Canadians Satisfied with Governments on COVID-19 Handling

Two thirds of Canadians favour implementing a global ban on “wet markets” that sell live animals for human consumption.

Vancouver, BC [March 24, 2020] – Most Canadians are content with the way in which different levels of government have managed the COVID-19 outbreak so far, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, two thirds of Canadians (66%) say they are satisfied with the way the federal government has dealt with the COVID-19 outbreak.

Canadians aged 55 and over (73%) are more likely to express a positive view of Ottawa’s efforts related to COVID-19 than those aged 35-to-54 (64%) and those aged 18-to-34 (60%).

“As expected, public backing for Ottawa’s performance on COVID-19 is particularly high among Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in last year’s election (80%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But majorities of Canadians who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (67%) and the Conservative Party (54%) are also pleased.”

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) are satisfied with how their provincial governments have handled the current situation, while 64% feel the same way about the performance of their municipal administrations.

Approval of provincial governments is highest in Quebec (84%), followed by British Columbia (69%), Ontario (66%), Alberta (65%), Atlantic Canada (64%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (also 64%).

A “wet market” in Wuhan, China, which sells live animals for human consumption has been mentioned as the place where COVID-19 may have originated.

A sizeable proportion of Canadians (68%) would like to see governments around the world implementing a ban on “wet markets”—including 75% of British Columbians and 73% of Ontarians.

Two thirds of Canadians (66%) believe the Government of the People’s Republic of China should take responsibility for its role in the COVID-19 outbreak. This includes majorities of Canadians who voted for the Conservatives (76%), the Liberals (66%) and the New Democrats (61%) in the 2019 federal election.

Three-in-five Canadians (61%) think it is not acceptable to refer to COVID-19 as the “Chinese virus” or “Chinese flu”. This sentiment is more pronounced among residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (66%), Canadians aged 18-to-34 (64%) and women (63%).

When asked if the Government of Canada should consider launching legal action against the People’s Republic of China on account of the COVID-19 outbreak, about one third of Canadians (32%) agree but a majority (52%) disagree.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 21 to March 22, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Some Canadians Forgoing Social Distancing in COVID-19 Crisis

Three-in-ten say it is “reasonable” to attend a gathering of 10 people or fewer—against the advice of health authorities.  

Vancouver, BC [March 21, 2020] – While more than seven-in-ten Canadians are resigned to a worsening situation on account of the COVID-19 outbreak, some believe specific activities that could spread the virus are still sensible at this time, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 72% of Canadians think the worst is “definitely” or “probably” ahead of us when it comes to COVID-19.

Albertans (82%), Atlantic Canadians (81%) and residents aged 55 and over (76%) are more likely to believe that the situation will worsen.  

Over the past two weeks, health authorities and governments of all levels have urged Canadians to abide by social distancing guidelines and increase the physical space between people to avoid spreading the illness. These recommendations include working from home instead of at the office and avoiding in-person visits to loved ones.  

More than one-in-five Canadians (22%) believe visiting elderly relatives, such as parents or grandparents, is “reasonable” at this time—including 28% of those aged 18-to-34, 26% of men and 27% of Ontarians.

Three-in-ten Canadians (30%) think it is “reasonable” to hold a gathering of 10 people or fewer at this time.  

“Toronto’s chief medical officer of health, Dr. Eileen de Villa, stated on March 18 that having people over for dinner or coffee is not social distancing,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Yet we see that 41% of Canadians aged 18-to-34, 38% of Albertans and 34% of men believe this is reasonable behaviour during the COVID-19 outbreak.”  

Significantly fewer Canadians think it is “reasonable” at this point to eat inside restaurants (15%), hold a gathering of more than 10 people (13%) and exercise at gyms or fitness facilities (12%).

Across the country, 82% of Canadians refer to the COVID-19 outbreak as a “major crisis”, including 85% of women, 85% of Quebecers and 92% of Atlantic Canadians.  

Conversely, 13% of Canadians believe the outbreak represents a “minor crisis”, while only 3% believe it is “not a crisis at all.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 19 to March 20, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Four-in-Five British Columbians Would Delay Cruise Ship Season

Support for this measure, on account of the COVID-19 outbreak, is high across all demographics in the province.

Vancouver, BC [March 12, 2020] – Most residents of British Columbia would follow a recent suggestion made by provincial health officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry, to postpone the start of the cruise ship season in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 82% of British Columbians agree with delaying the start of the cruise ship season on account of the COVID-19 outbreak, while 12% disagree and 6% are undecided.

The cruise ship season is currently slated to begin in April in Victoria and Vancouver. Public support for a postponement of the cruise ship season is strong across both genders in British Columbia (84% among women and 80% among men) and all three major age groups (79% among those aged 18-to-34 and 84% among both those aged 35-to-54 and aged 55 and over).

On a regional basis, support for a delay in the cruise ship season is highest in Vancouver Island (92%), followed by Northern BC (89%), the Fraser Valley (85%), Metro Vancouver (82%) and Southern BC (71%).

“British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the last provincial election are the most likely to agree with postponing the cruise ship season (86%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support is slightly lower among BC Green Party voters (84%) and BC Liberal voters (80%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 9 to March 11, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Conscience Rights on Physician-Assisted Death Split Canadians

About two-in-five Canadians would allow health care professionals to object to providing abortion services.

Vancouver, BC [February 26, 2020] – While practically half of Canadians are not in favour of legislative action that would entrench conscience rights for health care workers, the country is evenly divided when assessing cases of physician-assisted death, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 44% of Canadians agree that health care professionals should have the ability to object to providing services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to physician-assisted death. A similar proportion of Canadians (42%) disagree with this stipulation.

Alberta—where public debate over Bill 207 intensified late last year—has the lowest proportion of residents who would agree to entrench conscience rights in cases of physician-assisted death (38%).

The level of support for a caveat for health care professionals on physician-assisted suicide cases is highest in British Columbia (48%), followed by Quebec (47%), Atlantic Canada (46%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (46%) and Ontario (41%).

When asked about conscience rights on two other instances, Canadians are not as divided. Practically half (49%) disagree with health care professionals objecting to provide services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to abortion, while 39% agree.

A majority of Canadians (58%) disagree with health care professionals objecting to provide services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to serving lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, gender diverse, queer and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2+) people, while 31% agree.

“Canadians who profess a religion are more likely to extend the ability for health care professionals to have moral or faith-based objections in cases of physician-assisted suicide (52%), abortion (46%) and serving LGBT people (37%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The level of support is considerably lower among Canadians who have no religious affiliation (28%, 24% and 18% respectively).”

Across the country, 49% of Canadians say that they would oppose a bill that sought to allow health care professionals the ability to have a moral or faith-based objection to providing services, while 39% would support this provincial legislation.

Opposition to this type of bill is highest in Alberta (59%), followed by Atlantic Canada (53%), British Columbia (51%), Ontario (49%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (45%) and Quebec (42%).  

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 14 to February 17, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Canadians and Americans Agree on Vaccinations for Children

Majorities in both countries believe individuals should decide if they want to get immunized against seasonal diseases.

Vancouver, BC [February 14, 2020] – While four-in-five Canadians endorse the concept of mandatory inoculations for children, the proportion of Americans who feel the same way is smaller, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 81% of Canadians—up three points since a similar study conducted in 2018—believe that vaccinations for children should “definitely” or “probably” be mandatory in their province.

The proportion of Americans who think immunizations for children should “definitely” or “probably” be mandatory in their state is lower (68%).

“More than one-in-four Americans (27%) believe decisions on childhood vaccinations should be made by parents,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion of Canadians who would follow this course of action is decidedly lower (12%).”

In Canada, Quebec has the highest proportion of residents (17%) who believe parents should choose whether their children should be vaccinated. In the United States, 30% of residents of the South and the West feel the same way.

When asked about inoculations and seasonal diseases (such as the flu), slim majorities of Canadians and Americans (51% in each country) believe each person should “definitely” or “probably” be allowed to decide whether they want to get vaccinated or not.

Just over two-in-five respondents in each country (44% in Canada and 43% in the United States) feel the flu vaccine should be mandatory for everybody in their province or state.

In the late 1990s, a study published in the weekly medical journal The Lancet—which has since been discredited and retracted—attempted to link childhood vaccination and autism.

In Canada, 26% of respondents to this survey think there is a connection between the childhood vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella and autism. The proportion of Americans who believe this is slightly higher, at 30%.

Respondents aged 18-to-34 in both countries (36% in Canada and 43% in the United States) are more likely to believe in the debunked connection between childhood immunization and autism than their older counterparts.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 7 to February 9, 2020, among 1,000 Canadian adults, and an online study conducted from February 6 to February 8, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each study, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full Canadian dataset here, our full American dataset here and download the press release here.

Photo Credit: John Keith

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca