Three-in-Four Canadians Back Temporary Ban on Vaping Products

A majority of residents would also support prohibiting flavoured vaping products.

Vancouver, BC [November 13, 2019] – A large proportion of Canadians support enacting a temporary prohibition on the sale and distribution of e-cigarettes, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-four Canadians (74%) would agree with their province implementing a vaping ban similar to the one that was recently enacted in Massachusetts.

Support for a temporary ban on all vaping products is high across all regions of the country, from 71% in Alberta to 77% in Atlantic Canada.

On Sept. 24, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker decreed a temporary four-month ban on all vaping products in the American state, following cases of lung damage associated with the use of e-cigarettes.

Just over one-in-ten Canadians (11%) say they used an electronic cigarette in the past year. The proportion is higher among those aged 18-to-34 (17%) and British Columbians (16%).

More than four-in-five Canadians (85%, -6 since a Research Co. survey conducted in 2018) want vaping products that contain nicotine to display a warning, similar to the one used for tobacco products. 

In addition, 73% of Canadians (-3) call for the use of e-cigarettes to be restricted to areas where smoking is currently allowed, and a majority (57%) want all flavoured vaping products to be banned 

Half of Canadians (50%, unchanged) say they would not consider dating a person who used electronic cigarettes—including 54% of British Columbians.

Canadians aged 55 and over (57%) are more likely to say they would shun a dating prospect because of vaping. The proportion is lower among Canadians aged 35-to-54 and 18-to-34 (47% each).

“When it comes to vaping and dating, there is no gender gap across Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Equal proportions of men and women say they wold not consider courting a vaper.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 21 to October 23, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Wait Times Are Biggest Health Care Issue for British Columbians

Almost three-in-five residents say there are some good things in the system, but some changes are required.

Vancouver, BC [September 6, 2019] – Most British Columbians have a positive view of the provincial health care system, but more than a third express worries about long waiting times, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 58% of British Columbians believe there are some good things in health care in the province, but some changes are required.

One-in-four British Columbians (26%) think the health care system in the province works well and only minor changes are needed to make it work better. 

A smaller proportion of residents (12%) believe health care in British Columbia has so much wrong with it that we need to completely rebuild it.

“Residents of Metro Vancouver and Southern BC are more likely to say that the provincial health care system requires only minor changes (27% each),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower in Northern BC (22%), Vancouver Island (also 22%) and the Fraser Valley (18%).”

Almost two-in-five British Columbians (38%) identify long waiting times as the biggest problem facing the health care system in the province right now.

One-in-five residents (20%) say a shortage of doctors and nurses is the biggest issue, followed by inadequate resources and facilities (15%), and bureaucracy and poor management (10%).

Fewer British Columbians mention a lack of a wider range of services for patients (6%), vague legal rights of patients (4%), little focus on preventive care (3%) and insufficient standards of hygiene (1%).

Across the province, 45% of British Columbians say they would be willing to pay out of their own pocket to have quicker access to medical services that currently have long waiting times—a proportion that includes 56% of those in the highest income bracket.

More than a third of British Columbians (37%) say they would be willing to travel to another country to have quicker access to medical services that currently have long waiting times.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

BC Parents Partial to Kids Pursuing Medicine and Engineering

Almost two thirds of parents would try to discourage their children from seeking a career in politics.

Vancouver, BC [September 4, 2019] – Parents in British Columbia are more enthusiastic about their children pursuing a career in medicine or engineering than in politics, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of parents who have a child enrolled in K-12 in British Columbia, nine-in-ten respondents (91%) say they would “definitely” or “probably” try to encourage their child to become a doctor or nurse.

A similarly high proportion of parents in British Columbia (89%) would attempt to encourage their child to become an engineer.

Almost three-in-five parents in British Columbia (59%) would try to encourage their child to pursue a career path as a police officer.

More than half of parents in the province would try to steer their child to become a professional athlete (56%) or an arts performer (52%).

Conversely, fewer than three-in-ten parents in British Columbia (28%) would “definitely” or “probably” try to encourage their child to become a politician. 

“Almost two thirds of parents in British Columbia (65%) say they would attempt to discourage their children from pursuing a career in politics,” says Mario Canseco, President at Research Co. “The proportion is highest among parents in Vancouver Island (69%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 20 to May 28, 2019, among 700 parents in British Columbia who have a child enrolled in Kindergarten, Elementary School (Grades 1 to 7) or High School (Grades 8 to 12). The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Back Opt-Out System for Organ and Tissue Donation

Support for change is highest in British Columbia, Alberta and Quebec.

Vancouver, BC [August 21, 2019] – A majority of Canadians would welcome a modification in the way the registries of organ and tissue donors are compiled across the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than three-in-five Canadians (63%) think their province should “definitely” or “probably” implement an “Active Donor Registration” system for organ and tissue donation after death.

Some jurisdictions around the world have established “Active Donor Registration” systems for organ and tissue donation. Under these systems, every person over the age of 18 is considered an organ and tissue donor after death unless they specifically opt-out of a registry.

Across the country, 25% of Canadians are opposed to their province implementing an opt-out system for organ and tissue donation and 13% are undecided.

Earlier this year, Nova Scotia’s House of Assembly unanimously passed the “Human Organ and Tissue Act”. The law makes every single person who has resided in the province for at least a year a potential organ and tissue donor after death. Nova Scotians who do not wish to be donors are able to opt-out of the system.

 “Support for enacting an opt-out system for organ and tissue donation reaches 66% in British Columbia, Alberta and Quebec,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “A majority of residents of Manitoba and Saskatchewan (63%), Atlantic Canada (59%) and Ontario (57%) would also welcome the change.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 12 to August 14, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Call for Holistic Approach to Deal with Drug Use

More than half prefer to focus on treatment that does not rely on opioid replacement therapy and aims for abstinence.

Vancouver, BC [August 14, 2019] – A majority of Canadians express support for policies to deal with drug use in the country that focus on information, “harm reduction” and the goal of abstinence, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than four-in-five Canadians (83%) support education and prevention campaigns to deal with drug use in Canada.

About three-in-five Canadians are also in favour of supervised injection sites (59%) and needle-exchange programs (58%).

“Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (77%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (64%) in the last federal election are supportive of supervised injection sites,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However, only 48% of Conservative Party voters in the 2015 ballot concur.”

A majority of Canadians (57%) support treatment that does not rely on opioid replacement therapy and aims for abstinence.

Conversely, fewer than half of Canadians are in favour of treatment that does not aim for abstinence and relies on opioid replacement therapy (48%).

More than half of Canadians (52%) approve of having a supervised injection site located “anywhere in their municipality.” However, only 38% would consent to a facility of this nature located “anywhere in their neighbourhood” and just 33% would approve of one “a block away from their home.”

Residents of Atlantic Canada and Quebec are more likely to accept a supervised injection site located “a block away from their home” (40% and 39% respectively) than those who live in British Columbia (31%), Manitoba and Saskatchewan (28%), Ontario (24%) and Alberta (22%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from July 15 to July 17, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca