Half of Canadians Are Losing Sleep Over Financial Concerns

A third say worrying about relationships and health made it harder for them to fall asleep in the past month. 

Vancouver, BC [November 25, 2022] – Most Canadians are unable to match Health Canada’s recommended sleep guidelines, and half are finding it harder to rest every night because of financial anxiety, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 50% of Canadians acknowledge that worrying about money made it harder for them to fall asleep at night over the past month, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2021.

One third of Canadians say concerns about relationships and family (33%, +1) and health (also 33%, -3) make it more difficult for them to fall asleep at night. Fewer Canadians lost sleep over work (28%, +4), Canadian politics and issues (10%, =) and international politics and issues (10%, +1) over the past four weeks.

“Two-in-five Canadians aged 18-to-34 (40%) are losing sleep because of employment concerns,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer Canadians aged 35-to-54 (33%) and aged 55 and over (14%) share the same experience.”

Health Canada guidelines recommend sleeping from 7 to 9 hours a night. Almost two thirds of Canadians (64%, +4) are sleeping fewer than seven hours on a typical weekday or workday.

Only 35% of Canadians (-3) say they are sleeping anywhere from 7 to 9 hours on a typical weekday or workday. On a regional basis, Quebec is first (40%), followed by Atlantic Canada (39%), Alberta (36%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (31%), Ontario (also 31%) and British Columbia (28%).

Across the country, 43% of Canadians (-3) are sleeping anywhere from 7 to 9 hours on a typical weekend or non-workday, while 50% (-1) are spending less time in bed.

Almost seven-in-ten Canadians (69%, -1) are “well rested” after a typical night’s sleep on a weekday or workday, while 76% (+1) feel the same way after a typical night’s sleep on a weekend or non-workday.

One-in-four Canadians (25%) claim to “never” find it hard to fall asleep at night on an average week—a proportion that rises to 31% among men and 33% among those aged 55 and over and 29 per cent of Quebecers.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 18 to November 20, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty. 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Move Away from Conscience Rights in Health Care

Compared to 2020, more Canadians believe practitioners should not be able to refuse services on account of moral beliefs.

Vancouver, BC [November 18, 2022] – Disapproval with the notion of provinces taking legislative action to entrench conscience rights for health care workers has grown in Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Canadians would oppose a bill that sought to allow health care professionals the ability to have a moral or faith-based objection to providing services, up three points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in February 2020.

“Opposition to the concept of conscience rights in health care delivery is strongest among Canadians aged 55 and over (56%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (50%) and aged 18-to-34 (48%).”

In 2019, Alberta considered the implementation of Bill 207 which was later abandoned. The proposed legislation sought to enable the province’s health care practitioners to abstain from providing services to an individual if they considered that their conscientious beliefs would be infringed upon.

Just over half of Canadians (51%, +9) disagree with health care professionals having the ability to object to providing services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to physician-assisted death.

Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (59%) and the Liberal Party (56%) in the 2021 federal election are more likely to disagree with conscience rights in physician-assisted death than those who backed the Conservative Party (40%).

A majority of Canadians (56%, +7) are against health care professionals being able to object to providing services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to abortion.

Opposition to conscience rights on abortion is highest in Quebec (63%), followed by Atlantic Canada (60%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (55%), British Columbia (54%), Alberta (also 54%) and Ontario (50%).

More than three-in-five Canadians (63%, +5) reject the notion of health care practitioners refusing to serve lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, gender diverse, queer and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2+) people because of a moral or faith-based objection—a proportion that rises to 69% among both Canadians aged 55 and over and Atlantic Canadians.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 12 to November 14, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Rising Cost of Food Impacting the Habits of British Columbians

More than three-in-five of the province’s residents have reduced their visits to restaurants since September.

Vancouver, BC [November 15, 2022] – Residents of British Columbia are starting to take action to deal with increasing food prices, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 64% of British Columbians say they have cut back on dining out on the weekend over the past two months, and a slightly smaller proportion (61%) have cut back on buying or going out to lunch on a weekday.

More than half of British Columbians have also cut back on treats (59%) and visits to coffee shops (56%), while more than two-in-five (44%) have switched packaged food brands to lower priced alternatives.

“Only 14% of British Columbians have not made any adjustments to their food budget over the past two months,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This includes 19% of male residents and 10% of female residents.”

More than four-in-five British Columbians (82%) say the price of groceries has increased since September, and practically seven-in-ten say lunch at a restaurant (69%) and dinner at a restaurant (71%) are more expensive now than they were two months ago.

Almost half of British Columbians (49%) also think the price of food delivery has increased—a proportion that rises to 60% among those aged 18-to-34.

More than three-in-five British Columbians (61%) say their diet has been healthy over the past two months, while just over a third (34%) describe it as unhealthy.

Women (39%), residents of Vancouver Island (40%) and British Columbians in the lowest income bracket (43%) are more likely to report that their diet has not been healthy since September.

More than three-in-five British Columbians who have not followed a healthy diet recently (61%) say an inability to afford healthier foods has negatively impacted their nourishment, while just over half (51%) blame the stress and pressures of daily life getting in the way of good eating habits.

Fewer British Columbians who claim their diet is unhealthy say they find it difficult to make lifestyle changes (38%), lack the time for food preparation at home (33%) or lack the time to buy groceries (16%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 6 to November 8, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Mixed Messages on Organ Donation After Death in Canada

While sizeable majorities of Canadians agree with the practice, significantly fewer have explicitly outlined their wishes.

Vancouver, BC [October 25, 2022] – While a vast majority of Canadians say they want to donate their human organs and tissue after death, few are actually registered to do so, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 84% of Canadians support the donation of human organs and tissue after death.

Canadians aged 55 and over are the most supportive of the practice (92%), followed by their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (84%) and aged 18-to-34 (78%).

Two thirds of Canadians (68%) say they would want their organs and tissue to be donated after their death, while 21% disagree and 11% are undecided.

On a regional basis, residents of Atlantic Canada are more likely to say that they would like to donate their organs and tissue after death (79%), followed by those who live in British Columbia and Alberta (each at 71%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (69%), Quebec (66%) and Ontario (64%).

Across the country, only 43% of Canadians say they have registered to be an organ and tissue donor after their death, an “explicit consent” usually expressed in a health card or driver’s licence.

“On the issue of organ and tissue donation after death, the thoughts and actions of Canadians differ greatly,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While two thirds want to go through with donations, fewer than half have actually registered to do so.”

Some jurisdictions around the world have established “Active Donor Registration” systems for organ and tissue donation. Under these systems, every person over the age of 18 is considered an organ and tissue donor after death unless they specifically opt-out of a registry.

In January 2021, Nova Scotia’s “Human Organ and Tissue Act” came into effect. The law makes every single person who has resided in the province for at least a year a potential organ and tissue donor after death. Nova Scotians who do not wish to be donors are able to opt-out of the system.

Almost two thirds of Canadians (65%, down five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2020) want their provincial government to “definitely” or “probably” implement an “Active Donor Registration” system for organ and tissue donation after death.

Support for the implementation of an “Active Donor Registration” system is highest among Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) in the 2021 federal election (74%), but also encompasses majorities of those who cast ballots for the Liberal Party (68%) and the Conservative Party (67%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from October 1 to October 3, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Concerns About Opioid Crisis Stagnant in Canada, Rise in U.S.

Just over a third of Canadians and Americans are satisfied with the way Justin Trudeau and Joe Biden are managing this issue.

Vancouver, BC [October 21, 2022] – Residents of Canada and the United States voice a high level of support for specific strategies to deal with the opioid crisis, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 45% of Canadians and 60% of Americans describe the current situation related to the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in their community as “a major problem”.

Grave concerns about the opioid crisis remain stagnant in Canada compared to a Research Co. poll conducted in October 2021, but have risen by seven points in the United States since September 2020.

Respondents to this survey were asked to consider six ideas related to opioids. More than four-in-five Canadians and Americans endorse two of them: launching more education and awareness campaigns about drug use (CAN 84%, USA 88%) and creating more spaces for drug rehabilitation (CAN 82%, USA 84%).

The concept of “safe supply” programs, where alternatives to opioids can be prescribed by health professionals, is supported by 74% of Canadians and 80% of Americans. In addition, three-in-four residents of each country (CAN 75%, USA 75%) believe it is time to reduce the prescription of opioids by medical professionals.

Two other proposals are more contentious. Majorities of Canadians and Americans (CAN 63%, USA 56%) agree with setting up more “harm reduction” strategies, such as legal supervised injection sites.

The notion of decriminalizing all drugs for personal use is endorsed by 40% of Canadians and 35% of Americans.

“Nationwide support for the decriminalization of all drugs for personal use increased in Canada from 33% in 2021 to 40% this year,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the United States, it dropped from 47% in 2020 to 35% in 2022.”

Canadians and Americans have similar opinions on the work of elected politicians to deal with the opioid crisis. More than a third consider the performance of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the Canadian federal government (36%) and President Joe Biden and the American federal government (34%) as satisfactory.

While 34% of Canadians think their own Member of Parliament is doing a “good job” managing the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in your community, only 23% of Americans feel the same way about the U.S. Congress.

The ratings are equivalent for Canadians premiers and provincial governments (36%) and American governors and state governments (also 36%).

Local governments fare slightly better, with 39% of Americans endorsing the work of their mayor and local government on the opioid crisis and 38% of Canadians feeling the same way about their mayor and council.

Methodology: Results are based on online studies conducted from October 15 to October 17, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

CAQ Headed for Second Majority Mandate in Quebec

Vancouver, BC [October 2, 2022] – The governing Coalition Avenir Québec (CAQ) heads to tomorrow’s provincial election as the overwhelming favourite, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of likely voters in Quebec, 41% of decided voters will cast a ballot for the CAQ candidate in their constituency, up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in mid-September.

The Liberal Party of Quebec and the Conservative Party of Quebec are tied for second place with 16% each (-1 and -2 respectively), followed by Québec solidaire with 14% (=) and the Parti Québécois (PQ) with 12% (+2).

More than three-in-five decided voters aged 55 and over (64%) say they will support the CAQ, along with 39% of those aged 35-to-54. Québec solidaire is the top choice for decided voters aged 18-to-34 (30%).

A majority of likely voters in Quebec (55%, -2) approve of François Legault’s performance as Premier and CAQ leader—a proportion that rises to 68% among those aged 55 and over.

Since mid-September, the approval rating improved for Québec solidaire co-spokesperson Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois (42%, +5), PQ leader Paul St-Pierre Plamondon (40%, +4) and Official Opposition and Liberal leader Dominique Anglade (39%, +6). The numbers are lower for Conservative leader Éric Duhaime (29%, -2).

On the “Best Premier” question, Legault maintains a sizeable lead (40%, -3), followed by Nadeau-Dubois (12%, +2), Duhaime (also 12%, -1), Anglade (10%, -1), and  Plamondon (8%, +2).

“More than seven-in-ten CAQ voters from the 2018 election (73%) think Legault would make the best premier out of the five main party leaders in Quebec ,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In stark contrast, only 30% of Liberal voters from the previous provincial ballot feel the same way about Anglade.”

The most important issue for likely voters in Quebec is health care (40%, -5), followed by the economy and jobs (17%, +1) and housing, homelessness and poverty (12%, unchanged).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from September 30 to October 2, 2022, among 708 likely voters in Quebec, including 637 decided voters in the 2022 provincial election. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points for the sample of likely voters and +/- 3.9 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Positive Views on State of Health Care Drop in British Columbia

Half of the province’s residents say a shortage of doctors and nurses is the biggest problem facing the system right now.

Vancouver, BC [September 30, 2020] – Just over three-in-ten British Columbians believe the province’s health care system requires a major overhaul, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 31% of British Columbians believe health care in the province has so much wrong with it that we need to completely rebuild it, up 20 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November 2020.

Only 13% of British Columbians (-9) think health care in the province works well, and only minor changes are needed to make it work better, while half (50%, -14) say there are some good things in health care in British Columbia, but some changes are required.

“Negative perceptions about the current state of the health care system in British Columbia increase with age,“ says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 22% of residents aged 18-to-34 call for a complete rebuild, the proportion rises to 30% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 40% among those aged 55 and over.”

Half of British Columbians (50%, +26) consider a shortage of doctors and nurses as the biggest problem facing the health care system right now. Long waiting times is a distant second on the list of concerns with 18% (-9), followed by bureaucracy and poor management (10%, =) and inadequate resources and facilities (7%, -6).

Two-in-five British Columbians (40%, =) say they would be willing to pay out of their own pocket to have quicker access to medical services that currently have long waiting times—a proportion that rises to 49% among those aged 18-to-34.

In addition, a third of British Columbians (33%, +6) would consider travelling to another country to have quicker access to medical services that currently have long waiting times.

In September 2020, a B.C. Supreme Court justice ruled that access to private health care is not a constitutional right, even if wait times for care under the public system are too long.

More than a third of British Columbians (37%, -9) agree with the decision taken by the B.C. Supreme Court justice, while 49% (+18) disagree and 14% (-9) are undecided.

British Columbians who voted for the BC Liberals and the BC Green Party in the 2020 provincial election are more likely to disagree with the justice’s decision (52% and 51% respectively) than those who supported the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (43%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 23 to September 25, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Canadians Say Their City or Town is Noisier Than in 2021

More than a third of the country’s residents (36%) have been bothered by unnecessary noise from vehicles in their own homes.

Vancouver, BC [August 23, 2022] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians have been bothered by a variety of noises while inside their homes, and practically half claim that their surroundings are not as quiet as they were in 2021, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians believe their city or town has become noisier over the past year, up 22 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in January 2021.

Just over two-in-five Canadians (41%, +18) think their street is noisier now than it was in 2021, while three-in-ten (30%, +2) feel the same way about their homes.

More than two-in-five Canadians of Indigenous (44%) and South Asian (41%) descent feel their home is noisier now, along with 32% of women, 40% of Canadians aged 18-to-34 and 37% of British Columbians.

When asked about specific disturbances that have bothered them at home over the past year, more than a third of Canadians (36%, +6) mention unnecessary noise from vehicles (such as motorcycles and cars revving up).

At least one-in-four Canadians were also subjected to construction-related noises (such as roofing, land clearing and heavy machinery) (29%, new), loud people outside their home (28%, +8), dogs barking (27%, +3), a car alarm (25%, +5) and yard work (such as lawnmowers and leaf blowers) (also 25%, +6).

Fewer Canadians were disturbed over the past 12 months by nine other noises, including loud music playing inside a vehicle (21%, +3), power tools (such as electric saws and sanders) (21%, +3), drivers honking the horn excessively (20%, +8), yelling or screaming at a nearby home (19%, +1), loud music at a nearby home (18%, +1), fireworks (18%, +2), a loud gathering or party at a nearby home (17%, +2), a home alarm (10%, +1) and cats meowing (7%, +2).

“Compared to 2021, there is significant growth in the proportion of Canadians who have been bothered at home by drivers honking the horn excessively,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In British Columbia, three-in-ten residents (30%) have experienced this nuisance.”

Practically three-in-four Canadians (74%, -5) have not taken any action to deal with noise at home. About one-in-seven (14%, +2) have worn earplugs or earmuffs to mitigate noise—including 20% of Quebecers and 22% of Canadians aged 18-to-34.

Fewer Canadians have chosen to report noise concerns to the police (8%, +3), acquired hardware to mitigate noise while inside their home (such as noise cancelling headphones or earphones) (7%, =) or moved away from their previous dwelling because of noise (5%, +1).

Methodology: Results are based on an online survey conducted from August 14 to August 16, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Say Homelessness Has Increased in Province

Most residents think all levels of government have done a “bad job” coming up with solutions to deal with this problem.

Vancouver, BC [August 19, 2022] – Majorities of residents of British Columbia are disappointed with the way their elected officials have addressed the issue of homelessness, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 61% of British Columbians think the federal government has done a “bad” or “very bad” job coming up with solutions to deal with homelessness.

More than half of British Columbians also believe both the provincial government (56%) and their municipal government (55%) have done a “bad” or “very bad” job on this file.

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (73%) consider the current situation related to homelessness in the province as a major problem—a proportion that rises to 83% in the Fraser Valley.

More than half of the province’s residents (52%) think homelessness in their municipality is a major problem, while 27% feel the same way about the current state of affairs in their neighbourhood.

Practically four-in-five British Columbians (79%) believe homelessness has increased across the province over the past three years, and more than three-in-five (63%) feel the same way about the current situation in their municipality. Just over two-in-five (42%) also say that homelessness has intensified in their neighbourhood.

When asked about factors that are to blame “a great deal” for the current situation regarding homelessness in the province, most British Columbians point the finger at addiction and mental health issues (60%) and a lack of affordable housing (53%).

Fewer British Columbians blame poverty and inequality (41%), personal actions and decisions (30%) and bad economy and unemployment (24%) for homelessness.

British Columbians are evenly split on whether homelessness can be eradicated. While 47% of the province’s residents believe this can be achieved with the proper funding and policies, 46% claim that homelessness will always be a problem in British Columbia.

“More than three-in-five British Columbians aged 55 and over (62%) believe that the notion of a province without homelessness is unattainable,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer of their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (39%) and aged 18-to-34 (34%) are skeptical.”

Most British Columbians agree with four different ideas to reduce homelessness in the province: increasing temporary housing options for people experiencing homelessness (80%), offering incentives to developers if they focus on building affordable housing units (78%), devoting tax money to build units to house homeless residents (67%) and changing zoning laws to allow property owners to build more units on standard lots (60%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 13 to August 15, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

A Third of Canadian Households Experienced COVID-19 Recently

The country’s residents are divided on whether restrictions and mandates were lifted at the right time in their community.

Vancouver, BC [August 8, 2022] – A growing number of Canadians acknowledge that their household has been negatively impacted by COVID-19 over the past few weeks, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 37% of Canadians say themselves, or someone else in their household, became infected with COVID-19 after restrictions and mandates were lifted in their community, up 14 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2022.

Across the country 46% of Canadians (+3) believe restrictions and mandates were abandoned too early in their community, while 44% (-5) think the decision was made at the right time.

“More than half of Atlantic Canadians (55%) appear disappointed with the absence of restrictions and mandates related to COVID-19,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower in Alberta (48%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (47%), British Columbia (45%), Quebec (also 45%) and Ontario (43%).”

Compared to May, there is little fluctuation when Canadians are asked about the possible return of specific regulations. Two thirds (66%, -2) would be satisfied if they have to wear a mask or face covering when entering an indoor premise. Slightly smaller proportions of Canadians would feel the same way if a reduction of capacity at venues (such as cinemas, theatres, concert halls and sports arenas) is implemented (63%, -1) or if proof of vaccination is required once again to go to restaurants or public events (60%, -1).

Three-in-five Canadians (60%, +1) believe it is only a matter of time before everyone catches COVID-19, and a majority (54%, +2) claim that, as long as people are vaccinated, the virus is a minor nuisance. In addition, 63% of Canadians (+3) foresee being vaccinated against COVID-19 at least once again in the next six months.

Just over two thirds of Canadians (68%) state that the worst of COVID-19 is definitely or probably “behind us”, down eight points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2022.

More than three-in-four Canadians (77%, -1) continue to brand COVID-19 as a real threat—including 82% of those aged 55 and over.

Public satisfaction with the pandemic performance of the federal government dropped from 61% in May to 55% this month. The rating is highest in Quebec (60%) and Atlantic Canada (58%), followed by Ontario (53%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (52%), British Columbia (49%) and Alberta (48%).

The satisfaction rating also fell this month for provincial administrations (53%, -10) and municipal governments (59%, -6).

In the four most populous provinces of Canada, the level of satisfaction with COVID-19 management is highest in British Columbia (62%, =), followed by Quebec (58%, -9), Ontario (48%, -17) and Alberta (39%, -14).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 1 to August 3, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Great11

Flag First, Health Care Down as Canadians Assess Sources of Pride

Fewer than half of Canadians say Parliament (45%) and the Monarchy (37%) make them proud.

Vancouver, BC [June 28, 2022] – While Canadians continue to rank the flag as their main source of pride, perceptions on the country’s health care system have dropped dramatically since 2021, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample asks Canadians to say if 12 institutions and features elicit feelings of pride among them.

Just under four-in-five Canadians (78%, +1 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in 2021) say they are proud of the flag.

More than two thirds of Canadians express pride in multiculturalism (69%, -1) and hockey (also 68%, +2).

Majorities of Canadians are proud of five other institutions and features: the Canadian Armed Forces (65%, -2), bilingualism (59%, =), the health care system (58%, -8) , Indigenous culture (also 58%, -4) and the state of democracy in Canada (57%, -5).

Just under half of Canadians express pride in the Canadian economy (49%, =) and the Canadian justice system (also 49%, -3). The ranking is lower for Parliament (45%, -5) and the Monarchy (37%, +3).

Three years ago, 77% of Canadians were proud of the health care system,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In 2022, the proportion has dropped by 19 points to 58%.”

Men are significantly more likely to say that the health care system is a source of pride (66%) than women (51%). On a regional basis, the health care system scores best in Ontario (71%), followed by Alberta (69%), British Columbia (59%), Atlantic Canada (51%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (50%) and Quebec (45%).

While 57% of Canadians are proud of the state of democracy in Canada, there are significant differences across the political spectrum. Fewer than half of Conservative Party voters in the 2021 federal election (48%) say the state of democracy in Canada is source of pride. The rating is higher among Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (55%) or the Liberal Party (79%) last year.

More than half of Ontarians (54%) are proud of Parliament. The rating on this question is lower in Quebec (46%), Atlantic Canada (42%), British Columbia (41%), Alberta (35%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (31%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 18 to June 20, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Double-Digit Advantage for Ontario’s Progressive Conservatives

Half of Ontarians (50%) approve of the performance of Doug Ford as Premier and PC leader, while 46% disapprove.

Vancouver, BC [June 1, 2022] – Public support for the governing Progressive Conservative Party has increased as the provincial election in Ontario draws near, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Ontarian adults, 39% of decided voters say they will cast a ballot for the Ontario PC candidate in their riding tomorrow or have already done so, up five points since the previous Research Co. poll completed in mid-May.

The Ontario Liberal Party remains in second place with 26% (-3), followed by the Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) with 23% (=), the Ontario Green Party with 6% (-1), the New Blue Party of Ontario with 3% (=) and the Ontario Party with 1% (=).

Since mid-May, the Progressive Conservatives have improved their standing in Ontario among both male decided voters (42%, +5) and female decided voters (37%, +7).

More than two-in-five decided voters aged 35-to-54 (42%) and aged 55 and over (also 42%) intend to back an Ontario PC candidate. The race is closer among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (PC 31%, Liberal 28%, NDP 26%).

“The Progressive Conservatives are keeping 81% of their 2018 voters, while the New Democrats are only maintaining 71% of them,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The Ontario Liberals are only attracting 52% of Ontarians who voted for the federal Liberal Party in last year’s Canadian federal election, as one-in-four of these voters (25%) are planning to vote for Ontario PC candidates tomorrow.”

Half of Ontarians (50%, +4) approve of the way Premier and Ontario Progressive Conservative Party leader Doug Ford has handled his duties.

The rating is lower for Official Opposition and Ontario NDP leader Andrea Horwath (46%, -1) Ontario Liberal Party leader Steven Del Duca (42%, =), Ontario Green Party leader Mike Schreiner (40%, +9), New Blue Party of Ontario leader Jim Karahalios (16%, +3) and Ontario Party leader Derek Sloan (16%, +4).

On the momentum question, Schreiner does particularly well, with 18% of Ontarians (+9 since mid-May) saying their opinion of the Ontario Green Party leader has improved since the electoral campaign started. The needle did not move for Del Duca (20%, =) and smaller gains are seen for Horwath (19%, +2), Ford (also 19%, +3), Karahalios (6%, +2) and Sloan (5%, +2).

More than a third of Ontarians (37%, +4) believe Ford would make the best premier of the province among the six main party leaders. Horwath is a distant second with 21% (-2), followed by Del Duca (19%, -1), Schreiner (7%, +4), Karahalios (2%, =) and Sloan (also 2%, =).

There is little movement on the issue landscape, where the top ranking belongs to housing, poverty and homelessness (26%, =), followed by health care (23%, -2) and the economy and jobs (22%, +2).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on May 31 and June 1, 2022, among 700 Ontario adults, including 659 decided voters in the 2022 provincial election. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points for the entire sample and +/- 3.8 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Josh Evnin

Three-in-Four Canadians Say Worst of COVID-19 is Now Behind Us

The satisfaction rating for the way provincial governments have managed the pandemic improved in Alberta and Quebec.

Vancouver, BC [May 24, 2022] – As a significant proportion of Canadians sense the end of the pandemic, positive views on the performance of various levels of government in managing COVID-19 have increased, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 76% of Canadians think the worst of COVID-19 is now “behind us”, up 14 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in April.

Four-in-five residents of Alberta and Ontario (80%) believe that the pandemic is unlikely to worsen, along with 76% of Quebecers, 71% of residents of British Columbia, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and 70% of Atlantic Canadians.

More than three-in-four Canadians (78%, -4) consider COVID-19 as a real threat—including 81% of those aged 55 and over.

A survey released by Research Co. earlier this month showed that 45% of Canadians were “anxious” about the end of COVID-19 restrictions and mandates in their community.

More than three-in-five Canadians (61%, +4) are currently satisfied with the way the federal government has dealt with COVID-19.

Sizeable majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (83%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (71%) in the 2021 Canadian federal election are happy with how Ottawa has managed the pandemic. The proportion is lower among those who voted for the Conservative Party last year (42%).

This month, the satisfaction rating also improved for provincial governments (63%, +6) and municipal administrations (65%, +5).

In the four most populous provinces, the level of satisfaction is highest in Quebec (67%, +8), followed by Ontario (65%, +4), British Columbia (62%, +1) and Alberta (53%, +16).

The satisfaction rating also rose across Canada for the federal chief public health officer (66%, +5) and for provincial health officers or chief medical officers (66%, +6).

“The numbers are remarkably consistent when Canadians rate the way their provincial health officers or chief medical officers are dealing with COVID-19,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Ontario is at the top of the list among the four most populous provinces at 67%, followed by Quebec with 66%, Alberta with 65% and British Columbia with 63%.”

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 14 to May 16, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Five-Point Lead for Ruling Progressive Conservatives in Ontario

Ontarians are divided when asked if the Liberals and the New Democrats should merge into a single party. 

Vancouver, BC [May 18, 2022] – The Ontario Progressive Conservative Party holds the upper hand in the provincial election campaign, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Ontarians, 34% of decided voters say they will support the Ontario PC candidate in their riding in next month’s provincial ballot.

The Ontario Liberal Party is second with 29%, followed by the Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) with 23%, the Ontario Green Party with 7%, the New Blue Party of Ontario with 3% and the Ontario Party with 1%.

The Progressive Conservatives are particularly popular among men (37%) and Ontarians aged 55 and over (41%). The Liberals are ahead in the 416 region (37%), while the New Democrats post their best numbers in Southwestern Ontario (32%).

Ontarians are divided when assessing the performance of Premier and Ontario Progressive Conservative Party leader Doug Ford. While 46% of the province’s residents approve of the way he has handled his duties, 48% disapprove.

More than two-in-five Ontarians approve of both Official Opposition and Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Andrea Horwath (47%) and Ontario Liberal Party leader Steven Del Duca (42%). The rating is lower for Ontario Green Party leader Mike Schreiner (31%), New Blue Party of Ontario leader Jim Karahalios (13%) and Ontario Party leader Derek Sloan (12%).

The first weeks of the campaign have not yielded a positive momentum score for any of the six main party leaders. One-in-five Ontarians (20%) say their opinion of Del Duca has improved. The numbers are paltrier on this indicator for Horwath (17%), Ford (16%), Schreiner (9%), Karahalios (4%) and Sloan (3%).

A third of Ontarians (33%) say Ford would make the best premier of the province, followed by Horwath (23%), Del Duca (20%), Schreiner (3%), Sloan (2%) and Karahalios (also 2%).

Ontarians identify three issues as the most important ones facing the province: housing, poverty and homelessness (26%), health care (25%) and the economy and jobs (20%).

“Ontarians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to look at housing, homelessness and poverty as the most important challenge (36%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Ontarians aged 55 and over are currently more concerned about health care (32%).”

Ford is perceived as the best leader to manage the economy and jobs (35%), crime and public safety (33%), energy and pipelines (31%) and accountability (29%). Horwath is ahead on being able to handle housing, homelessness and poverty (29%).

There is no clear leader when Ontarians ponder the best person to deal with health care (Horwath 28%, Ford 27%), education (Ford 26%, Del Duca 24%) and the environment (Ford 20%, Horwath 19%, Del Duca 19%, Schreiner 17%).

Ontarians are evenly split when asked if the Ontario Liberal Party and the Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) should merge into a single political party. While 41% of the province’s residents agree with this idea, 43% disagree and 16% are undecided.

Support for a provincial merger of Liberals and New Democrats is strongest in the 416 region (48%), but drops in Eastern Ontario (41%), Northern Ontario (also 41%), Southwestern Ontario (39%) and the 905 region (37%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 15 to May 17, 2022, among 700 Ontario adults, including 602 decided voters in the 2022 provincial election. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points for the entire sample and +/- 4.0 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: DXR

More Canadians Are Having Dinner in Front of the Television Set

Practically three-in-five Canadians spend anywhere from 31 to 60 minutes preparing dinner on an average weekday.

Vancouver, BC [May 13, 2022] – Most of Canada’s evening meals occur in a setting that is not the dining room and with electronic entertainment, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, Canadians report that 45% of their dinners at home in the past month took place at the dining room with no television, down six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2019. A majority of dinners (55%, +6) happened at a different part of the home, with the television on.

In Quebec, 50% of dinners at home in the past month occurred away from the dining room and with the television on. The proportion rises to 53% in British Columbia, 54% in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, 56% in Ontario, 58% in Atlantic Canada and 62% in Alberta.

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are having fewer evening meals away from the dining room (51%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (56%) and aged 55 and over (57%).

Three-in-ten Canadians (30%, -6 since a Research Co. survey conducted in June 2020) say they spend less than 30 minutes preparing dinner for themselves and others in their household on an average weekday.

Almost three-in-five Canadians (59%, +3) say making dinner on an average weekday takes anywhere from 31 to 60 minutes, while 11% (+3) require more than one hour to prepare food.

“A third of Ontarians, Quebecers and Albertans (33% each) manage to make dinner in less than half an hour,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (30%), British Columbia (26%) and Atlantic Canada (23%) can consistently manage this feat.”

Across the country, 65% of Canadians (unchanged) say they are “very familiar” or “moderately familiar” with Canada’s Food Guide. Awareness is lowest among Canadians aged 55 and over (56%) and rises among those aged 18-to-34 (70%) and those aged 35-to-54 (71%).

Fewer than three-in-five residents of British Columbia (58%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (59%) are familiar with Canada’s Food Guide. The proportion is higher in Quebec (64%), Alberta (65%), Ontario (68%) and Atlantic Canada (71%).

Just over a third of Canadians (35%, -6) rely on the recommendations of Canada’s Food Guide “all the time” or “most of the time” when choosing what they eat in an average week.

Women are more likely to review the recommendations of Canada’s Food Guide when deciding what to prepare (40%) than men (32%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 7 to May 9, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Young Canadians Are Vaping More Now Than in 2020

While most Canadians agree with the federal regulations that have been in place since 2018, support is not as strong this year.

Vancouver, BC [April 22, 2022] – The proportion of Canadians who have used an electronic cigarette or e-cigarette has increased in the past two years, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 17% of Canadians say they have vaped in the past 12 months, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September 2020.

Vaping remains more popular among Canadians aged 18-to-34 (26%) than among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (18%) and aged 55 and over (7%).

On a regional basis, British Columbia is at the top of the list when it comes to vaping (21%), followed by Atlantic Canada (18%), Quebec (also 18%), Ontario (16%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (15%) and Alberta (12%).

Current regulations related to vaping were implemented in May 2018, after Bill S-5—an overhaul of the Tobacco Act—was approved by the House of Commons and the Senate.

Across the country, more than four-in-five Canadians (82%, -4) agree with prohibiting the sale of vaping products to minors.

Almost two thirds of Canadians are also in favour of two other current measures: restricting any reference to e-cigarettes as healthier than standard tobacco products (65%, -12) and restricting the use of testimonials and “lifestyle” advertising for vaping products (64%, -11).

A majority of Canadians (58%, -11) agree with banning certain flavours of vaping products, such as cannabis and “confectionery.”

“The rise in vaping across Canada is accompanied by a drop in support for some of the measures introduced by the federal government in 2018,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There are double-digit drops in the level of agreement with advertising and flavouring guidelines.”

More than four-in-five Canadians (82%, -4) think vaping products that contain nicotine should display a warning, similar to the one used for tobacco products, while just over seven-in-ten (71%, -8) would ban the use of e-cigarettes in public places where smoking is currently prohibited.

Half of Canadians (50%, -6) would not consider dating a person who vapes—including 52% of men, 59% of Canadians aged 55 and over and 55% of Ontarians.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 16 to April 18, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Call for Public Inquiry into COVID-19 Response

The proportion of Canadians who are “anxious” about the end of pandemic restrictions and mandates increased to 56%.

Vancouver, BC [April 22, 2022] – A majority of Canadians believe a thorough review of the performance of various levels of government during the COVID-19 pandemic is warranted, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample, 66% of Canadians support holding a public inquiry into the way the COVID-19 pandemic was managed by the federal government, while 23% are opposed and 12% are undecided.

The Government of the United Kingdom has announced a public inquiry into the COVID-19 pandemic. The terms of reference intend to cover preparedness, the public health response, the response in the health care sector and the economic response. 

Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2021 federal election are more likely to endorse the call for a public inquiry into Ottawa’s pandemic management (77%) than those who voted for the Conservative Party (67%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (66%).

More than three-in-five Canadians believe that public inquiries into the way COVID-19 was handled by their provincial governments (64%) and their municipal governments (61%) are in order.

“More than two thirds of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (70%) and Ontario (68%) are in favour of holding a public inquiry into how their provincial governments managed the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support is slightly lower in Quebec (64%), British Columbia (61%), Alberta (also 61%) and Atlantic Canada (59%).”

This month, 82% of residents (+1 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March 2022) believe COVID-19 is a real threat. In addition, 62% of Canadians (-10) believe that the worst of COVID-19 is “behind us”.

Satisfaction with the way the federal government is handling the pandemic fell by four points to 57%. The rating is exactly the same for provincial administrations across Canada (57%, +1) and slightly higher for municipal governments (60% =).

Among the four most populous provinces, satisfaction is highest in British Columbia (61%, -2) and Ontario (also 61%, +4), followed by Quebec (59%, -4) and Alberta (37%, =).

There is little movement on the satisfaction of Canadians with the performance of the federal chief public health officer (61%, -2) and their provincial health officer or chief medical officer (60%, -1).

Most Canadians (56%) acknowledge feeling “very anxious” or “moderately anxious” about the end of COVID-19 restrictions and mandates in their community, up four points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in March 2022.

Three-in-five Canadians (60%, -5) plan to continue wearing a mask or face covering when entering an indoor premise in the next fortnight, while 45% (=) will do so every time they leave their home.

The proportion of Canadians who intend to visit relatives or friends in person over the next two weeks remains at 58%. Just over two-in-five Canadians are planning to have dinner (44%, -1) or lunch (43%, +4) at a sit-down restaurant in the next fortnight.

Fewer than one-in-four Canadians are planning to attend the theatre or cinema (22%, +1), a live sporting event as a spectator (11%, =) or a live concert as a spectator (also 11%, +2). 

While 22% of Canadians are planning to travel by car for an overnight stay in the next two weeks, only 13% are currently willing to travel by airplane.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 16 to April 18, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadian Views on Vaccinations for Children Shift Since 2020

While 75% (-6) think these shots should be mandatory in their province, 20% (+8) would leave the decision up to parents.  

Vancouver, BC [April 1, 2022] – Although most Canadians continue to agree with vaccinations for children being mandatory in their province, the proportion of those who would leave this decision in the hands of parents has grown over the past two years, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 75% of Canadians think that vaccinations for children should “definitely” (49%) or “probably” (26%) be mandatory in their province, down six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in February 2020.  

One-in-five Canadians (20%,+8) believe that parents should “probably” (12%) or “definitely” (8%) make the call on whether their kids are inoculated.  

Support for letting parents decide on vaccinations for children is highest in Ontario and Atlantic Canada (each at 25%), followed by British Columbia (21%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (19%), Alberta (16%) and Quebec (15%).  

In the late 1990s, a study published in the weekly medical journal The Lancet—which has since been discredited and retracted—attempted to link childhood vaccination and autism.  

Only 19% of Canadians (-7) believe there is “definitely” (6%) or “probably” (13%) a connection between the childhood vaccine for Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) and autism—a proportion that rises to 23% in Ontario.   Canadians were also asked about vaccinations and seasonal diseases (such as the flu).  

Just over half of Canadians (51%, =) say that each person should “definitely” (36%) or “probably” (19%) be allowed to decide if they want inoculation against the flu, while just over two-in-five (41%, -3) believe this type of vaccine should be mandatory in their province.  

“There is a fundamental age difference when Canadians ponder the notion of vaccinations against seasonal diseases being mandatory in their province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While a majority of Canadians aged 55 and over believe this should be the case (53%), the proportion drops markedly among those aged 35-to-54 (37%) and those aged 18-to-34 (33%).”  

More than half of Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) in the last federal election (54%) are in favour of the flu vaccine being mandatory in their province. The numbers are lower among Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (48%) and the Conservative Party (37%) last year.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from March 25 to March 27, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Armed Forces, Constitution and Flag Top Pride List in U.S.

Fewer than two-in-five Americans are proud of Congress and the state of race relations in the country.  

Vancouver, BC [March 29, 2021] – Significant proportions of Americans express pride in some of the country’s institutions and features, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 82% of Americans say the country’s Armed Forces make them proud.  

More than three-in-four Americans are proud of the Constitution (77%) and the flag (also 77%), while majorities feel the same way about the police (61%), American sports (55%) and the justice system (51%).  

“Republicans in the United States are more likely to say that they are proud of the police (81%) than Independents (60%) and Democrats (44%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “A similar scenario ensues when Americans are asked about the justice system, with 61% of Republicans stating they are proud of it, compared to 48% of Independents and 44% of Democrats.”  

More than two-in-five Americans are proud of the economy (44%), health care (also 44%), the state of democracy (42%) and the President (41%). The lowest ranked institutions and features are Congress (35%) and race relations (26%).  

While 33% of Americans of Hispanic or Latino descent are proud of the state of race relations in the United States, the numbers are lower among White Americans (26%) and African Americans (24%).  

Americans aged 18-to-34 are less likely to express pride about health care (38%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (46%) and aged 55 and over (45%).  

Across the United States, 42% of Americans approve of Joe Biden’s performance as president, down 11 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in April 2021.  

Biden’s approval reaches 75% among Democrats, but drops to 49% among Independents and to 15% among Republicans.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from March 25 to March 27, 2022, among 1,000 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Canadians Anxious About the End of COVID-19 Mandates

Almost two thirds plan to still wear a mask or face covering when entering an indoor premise in the next two weeks.  

Vancouver, BC [March 25, 2022] – Many Canadians are preoccupied about the next stage of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Canadians say they are “very anxious” or “moderately anxious” about COVID-19 restrictions and mandates being lifted in their community.  

Residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba are more likely to report feeling anxiety over the end of COVID-19 restrictions and mandates (61%) than their counterparts in British Columbia (53%), Alberta (52%), Ontario (also 52%), Atlantic Canada (also 52%) and Quebec (50%).  

“Majorities of Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (62%) and the Liberal Party (60%) in the last federal election are anxious about the current state of affairs,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 45% of those who voted for the Conservative Party in 2021 share this feeling.”  

In a poll conducted by Research Co. earlier this month, 72% of Canadians thought that the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic was now “behind us.”  

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%) think the recent protests and blockades related to the COVID-19 pandemic are responsible “a great deal” or “a fair amount” for restrictions and mandates being lifted in their community.  

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to credit the protests and blockades for the recent policy changes related to COVID-19 (59%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (46%) and aged 55 and over (31%).  

Across the country, 65% of Canadians say they will continue to wear a mask or face covering when entering an indoor premise in the next two weeks—a proportion that rises to 73% among those aged 55 and over. However, only 45% of Canadians plan to wear a mask or face covering when leaving their home.  

Almost three-in-five Canadians (58%) plan to visit relatives or friends in person over the next two weeks.  

Fewer than half of Canadians have made plans to partake in five other activities over the next two weeks: go out for dinner at a sit-down restaurant (43%), go out for lunch at a sit-down restaurant (39%), go to the theatre or cinema (21%), go to a live sporting event as a spectator (11%) or go to a live concert as a spectator (9%).  

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from March 18 to March 20, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca