform better than Italy’s in the next six months.  

Smaller proportions of Canadians foresee the domestic economy outpacing France (32%), China (29%), United Kingdom (26%), the United States (23%), Germany (22%) and Japan (20%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 30 to April 1, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Most Parents in British Columbia Stressed by Work and Finance

The proportion of Metro Vancouver parents who expect their kids to relocate increased by 24 points since 2019.

Vancouver, BC [February 18, 2020] – A majority of parents across British Columbia are experiencing tension on account of specific issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample of parents, 58% say they experience work-related stress “frequently” or “occasionally.”

Majorities of parents in the province say they have also “frequently” or “occasionally” experienced financial stress (57%), family-related stress (53%) and housing-related stress (51%).

Across British Columbia, two-in-five parents (40%) say it is currently “moderately difficult” or “very difficult” for them to make ends meet. 

The proportion of parents who are having a hard time getting by financially is highest in Northern BC (60%), followed by Vancouver Island (45%), the Fraser Valley (40%), Metro Vancouver (39%) and Southern BC (28%).

Almost three-in-five parents in British Columbia (58%) say it is currently “very difficult” or “moderately difficult” for them to save money in a bank account. 

Other tasks that are currently tough for about two-in-five parents in the province are paying for day to day expenses (44%), paying for child care (42%) and paying for transportation (39%).

“Majorities of parents who reside in the Fraser Valley (62%), Metro Vancouver (59%), Vancouver Island (55%) and Southern BC (52%) acknowledge that saving for the future has become more complicated,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Transportation is a bigger issue for parents in Southern BC (47%), while day to day expenses are more of a problem in Northern BC (48%) and Vancouver Island (47%).”

Across the province, 65% of parents say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that their child (or any one of their children) will have to move away from the municipality where they currently live due to the high cost of living.

The proportion of parents in Metro Vancouver who expect their children to move away on account of financial constraints stands at 66%, up 24 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in 2019.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 4 to February 7, 2020, among 623 adult parents of children aged 0 to 18 in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Than Seven-in-Ten British Columbians Endorse Housing Taxes

Almost half of residents think these actions will be effective in making housing more affordable in the province.

Vancouver, BC [January 3, 2020] – The “speculation tax” introduced by the Government of British Columbia is still backed by a sizeable proportion of the province’s residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 76% of British Columbians agree with the implementation of the “speculation tax” in specific urban areas targeting foreign and domestic homeowners who pay little or no income tax in BC, and those who own second properties that aren’t long-term rentals.

The survey outlines an eight-point increase in agreement with the “speculation tax” since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March 2019.

“Agreement with this particular tax is strong among voters of all three major political parties in the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “It encompasses 86% for those who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in 2017, as well as 75% of those who cast ballots for candidates from the BC Liberals and the BC Green Party.”

More than three-in-four British Columbians agree with two other policies: Increasing the foreign buyers tax from 15% to 20% (77%, -3) and expanding the foreign buyers tax to areas located outside of Metro Vanncouver (also 77%, +2).

Agreement is also strong with two other measures: increasing the property transfer tax from 3% to 5% for homes valued at more than $3 million. The 5% portion only applies to the value greater than $3 million (72%, +8) and introducing a tax of 0.2% on the value of homes between $3 million and $4 million, and a tax rate of 0.4% on the portion of a home’s value that exceeds $4 million (also 72%, +6).

Across the province, 49% of residents think the actions of the provincial government will be “effective”, in making housing more affordable in British Columbia, while 39% consider they will be ”ineffective.”

There is a pronounced regional divide on this question. While majorities of residents of Northern BC (56%) and Metro Vancouver (52%) think the provincial government’s actions will help make housing more affordable, the proportion is lower in the Fraser Valley (45%), Vancouver Island (44%) and Southern BC (40%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 12 to December 16, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

If Forced to Relocate, Almost Half of Albertans Would Pick BC

Just over one-in-four British Columbians would select Alberta as the province to resettle.

Vancouver, BC [August 27, 2019] – A significant proportion of Albertans would welcome relocating to British Columbia if circumstances called for a move, a new two-province Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative provincial samples, 47% of Albertans say they would choose British Columbia if they had to move out of Alberta and live in any other region of Canada.

Ontario and Saskatchewan are tied as the second Canadian destination for Albertans with 11% each, followed by Nova Scotia at 4%.

“A majority of Edmontonians (53%) would choose British Columbia if they were compelled to move away from Alberta,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But more than two-in-five Calgarians (45%) and residents of other parts of Alberta (42%) are willing to join them.”

In British Columbia, 26% of residents say they would move to Alberta if they had to leave British Columbia and resettle in a different Canadian province. 

Ontario is second in the minds of British Columbians with 16%, followed by Nova Scotia with 8%. One third of residents (33%) are undecided about which province they would move to.

While more residents of Metro Vancouver express a preference to resettle in Ontario (24%) than in Alberta (20%), all other regions of the province select Alberta first, including 33% of those in Northern BC and 32% of those in the Fraser Valley.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from July 23 to July 25, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia and 700 adults in Alberta. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia and Alberta. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for the British Columbia sample and +/- 3.7 percentage points for the Alberta sample, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca