Some British Columbians Keep Options Open to Work from Home

Only 11% of British Columbians who worked from home during the COVID-19 pandemic have returned to the office full time.

Vancouver, BC [October 7, 2002] – Employed British Columbians are still figuring out the new qualms of office life, and more than a third are not particularly thrilled with their current arrangements to work from home, a new Research Co. poll has found

In the online survey of a representative sample, more than three-in-five home workers in British Columbia (63%) say they are happy with their current arrangements to perform their duties away from the office. Similar proportions claim to be working from home more often (19%) or less often (18%) than they would like to.

Just over one-in-ten British Columbians who worked from home during the COVID-19 pandemic (11%) have returned to the office full time. About a third (32%) are working from home once or twice a week, while 25% are there three to four times a week and 31%  work from home five days a week.

“There is a significant generational divide when it comes to the home office in British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 19% of home workers aged 18-to-34 are not commuting at all, the proportion rises to 35% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 47% among those aged 55 and over.”

More than half of British Columbians who worked from home during the pandemic (53%) say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to seek a different job if their current company does not allow them to work from home as often as they want. Just under one-in-ten (8%) have already left a position because of this reason.

Two thirds of home workers in British Columbia (66%, +2 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2022) say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to explore the possibility of switching to a different job that can be performed from home in their own metropolitan area.

Smaller proportions of home workers in British Columbia would consider switching to a different job that can be performed from home for a company headquartered in the province (59%, +2) or in a different Canadian province (45%, =).

Compared to January 2022, we see fewer employed British Columbians reporting an increase in virtual staff meetings (28%, -17) and virtual business development (21%, -24) at their workplace.

Conversely, employed British Columbians say that they have seen more in person staff meetings (27%, +13) and more in-person business development (21%, +6) than three months ago.

The change is not as pronounced on business travel, with 15% of employed British Columbians (+5) noticing more trips and 31% (-8) saying they are less common than three months ago. In addition, there is a slight reduction in the amount of virtual communications between offices (27%, -19).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 28 to September 30, 2022, among 700 adults who work in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadian Couples Did Mostly Well Cohabiting During Pandemic

Significant gender gaps are observed when Canadians ponder their spouse or partner’s cleanliness and ability to prepare meals.

Vancouver, BC [September 20, 2022] – While most Canadians appear to be content with the manner in which their spouse or live-in partner behaved during the COVID-19 pandemic, there are some components of life at home where the discrepancies between genders are evident, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of adults who are living with their spouse or partner, 70% of respondents say they “strongly approve” of their significant other’s performance during the COVID-19 pandemic, while 22% “moderately approve.”

Canadians aged 55 and over who are living with their spouse or partner are more likely to say they “strongly approve” of their pandemic performance (80%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (64%) and aged 18-to-34 (58%).

“More than seven-in-ten Atlantic Canadians (76%) and Quebecers (72%) are particularly happy with the way their spouse or live-in partner managed the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The rating is slightly lower in British Columbia (69%), Ontario (68%), Alberta (67%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (65%).”

In spite of this high level of satisfaction, there are certain aspects of life at home where a significant difference between men and women is observed.

More than three-in-five men (63%) say they are “very satisfied” with their spouse or live-in partner on the matter of keeping the home clean and tidy. The proportion of women who feel the same way about their spouse or live-in partner is markedly smaller (41%).

While 73% of men are “very satisfied” with their spouse or live-in partner’s personal hygiene, the proportion drops to 64% among women.

A gender gap also emerges on the issue of cooking meals, with 67% of men saying they are “very satisfied” with the involvement of their spouse or live-in partner, compared to 56% of women.

The satisfaction levels are fairly stable across cohabiting couples on five other issues: taking care of pets (65%), taking care of children (62%), providing emotional support when needed (59%), making decisions about what to do (55%) and overall attitude and demeanour (also 55 %).

Almost half of Canadian adults who are living with their spouse or partner (47%) say their experience during the COVID-19 pandemic made them grow closer as a couple. More than two-in-five (44%) report no change, while 7% believe they grew more distant.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from August 14 to August 21, 2022, among a representative sample of 1,135 adults in Canada who are living with their spouse or partner. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.9 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Stewart and Sim Are Frontrunners in Vancouver Mayoral Election

More than a third of likely voters believe housing is the most important issue facing the city right now.

Vancouver, BC [September 8, 2022] – Four mayoral candidates are in double-digits as voters in Vancouver ponder their choices in next month’s election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample, 35% of decided voters in the City of Vancouver would support incumbent Kennedy Stewart of Forward Vancouver, while 30% would cast their ballot for Ken Sim of A Better City (ABC).

Colleen Hardwick of TEAM for a Livable Vancouver is in third place with 17 per cent, followed by Mark Marissen of Progress Vancouver with 13% and Fred Harding of the Non-Partisan Association (NPA) with 4%.

More than a third of likely voters in Vancouver (35%) say housing is the most important issue facing the city, followed by drug overdoses (14%), crime (9%), poverty (also 9%) and property taxes (also 9%).

“Concerns about housing are particularly high among women (42%) and likely voters aged 35-to-54 (39%) in the City of Vancouver,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Drug overdoses are a more prevalent topic among likely voters who reside Downtown (19%) than among their counterparts who live on the West Side (13%) or the East Side (11%).”

Two thirds of likely voters in the City of Vancouver (67%) have followed the municipal electoral campaign “very closely” or “moderately closely.”

Over the past two months, a majority of likely voters in the City of Vancouver (52%) have seen, read or heard media stories where mayoral or council candidates discussed their position on issues. Almost three-in-ten (29%) have visited the website of a mayoral or council candidate.

While 16% of likely voters in the City of Vancouver have interacted with a mayoral or council candidate on social media (such as following on Twitter or liking on Facebook), the proportion rises to 25% among those aged 18-to-34.

Just over two thirds of likely voters in Vancouver (68%) support the use of “SOGI-Inclusive Education”, which raises awareness of and welcomes students of all sexual orientations, gender identities and family structures.

In national survey conducted by Research Co. in July 2019, 62% of Canadians supported the use of “SOGI-Inclusive Education” in their province.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from September 3 to September 5, 2022, among a representative sample of 400 municipal likely voters in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Young British Columbians Lose Faith on Staying in the Province

Only 19% of British Columbians believe the province would be better off as its own country.

Vancouver, BC [August 30, 2022] – Young adults who reside in British Columbia are having a hard time envisioning the possibility of growing old in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 72% of British Columbians believe they will stay in the province for the rest of their lives, down three points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in 2021.

“Only 56% of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 expect to stay in the province for the rest of their lives,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are significantly higher among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (70%) and aged 55 and over (84%).”

More than four-in-five British Columbians (82%, -2) say they are very proud of the province that they live in and just under three-in-five (59%, +2) consider their views as different from the rest of the country.

More than three-in-five British Columbians (62%, +3) believe they have more in common with the people of Seattle and Portland than with those in Toronto or Montreal.

Residents of the Fraser Valley are more likely to express an affinity towards the people of Seattle and Portland (64%), followed by those who live in Metro Vancouver (63%), Vancouver Island (62%), Northern BC (61%) and Southern BC (55%).

Just under one-in-five British Columbians (19%, +1) think British Columbia would be better off as its own country—a proportion that rises to 23% among those aged 18-to-34.

More than three-in-five respondents (63%, +2) claim to consider themselves “Canadians first, and British Columbians second”, while 22% (=) acknowledge being “British Columbians first, and Canadians second.”

Three-in-ten British Columbians (30%, +1) think that John Horgan has been the province’s best premier since 1986, followed by Christy Clark (7%, -2), Gordon Campbell (also 7%, +1) and Mike Harcourt (6%, =).

Just under one-in-five British Columbians (19%, -2) believe Clark is the worst recent head of government, followed by Campbell (10%, -1) and Horgan (also 10%, +2).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 20 to August 22, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Say Homelessness Has Increased in Province

Most residents think all levels of government have done a “bad job” coming up with solutions to deal with this problem.

Vancouver, BC [August 19, 2022] – Majorities of residents of British Columbia are disappointed with the way their elected officials have addressed the issue of homelessness, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 61% of British Columbians think the federal government has done a “bad” or “very bad” job coming up with solutions to deal with homelessness.

More than half of British Columbians also believe both the provincial government (56%) and their municipal government (55%) have done a “bad” or “very bad” job on this file.

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (73%) consider the current situation related to homelessness in the province as a major problem—a proportion that rises to 83% in the Fraser Valley.

More than half of the province’s residents (52%) think homelessness in their municipality is a major problem, while 27% feel the same way about the current state of affairs in their neighbourhood.

Practically four-in-five British Columbians (79%) believe homelessness has increased across the province over the past three years, and more than three-in-five (63%) feel the same way about the current situation in their municipality. Just over two-in-five (42%) also say that homelessness has intensified in their neighbourhood.

When asked about factors that are to blame “a great deal” for the current situation regarding homelessness in the province, most British Columbians point the finger at addiction and mental health issues (60%) and a lack of affordable housing (53%).

Fewer British Columbians blame poverty and inequality (41%), personal actions and decisions (30%) and bad economy and unemployment (24%) for homelessness.

British Columbians are evenly split on whether homelessness can be eradicated. While 47% of the province’s residents believe this can be achieved with the proper funding and policies, 46% claim that homelessness will always be a problem in British Columbia.

“More than three-in-five British Columbians aged 55 and over (62%) believe that the notion of a province without homelessness is unattainable,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer of their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (39%) and aged 18-to-34 (34%) are skeptical.”

Most British Columbians agree with four different ideas to reduce homelessness in the province: increasing temporary housing options for people experiencing homelessness (80%), offering incentives to developers if they focus on building affordable housing units (78%), devoting tax money to build units to house homeless residents (67%) and changing zoning laws to allow property owners to build more units on standard lots (60%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 13 to August 15, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Enthusiastic and Selective About Activism

Three-in-ten British Columbians would protest a low-income housing project located within three blocks of their home.

Vancouver, BC [July 19, 2022] – A significant proportion of British Columbians are engaged in campaigns to bring about political or social change, but their willingness to protest plans to establish specific facilities in their neighbourhood is not substantial, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 30% of British Columbians say they have used social media to protest or support an issue, while 25% have donated money to an organization that supports or opposes an issue.

About one-in-seven British Columbians have attended a public consultation meeting or process (15%) or a protest (14%), while fewer acknowledge joining a political party or campaign (7%), participating in a political campaign (6%) or taking legal action against a development or project (5%)

“Two thirds of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (67%) have been involved in some form of activism,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (48%) and aged 55 and over (41%).”

The survey also asked British Columbians about which actions they would take under hypothetical circumstances related to their municipality and their neighbourhood.

More than half of the province’s residents would take no action if there were plans to install a military base (57%), a casino (62%), a recycling plant (64%) or wind turbines (67%) within the boundaries of their municipality.

British Columbians are more likely to consider passive protest—such as sending letters to politicians or complaining on social media—to register concerns about a natural gas pipeline (19%), an incinerator for waste treatment (21%), a prison (22%), an oil pipeline, a landfill site, an oil refinery or a nuclear power plant (23% each) or a coal terminal (26%).

Active protest, which includes donating to opponents and attending town halls, would be the recourse of 24% of British Columbians to deal with a coal terminal and of 29% to deal with a nuclear power plant.

When asked about the possibility of specific facilities seeking a permit to operate three blocks away from their home, majorities of British Columbians would take no action on a cell phone tower (54%), a low-income housing project (58%), a marijuana store (60%), a recycling depot (63%), a retail or mall development (65%), an entertainment complex (69%), a pub or bar (also 69%) or a hospital (75%).

At least one-in-five British Columbians would passively protest if a composting site (20%), a homeless shelter (22%) or a sewage plant (27%) attempted to operate within three blocks of their home. Similar proportions of residents would actively protest against a composting site and a homeless shelter (20% each) and a sewage plant (25%).

Three-in-ten British Columbians (30%) are willing to passively (16%) or actively (14%) protest a low-income housing project seeking a permit to set-up within three blocks of their home, while 58% would take no action.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from July 4 to July 6, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Than Half of Vancouver Voters Would Abolish Park Board

Almost three-in-five respondents support changing zoning laws to allow up to six strata title units on a standard lot.

Vancouver, BC [June 17, 2022] – Public confidence in the only elected Park Board in Canada has eroded considerably over the past year and a half, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample, 52% of likely voters in the City of Vancouver think the Board of Parks and Recreation should be eliminated, and that public parks and the public recreation system should be placed under the jurisdiction of City Council.

“In November 2020, only 44% of municipal likely voters in Vancouver favoured the elimination of the Board of Parks and Recreation,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This month, the proportion has reached 52%.”

Public support for abolishing Vancouver’s Park Board is highest among likely voters who reside Downtown (63%), followed by those who live in the West Side (52%) and the East Side (45%).

Vancouverites who voted for Kennedy Stewart or Ken Sim in the 2018 mayoral election are significantly more likely to endorse the abolition of the Board of Parks and Recreation (61% and 60% respectively) than those who cast a ballot for Shauna Sylvester  (43%).

Just over half of likely voters in Vancouver (51%, +5) believe it would be worthwhile to explore the idea of amalgamating all of the municipalities in Metro Vancouver, like they did in Toronto or Montreal.

Two thirds of Vancouverites who voted for Stewart in 2018 (67%) support exploring the concept of amalgamation, compared to just under half of those who cast a ballot for Sim (49%).

Almost three-in-five likely voters in Vancouver (58%, +5) are in favour of changing zoning laws to allow property owners to build up to six strata title units on a standard lot, provided the new building is no taller than an average home.

Majorities of Vancouver’s likely voters who currently rent or own their primary residence support a change in zoning laws (65% and 54% respectively).

Seven-in-ten likely voters in the City of Vancouver (71%, -10) are in favour of the plan to extend the Skytrain Millennium Line (currently under construction to Arbutus) to the University of British Columbia (UBC) campus at Point Grey.

Public support for the proposed SkyTrain extension is strongest among likely voters who reside Downtown (75%), followed by those who live in the East Side (72%) and the West Side (67%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 7 to June 9, 2022, among 400 municipal likely voters in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty. 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Double-Digit Advantage for Ontario’s Progressive Conservatives

Half of Ontarians (50%) approve of the performance of Doug Ford as Premier and PC leader, while 46% disapprove.

Vancouver, BC [June 1, 2022] – Public support for the governing Progressive Conservative Party has increased as the provincial election in Ontario draws near, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Ontarian adults, 39% of decided voters say they will cast a ballot for the Ontario PC candidate in their riding tomorrow or have already done so, up five points since the previous Research Co. poll completed in mid-May.

The Ontario Liberal Party remains in second place with 26% (-3), followed by the Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) with 23% (=), the Ontario Green Party with 6% (-1), the New Blue Party of Ontario with 3% (=) and the Ontario Party with 1% (=).

Since mid-May, the Progressive Conservatives have improved their standing in Ontario among both male decided voters (42%, +5) and female decided voters (37%, +7).

More than two-in-five decided voters aged 35-to-54 (42%) and aged 55 and over (also 42%) intend to back an Ontario PC candidate. The race is closer among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (PC 31%, Liberal 28%, NDP 26%).

“The Progressive Conservatives are keeping 81% of their 2018 voters, while the New Democrats are only maintaining 71% of them,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The Ontario Liberals are only attracting 52% of Ontarians who voted for the federal Liberal Party in last year’s Canadian federal election, as one-in-four of these voters (25%) are planning to vote for Ontario PC candidates tomorrow.”

Half of Ontarians (50%, +4) approve of the way Premier and Ontario Progressive Conservative Party leader Doug Ford has handled his duties.

The rating is lower for Official Opposition and Ontario NDP leader Andrea Horwath (46%, -1) Ontario Liberal Party leader Steven Del Duca (42%, =), Ontario Green Party leader Mike Schreiner (40%, +9), New Blue Party of Ontario leader Jim Karahalios (16%, +3) and Ontario Party leader Derek Sloan (16%, +4).

On the momentum question, Schreiner does particularly well, with 18% of Ontarians (+9 since mid-May) saying their opinion of the Ontario Green Party leader has improved since the electoral campaign started. The needle did not move for Del Duca (20%, =) and smaller gains are seen for Horwath (19%, +2), Ford (also 19%, +3), Karahalios (6%, +2) and Sloan (5%, +2).

More than a third of Ontarians (37%, +4) believe Ford would make the best premier of the province among the six main party leaders. Horwath is a distant second with 21% (-2), followed by Del Duca (19%, -1), Schreiner (7%, +4), Karahalios (2%, =) and Sloan (also 2%, =).

There is little movement on the issue landscape, where the top ranking belongs to housing, poverty and homelessness (26%, =), followed by health care (23%, -2) and the economy and jobs (22%, +2).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on May 31 and June 1, 2022, among 700 Ontario adults, including 659 decided voters in the 2022 provincial election. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points for the entire sample and +/- 3.8 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Josh Evnin

Five-Point Lead for Ruling Progressive Conservatives in Ontario

Ontarians are divided when asked if the Liberals and the New Democrats should merge into a single party. 

Vancouver, BC [May 18, 2022] – The Ontario Progressive Conservative Party holds the upper hand in the provincial election campaign, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Ontarians, 34% of decided voters say they will support the Ontario PC candidate in their riding in next month’s provincial ballot.

The Ontario Liberal Party is second with 29%, followed by the Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) with 23%, the Ontario Green Party with 7%, the New Blue Party of Ontario with 3% and the Ontario Party with 1%.

The Progressive Conservatives are particularly popular among men (37%) and Ontarians aged 55 and over (41%). The Liberals are ahead in the 416 region (37%), while the New Democrats post their best numbers in Southwestern Ontario (32%).

Ontarians are divided when assessing the performance of Premier and Ontario Progressive Conservative Party leader Doug Ford. While 46% of the province’s residents approve of the way he has handled his duties, 48% disapprove.

More than two-in-five Ontarians approve of both Official Opposition and Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Andrea Horwath (47%) and Ontario Liberal Party leader Steven Del Duca (42%). The rating is lower for Ontario Green Party leader Mike Schreiner (31%), New Blue Party of Ontario leader Jim Karahalios (13%) and Ontario Party leader Derek Sloan (12%).

The first weeks of the campaign have not yielded a positive momentum score for any of the six main party leaders. One-in-five Ontarians (20%) say their opinion of Del Duca has improved. The numbers are paltrier on this indicator for Horwath (17%), Ford (16%), Schreiner (9%), Karahalios (4%) and Sloan (3%).

A third of Ontarians (33%) say Ford would make the best premier of the province, followed by Horwath (23%), Del Duca (20%), Schreiner (3%), Sloan (2%) and Karahalios (also 2%).

Ontarians identify three issues as the most important ones facing the province: housing, poverty and homelessness (26%), health care (25%) and the economy and jobs (20%).

“Ontarians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to look at housing, homelessness and poverty as the most important challenge (36%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Ontarians aged 55 and over are currently more concerned about health care (32%).”

Ford is perceived as the best leader to manage the economy and jobs (35%), crime and public safety (33%), energy and pipelines (31%) and accountability (29%). Horwath is ahead on being able to handle housing, homelessness and poverty (29%).

There is no clear leader when Ontarians ponder the best person to deal with health care (Horwath 28%, Ford 27%), education (Ford 26%, Del Duca 24%) and the environment (Ford 20%, Horwath 19%, Del Duca 19%, Schreiner 17%).

Ontarians are evenly split when asked if the Ontario Liberal Party and the Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) should merge into a single political party. While 41% of the province’s residents agree with this idea, 43% disagree and 16% are undecided.

Support for a provincial merger of Liberals and New Democrats is strongest in the 416 region (48%), but drops in Eastern Ontario (41%), Northern Ontario (also 41%), Southwestern Ontario (39%) and the 905 region (37%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 15 to May 17, 2022, among 700 Ontario adults, including 602 decided voters in the 2022 provincial election. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points for the entire sample and +/- 4.0 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: DXR

Saving Money Remains a Challenge for Many British Columbians

Significant proportions of the province’s residents are spending more on transportation and groceries than in 2020.  

Vancouver, BC [March 15, 2022] – Most British Columbians acknowledge that it is hard to meet certain financial goals two years after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 64% of British Columbians say it is “very difficult” or “moderately difficult” to save money for retirement or a rainy day, while 56% feel the same way about having money for leisure.  

More than two-in-five British Columbians (43%) say it is currently hard to pay for necessities—a proportion that rises to 50% among women and to 56% among residents aged 18-to-34.  

“Disposable income is a significant problem for younger British Columbians, with two thirds of those aged 18-to-34 (68%) saying it is difficult to find money for dining out or entertainment,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (55%) and aged 55 and over (47%).”  

Across the province, 33% of British Columbians say that, compared to how things were before the COVID-19 pandemic, their household’s financial situation is currently worse, unchanged since a Research Co. poll conducted in March 2021.  

One-in-five British Columbians (21%, +4) say that their household’s financial standing is better now than before the pandemic, while 42% (-6) believe it is about the same.  

On a regional basis, residents of Vancouver Island are more likely to state that their household’s financial situation has worsened (37%) than those who reside in Northern BC (34%), Metro Vancouver (33%), the Fraser Valley (32%) and Southern BC (30%).  

British Columbians report spending more than they did before the COVID-19 pandemic started on several items, including books (19%), board games (16%) and newspapers and magazines (15%).  

In March 2021, only 14% of British Columbians said they were spending more on housing—such as rent or mortgage—than they did a year earlier. In March 2022, the proportion has risen markedly to 44%.   

Residents of the province report significantly higher expenses than in 2021 on other categories, including electronic entertainment (46%, +17), transportation (54%, +36) and groceries (75%, +21).  

Methodology: Results are based on an online survey conducted from March 2 to March 4, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here, and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co. 778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Housing is Greatest Source of Stress for Parents in British Columbia

Almost three-in-five parents across the province say it is difficult for them and their family to save money in a bank account.  

Vancouver, BC [February 21, 2022] – Compared to two years ago, parents across British Columbia are not as worried about issues related to finances, work or family, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample of parents, 48% say they experience financial stress “frequently” or “occasionally”, down nine points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in February 2020.  

Fewer than half of parents in British Columbia acknowledge experiencing family-related stress (47%, -6) and work-related stress (37%, -21) “frequently” or “occasionally”.  

Almost three-in-five parents (58%, +7) say they experience housing-related stress—such as finding a place to live or paying for a mortgage or rent—“frequently” or “occasionally”.  

“Losing sleep over housing is not an occurrence exclusive to parents in the Lower Mainland,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In fact, parents in Southern BC (71%) and Northern BC (66%) are significantly more likely to say that they are experiencing housing-related stress.”  

Two-in-five parents (40%, =) say it is “moderately difficult” or “very difficult” for them to make ends meet at this point—a proportion that rises to 46% among those who reside in Southern BC.  

As was the case in 2020, almost three-in-five parents in British Columbia (59%, +1) acknowledge having difficulties saving money in a bank account. More than two-in-five (42%, -2) feel the same way about covering day-to-day expenses.  

Fewer parents in British Columbia say it is currently difficult to pay for transportation (34%, -5) and to pay for child care (30%, -12).  

Almost half of parents in British Columbia (49%, -16) believe it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that their child (or any one of their children) will have to move away from the municipality where they currently live due to the high cost of living.  

While majorities of parents in Metro Vancouver (56%) and Southern BC (52%) expect their kids to move away at some point because of affordability issues, the proportion is lower in Vancouver Island (38%), the Fraser Valley (30%) and Northern BC (23%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from February 7 to February 9, 2022, among 627 adult parents of children aged 0 to 18 in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca  

BC NDP Remains Ahead of BC Liberals in British Columbia

The approval rating for Premier John Horgan stands at 69%, while Kevin Falcon starts his tenure as BC Liberal leader at 38%.  

Vancouver, BC [February 18, 2022] – The BC New Democratic Party (NDP) holds an eight-point advantage over the opposition BC Liberals among decided voters in British Columbia, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 46% of decided voters would cast a ballot for the BC NDP candidate in their constituency if a provincial election were held today.  

The BC Liberals are in second place with 38%, followed by the BC Green Party with 13% and the BC Conservative Party with 2%.  

The BC NDP holds substantial leads over the BC Liberals among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (43% to 36%) and decided voters aged 35-to-54 (48% to 35%). The race is closer among decided voters aged 55 and over (BC NDP 46%, BC Liberals 42%).  

While the two main parties are separated by just three points among male decided voters (BC NDP 44%, BC Liberals 41%), the New Democrats have a substantial lead over the BC Liberals among female decided voters (47% to 35%).  

Almost seven-in-ten British Columbians (69%) approve of the performance of Premier and BC NDP leader John Horgan, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted just before the last provincial election in October 2020.  

The approval rating for Kevin Falcon—who became the leader of the BC Liberals earlier this month—stands at 38%. The indicator is similar for BC Greens leader Sonia Furstenau (36%, -10) and lower for BC Conservative leader Trevor Bolin (19%).  

“British Columbia’s two main party leaders are not having difficulties connecting with their base of support,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Nine-in-ten BC NDP voters in 2020 approve of Horgan (90%), while two thirds of BC Liberal voters in the last provincial ballot approve of Falcon (67%).”  

A third of British Columbians (33%, +10) identify housing, homelessness and poverty as the most important issue facing the province today—a proportion that rises to 41% among those aged 18-to-34.   Health care is second on the list of concerns with 23% (+2), followed by the economy and jobs (16%, -9), the environment (10%, +3), COVID-19 (6%, -7) and crime and public safety (4%, =).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from February 12 to February 14, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Xue Dong

British Columbians Ponder Who Can Deliver Affordable Housing

The provincial government has the highest level of trust from residents, while for-profit developers are at the bottom.  

Vancouver, BC [January 11, 2021] – The current provincial administration outranks the federal government when British Columbians are asked who they have confidence in to deal with affordable housing, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 55% of British Columbians say they trust the provincial government under the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) to deliver affordable housing in the province.  

The numbers are significantly lower when residents are asked to consider the actions of a provincial government headed by the BC Liberal Party (36%) or headed by the BC Green Party (33%).  

“As expected, a sizeable majority of BC NDP voters in the 2020 election (73%) express confidence in the current provincial government to manage affordable housing ,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than two-in-five of those who cast ballots for the BC Liberals (47%) and the BC Greens (45%) in 2020 also trust the current provincial administration on this file.”  

Fewer than two-in-five British Columbians (39%) have confidence in the federal government under the Liberal Party to deliver affordable housing. The numbers are significantly higher when the province’s residents assess what things would look like with the federal NDP in charge (51%) and lower for a federal government assembled by the Conservative Party (32%).  

Women (40%) and British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (46%) are more likely to express confidence in the actions of the federal government under the Liberal Party to deliver affordable housing than men (37%), residents aged 35-to-54 (38%) and residents aged 55 and over (35%).  

Almost half of British Columbians (47%) trust their own provincial administration to deliver affordable housing. The rating is slightly higher for not-for-profit developers (49%) and substantially lower for for-profit developers (19%).  

In a December 2021 poll conducted by Research Co. in Metro Vancouver, 31% of respondents identified housing as the most important issue facing their municipality.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 21 to December 23, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Metro Vancouverites Ponder Guidelines for Municipal Votes

More than half are against “corporate votes”, non-resident electors and allowing residents aged 16 and 17 to cast ballots.  
 
Vancouver, BC [December 23, 2021] – More than three-in-five residents of Metro Vancouver believe it is time to end the regulation that allows people who do not reside in a municipality to vote in local elections if they own property there, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 63% of residents agree with eliminating non-residency property electors and only letting residents of a city vote in municipal elections.  
 
Majorities of Metro Vancouverites disagree with the notion of allowing “corporate voting” by giving businesses the ability to vote in municipal elections (56%) and with letting Canadians aged 16 and 17 cast ballots in municipal elections (51%).  
 
The idea of allowing adult Permanent Residents of Canada to vote in municipal elections is endorsed by more than seven-in-ten Metro Vancouverites (71%), while only 22% disagree and 7% are undecided.  
 
Three-in-ten Metro Vancouverites (31%) identify housing as the most important issue facing their municipality right now, followed by COVID-19 (24%), property taxes (10%), climate change (7%), drug overdoses (6%) and crime (5%).
 
“While concerns about housing are particularly high in Burnaby (45%), this is also the main preoccupation for residents of Vancouver (31%) and Surrey (24%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Drug overdoses are a salient issue in Vancouver (9%) while crime is a significant worry in Surrey (12%).”  
 
The approval rating for Vancouver Mayor Kennedy Stewart stands at 57%, up six points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in January 2020. The numbers are stable for Burnaby Mayor Mike Hurley (51%, =), while Surrey Mayor Doug McCallum has seen his rating drop from 50% at the start of 2020 to 30% in the last month of 2021.  
 
Across Metro Vancouver, 42% of residents believe their current mayor deserves re-election, while 37% disagree and 20% are undecided.  
 
Almost half of residents of Burnaby (48%) and Vancouver (47%) are currently willing to re-elect Hurley and Stewart respectively. In Surrey, only 28% think McCallum deserves a new term in office while 59% disagree.
 
Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from December 17 to December 19, 2021, among 1,200 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

All Tied Up as Canadians Prepare to Vote in the Federal Election

Support for both the Liberal Party and the Conservative Party is 32%, while approval of their two leaders is also identical (42%).  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 19, 2021] – Voters in Canada head to tomorrow’s federal election with the two main contending parties enjoying the same level of voter support across the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 32% of decided voters (-2 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted earlier this month) would cast a ballot for the candidate of the Liberal Party in their constituency, while 32% (+2) would support the contender of the Conservative Party.  
 
The New Democratic Party (NDP) is in third place with 19% (-1), followed by the Bloc Québécois with 7% (=), the People’s Party with 6% (+1) and the Green Party with 4% (+1). In addition, 1% of decided voters in the country would vote for a different political party or an independent candidate.  
 

On a regional basis, the Liberals are in first place in Atlantic Canada (42%, with the Conservatives at 27%), Quebec (34%, with the Bloc at 31%) and Ontario (37%, with the Conservatives at 30%).  
 
Conversely, the Conservatives dominate in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (43%, with the NDP at 23%) and Alberta (50%, with the NDP at 21%). In British Columbia, the Conservatives are slightly ahead of the New Democrats (33% to 31%), with the Liberals at 25%.  
 
The Green Party gets its best result in British Columbia (6%, but reaching 14% in its stronghold of Vancouver Island). The People’s Party is particularly prevalent in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (10%) and Alberta (8%).  
 
As the campaign draws to a close, the approval rating for the two main contenders is exactly the same. Just over two-in-five Canadians (42%) approve of the way both Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau and Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole have performed in their jobs. The disapproval rating is higher for Trudeau (53%) than it is for O’Toole (47%).  
 
NDP leader Jagmeet Singh has the highest approval rating (51%, +2), while the numbers are significantly lower for Green Party leader Annamie Paul (24%, +1) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (20%, +5). Since the start of the campaign, one-in-four Canadians report having an improved opinion of both Singh (26%) and O’Toole (25%). The proportions are significantly lower for Trudeau (16%), Paul (10%) and Bernier (also 10%).  
 
Trudeau remains ahead when Canadians are asked which of the five leaders running nationwide campaigns would make the best Prime Minister (31%, -2), followed by O’Toole (27%, +1), Singh (19%, +1), Bernier (7%, +2) and Paul (2%, =).  
 
More than a quarter of Canadians (27%, +4) think health care is the most important issue facing the country. The economy and jobs is second on the list with 22% (=), followed by housing, homelessness and poverty (15%, -1) and the environment (10%, -2).  
 
The COVID-19 pandemic is the most important issue for 8% of Canadians—a proportion that rises to 16% in Alberta.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on September 18 and September 19, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada, and 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for the survey of Canadians and +/- 3.5 percentage points for the survey of British Columbians, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Iouri Goussev

Canadians Pick Trudeau to Manage Pandemic, O’Toole for Jobs

There is no clear leader on two matters: housing, homelessness and poverty, and transportation projects.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 15, 2021] – The incumbent prime minister is the first choice of Canadians to handle issues such as health care and the COVID-19 pandemic, while the leader of the official opposition is preferred for financial and public safety concerns, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
The online survey of a representative national sample asked Canadians to select which one of the five federal party leaders who are running nationwide campaigns is the best person to manage 16 different issues.  
 
More than a third of Canadians (36%) think Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is better suited to handle the COVID-19 pandemic, followed by Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole with 22%, New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Jagmeet Singh with 12%, People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier with 6% and Green Party leader Annamie Paul with 2%.  
 
More than three-in-ten Canadians also pick Trudeau to manage foreign affairs (31%), child care (also 31%) and regulations related to firearms (also 31%).  
 
Earlier in the campaign, Erin O’Toole was tied with Justin Trudeau on the foreign affairs file,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the final week before votes are cast, Trudeau has a five-point lead on this particular issue.”  
 
The Liberal leader is also ahead of all rivals on being the best person to handle immigration (29%), health care (also 29%), the environment (28%), Indigenous issues and reconciliation (27%), seniors care (26%), and racism and discrimination (also 26%).  
 
One third of Canadians (33%) believe O’Toole would be the best leader to manage the economy and jobs, followed by Trudeau with 29%, Singh with 15%, Bernier with 4% and Paul with 2%.  
 
The Conservative leader is in first place on three other issues: crime and public safety (29%), accountability and leadership (27%), and energy and pipelines (also 27%).  
 
There is a tie on two specific concerns. Across the country, 25% of Canadians select either Trudeau or Singh as the best leaders to manage housing, homelessness and poverty. When asked about transportation projects, equal proportions of respondents pick Trudeau and O’Toole (25% each).  
 
Paul gets her best rating on the environment (14%), while Bernier scores highest on the COVID-19 pandemic (6%).  
 
In a survey released by Research Co. this week, health care, the economy and jobs, housing homelessness and poverty, and the environment were identified as the most important issues facing Canada.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 13, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Tobi 87
 
 

Liberals Regain Lead, Conservatives and NDP Drop in Canada

One-in-ten Conservative Party voters from 2019 say they will cast a ballot for the People’s Party in this month’s election.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 14, 2021] – As Canada heads to the final week of campaigning in the 2021 federal election, the governing Liberal Party is ahead of its competitors, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 34% of decided voters in Canada would support the Liberal candidate in their constituency, up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in late August.  
 
The Conservative Party is second with 30% (-2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (-2), the Bloc Québécois with 7% (+1), the People’s Party with 5% (+2) and the Green Party with 3% (-1). In addition, 1% of decided voters in the country would back a different party or an independent candidate.  
 
The Conservatives remain ahead of the Liberals among male voters (36% to 31%) and voters aged 55 and over (35% to 31%). The Liberals hold the upper hand over the Conservatives among female voters (38% to 25%) and voters aged 35-to-54 (39% to 30%). The Liberals are also in first place among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (37%, with the NDP at 27% and the Conservatives at 18%).  
 
In Atlantic Canada, the Liberals remain the most favoured option for voters (40%, with the Conservatives at 34%). In Quebec, the governing party holds an eight-point lead over the Bloc (37% to 29%).  
 
Half of decided voters in Alberta (50%) would support the Conservative candidate in their constituency, along with more than two-in-five (43%) of those who reside in Saskatchewan and Manitoba.  
 
The race remains closely contested in Ontario, where the Liberals are slightly ahead of the Conservatives (37% to 34%) and in British Columbia, where the three main federal parties are virtually tied (30% for the Conservatives, 29% for the New Democrats and 28% for the Liberals).  
 
The People’s Party is benefiting from a higher level of support in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (9%), Alberta (7%) and Ontario (6%). In fact, 10% of Canadians who supported the Conservatives in the 2019 federal election say they will be voting for the People’s Party in 2021.  
 
Almost one-in-four Canadians (23%, -3) think health care is the most important issue facing the country today, followed by the economy and jobs (22%, +2), housing, homelessness and poverty (16%, +1) and the environment (12%, -1).  
 
Across Canada, the NDP’s Jagmeet Singh continues to post the highest approval rating among the five leaders who are running nationwide campaigns (49%, -2), followed by Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau (43%, -2), Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole (40%, -1), Annamie Paul of the Green Party (23%, +2) and Maxime Bernier of the People’s Party (15%, =).  
 
Singh also remains ahead on personal momentum, with 27% of Canadians saying their opinion of him has improved since the start of the campaign. The numbers on this indicator are lower for O’Toole (22%), Trudeau (15%), Paul (12%) and Bernier (8%).  
 
On the “Best Prime Minister” question, Trudeau remains in first place with 33% (+1), followed by O’Toole (26%, =), Singh (18%, -2), Bernier (5%, +2) and Paul (2%, +1).  
 
“A third of Canadian women (33%) feel Justin Trudeau is the best person to manage the federal government, while only one-in-five (19%) select Erin O’Toole,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The race is significantly tighter among male voters on this same question, with Trudeau at 34% and O’Toole at 33%.”
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 13, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Dave Doe
 

Canadians Hold Mixed Views on Which Leader is Best on Issues

Just under one-in-five Canadians (17%) say they intend to vote by mail in this year’s federal election.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 6, 2021] – As the federal election campaign continues, the three main federal party leaders are connecting in different ways with Canadians on the most important issues facing the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, just under a third of Canadians (32%) think Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is the best person to handle crime and public safety.  
 
Trudeau is also the preferred choice of Canadians to manage immigration (30%), health care (29%) and the environment (28%).  
 
Official opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole is the top option for Canadians to handle the economy and jobs (34%), energy and pipelines (32%), and accountability and leadership (27%). O’Toole and Trudeau are tied, with 30% each, when Canadians are asked about the best leader to manage foreign affairs (30%).  
 
New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Jagmeet Singh is the most popular leader to deal with housing, homelessness and poverty (27%), with Trudeau and O’Toole tied at 24%.  
 
Health care is identified as the most important issue facing Canada for 26% of respondents, followed by the economy and jobs with 20%, housing, homelessness and poverty with 15% and the environment with 13%.  
 
The survey also asked Canadians about other characteristics and topics related to the three main federal party leaders. Trudeau emerged as the most popular option to be the Prime Minister in the event of another Quebec referendum (31%) and to represent Canada at the next round of climate change talks (30%).  
 
The incumbent prime minister is also ahead on four personality traits: having a drink with you at the local bar (28%), being on your sports team (also 28%), babysitting your kids or a relative’s kids (25%) and being part of your trivia quiz team (23%, with Singh close behind at 21%).  
 
Singh is practically tied with Trudeau on two of the items tested: having a coffee or tea with you at the local coffee shop (27%, with Trudeau at 26%) and giving you a good recommendation on a book to read (22%, with Trudeau at 21%).  
 
More than three-in-ten Canadians express a preference for O’Toole on three separate matters: negotiating with U.S. President Joe Biden on trade and security issues (34%), being the Prime Minister in the event of a terrorist attack (32%) and negotiating with Russia over Arctic sovereignty (31%).  
 
“There is a theme developing when it comes to the perceptions of Canadians on the three main party leaders,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While Trudeau and Singh score highly on some of the personality traits, like hanging around at a bar or coffee shop, O’Toole has a decisive advantage on foreign policy items.”  
 
This week, there will be two televised debates organized by the Leaders’ Debate Commission. More than two-in-five Canadians (42%) agree with the Commission’s decision to not extend an invitation to these debates to People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier, while 33% disagree and 25% are undecided.  
 
The results are similar when Canadians are asked about the presence of Maverick Party leader Jay Hill on the televised meetings, with 44% agreeing with the decision to leave him out, 27% disagreeing and 29% saying they are not sure.  
 
Almost half of Quebecers (49%) are in favour of the Commission’s decision to leave both Bernier and Hill off the stage.  
 
Across the country, 17% of Canadians say they plan to vote by mail this year—a proportion that includes 30% of British Columbians and 21% of Albertans.  
 
While more than one-in-four Canadians (26%) plan to cast their ballot during Advance Voting from September 10 to September 13, more than two-in-five (44%) intend to vote on Election Day (September 20).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Conservatives Close Gap in Canada as Liberal Lead Disappears

Justin Trudeau’s approval rating fell to 45% (-5 since June), but he is still ahead of Erin O’Toole in the “Preferred PM” question.
 
Vancouver, BC [August 31, 2021] – The federal election in Canada is currently a dead heat between the two most prominent parties in the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 33% of Canadian decided voters would cast a ballot for the candidate of the Liberal Party in their riding, down five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June.
 
The Conservative Party remains in second place with 32% (+2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 22% (+2), the Bloc Québécois with 6% (+1), the Green Party with 4% (-1) and the People’s Party with 3% (+2). Fewer than 1% of decided voters would vote for the Maverick Party, for another party or for an independent candidate.
 
In June, the Liberals were ahead of the Conservatives by 15 points among female decided voters in Canada. This month, the advantage has narrowed to just eight points (36% to 28%). The Tories are now in first place among male decided voters (36% to 31%).
 
The Liberals are still popular among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (34%, followed by the NDP with 29%) and among decided voters aged 35-to-54 (38%, with the Conservatives at 32%). The Tories hold a seven-point advantage over the Liberals among decided voters aged 55 and over (37% to 30%).
 
The Liberals are in first place among decided voters in Atlantic Canada (40%) and Quebec (also 40%). The Conservatives have outright leads in Alberta (49%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (46%).
 
There are close races developing in two Canadian provinces. In Ontario, the Conservatives and the Liberals are essentially tied (36% and 35% respectively). In British Columbia, the Liberals—who were leading in a Research Co. survey conducted in early August—have fallen to third place (28%), with both the Conservatives and the New Democrats at 32%.
 
There is some movement when Canadians are asked about the most important issue facing the country. Health care is first with 26% (-3), followed by the economy and jobs with 20% (-3) and housing, homelessness and poverty with 15% (+1). The environment is fourth on the list with 13% (+6).
 
“While health care remains the dominant issue for Atlantic Canadians and Quebecers, financial matters are crucial for those who reside in Alberta,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “One-in-five Ontarians and British Columbians are worried about housing, but the issue that has seen the biggest gains since June is the environment.”
 
The approval rating for Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau stands at 45% at the end of the month. This is higher than the numbers posted by Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole (41%, +7) and lower than NDP leader Jagmeet Singh (51%, +1).
 
Just over one-in-five Canadians (21%, -11) approve of the way Green Party leader Annamie Paul is handling her duties, while there was no significant movement for People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (15%, +1).
 
When Canadians are asked which one of the five leaders who are running nationwide campaigns would make the best head of government, the incumbent prime minister also lost some ground. Trudeau is in first place with 32% (-5), followed by O’Toole (26%, +11), Singh (20%, +4), Bernier (3%, =) and Paul (1%, -1).
 
Since the start of the campaign, Trudeau posts a negative momentum score (-24, with 39% of Canadians saying their opinion of him has worsened). Paul and Bernier are also in negative territory (-18 and -19 respectively), while O’Toole is even and Singh is at +10 (with 27% of Canadians reporting a better assessment of the current NDP leader).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Most British Columbians Proud of Province, Intend to Stay Put

Just under three-in-five residents of British Columbia express sympathy towards their counterparts in Seattle and Portland.  
 
Vancouver, BC [August 24, 2021] – A significant proportion of British Columbians believe they will have a chance to live out their days in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 75% of British Columbians believe they will stay in the province for the rest of their lives, while 12% disagree and 12% are undecided.  
 
While 90% of British Columbians aged 55 and over foresee remaining in the province, the proportion drops to 72% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 61% among those aged 18-to-34.  
 
Across British Columbia, 84% of residents say they are very proud of the province that they live in, up three points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2020.  
 
While 90% of British Columbians who live in the Fraser Valley are very proud of their province, the numbers are lower in Metro Vancouver (84%), Southern BC (82%), Vancouver Island (78%) and Northern BC (also 78%).  
 
A majority of British Columbians (57%, -7) say their views are different from the rest of the country, and a slightly larger proportion (59%, +1) think they have more in common with the people of Seattle and Portland than with those in Toronto or Montreal.  
 
Fewer than one-in-five British Columbians (18%, -9) believe British Columbia would be better off as its own country.   Just over three-in-five respondents (61%, -2) say they consider themselves “Canadians first, and British Columbians second”, while 22% (-3) say they are “British Columbians first, and Canadians second.”  
 
“Three-in-ten residents of the province who voted for the BC Greens in the 2020 provincial election (30%) consider themselves British Columbians first,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are lower among those who supported the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (25%) and the BC Liberals (21%) in last year’s ballot.”  
 
Just under three-in-ten British Columbians (29%, +7) think John Horgan has been the province’s best head of government since 1986, followed by Christy Clark (9%, =), Mike Harcourt (6%, -1), Gordon Campbell (also 6%, -1) and Bill Vander Zalm (5%, -9).
 
One-in-five British Columbians (21%, +6) regard Christy Clark as the worst recent premier, followed by Campbell (11%, =), Glen Clark (9%, +1) and Horgan (8%, +3).
 
Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 7 to August 9, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca