Most Americans Reject Delaying the 2020 Presidential Election

Among decided voters, Democratic candidate Joe Biden keeps a sizeable advantage over incumbent Donald Trump. 

Vancouver, BC [August 7, 2020] – Most likely voters in the United States reject the notion of delaying the presidential election that is scheduled for November, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of likely voters, two thirds of respondents (68%) think the election should not be postponed to a later date because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Majorities of likely voters who identify as Democrats (75%), Independents (67%) and Republicans (59%) believe this year’s presidential ballot should go on as planned.

More than half of decided voters (53%) would support prospective Democratic nominee Joe Biden in the November election, while 42% would vote for Republican incumbent Donald Trump.

Support is decidedly lower for Libertarian nominee Jo Jorgensen (2%), Green nominee Howie Hawkins (1%) and other candidates (also 1%).

These results are largely unchanged at the national level since the July Research Co. survey that also placed Biden ahead by double-digits among decided voters.

The bulk of support for Biden comes from women (59%), decided voters aged 18-to-34 (54%) and African Americans (71%). The race is closer among men, where Biden is slightly ahead of Trump (47% to 45%). Among White voters, Trump is practically tied with Biden (48% to 47%).

More than nine-in-ten decided voters (92%) say they are certain that they will vote for their chosen candidate in the election. This includes 94% of those who intend to support Trump and 91% of those who plan to vote for Biden.

There are some sizeable differences when supporters of the two main contenders are asked about the factors for their choice.

About a third of decided voters who support Trump (34%) say their main motivator is the candidate’s ideas and policies, while fewer point to disgust with other candidates (23%) and Trump’s political party (22%).

Biden voters are primarily motivated by disgust with other candidates (30%), and to a lesser extent by the candidate’s ideas and policies (23%) and his political party (21%).

When asked which one of the two main candidates is better suited to handle specific issues, Biden holds the upper hand on the environment (50%), health care (49%), race relations (48%), education (47%), COVID-19 (46%), government accountability (45%), foreign policy (43%), energy and oil (41%) and managing the deficit (40%)

The two contenders are tied or virtually even on five issues: crime (Trump 39%, Biden 39%), the economy (Trump 43%, Biden 41%), job creation (Trump 42%, Biden 41%), immigration (Biden 42%, Trump 40%) and national defense (Trump 41%, Biden 41%).

“In our June survey, Trump was ahead of Biden on job creation, the economy and national defense,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Now the numbers on these issues have tightened considerably, while Biden has also gained ground on energy and oil.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on August 3 and August 4, 2020, among 1,018 likely voters in the United States and 946 decided voters in the 2020 presidential election. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 3.2 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our datasets here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Most Americans Think Worst of COVID-19 Pandemic Lies Ahead

Sizeable majorities of Americans of all political stripes agree with requiring all customers to wear masks at indoor premises.

Vancouver, BC [August 5, 2020] – Americans remain worried about the COVID-19 pandemic, and fewer are satisfied with the way federal authorities have handled the situation, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Americans believe “the worst is ahead” when it comes to the COVID-19 pandemic. This represents an 11-point increase since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June.

Americans aged 55 and over are more likely to expect the COVID-19 situation to worsen (58%) than those aged 35-to-54 (48%) and those aged 18-to-34 (47%).

“In June, 47% of Americans thought they had left the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic behind,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This month, only 37% feel the same way.”

Across the United States, just over a third of Americans (37%) are satisfied with how the federal government has dealt with the COVID-19 outbreak, down nine points since June. Dissatisfaction has risen from 48% to 53%.

The level of satisfaction in how the COVID-19 pandemic has been handled continues to be higher when Americans rate their state governments (56%, -6) and their local governments (61%, -3).

More than four-in-five Americans (82%) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside. Support for this measure is high among Democrats (90%), Independents (83%) and Republicans (73%).

About two thirds of Americans (65%, -4) say they would take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available, while 25% (+5) say they would not.

Three-in-ten Republicans (31%) say they are not willing to get inoculated against COVID-19, along with 27% of Independents and 18% of Democrats.

The approval rating for U.S. President Donald Trump stands at 43% this month, up three points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in July. Satisfaction with Trump’s performance is highest among men (47%), Americans aged 35-to-54 (also 47%), White Americans (46%), Fox News watchers (66%) and Republicans (83%)

A majority of Americans (54%, -2) disapprove of how Trump is handling his duties, including 59% of women, 57% of Americans aged 55 and over, 62% of African Americans and 83% of Democrats.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on August 3 and August 4, 2020, among 1,200 American adults.  The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our datasets here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Half of Canadians Have Experienced Racism in Social Interactions

Three-in-four Canadians (74%) think the policy of multiculturalism has been good for the country, up 15 points since January 2019. 

Vancouver, BC [July 21, 2020] – Racist behaviour in day-to-day social interactions has impacted half of Canadians, with a significantly higher incidence reported among those who identify as First Nations, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians say they have experienced racist behaviour in day-to-day social interactions with others, such as shopping and taking public transit.

More than four-in-five Canadians who identify as First Nations, Métis or Inuit (86%) say they have endured racism in day-to-day social interactions, along with 78% of Canadians of African descent, 68% of South Asians, 63% of East Asians and 58% of Southeast Asians.

Slightly lower proportions of Canadians acknowledge experiencing racist behaviour on social media (46%), at school (43%) or at work (41%).

A third of Canadians say they have endured racism during interactions with police or law enforcement officers (33%) and the health care system (29%).

“Canadians of European ancestry are less likely to have endured racism, and the numbers on specific settings go through significant fluctuations according to a person’s ethnicity,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Three-in-five Canadians of African descent (61%) have experienced racism during interactions with police, and seven-in-ten Canadians who identify as First Nations (70%) have endured racism at work.”

Majorities of Canadians of First Nations (56%), South Asian (also 56%) and African descent (58%) say they have faced racism during interactions with the health care system.

When asked if they have witnessed behaviour that they would describe as racist, more than half of Canadians say they have perceived it in day-to-day social interactions (58%) and social media (57%), while fewer have seen it at school (50%), at work (47%), dealing with police and law enforcement (41%) and engaging with the health care system (34%).

Half of Canadians (49%) believe race relations in Canada have improved over the past two years, while 29% feel they have worsened. Men (56%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (61%) are more likely to think that the situation is getting better.

Three-in-four Canadians (74%) believe the policy of multiculturalism has been “very good” or “good” for Canada—up 14 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in January 2019.

The proportion of Canadians who think multiculturalism has been “bad” or “very bad” for the country fell to 18% (-15).

As was the case last year, Canadians are divided when assessing two distinct concepts. Almost half (46%, -3 since January 2019) believe Canada should be a melting pot and immigrants should assimilate and blend into Canadian society.

A smaller proportion of Canadians (41%, -1) believe the country should be a mosaic and think cultural differences within Canadian society are valuable and should be preserved.

Quebecers (51%), Ontarians (48%) and Albertans (also 48%) are more likely to endorse the concept of the melting pot for Canada. Smaller proportions of residents of British Columbia (43%), Atlantic Canada (38%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 38%) concur.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from July 3 to July 8, 2020, among 2,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.2 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Four Canadians Would Take a COVID-19 Vaccine

Satisfaction with how provincial governments have handled the pandemic increased to 75% across the country.

Vancouver, BC [July 7, 2020] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians would welcome the idea of inoculation against COVID-19, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-four Canadians (75%) would take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available, up two points since a similar survey conducted in April.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) say they are satisfied with the way the federal government has handled the COVID-19 outbreak, up one point since May. The same proportion (70%) are satisfied with the performance of their municipal administrations during the pandemic.

Satisfaction with the way provincial governments have managed COVID-19 increased by 11 points to 75% across Canada. The rating improved in the four most populous provinces: British Columbia, (83%, +14), Ontario (76%, +23), Quebec (69%, +3) and Alberta (62%, +6).

The proportion of Canadians who say they wear a mask every time they go out has increased dramatically, from 14% in May to 48% in late June.

“There is a big gender gap when it comes to wearing protective masks outside the home,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While more than half of women in Canada (57%) are not leaving their home without a mask, only 39% of men are partaking in the same behaviour.”

Two-in-five Canadians (40%, -7) are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection, and about one-in-four (23%, -17) say they are not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection.

The proportion of Canadians who acknowledge eating more than usual at home remained at 29%, while 18% (+5) are drinking more at home and 16% (-2) are losing their temper more often.

Across the country, only 37% of Canadians expect to be able to attend or host a large social gathering before December, while fewer believe they will be able to shake the hand of a person who is not at their home (33%), attend a live sporting event (26%) or travel abroad (21%).

Half of Canadians (49%, +25 since May) believe the worst of the COVID-19 outbreak is “behind us”—a proportion that rises to 57% in Quebec.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 26 to June 28, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Flag First, Monarchy Last in List of What Makes Canadians Proud

The proportion of Canadians who say the monarchy makes them proud fell by seven points since 2019.

Vancouver, BC [July 3, 2020] – The perceptions of Canadians on specific institutions and features of the country went through noticeable changes over the past year, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than four-in-five Canadians (82%) say they are proud of the Canadian flag. This represents an 11-point decrease since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2019.

More than seven-in-ten Canadians express pride in the health care system (75%, -2), the Canadian Armed Forces (74%, -15) and multiculturalism (71%, +5).

More than three-in-five Canadians say they are proud of the state of democracy in Canada (66%, -4), hockey (64%, -8) indigenous culture (62%, +6) and bilingualism (61%, +6).

“Compared to last year, there are significant fluctuations in the way Canadians feel about features and institutions of the country that elicit inclusiveness and togetherness,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There is a deeper appreciation this year for multiculturalism, Indigenous culture and bilingualism than what we saw in 2019.”

Just over half of Canadians express pride in the Canadian justice system (55%, +15), the Canadian economy (53%, -27), Parliament (53%, +8) and the monarchy (40%, -7).

The monarchy is once again the lowest rated item on this list. Women (45%) and British Columbians (50%) are more likely to say that this particular institution elicits feelings of pride than men (35%) and Quebecers (31%).

Quebec posts the highest rating of any region for bilingualism (71%) and the lowest for the health care system (61%).

Two thirds of Ontarians and British Columbians (67% each) say that indigenous culture elicits feelings of pride, followed by residents of Atlantic Canada (60%), Quebec (58%), Alberta (56%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (55%).

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be proud of multiculturalism (77%) than those aged 35-to-54 (70%) and those aged 55 and over (66%).

There are some major differences along political lines on two items. Large majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election say they are proud of Parliament (72%) and the Canadian justice system (66%).

Significantly fewer Canadians who cast ballots for the Conservative Party and the New Democratic Party (NDP) feel the same way about Parliament (41% and 42% respectively) and the Canadian justice system (54% and 43% respectively).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 26 to June 28, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Lockdown Exposes Areas Where Canadian Couples Are Struggling

Men get significantly lower grades from their partners on cooking meals, taking care of children and keeping the home clean.

Vancouver, BC [June 23, 2020] – While most Canadians who live with their spouse or partner appear happy with the way their significant others have behaved during the COVID-19 pandemic, there are certain aspects where men are faring worse than women, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of adults in Canada who live with a spouse or partner, 69% say they “strongly approve” of the performance of their significant other, while 22% “moderately approve.”

“Ontario (66%), Quebec (64%) and British Columbia (also 64%) are the regions of Canada with the lowest proportion of men and women who strongly approve of their spouses of partners,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are significantly higher in Alberta (75%), Atlantic Canada (80%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (83%).”

The level of “strong approval” of a spouse or partner is higher from men (73%) than women (65%). Both genders currently have the same level of “strong disapproval” (6%).

A majority of Canadians who are living with a spouse or partner say they are “very satisfied” with the way their significant other has handled eight issues:

  • Personal hygiene (69%)
  • Taking care of pets (57%)
  • Cooking meals (56%)
  • Taking care of children (55%)
  • Keeping the home clean and tidy (54%)
  • Overall attitude and demeanour (also 54%)
  • Making decisions about what to do (53%)
  • Providing emotional support when they need it (also 53%).

While 62% of men are “very satisfied” with their spouse or partner on keeping the home clean and tidy, the proportion drops to 46% when women answer the same question. In addition, 64% of men are “very satisfied” with their partner when it comes to cooking meals, but just 48% of women concur.

A similar gap is observed on taking care of children, with just 46% of women saying they are “very satisfied” with their partners—compared to 63% when men are asked.

On all eight issues, the level of strong satisfaction is higher among Canadians who have lived with their current spouse or partner for more than 10 years.

Almost half of Canadians who are living with a spouse or partner (46%) say the experience of the COVID-19 pandemic has made them grow closer as a couple. A similar proportion (47%) report no change in their relationship, while 6% say they have become more distant.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 8 to June 17, 2020, among 796 adults in Canada who live with a spouse or partner. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

COVID-19 Significantly Affects Exercise Routines in Canada

The proportion of Canadians who meet the recommended guidelines for physical activity fell to 29% during the pandemic.

Vancouver, BC [June 16, 2020] – Half of Canadians are having a tougher time exercising due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians say their physical activity routines were affected by the lockdown and they had to avoid specific actions.

A third of Canadians (33%) say they had to stop going to a gym or community centre since the start of the pandemic, while one-in-five (21%) had to stop going to a pool for swimming.

More than one-in-ten Canadians say they had to stop participating in an organized sports league (15%), had to stop going to a yoga studio (13%) or had to stop participating in pick-up sports that are not part of a league (12%).

“More than half of men in Canada (53%) say their exercise routine had to be modified because of the lockdown,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of Canadians who live in Ontario (56%), British Columbia (54%) and Alberta (51%) were affected.”

Just over two-in-five Canadians (42%) took action in order to exercise differently during the COVID-19 pandemic—including 45% of women, 48% of Ontarians and 70% of those aged 18-to-34.

One-in-four Canadians (25%) say they followed workouts or routines online, while 17% took up a sport that does not require equipment, such as running or jogging.

Smaller proportions of Canadians acquired weightlifting equipment (12%) or cardio machines (9%) for their home.

The poll also asked Canadians about their exercise routines before and after the COVID-19 pandemic.

Across the country, 36% of Canadians acknowledged meeting the Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines—accumulating at least two and a half hours of moderate- to vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity per week—every week before the pandemic started.

The proportion of Canadians who were able to meet the guidelines was higher among Canadians aged 18-to-34 (38%), Canadians aged 35-to-54 (also 38%), Ontarians (also 38%), Albertans (37%) and British Columbians (36%).

When asked about their physical activity after the pandemic began, only 29% of Canadians acknowledged that they have met the guidelines every week.

The proportion of Canadians who are able to currently meet the exercise guidelines dropped in Ontario (from 38% to 30%), Alberta (from 37% to 31%), British Columbia (from 36% to 29%) and Quebec (from 33% to 24%).

More than one-in-four Canadians (27%) say they never meet the recommended guidelines for physical activity. up from 23% before the lockdown.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 8 to June 10, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Ten Canadians Have Gained Weight During Pandemic

Only 41% of respondents say they follow the recommendations of Canada’s Food Guide “all the time” or “most of the time.”

Vancouver, BC [June 9, 2020] – The COVID-19 pandemic has changed some of the eating and food preparation habits of Canadians, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 31% of Canadians say they have personally gained weight during the pandemic, while 52% report no change and 14% say they have lost weight.

Women (33%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (36%) are more likely to acknowledge weight gain during the pandemic.

While two thirds of Canadians (66%) are “very familiar” or “moderately familiar” with Canada’s Food Guide, only 41% say they follow the document’s recommendations “all the time” or “most of the time” when choosing what to eat in an average week.

“Half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (50%) are paying attention to the recommendations of Canada’s Food Guide,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Smaller proportions of Canadians aged 35-to-54 (42%) and aged 55 and over (34%) are following the same course of action.”

Across the country, 36% of Canadians say they prepare dinner for themselves and others in their household in less than 30 minutes—up six points since a similar Research Co. survey completed in June 2019.

Most Canadians (56%, -4) are in the kitchen for 31 to 60 minutes on an average weeknight, while 8% (-2) devote more than an hour to making dinner,

Three-in-ten Canadians (29%) say they are baking desserts—such as cakes or cookies—at home more often than they did before the COVID-19 pandemic. One-in-five (21%) bake bread at home more often now than a few months ago.

Residents of Ontario are more likely to be baking bread at home more often than residents of other regions (27%), while Albertans are more likely to be baking homemade desserts (35%).

While most Canadians do not report a significant change to their consumption of six different foods since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, there are some nuances.

Almost one-in-five Canadians (15%) are eating less fish and shellfish, and 15% report eating less meat. Conversely, 24% of Canadians say they are eating both fruits and vegetables more often than before the pandemic began.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 1 to June 3, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Americans Prefer Biden Over Trump on Seven Policy Issues

A third of Americans consider Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris and Amy Klobuchar as “good choices” for Vice President.

Vancouver, BC [June 3, 2020] – Prospective Democratic Party nominee Joe Biden remains ahead of incumbent Donald Trump of the Republican Party with five months to go before the United States presidential election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 51% of decided voters in the United States (+1 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in April) would support Biden, while 46% (+2) would vote for Trump. Libertarian Party nominee Jo Jorgensen garners the backing of 2% of decided voters.

In 2016, Trump received 46% of the popular vote, two points behind Hillary Clinton (48%). Trump secured 306 votes in the Electoral College to Clinton’s 232.

Trump currently holds an 11-point lead over Biden among White decided voters (54% to 43%). Sizeable proportions of African American (83%) and Hispanic / Latino decided voters (67%) are planning to vote for Biden.

“Compared to what we reported on in April, there is significant movement among Independent voters,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “At this stage of the campaign, 15% of these voters are undecided, and among those who choose a candidate, Biden is nearly tied with Trump (47% to 45%).”

Most viewers of CNN and MSNBC / CNBC would vote for Biden (74% and 78% respectively), while more than seven-in-ten Fox News watchers (72%) would cast a ballot for Trump.

Biden is regarded by a plurality of Americans as the presidential candidate best suited to deal with seven policy issues:

  • The environment (46%).
  • Health care (45%).
  • Race relations (44%).
  • Education (also 44%).
  • Foreign policy (42%).
  • Government accountability (40%).
  • COVID-19 (also 40%).

Trump is ahead on three issues:

  • Job creation (43%).
  • The economy (also 43%).
  • National defense (41%).

The two contenders are virtually tied on four other issues:

  • Crime (Biden 38%, Trump 37%).
  • Managing the deficit (both at 36%).
  • Energy and oil (Biden 38%, Trump 37%).
  • Immigration (Biden 40%, Trump 39%).

When Americans are asked about nine characteristics that people may find in politicians, Biden has a higher score than Trump on eight items:

  • Being able to unite America and not divide it (47% to 30%).
  • Being in touch with the problems ordinary Americans face in their daily lives (47% to 35%).
  • Generally agreeing with respondents on issues they care about (45% to 40%).
  • Being able to bring the kind of change America needs (45% to 42%).
  • Being able to deal with labour unions effectively in the event of a dispute (45% to 41%).
  • Sharing the values of respondents (44% to 34%).
  • Being a good speaker and communicator (42% to 33%).
  • Being honest and trustworthy (42% to 32%).

Trump holds the upper hand on only one trait:

  • Being a good economic manager (47%, with Biden at 39%).

Biden has said he intends to choose a woman as his running mate. Across the United States, 40% of respondents think Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren would be a “good choice” for Vice President, followed by California Senator Kamala Harris at 39%, Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar at 35%, former Georgia Congresswoman Stacey Abrams at 29% and New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand at 26%.

More than three-in-five Democrats thin Warren (64%) and Harris (62%) would be good choices for the party’s ticket in 2020, while almost half feel the same way about Klobuchar (48%) and Abrams (46%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on June 1 and June 2, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our datasets here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Federal Government’s Handling of COVID-19 Splits Americans

Just over half of Americans (51%) disapprove of Donald Trump’s performance as president, including 56% of Independents.

Vancouver, BC [June 3, 2020] – People in the United States are divided in their assessment of the federal government’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 46% of Americans are satisfied with the way Washington has dealt with the COVID-19 pandemic, while 48% are dissatisfied.

Americans who voted for Republican Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election are more likely to say they are satisfied with the federal government’s efforts (76%) than those who cast a ballot for Democrat Hillary Clinton (29%).

Majorities of Americans are satisfied with the way their state governments (62%) and their local governments (64%) have managed the pandemic.

The approval rating for Trump stands at 46% this month, up three points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in April. More than half of Americans (51%, -1) currently disapprove of the president, including 80% of Democrats and 56% of Independents.

Americans who usually watch Fox News are more likely to approve of the president’s performance (72%) than those who get information from a local network (41%), CNN (31%) and MSNBC / CNBC (28%) 

The disapproval rating for Trump is higher among African Americans (67%) and those with Hispanic or Latino ancestry (59%) than among White Americans (46%).

Almost seven-in-ten Americans (69%) say they would take a vaccine against COVID-19 if it ultimately becomes available. Men are more likely to say they would get themselves vaccinated (77%) than women (62%).

“Views on the possibility of inoculation against COVID-19 vary across the political spectrum in the United States,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 77% of Democrats would take the vaccine, the proportion drops to 65% among Republicans and 62% among Independents.”

Almost half of Americans (47%) believe the worst is “behind us” when it comes to the COVID-19 outbreak, while 41% think the worst is “ahead of us.”

More than a third of Americans consider that the United States has been better in dealing with the COVID-19 outbreak than Brazil (35%), Mexico (33%) and Italy (31%).

Fewer respondents believe the U.S. has done a better job handling the pandemic than France (26%), Spain (also 26%), South Korea (24%), the United Kingdom (also 24%), Germany (23%), Canada (22%) and Japan (also 22%).

Photo Credit: Daniel Case

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on June 1 and June 2, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our datasets here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

British Columbians Hesitant About Life Without COVID-19 Vaccine

Most residents are willing to visit barbershops and restaurants, but the proportion drops for public transit, gyms and music venues.

Vancouver, BC [May 21, 2020] – A significant proportion of British Columbians are unwilling to partake in specific activities unless a vaccine against COVID-19 is available, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, more than half of British Columbians say they would not attend a live sporting event as a spectator (61%) or a music venue (59%) before there is a vaccine against COVID-19.

At this stage, more than half of British Columbians are willing to visit a community centre (60%) as well as a gym or fitness facility (53%).

“More than half of women in British Columbia (54%) say they would not set foot inside a gym or fitness facility before they can have access to a COVID-19 vaccine,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, most men (60%) say they would have no problem visiting these venues.”

There is a split among residents on the issue of public transit usage. Across the province, 57% of British Columbians are willing to ride on a bus without a COVID-19 vaccine, while 43% would not do so. In addition, 55% would ride on SkyTrain, while 45% would not.

Men are more likely than women to say they would be willing to ride a bus (63% to 52%) and ride on SkyTrain (60% to 50%) before a COVID-19 vaccine is accessible.

Fewer than a third of British Columbians say they would not visit restaurants, pubs or bars where people can only eat indoors (32%), libraries (29%), restaurants, pubs or bars where people eat outside (also 29%) and barbershops or salons (27%) without a COVID-19 vaccine.

British Columbians aged 55 and over are more likely to have no reservations about going to a restaurant patio (72%) or to a restaurant that only offers food indoors (64%).

British Columbians of European descent are more likely to say that they would visit an indoor restaurant before a COVID-19 vaccine is available (76%) than those of East Asian (69%) and South Asian (57%) heritage.

At least three-in-five British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (60%) and aged 55 and over (64%) say they are not willing to visit a music venue without a COVID-19 vaccine. The proportion is lower among those aged 35-to-54 (54%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 15 to May 17, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Split on “Family Bubbles” During COVID-19 Pandemic

While 82% would take advantage of an opportunity to expand their social circle, only 44% believe the concept is a good idea.

Vancouver, BC [May 12, 2020] – Fewer than half of Canadians agree with the notion of allowing two households a chance to socialize and interact during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 44% of Canadians believe the “family bubbles” are a good idea, while 35% disagree and 21% are undecided.

The “two-household bubble” or “family bubble” concept was originally introduced last month in New Brunswick as an effort to reduce social isolation.

There are some drastic discrepancies across the country when Canadians ponder this concept. While two thirds of Quebecers (68%) think the “family bubbles” are a good idea, the proportion of residents who feel the same way drops to 40% in Ontario, 39% in British Columbia, 37% in Atlantic Canada, 25% in Alberta and 18% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

If their province allowed it, more than four-in-five Canadians (82%) say they would take advantage of the opportunity to have a “family bubble”—including 84% of those aged 55 and over, 83% of those aged 18-to-34 and 77% of those aged 35-to-54.

However, while 50% of Canadians say they know exactly which household they would ask to become part of their “family bubble”, 37% disagree and 13% are not sure.

“There is a significantly large proportion of Canadians who would jump at the chance to expand their social circle during the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However, most are not entirely convinced that this is the right course of action at this time, and half are currently unable to select who to join.”

Canadians are not particularly optimistic of two particular milestones happening before the end of the summer.

Only 41% of Canadians expect people to go to the office and not work from home anymore before the end of August, and just 31% foresee being able to attend or host a large social gathering during the same period.

Across the country, 48% of Canadians expect things in their city or town to go back to the way they were before the COVID-19 outbreak in January 2021 or later.

Only 11% of Canadians believe a return to normalcy will happen before the end of August, Including 17% of those aged 18-to-34 and 17% of Quebecers.

More than two thirds of Canadians (68%) believe the worst is “definitely” or “probably” ahead of us when it comes to the COVID-19 outbreak—a four-point drop since Research Co. asked this question for the first time in March 2020.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 4 to May 6, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Hold Mixed Feelings About Trudeau’s Performance

The Liberal Party holds a nine-point advantage over the Conservative Party across the country.

Vancouver, BC [May 8, 2020] – Canadians are divided in their assessment of the first four and a half years of Justin Trudeau’s tenure as prime minister, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 48% of Canadians think Trudeau has performed “about the same” as they expected. Similar proportions of Canadians believe Trudeau has been “better” than they envisioned (24%) or “worse” than they anticipated (25%).

“More than a third of Canadians aged 55 and over (36%) believe Trudeau has been worse than they expected,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Significantly fewer Canadians aged 35-to-54 (21%) and 18-to-34 (18%) feel the same way.”

Two-in-five Canadians (41%) believe Trudeau has accomplished “little” as head of government. Comparable quantities of Canadians believe he has achieved “much” (24%) or that it is “too early” to judge his accomplishments (also 24%) since he took office in November 2015.

While 40% of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in last year’s federal election believe Trudeau as accomplished “much” since becoming prime minister, the proportion falls to 27% among those who cast ballots for New Democratic Party (NDP) candidates and to just 6% among those who supported the Conservative Party.

Respondents to this survey were also asked to evaluate if 10 different issues are better, the same, or worse now than six years ago, when Stephen Harper served as Canada’s prime minister.

At least one-in-five Canadians believe that four issues are better now: Canada’s reputation in the world (30%), Canada’s role in global affairs (25%), the environment (21%) and ethics and accountability (20%).

Fewer Canadians believe there has been an improvement on public safety (19%), health care (also 19%), national unity (18%), the Canadian economy (16%), taxation (13%) and national defence (11%).

If a federal election were held today, the governing Liberals would garner the backing of 39% of decided voters. The Conservatives are in second place with 30%, followed by the New Democrats with 17%, the Green Party with 7%, the Bloc Québécois with 5%, and the People’s Party with 1%.

The Liberals are particularly popular in Ontario (44%), Quebec (40%) and British Columbia (39%). The Conservatives are ahead in Alberta (45%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (38%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 1 to May 3, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Jeangagnon

Canadians Hold Differing Views on Easing COVID-19 Restrictions

While most agree with the plans outlined by their province, few think certain services should be available this month.  

Vancouver, BC [May 6, 2020] – While most Canadians endorse the proposals of their respective provincial administrations to restart the economy during the COVID-19 pandemic, significantly fewer believe that restaurants, barber shops or gyms should be open to the public in May, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 53% of Canadians agree with their provincial government’s plan to ease restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic, while 39% disagree and 8% are undecided.  

There is a noteworthy disparity on this question, with only 6% of Canadians saying they “strongly agree” with their provincial administration’s proposals, and 21% saying they “strongly disagree” with it.  

In spite of the high level of support for current plans to ease restrictions, few Canadians are eager to see a quick return to particular activities.  

Only 28% of Canadians would allow coffee shops to open for dine-in service before the end of May. Similar proportions of Canadians would consent to allowing barber shops and salons to open (26%) and allowing restaurants to open for dine-in service (25%).  

“Many Canadians are not quite ready to partake in some of the activities that they abandoned as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic ,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than two thirds believe that it would be unwise to return to dine-in service at coffee shops and restaurants before the end of this month.”  

Only one-in-five Canadians believe movie theatres (20%) and gyms, fitness facilities and community centres (also 20%) should open before the end of May. Fewer residents (13%) would allow live sporting events in the next few weeks.  

Even as most residents of the country remain under lockdown, one third of Canadians (34%) observed aggressive behaviour among shoppers inside stores over the past month. One-in-five (20%) witnessed aggressive behaviour among drivers on the road and 9% among pedestrians on the street.  

Residents of British Columbia were more likely to witness aggressive behaviour inside stores (43%), while Ontarians were more likely to observe aggressive behaviour on the road (26%).  

When Canadians are asked to select four emotions they may have right now about the COVID-19 outbreak, 66% choose “sadness” while 64% pick “fear.” About a third (32%) feel “anger” and 27% say “angst.”  

Women are significantly more likely to feel “sadness” than men (74% to 58%), while men are more likely to experience “disgust” (22% to 17%) when thinking of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 27 to April 29, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Feel Vastly Superior to U.S. on COVID-19 Response

Almost three-in-four respondents (74%) think Canada is doing a better job dealing with the outbreak than the United States.

Vancouver, BC [April 28, 2020] – Most Canadians believe the federal government has been more skillful at managing the COVID-19 pandemic than the administrations of five other nations, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 74% of Canadians consider that Canada has done a better job dealing with the COVID-19 outbreak than the United States.

“Political allegiance does not play a role in shaping the perceptions of Canadians about what is transpiring in the United States,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberals (78%), the New Democrats (also 78%) and the Conservatives (69%) in last year’s federal election feel the same way.”

More than three-in-five Canadians think Canada’s response to the COVID-19 outbreak has been superior to that of Italy (69%) and Spain (62%). More than half also believe that Canada has been better at handling the pandemic than the United Kingdom (53%) and France (also 53%).

Canadians aged 55 and over appear to be particularly critical of the United States (81% think Canada has been better at handling the COVID-19 outbreak), Italy (78% think Canada has done better) and Spain (75% believe Canada has done better).

Three-in-five residents of Quebec (60%) feel that Canada has performed better than the United Kingdom in dealing with the pandemic, along with 54% of Atlantic Canadians, 51% of Ontarians and 50% of British Columbians.

More than two-in-five Canadians think that Canada has managed the COVID-19 outbreak in a better fashion than Brazil (47%) and Mexico (44%).

The level of undecided respondents is high when Canadians are asked to assess the two Latin American nations (30% for each one), but fewer than one-in-ten consider that those countries have done a better job than Canada so far (6% for Mexico and 4% for Brazil).

About a third of Canadians believe that Canada has been better at handling the COVID-19 outbreak than Germany (32%), Japan (31%) and South Korea (28%). One-in-five Canadians (25%) think Canada has done a worse job than South Korea when it comes to the pandemic. About three-in-ten believe Canada is doing “about the same” as Germany (31%) and Japan (29%) in managing the situation.

Photo Credit:

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 20 to April 22, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca