Vaccine Hesitation Drops, Satisfaction with Rollout Rises in Canada

Seven-in-ten Canadians say they are still wearing a mask every time they go out, including 76% of women.

Vancouver, BC [July 20, 2021] – More Canadians are pleased with the way their federal and provincial administrations have managed the inoculation process related to the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than seven-in-ten Canadians are satisfied with the vaccination plans and phases outlined by their province (73%, +12 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May) and with the pace of vaccination efforts in their province (also 73%, +15).

A similar proportion of Canadians are content with the procurement of COVID-19 vaccine doses from the federal government (72%, +15).

This month, almost nine-in-ten Canadians (88%, +5) acknowledge that they have already been inoculated against COVID-19, or plan to have their first shot when it becomes available to them.

Fewer than one-in-ten Canadians (8%, -5) say they will “definitely” or “probably” not get vaccinated. This marks the first time in nine different surveys conducted since April 2020 that the proportion of Canadians who plan to refuse a COVID-19 shot is in single digits.

In December 2020, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) stated that it expected to have enough COVID-19 vaccine doses to inoculate every willing Canadian by the end of September 2021.

“In February 2021, only 45% of Canadians expected the vaccination goal outlined by the PHAC to actually be met,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This month, practically three-in-four Canadians (74%) believe the milestone will be reached.”

Across the country, seven-in-ten Canadians (70%, -5) say that they wear a mask every time they go out, including 76% of women and 75% of Canadians aged 55 and over.

This month sees sizeable reductions in the proportion of Canadians who are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection (24%, -6) and who are losing their temper more than usual at home (16%, -4).

The indicators are mostly stable on other behavioural aspects related to the pandemic, including the proportion of Canadians who are overeating or eating more than usual at home (27%, -2),  not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection (16%, +1), having a bath or shower less often (14%, -2), drinking more alcohol than usual at home (also 14%, +1) and brushing their teeth less often than before the pandemic (9%, -2).

Methodology:  Results are based on an online study conducted from July 9 to July 11, 2021, among 1,000 Canadian adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Satisfaction with Pandemic Handling Increases Across Canada

Three-in-four Canadians think the border with the United States should remain closed to non-essential travel.

Vancouver, BC [July 15, 2021] – While more Canadians are content with the way all levels of government have managed the COVID-19 pandemic, a majority of the country’s residents believe it is too soon to fully reopen the border with the United States, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than three-in-five Canadians (61%) are satisfied with the way the federal government has dealt with the COVID-19 outbreak, up 10 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May.

“Residents of Atlantic Canada (73%) and Quebec (67%) are more likely to be satisfied with the way Ottawa has managed the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “They are joined by majorities of Canadians who reside in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (62%), Ontario (54%), Alberta (53%) and British Columbia (52%).”

More than three-in-five Canadians are also satisfied with the way their municipal governments (63%, +8) and their provincial governments (62%, +10) have handled COVID-19.

The satisfaction rating increased in the four most populous provinces. British Columbia (71%, +10) and Quebec (71%, +10) continue to post significantly higher numbers than Ontario (51%, +9) and Alberta (46%, +12).

More than seven-in-ten Canadians (72%, +17) think the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic is now behind us, while 15% (-12) believe it still lies ahead.

In spite of the fact that most Canadians think the pandemic will not worsen, 77% believe that COVID-19 is still “a very serious” or “moderately serious” problem, while 19% deem it “not too serious” or “not a problem.”

Just under four-in-five Canadians (79%, -5 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May) believe that all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise should wear a face covering while inside.

There are reductions in the proportion of Canadians who would like to prohibit non-essential travel from one province to another (65%, -9) and non-essential travel inside provinces (59%, -8). In addition, 71% (-8) would continue to place all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period.

Across the country, 75% of Canadians (-5 since May) think the border with the United States should remain closed to non-essential travel—a proportion that rises to 80% in British Columbia and 85% among Canadians aged 55 and over.

Methodology:  Results are based on an online study conducted from July 9 to July 11, 2021, among 1,000 Canadian adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Losing Pride in Specific Institutions and Features

The proportion of Canadians who say they are proud of the Armed Forces has fallen by 22 points since 2019.

Vancouver, BC [July 1, 2021] – Fewer Canadians are expressing a positive emotional connection with important components of life in the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than three-in-four Canadians (77%) say they are proud of the Canadian flag, down five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in 2020.

At least two thirds of Canadians express pride in multiculturalism (70%, -1), the Canadian Armed Forces (67%, -7), the health care system (66%, -9) and hockey (also 66%, +2).

Compared to a Research Co. poll conducted in 2019, pride in the Canadian Armed Forces has fallen by 22 points. Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to express pride in the Canadian Armed Forces (73%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (67%) and aged 18-to-34 (60%).

This year, about three-in-five Canadians say they are proud of Indigenous culture (62%, =), the state of democracy in Canada (also 62%, -4), and bilingualism (59%, -2).

Just over half of Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election (54%) are proud of indigenous culture. The proportion is significantly higher among those who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (72%) and the Liberal Party (75%).

About half of Canadians express pride in the Canadian justice system (52%, -3), Parliament (50%, -3) and the Canadian economy (49%, -4).

While two thirds of Canadians who voted for the Liberals in the last federal election (68%) say they are proud of Parliament, only a third of those who supported the Conservatives (34%) share the same view.

“In 2019, 80% of Canadians said they were proud of the Canadian economy,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This year, the proportion has fallen by 31 points to 49%.”

The Monarchy remains the lowest ranked of the 12 institutions and features tested, with 34% of Canadians saying it makes them proud, down six points since 2020.

British Columbia has the highest proportion of residents who are proud of the monarchy (44%) while Quebec has the lowest (29%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 24 to June 26, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Liberals Have Eight-Point Lead Over Tories in Canada

Health care is the most important issue facing the country for three-in-ten Canadians, followed by the economy and jobs.

Vancouver, BC [June 17, 2021] – The governing Liberal Party remains ahead of its rivals in Canada’s federal political scene, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 38% of Canadian decided voters would support the Liberal candidate in their constituency if a federal election were held tomorrow, up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March.

The Conservative Party is second with 30% (+2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (=), the Bloc Québécois with 5% (-2), the Green Party also with 5% (-1) and the People’s Party with 1% (=).

The Liberals are ahead of the Conservatives by 15 points among female decided voters (40% to 25%). Among male decided voters, the Liberals are barely ahead of the Conservatives (37% to 35%).

This month, the Liberal Party fares best with decided voters aged 55 and over (41%, with the Conservatives at 36%) and decided voters aged 18-to-34 (40%, with the NDP at 29%). The race is closer among decided voters aged 35-to-54 (36% for the Liberals, and 34% for the Conservatives).

The Liberals remain the most popular federal party among decided voters in Atlantic Canada (49%), Ontario (42%) and Quebec (39%). The Conservatives continue to dominate in Alberta (50%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (also 50%). In British Columbia, the New Democrats are in first place (34%), followed by the Liberals (31%) and the Conservatives (27%).

Half of Canadians (50%, -6) approve of the way Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is handling his duties.

NDP leader Jagmeet Singh posted the same approval rating as Trudeau (50%, +4). The numbers are lower for Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole (34%, +1), Green Party leader Annamie Paul (32%, +2) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (14%, -1).

More than a third of Canadians select Trudeau when asked which one of the main party leaders would make the best prime minister (37%, -3). For the first time, Singh is in second place on this indicator (17%, +5), followed by O’Toole (15%, =), Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (3%, +1), Bernier (3%, +1) and Paul (2%, -1).

Health care is identified as the most important issue facing the country by 29% of Canadians (-4), followed by the economy and jobs (23%, -1), housing, homelessness and poverty (14%, +5), the environment (9%, +2) and COVID-19 (7%, -4).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from June 12 to June 14, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Makaristos

Canadians Support Paid Leave for Couples After Miscarriage

Across the country, 13% of Canadians say themselves or their partner have experienced a miscarriage.

Vancouver, BC [June 4, 2021] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians are in favour of allowing people who have experienced a pregnancy loss to have paid time off from work, a new Research Co. poll has found.

New Zealand’s Parliament recently voted to pass legislation that would allow couples who go through a miscarriage or stillbirth to have three days of paid leave.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 78% of Canadians support enacting similar legislation in Canada, while only 10% are opposed and 13% are undecided.

Support for allowing paid leave to people who experience a pregnancy loss reaches 80% among women, 81% among Canadians aged 55 and over, and 83% among British Columbians.

Across the country, 13% of Canadians say themselves or their partner have experienced a miscarriage, defined as the loss of a pregnancy before 20 weeks of gestation. In addition, about one-in-five say they know a family member (19%) or a friend (18%) who went through this complication.

Fewer Canadians have faced two other setbacks. Just under one-in-ten (8%) report that themselves or their partner experienced infertility, or trying to get pregnant for at least a year with no success, and 3% endured a stillbirth, defined as the loss of a pregnancy after 20 weeks of gestation.

Most Canadians who have experienced miscarriage and/or stillbirth say they received enough information and support from their family (70%) and their friends (66%). The numbers are lower for their family doctor or general practitioner (58%) and their workplace (41%).

Three-in-ten Canadians (30%) who endured a miscarriage or stillbirth state that their family doctor did not provide enough information and support after the loss, while one-in-four (24%) feel the same way about their workplace.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 17 to May 19, 2021, among 1,000 Canadian adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Vaccine Rollout Opinions Improve in Some Canadian Provinces

Almost two thirds of respondents think the goal to inoculate every willing Canadian by the end of September 2021 will be attained.

Vancouver, BC [May 28, 2021] – The perceptions of Canadians on the way COVID-19 vaccination efforts are advancing have improved markedly this month, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 57% of Canadians are satisfied with the procurement of COVID-19 vaccine doses from the federal government, up nine points since a similar survey conducted in March 2021.

Majorities of Canadians are also content with the vaccination plans and phases outlined by their province (61%, +7) and with the pace of vaccination efforts in their province (58%, +10).

“The same regional differences that we currently see across Canada when it comes to COVID-19 management are also present on the vaccine rollout,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While more than three-in-five residents of Quebec (69%) and British Columbia (62%) are satisfied with the pace of vaccination efforts, only 48% of those in Ontario and Alberta feel the same way.”

In December 2020, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) stated that it expected to have enough COVID-19 vaccine doses to inoculate every willing Canadian by the end of September 2021.  

Almost two thirds of Canadians (65%) believe the vaccination goal outlined by the PHAC will be attained, up 20 points since a similar survey completed in February 2021.  

This month, 83% of Canadians say they have already been vaccinated against COVID-19, or plan to have a first shot when it becomes available to them, while 13% will “definitely” or “probably” not get inoculated—including 20% of those who voted for Conservative Party candidates in the 2019 federal election.  

More than four-in-five Canadians (84%, +1) agree with regulations that require all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask while inside.  

Three-in-four Canadians (75%, -2) say they wear a mask every time they go out, a proportion thar rises to 82% among women and 80% among Canadians aged 55 and over.  

Sizeable proportions of Canadians continue to endorse specific measures to deal with COVID-19, including keeping the border with the United States closed to non-essential travel (80%, -3) and placing all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period (79%, -3). In addition, 74% (=) would prohibit non-essential travel from one province to another and 67% (-1) would prohibit non-essential travel inside provinces.  

Just under a third of Canadians say they are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection (30%, +1) and acknowledge they are overeating or eating more than usual at home (29%, +4).  

Fewer Canadians admit to losing their temper more than usual at home (20%, including 28% of those aged 18-to-34), having a bath or shower less often than before the pandemic (16%, -1), not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection (15%, -4), drinking more alcohol than usual at home (13%, -1) and brushing their teeth less often than before the pandemic (11%, but rising to 21% among Albertans).  

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 17 to May 19, 2021, among 1,000 Canadian adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Views on Governments Falter as Canadians See Pandemic’s End

Ontarians and Albertans are the least likely to express confidence in the measures implemented by their provincial administrations.

Vancouver, BC [May 25, 2021] – For the first time since the start of the pandemic, a majority of Canadians believe the most vicious moments of COVID-19 have passed, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 55% of Canadians think the worst of the COVID-19 outbreak is behind us, up eight points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in March.

Conversely, 27% of Canadians think the worst of the pandemic is ahead of us, down six points in two months.

Just over half of Canadians (51%) are satisfied with how the federal government has managed the pandemic, unchanged since March. The numbers are similar for provincial governments (52%, -1) and municipal governments (55%, +1).

Among the four most populous provinces, the satisfaction rating remains below the 50% threshold in Ontario (42%, -3) and Alberta (34%, -3). More than three-in-five residents of British Columbia (62%, -3) and Quebec (61%, +3) are content with how their governments have managed COVID-19.

Almost half of Canadians (46%) think the measures that are currently in place in their province to deal with COVID-19 are correct for the situation. While three-in-ten (29%) believe the measures do not go far enough, one-in-five (19%) claim they go too far.

“Residents of Ontario and Alberta are more likely to be dissatisfied with the measures implemented to deal with COVID-19,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Just over a third of residents in each jurisdiction endorse the course of action outlined by their provincial governments.”

Canadians were also asked about the level of confidence they have in their provincial government to handle specific tasks.

Majorities of respondents trust their provincial administration to release accurate (61%) and complete (56%) information about COVID-19 cases and hospitalization rates to the media and the public.

Most Canadians also trust their provincial administrations to respond to a natural disaster (60%), establish public health guidelines and restrictions (58%) and ensure the sustainability of the health care system (55%). Fewer respondents (43%) express confidence in their provincial government to spend tax dollars wisely.

On the matter of establishing public health guidelines, the level of confidence is highest in British Columbia (66%), followed by Quebec (63%), Atlantic Canada (also 63%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (58%), Ontario (52%) and Alberta (45%).

Across the country, 84% of Canadians believe that COVID-19 is “definitely” or “probably” a real threat, while 12% disagree with this assessment.

Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election are more likely to be skeptical of the threat posed by COVID-19 (20%) than those who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP) (11%) or the Liberal Party (8%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 17 to May 19, 2021, among 1,000 Canadian adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Money and Health Worries Are Making Canadians Lose Sleep

Three-in-five Canadians (60%) fall below the recommended sleep guidelines on weekdays or workdays.

Vancouver, BC [May 11, 2021] – Canadians who are having a difficult time falling asleep at night have two major concerns on their minds, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 43% of Canadians say financial matters made it harder for them to fall asleep at night over the past month, while 36% mention health.

Since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in December 2019, the proportion of Canadians who found it challenging to fall asleep on account of financial matters fell by six points, while those worried about health increased by seven points.

One third of Canadians (32%, =) had a hard time falling asleep on account of relationship and family concerns, while fewer were worried about work (24%, +1), Canadian politics and issues (10%< +4) and international politics and issues (9%, +3).

“More than two-in-five Canadians aged 55 and over (44%) had no trouble falling asleep over the past month,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers drop dramatically among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (23%) and aged 18-to-34 (17%).”

Millennials are significantly more likely to have a difficult time falling asleep due to financial matters (53%) and work (42%) than Baby Boomers (31% and 7% respectively).

Health Canada guidelines recommend sleeping from 7 to 9 hours a night. Across the country, 60% of Canadians are sleeping for fewer than 7 hours on weekdays or workdays, down four points since 2019. Just under half of Canadians (49%, -2) are sleeping for fewer than 7 hours on a weekend or non-workday.

There is little change since 2019 on the feeling Canadians have after waking up each morning. Almost one-in-five respondents (18%, +1) say they are “very well rested” after a typical night’s sleep on a weekday or workday, and a majority (52%, -1) are “moderately well rested.” 

About a third of women (33%), Canadians aged 35-to-54 (34%), Atlantic Canadians (also 34%) and residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 34%) deem themselves “not too well rested” or “not well rested at all” when a new workday or weekday arrives.

After a typical night’s sleep on a weekend or non-workday, the proportion of Canadians who claim to feel “very well rested” or “moderately well rested” remains at 75%.

Just over two-in-five Canadians (41%, +2) continue to say that they have a difficult time falling asleep at least 3 days a week. A slightly smaller proportion (35%, -1) find it difficult to slumber for 1 or 2 days each week, while one-in-four (24%, -1) never have problems. 

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from May 1 to May 3, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Endorse “Vaccine Passports” for Mass Gatherings

Majorities of residents think the concept is a “good idea” for sporting events, concerts, plays and movies.

Vancouver, BC [May 7, 2021] – More than half of Canadians are in favour of a “Vaccine Passport” that would allow crowds to assemble during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 57% of Canadians think it is a good idea to rely on a “Vaccine Passport” to be able to go to live sporting events as a spectator.

“Vaccine Passports” would essentially amount to “Proof of Vaccination” certificates for people who have been inoculated against COVID-19.

“Almost three-in-five residents of British Columbia, Alberta and Ontario (59%) support the concept to be put in place for live sporting events,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than half of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (57%), Quebec (56%) and Atlantic Canada (51%) concur.”

Majorities of Canadians are also in favour of “Vaccine Passports” for people to be able to go to live concerts as a spectator (56%) and to be able to go to the theatre or cinema (55%).

The “Vaccine Passport” is more popular when Canadians are asked about trips in three different iterations. Almost two thirds of respondents (64%) believe the concept is a good idea for travel to other countries, while 54% endorse it for trips to other Canadian provinces and 54% for travel inside their own province.

Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election are more likely to support the use of a “Vaccine Passport” for trips inside their own province (63%) than those who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (54%) and the Conservative Party (53%).

While two thirds of Canadians aged 55 and over (66%) are in favour of “Vaccine Passports” for travel to other Canadian provinces, the level of support drops to 57% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 56% among those aged 18-to-34.

The level of support is slightly lower—although still a majority—for the use of “Vaccine Passports” to be able to visit a gym or fitness facility (54%) and to be able to work at an office (52%).

Canadians who voted for the Conservatives in 2019 are less likely to support the concept of “Vaccine Passports” for offices (49%) than those who voted for the New Democrats (55%) and the Liberals (61%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from May 1 to May 3, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Five Americans Want Obamacare to Remain in Place

By a 2-to-1 margin, Americans would prefer to establish a national, publicly funded healthcare system.

Vancouver, BC [April 27, 2021] – A majority of Americans believe the Affordable Care Act should continue to exist, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The U.S. Supreme Court is scheduled to rule on the validity of the Affordable Care Act—sometimes referred to as Obamacare—in the next few months. 

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 61% of Americans say they would prefer for the Affordable Care Act to remain in place, while 28% would like to see the legislation repealed.

While 83% of Democrats and 60% of Independents support keeping the Affordable Care Act, only 41% of Republicans concur.

Almost three-in-five Americans (59%) agree with the United States moving to establish a national, publicly funded healthcare system, similar to the ones that currently exist in Canada and some European countries, while 30% disagree and 12% are not sure.

Support for this type of system is highest among men (65%), Americans aged 18-to-34 (67%), and residents of the West (70%).

“Seven-in-ten Americans who voted for Joe Biden last year (70%) are in favour of a move towards a national, publicly funded healthcare system,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Americans who voted for Donald Trump last year are deeply divided on this topic, with 45% agreeing and 47% disagreeing.”

Three-in-four Americans (75%) say they are “very confident” or “moderately confident” that America’s healthcare system would be there to provide the help and assistance that they would need if they had to face an unexpected medical condition or disease.

In addition, 71% of Americans say the healthcare system currently meets their needs and the needs of their family—a proportion that rises to 75% among men, 73% among Americans aged 55 and over and 76% among residents of the Northeast.

More than half of Americans (53%) approve of Joe Biden’s performance as president, while 42% disapprove and 5% are undecided.

Biden’s numbers are significantly high among Democrats (85%) but drop to 55% among Independents and to 21% among Republicans.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from April 23 to April 25, 2021, among 1,000 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Inching Closer to a True Work-Life Balance

More than a third of employed residents of the province (35%, -7 since 2019) say work has put a strain on their relationships.

Vancouver, BC [April 16, 2021] – The number of employed British Columbians who feel they are doing a good job managing their jobs and their leisure time has increased over the past two years, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 41% of employed British Columbians claim to have achieved a perfect balance between work and lifestyle, up eight points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in April 2019.

Conversely, 45% of employed British Columbians (-8) think work has become more important than lifestyle, while only 10% (-2) believe lifestyle is taking precedence over work.

“While the province-wide numbers may point to an improvement for the workforce of British Columbia, some generational differences prevail,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 32% of those aged 55 and over are putting their careers ahead of everything else, compared to 47% among those aged 35-to-54 and 50% among those aged 18-to-34.”

Almost two-in-five employed British Columbians (39%, -2) believe it is harder for them to achieve a work-life balance than it was for their parents, while 16% (-3) think this task is now easier.

More than a third of employed British Columbians (35%, -12) say they had to stay late after work in the past six months, while just under three-in-ten (28%, +3) had to take a work-related call on their mobile phone while they were with family or friends.

One in four employed British Columbians were compelled to reply to a work-related e-mail while they were with family or friends (24%, -4) or had to work from home on a weekend (24%, =). 

Slightly fewer employed British Columbians had to work from home at night (22%, +1) or missed a “lifestyle” engagement (like a virtual or live family gathering or leisure activity) because they had to work (17%, -12).

Across the province, 35% of British Columbians acknowledge that their work has put a strain on their relationships with family and friends, down seven points since April 2019.

Employed British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are significantly more likely to admit that their relationships are suffering because of their jobs (48%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (37%) and aged 55 and over (15%). 

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from April 3 to April 6, 2021, among 650 adults in British Columbia who are employed full time or part time. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Satisfaction with COVID-19 Management Falls Across Canada

Fewer than half of Ontarians and Albertans are content with the way their provincial governments have handled the pandemic.

Vancouver, BC [April 5, 2021] – The proportion of Canadians who are pleased with the way the federal government has managed the pandemic has dropped to the lowest level recorded, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 51% of Canadians are satisfied with the way the federal government has dealt with COVID-19, down seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January.

A slightly higher proportion of Canadians are content with how their municipal governments (54%, -6) and their own provincial government (53%, -5) have handled the pandemic.

British Columbia continues to have the highest level of satisfaction among the four most populous provinces (65%, -7), followed by Quebec (58%, -7). The rating is significantly lower for Ontario (45%, -8) and Alberta (37%, +3).

Almost half of Canadians (47%, +14) think the worst of the pandemic is “definitely” or “probably” behind us, while one third (33%, -17) believe the worst of COVID-19 is “definitely” or “probably” ahead of us.

Practically four-in-five Canadians (79%, +5) are either already vaccinated against COVID-19 or will “definitely” or “probably” be inoculated when they get the chance, while 14% (-2) would not and 8% (-1) are not sure.

In December 2020, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) stated that it expected to have enough COVID-19 vaccine doses to inoculate every willing Canadian by the end of September 2021.

This month, half of Canadians (50%, +5 since a similar Research Co. survey completed in February) think the September vaccination goal set by the PHAC will be attained, while almost two-in-five (38%, -8) believe it will not be reached.

Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election are significantly more likely to think that the federal government’s vaccination goal will be attained (66%) than those who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (48%) and the Conservative Party (35%).

A majority of Canadians (54%, +3) are content with the vaccination plans and phases outlined by their province. The level of satisfaction on this matter is highest in Quebec (64%, +11), followed by Atlantic Canada (63%, +9), British Columbia (57%, +1), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (53%, -4), Alberta (46%, +4) and Ontario (44%, -1).

The results are lower when Canadians are asked about the pace of vaccination efforts in their province. Almost half of Canadians (48%, +7) are satisfied, while 41% (-8) are dissatisfied.

Quebec also has the highest level of satisfaction on the pace of vaccination efforts (60%, +14), followed by Atlantic Canada (56%, +14), British Columbia (50%, +5), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (46%, +6), Alberta (45%,+8) and Ontario (37%, +3).

Almost half of Canadians (48%, +2) are content with the procurement of vaccines from the federal government, while 43% (=) are not. 

While sizeable proportions of Canadians continue to voice support for specific travel restrictions, the proportions are lower this month than in January.

More than four-in-five Canadians are in favour of keeping the border with the United States closed to non-essential travel (83%, -5) and placing all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period (82%, -8).

In addition, 74% of Canadians (-6) are in favour of forbidding non-essential travel from one province to another, and 66% (-6) agree with prohibiting non-essential travel inside their own province.

More than four-in-five Canadians (83%, -5) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside.

There is a slight drop in the proportion of Canadians who are wearing a mask every time they go out (77%, -4). Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to always be taking this measure (83%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (77%) and aged 18-to-34 (72%). 

Across the country, 29% of Canadians (=) are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection, while 19% (-2) are not ordering food from restaurants at all for the same reason.

Compared to January, fewer Canadians report overeating (25%, -5) or drinking alcohol more often at home (14%, -4). Almost one-in-five (18%, +1) admit that they are losing their temper more often.

One-in-ten Canadians (10%, =) continue to acknowledge that they are brushing their teeth less often than before COVID-19, while 17% (-1) are having showers or baths less often.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted on March 29 and March 30, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Liberals Stay Ahead as Conservative Support Falls in Canada

Two-in-five Canadians think Justin Trudeau would make the best Prime Minister, as Erin O’Toole drops to 15% on this question.

Vancouver, BC [March 18, 2021] – Public support for the governing Liberal Party remains stable in Canada since the end of last year, while fewer voters are willing to cast a ballot for the Conservative Party, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 37% of decided voters in Canada would back the Liberal candidate in their constituency if a federal election were held tomorrow, unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2020.

The Conservatives are in second place with 28% (-3), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (=), the Bloc Québécois with 7% (=), the Green Party with 6% (+3) and the People’s Party with 1% (=).

The Liberals hold a three-point edge over the Conservatives among male decided voters (34% to 31%). Among female decided voters, the Liberals are also first (40%), with the Conservatives and New Democrats tied at 24%.

Support for the Liberal Party is strongest among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (41%, with the NDP in second place with 27%). The governing party is also ahead among decided voters aged 35-to-54 (35%, with the Conservatives at 30%) and aged 55 and over (37% to 29%).

More than two-in-five decided voters in Atlantic Canada (46%), Quebec (43%) and Ontario (42%) are currently backing the Liberals, while the Conservatives are leading in Alberta (46%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (41%). In British Columbia, the New Democrats are slightly ahead of the Liberals (31% to 29%), with the Conservatives in third place (26%).

The approval rating for Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau stands at 56% this month (+1) and is higher among women (60%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (67%).

A third of Canadians (33%, -2) are satisfied with the performance of Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole, a proportion that jumps to 47% among Albertans.

“In September 2020, Canadians were divided in three identical groups when assessing O’Toole’s performance as leader,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Since then, disapproval has risen by 12 points to 46%, and the level of undecideds has fallen from 33% to 21%.”

Since December, the approval rating for NDP leader Jagmeet Singh remains stable (46%, =). The numbers improved for Green Party leader Annamie Paul (30%, +5) and fell slightly for People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (15%, -2).

Trudeau maintains a sizeable advantage over his rivals when Canadians are asked who would make the best prime minister of the country (40%, +1). O’Toole is a distant second on this question with 15% (-7), followed by Singh (12%, -1), Paul (3%, +1), Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (2%, =) and Bernier (2%, -1).

A third of Canadians (33%, +5) believe health care is the most important issue facing the country today, followed by the economy and jobs (24%, -3), COVID-19 (11%, -4), housing, homelessness and poverty (9%, =) and the environment (7%, +1).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from March 13 to March 15, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Adults 55+ Most Satisfied with Digital Health Tools During Pandemic

Over the past year, 51 per cent of British Columbians essentially “migrated” to virtual care.

Vancouver, BC [March 3, 2021] – Despite typical narratives about older adults’ reluctance to adopt technology, a poll released today by Research Co. and Digital Health Circle found that, during the COVID-19 pandemic, British Columbians 55 and over have been the most satisfied with digital health tools of any age group (86 per cent were very satisfied or moderately satisfied versus 75 per cent and 80 per cent for ages 18- 34 and 35-54 respectively).

The COVID-19 pandemic has spurred both the innovation and adoption of more and more digital health solutions as healthcare providers and consumers were forced to pivot, and virtual care and wellness activities became necessary. Digital Health Circle partnered with Research Co. to better understand how British Columbians, especially older adults, have been using digital health products during the pandemic, in order to help local businesses and healthcare providers better address their consumers’ needs.

“As Digital Health Circle’s work focuses on assisting tech companies to develop products that meet consumers’ needs, we wanted to learn if and how people were using these tools, if they were satisfied and what the barriers or gaps might be,” said Dr. Sylvain Moreno, Chief Executive Officer and Scientific Director, Digital Health Circle. “We learned that as the silver tsunami continues, clearly those older adults have an appetite and an urgent need for digital health tools, which means there is a real opportunity to help improve health outcomes, as well as for product and job creation in B.C.”

Today’s poll is a follow up to the one Research Co. did pre-pandemic, September 18, 2018 to understand how British Columbians were using digital tools for health care.

“The data in our poll refutes the stereotype that older adults, including baby boomers, are averse to technology adoption and avoid using digital health solutions,” said Mario Canseco, President, Research Co. “The high uptake amongst older adults may be in part due to concerns about exposure to COVID-19 in the community, making this group more likely to avoid going to the doctor in person or seeking traditional health care. Older adults also have higher healthcare needs and less transportation access, making digital health solutions very convenient.”page1image63486976page1image63474112

The data also provides two distinct learnings to inform the Provincial Government’s health policy development:

  • Government should continue to build on the digital capacity the health sector gained during the COVID-19 pandemic—the data tells us that use of digital health solutions holds a promise to satisfy older adults’ care needs.
  • It is now up to Government, including health authorities, to keep their feet on the gas and continue to make these products available in the health care system or incur the frustrations of this cohort, which includes baby boomers.“This data will help DHC as we assist small tech companies increase their chance of developing the best possible digital health solutions for British Columbians,” said Dr. Moreno. “The survey suggests that older adults want digital health solutions and products to be developed for them at least at the same rate as the general public.”

Other findings included:

  • During the pandemic, 51 per cent of British Columbians essentially “migrated” to virtual care. It was even higher for older adults (55+) at 54 per cent.
  • Vancouver Islanders are most divided on whether they will keep using digital solutions post pandemic, with 50 per cent saying they will continue to use them, 16 per cent saying they won’t and 34 per cent unsure.
  • Higher income residents say they will rely on these tools more post-pandemic: 64 per cent of those earning over $100,000/year versus 42 per cent of those earning under $50,000/year. However, the lowest income group had a higher satisfaction level that higher earners. Digital Health Circle plans to further explore the issue of access in the coming year.
  • More than two-in-five British Columbians are relying on digital health solutions, but the way they come into contact with them is different. The 55+ group is more likely to be getting recommendations from their physicians. Word of mouth and ads resonate with Millennials and Generation X.
  • There is generally similar use and perspectives on digital health products across ethnic groups and regions, with similar levels of satisfaction. One of the main differences is observed with tools for mental well-being, where adoption is highest among British Columbians of First Nations descent (23 per cent) but drops among those of South Asian (13 per cent), East Asian (8 per cent) and European heritage (7 per cent). Further investigation would be needed to understand if this is due to need, willingness to adopt technologies or another reason.
  • The most popular digital health care tools were in the following categories: physical activity and exercise (38 per cent), sleep tracking (14 per cent), nutrition (12 per cent), heart health/blood pressure (11 per cent) and mental well-being (9 per cent). This may be due to availability of apps, so this might not correlate to interest or willingness.

This comprehensive poll of 800 adults in British Columbia was undertaken as an online survey conducted from February 22 and February 23, 2021. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Laura Cropper, Coast Communications and Public Affairs
778.323.382790
[e] laura@coastcomms.ca

British Columbians Still Shun Activities Without COVID-19 Vaccine

Almost two thirds of the province’s residents think the economy’s reopening should happen slowly to ensure low infection rates.

Vancouver, BC [February 23, 2020] – Almost two thirds of British Columbians balk at the prospect of attending a concert or game before being inoculated against COVID-19, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 65% of British Columbians say they would not be comfortable attending a live sporting event as spectators without a COVID-19 vaccine, up four points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2020.

An equally high proportion of British Columbians (64%, +5) are not ready to attend a concert at a music venue, including 66% of those who reside in Metro Vancouver.

Three-in-five British Columbians (60%, +13) say they would not visit a gym or fitness facility unless they have been inoculated against COVID-19.

“Across the province, 41% of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 say they would be willing to go to the gym right now or if the venue is regularly cleaned and there is enough room to physically distance,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 33% of those aged 35-to-54 and 22% of those aged 55 and over share the same view.”

One third of British Columbians say they would not go to three different venues unless they are vaccinated against COVID-19: a library (33%, +4), a barbershop or salon (also 33%, +6) or dinner at a patio (also 33%, +4). A slightly larger proportion of the province’s residents (35%, +3) would not visit a restaurant to eat indoors if they have not been vaccinated.

A majority of the province’s residents (51%, +11) are not willing to go to a Community Centre without being inoculated against COVID-19, while almost half would not ride the bus (46%, +3) or rely on SkyTrain (also 46%, +1).

Almost two thirds of British Columbians (64%, +2 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2020) think we should reopen the economy slowly and ensure that COVID-19 infection rates remain low, while three-in-ten (29%, -6) would prefer to reopen the economy quickly and ensure that no more jobs are lost due to the pandemic.

Women (67%) and British Columbians aged 55 and over (74%) are more likely to suggest that any eventual economic reopening should be done gradually.

Across the province, 73% of residents of Vancouver Island call for a slow reopening of the economy, along with 67% of those in Northern BC, 64% of those in Metro Vancouver and 56% of those who reside in both Southern BC and the Fraser Valley.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from February 14 to February 16, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Divided Over Vaccine Rollout and Expectations

Fewer than one-in-four respondents believe the vaccines developed in Russia, China and India are safe for them.

Vancouver, BC [February 4, 2021] – Canadians are split on the notion that every resident of the country who wants to have a vaccine against COVID-19 will be able to get one in the timeline specified by the federal government, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In December 2020, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) stated that it expected to have enough COVID-19 vaccine doses to inoculate every willing Canadian by the end of September 2021.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 45% of Canadians believe this goal will be attained, while 46% think it will not be attained.

“More than half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (53%) expect everyone in the country to be vaccinated in the next eight months,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer Canadians aged 35-to-54 (46%) and aged 55 and over (37%) have the same optimism.”

About three-in-four Canadians (74%) say they would take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available to them, while 18% would not and 8% are undecided. These proportions are consistent with what Research Co. has found in surveys conducted in September 2020November 2020 and January 2021.

Canadians are divided in their assessment of various aspects of the COVID-19 vaccine rollout. While 46% say they are satisfied with the procurement of vaccine doses from the federal government, 43% are not.

Canadians who supported the Conservative Party in the 2019 election are particularly critical of the federal government, with 65% saying they are dissatisfied with the procurement of vaccine doses—compared to 44% for those who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) and 30% for those who voted for the Liberal Party.

More than half of Canadians (51%) are satisfied with the vaccination plans and phases outlined by their province. 

While majorities of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (57%), British Columbia (56%), Atlantic Canada (54%) and Quebec (53%) are satisfied with this aspect of the vaccine rollout, the proportion is lower in Ontario (45%) and Alberta (42%).

Across the country, 41% of Canadians say they are satisfied with the pace of vaccination efforts in their province, 49% are dissatisfied. 

The level of satisfaction with the pace of vaccination efforts is highest in Quebec (46%), followed by British Columbia (45%), Atlantic Canada (42%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (40%), Alberta (37%) and Ontario (34%).

Health authorities around the world have allowed the emergency use of nine vaccines against COVID-19. When this survey was conducted, Canada had only allowed two vaccines: the Pfizer–BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine and the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. 

More than two thirds of Canadians consider the Moderna (69%) and Pfizer (67%) vaccines as “safe” for them personally. These two vaccines are considered “not safe” by 12% and 15% of Canadians respectively.

Almost half of Canadians (48%) feel the Oxford-Astra Zeneca COVID-19 vaccine is “safe” for them personally, while 16% consider it “not safe” and 35% are not sure.

Fewer than one-in-four Canadians deem six other vaccines as “safe” for them: the KeeGam-COVID-Vac (Sputnik V) from Russia (20%), the EpiVacCorona from Russia (also 20%), the BBV152 (Varat Biotech) from India (also 20%), the CoronaVac (Sinovac) from China (18%), the Ad5-nCoV (Cansino Biologics) from China (17%) and the BBIBP-CorV (Sinopharm) from China (15%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from January 30 to February 1, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Life Getting Noisier for More Than a Quarter of Canadians

Three-in-ten respondents say they were bothered at home by unnecessary noise from vehicles over the past year.

Vancouver, BC [February 2, 2021] – More than one-in-four Canadians believe their surroundings are noisier now than they were a year ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 27% of Canadians say their city or town has become noisier over the past year.

Similar proportions of Canadians believe their home (28%) and their street (23%) are noisier now than they were a year ago.

Women (28%), Canadians aged 18-to-34 (33%), British Columbians (31%) and respondents of South Asian descent (36%) are more likely to feel that the city or town where they live is noisier now than in early 2020.

When asked about specific sounds that have bothered them at home over the past year, at least one-in-five Canadians mention unnecessary noise from vehicles (such as motorcycles and cars revving up) (30%), dogs barking (24%), loud people outside their home (20%) and car alarms (also 20%).

Fewer Canadians report being disturbed by 10 other noises at home: yard work (such as lawnmowers and leaf blowers) (19%), yelling or screaming at a nearby home (18%), loud music playing inside a vehicle (also 18%), power tools (such as electric saws and sanders) (also 18%), loud music at a nearby home (17%), fireworks (16%), a loud gathering or party at a nearby home (15%), drivers honking the horn excessively (12%), home alarms (9%) and cats meowing (5%).

“More than three-in-four Canadians aged 18-to-34 (78%) say that they were bothered by outside noises when they were at home,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion drops to 65% among those aged 35-to-54 and 60% among those aged 55 and over.”

Over the past year, more than one-in-ten Canadians (12%) wore earplugs or earmuffs to mitigate noise while inside their home—including 19% of those aged 18-to-34 and 14% of Ontarians.

Smaller proportions of Canadians acquired hardware to mitigate noise while inside their home (such as noise cancelling headphones or earphones) (7%), reported noise concerns to the police (5%) or moved away from their previous home because of noise (4%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from January 24 to January 26, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Four Canadians Back Medical Assistance in Dying Rules

Almost three-in-five respondents personally think the practice should be permitted, but only under specific circumstances.

Vancouver, BC [January 15, 2021] – The regulations that allow people in Canada to seek medical assistance in dying under specific conditions are endorsed by a large majority of the country’s residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 76% of Canadians support the practice under the current guidelines specified by the federal government:

  • Being eligible for health services funded by the federal government, or a province or territory (or during the applicable minimum period of residence or waiting period for eligibility).
  • Being at least 18 years old and mentally competent.
  • Having a grievous and irremediable medical condition.
  • Making a voluntary request for medical assistance in dying that is not the result of outside pressure or influence.
  • Giving informed consent to receive medical assistance in dying.

Support for the regulations to seek medical assistance in dying is high across all groups, but the measure is particularly accepted among Canadians aged 55 and over (82%).

At least four-in-five residents of Alberta (84%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (80%) are in favour of the current guidelines to seek medical assistance in dying, along with 79% of British Columbians, 77% of Quebecers, 74% of Ontarians and 74% of Atlantic Canadians.

When asked about their personal feelings on this issue, almost three-in-five Canadians (58%) believe medical assistance in dying should be allowed, but only under specific circumstances. 

Only one-in-five Canadians (20%) would always allow the practice regardless of who requests it, while one-in-ten (11%) would never permit it.

“Majorities of Canadians who voted for each of the three major parties in the last federal election are personally in favour of permitting medical assistance in dying under specific circumstances,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This includes 64% of those who voted for the Liberal Party and 58% of those who voted for either the Conservative Party or the New Democratic Party (NDP).”

Just over two-in-five Canadians (43%) say they are satisfied with the regulations that are currently in place in Canada to deal with the issue of medical assistance in dying, while 26% are dissatisfied and 31% are undecided.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from January 9 to January 11, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Liberals Stay Ahead in Canada as Trudeau’s Rating Improves

Health care (28%, +3) is regarded as the most important issue facing the country, followed by the economy and jobs (27%, -2).

Vancouver, BC [December 17, 2020] – The governing Liberal Party maintains the upper hand in Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 37% of decided voters would support the Liberal candidate in their riding if a federal election were held today, down one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September.

The Conservative Party is second with 31% (-1), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (+3), the Bloc Québécois with 7% (-1), the Green Party with 3% (=) and the People’s Party with 1% (=).

The Liberals are nine points ahead of the Conservatives among female decided voters (38% to 29%) and hold a three-point edge among male decided voters (36% to 33%).

The Conservatives are the most popular federal party in Alberta (51%) and in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (48%). The Liberals are ahead in Atlantic Canada (44%), Quebec (45%, with the Bloc at 35%) and Ontario (37%). In British Columbia, the New Democrats and the Conservatives are essentially tied (34% and 33% respectively), with the Liberals at 29%.

Health care is regarded as the most important issue facing the country by 28% of Canadians (+3), followed by the economy and jobs (27%, -2), COVID-19 (15%), housing, homelessness and poverty (9%, -3) and the environment (6%, -1).

“Concerns about health care are more prevalent among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (30%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (29%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Those aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be preoccupied with the economy and jobs (36%).”

The approval rating for Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is 55%, up five points since September, while 40% of Canadians disapprove of his performance (-5).

Trudeau’s rating is highest in Atlantic Canada (60%), followed by Ontario (59%), British Columbia (58%), Quebec (55%), Manitoba and Saskatchewan (42%) and Alberta (37%).

Just over one third of Canadians (35%, +2) approve of the way Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole has handled his duties, while 38% (+4) disapprove—including 45% of Quebecers.

Almost half of Canadians (46%, +2) approve of the performance of Jagmeet Singh as leader of the NDP. The numbers are lower for Green Party leader Annamie Paul (25%) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (17%, +3).

Trudeau remains ahead of all other leaders when Canadians are asked who would make the best prime minister of the country (39%, +1), followed by O’Toole (22%, -1), Singh (13%, =), Bernier (3%, +1), Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (2%, -1) and Paul (2%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 12 to December 14, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Age and Gender Shape Views on Health Care in British Columbia

Almost half of the province’s residents agree with the recent court ruling on private delivery, while three-in-ten disagree.

Vancouver, BC [December 8, 2020] – The views of British Columbians on how best to manage the province’s health care system vary greatly by age and gender, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 27% of British Columbians identify long waiting times as the biggest problem facing the health care system right now, down 11 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2019.

A shortage of doctors and nurses is second on the list of concerns with 24% (+4), followed by inadequate resources and facilities (13%, -2), and bureaucracy and poor management (10%, =).

Fewer British Columbians believe the most important health care problems right now are the absence of a focus on preventive care (9%, +6), a lack of a wider range of services for patients (6%, =), vague legal rights of patients (3%, -1) and insufficient standards of hygiene (1%, unchanged).

Long waiting times is identified as the most important problem by women (30%), British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (34%) and British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (29%). Conversely, a shortage of doctors and nurses is the most prevalent concern for men (26%) and British Columbians aged 55 and over (33%).

In Metro Vancouver, one third of residents (33%) cite long waiting times as the biggest health care problem. A shortage of doctors and nurses is the top concern for respondents in Southern BC (25%), Vancouver Island (32%), the Fraser Valley (41%) and Northern BC (55%).

Almost two thirds of British Columbians (64%, +6) think there are some good things in health care in the province, but some changes are required.

Just over one-in-five British Columbians (22%, -4) believe the health care system in the province works well and only minor changes are needed to make it work better, while 11% (-1) think health care has so much wrong with it that we need to completely rebuild it.

“There are some significant gender differences when British Columbians assess the health care system,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 28% of men think only minor changes are needed, only 16% of women share the same point of view.”

The proportion of British Columbians who say they would be willing to pay out of their own pocket to have quicker access to medical services that currently have long waiting times fell from 45% in August 2019 to 40% this year.

In addition, only 27% of British Columbians are willing to travel to another country to have quicker access to medical services that currently have long waiting times, down 10 points since last year.

In September, a B.C. Supreme Court justice ruled that access to private health care is not a constitutional right, even if wait times for care under the public system are too long. Almost half of British Columbians (46%) agree with this decision, while 31% disagree and 23% are undecided.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 25 to November 27, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca