Canadians Support Wide Use of Territory Acknowledgements

Almost three-in-five of the country’s residents think the practice is a positive step towards reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.

Vancouver, BC [October 4, 2022] – While fewer than half of Canadians have been at an event that featured a territory acknowledgement, most believe that the practice should become more common across the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 39% of Canadians say they have attended a ceremony, lecture or public event that featured a territory acknowledgement.

Residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (49%), Alberta (46%) and British Columbia (44%) are more likely to have listened to a territory acknowledgement than their counterparts in Atlantic Canada (36%), Quebec (also 36%) and Ontario (35%).

Territory acknowledgements are usually worded this way: “I want to acknowledge that we are on the traditional territory of [nation names].”

More than half of Canadians (54%) think territory acknowledgements should be adopted widely before ceremonies, lectures and public events held in Canada, while 26% disagree and 19% are undecided.

“Support for the wide adoption of territory acknowledgements is highest among Canadians aged 18-to-34 (62%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer Canadians aged 35-to-54 (57%) and aged 55 and over (45%) share the same point of view.”

More than three-in-five Canadians who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (62%) and the Liberal Party (64%) in the 2021 federal election are in favour of the wide adoption of territory acknowledgements in Canada. Fewer than half of Conservative Party voters (44%) welcome this idea.

Just over half of Canadians (53%) consider territory acknowledgements as a sincere and important practice, and practically three-in-five (59%) think they are a positive step towards reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.

For 57% of Canadians, territory acknowledgements amount to a lip-service gesture, while just under two thirds (63%) believe they do little to address the problems facing Indigenous peoples.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 25 to September 27, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Appetite for Political Correctness Rises in Canada, Sinks in U.S.

One-in-five Americans (20%) claim to never act “politically correct”, compared to just 11% of Canadians.

Vancouver, BC [September 28, 2022] – Residents of Canada and the United States hold differing views on the concept of “political correctness”, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 55% of Canadians and 45% of Americans support the use of “political correctness” in their respective countries.

The term “political correctness” has been used to describe language and/or behaviour that seeks to minimize possible offenses to racial, cultural and gender identity groups, among others.

Since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2020, support for “political correctness” has increased by five points in Canada and fallen by eight points in the United States.

“Canadians who voted for the Conservatives in 2021 (41%) and Americans who identify as Independent (35%) or Republican (29%) are less likely to endorse political correctness,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are higher among (66%) in the United States (66%) and among Canadians who voted for the Liberals (64%) or the New Democrats (67%) in 2021.”

There is little change when Canadians are asked about their own behaviour, with just over a third (34%, +2) claiming to always act “politically correct” because it’s the right thing to do. Two-in-five (40%, =) sometimes act “politically correct” because it’s the safe thing to do, while only 11% (=) do not act “politically correct” because it’s the wrong thing to do.

In the United States, the proportion of Americans who claim to never act “politically correct” increased to 20% (+5), while those who sometimes act “politically correct” rose to 41% (+4). About one-in-four Americans (24%, -12) say they always act “politically correct” because it’s the right thing to do.

As was the case in 2020, more than half of Canadians and Americans think three groups in society should act in a “politically correct” manner “always” or “most of the time”: teachers (75% in Canada and 64% in the U.S.), politicians (72% in Canada and 60% in the U.S.) and journalists (67% in Canada and 55% in the U.S.).

Significantly fewer Canadians (41%) and Americans (28%) believe comedians should act in a “politically correct” way “always” or “most of the time”.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%, +5) and just under three-in-five Americans (59%, -3) are in favour of adding a disclaimer to explain that programs or movies are presented “as originally created” and “may contain outdated cultural depictions.”

Opposition grew in the United States toward the notion of printing new editions of books that remove words that may be deemed offensive to a specific race or ethnicity (65%, +6). More than half of Canadians (55%, -6) feel the same way (55%, -6).

A similar scenario ensues when residents of the two countries are asked about re-dubbing movies to remove words that may be deemed offensive to a specific race or ethnicity. Just under two thirds of Americans are opposed (64%, +7), along with a majority of Canadians (56%, -6).

Methodology: Results are based on online surveys conducted from September 16 to September 18, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Double-Digit Advantage for Ontario’s Progressive Conservatives

Half of Ontarians (50%) approve of the performance of Doug Ford as Premier and PC leader, while 46% disapprove.

Vancouver, BC [June 1, 2022] – Public support for the governing Progressive Conservative Party has increased as the provincial election in Ontario draws near, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Ontarian adults, 39% of decided voters say they will cast a ballot for the Ontario PC candidate in their riding tomorrow or have already done so, up five points since the previous Research Co. poll completed in mid-May.

The Ontario Liberal Party remains in second place with 26% (-3), followed by the Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) with 23% (=), the Ontario Green Party with 6% (-1), the New Blue Party of Ontario with 3% (=) and the Ontario Party with 1% (=).

Since mid-May, the Progressive Conservatives have improved their standing in Ontario among both male decided voters (42%, +5) and female decided voters (37%, +7).

More than two-in-five decided voters aged 35-to-54 (42%) and aged 55 and over (also 42%) intend to back an Ontario PC candidate. The race is closer among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (PC 31%, Liberal 28%, NDP 26%).

“The Progressive Conservatives are keeping 81% of their 2018 voters, while the New Democrats are only maintaining 71% of them,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The Ontario Liberals are only attracting 52% of Ontarians who voted for the federal Liberal Party in last year’s Canadian federal election, as one-in-four of these voters (25%) are planning to vote for Ontario PC candidates tomorrow.”

Half of Ontarians (50%, +4) approve of the way Premier and Ontario Progressive Conservative Party leader Doug Ford has handled his duties.

The rating is lower for Official Opposition and Ontario NDP leader Andrea Horwath (46%, -1) Ontario Liberal Party leader Steven Del Duca (42%, =), Ontario Green Party leader Mike Schreiner (40%, +9), New Blue Party of Ontario leader Jim Karahalios (16%, +3) and Ontario Party leader Derek Sloan (16%, +4).

On the momentum question, Schreiner does particularly well, with 18% of Ontarians (+9 since mid-May) saying their opinion of the Ontario Green Party leader has improved since the electoral campaign started. The needle did not move for Del Duca (20%, =) and smaller gains are seen for Horwath (19%, +2), Ford (also 19%, +3), Karahalios (6%, +2) and Sloan (5%, +2).

More than a third of Ontarians (37%, +4) believe Ford would make the best premier of the province among the six main party leaders. Horwath is a distant second with 21% (-2), followed by Del Duca (19%, -1), Schreiner (7%, +4), Karahalios (2%, =) and Sloan (also 2%, =).

There is little movement on the issue landscape, where the top ranking belongs to housing, poverty and homelessness (26%, =), followed by health care (23%, -2) and the economy and jobs (22%, +2).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on May 31 and June 1, 2022, among 700 Ontario adults, including 659 decided voters in the 2022 provincial election. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points for the entire sample and +/- 3.8 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Josh Evnin

More Canadians Are Having Dinner in Front of the Television Set

Practically three-in-five Canadians spend anywhere from 31 to 60 minutes preparing dinner on an average weekday.

Vancouver, BC [May 13, 2022] – Most of Canada’s evening meals occur in a setting that is not the dining room and with electronic entertainment, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, Canadians report that 45% of their dinners at home in the past month took place at the dining room with no television, down six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2019. A majority of dinners (55%, +6) happened at a different part of the home, with the television on.

In Quebec, 50% of dinners at home in the past month occurred away from the dining room and with the television on. The proportion rises to 53% in British Columbia, 54% in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, 56% in Ontario, 58% in Atlantic Canada and 62% in Alberta.

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are having fewer evening meals away from the dining room (51%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (56%) and aged 55 and over (57%).

Three-in-ten Canadians (30%, -6 since a Research Co. survey conducted in June 2020) say they spend less than 30 minutes preparing dinner for themselves and others in their household on an average weekday.

Almost three-in-five Canadians (59%, +3) say making dinner on an average weekday takes anywhere from 31 to 60 minutes, while 11% (+3) require more than one hour to prepare food.

“A third of Ontarians, Quebecers and Albertans (33% each) manage to make dinner in less than half an hour,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (30%), British Columbia (26%) and Atlantic Canada (23%) can consistently manage this feat.”

Across the country, 65% of Canadians (unchanged) say they are “very familiar” or “moderately familiar” with Canada’s Food Guide. Awareness is lowest among Canadians aged 55 and over (56%) and rises among those aged 18-to-34 (70%) and those aged 35-to-54 (71%).

Fewer than three-in-five residents of British Columbia (58%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (59%) are familiar with Canada’s Food Guide. The proportion is higher in Quebec (64%), Alberta (65%), Ontario (68%) and Atlantic Canada (71%).

Just over a third of Canadians (35%, -6) rely on the recommendations of Canada’s Food Guide “all the time” or “most of the time” when choosing what they eat in an average week.

Women are more likely to review the recommendations of Canada’s Food Guide when deciding what to prepare (40%) than men (32%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 7 to May 9, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Fewer British Columbians Are Noticing Distracted Drivers on Roads

Almost two thirds of the province’s residents support seizing the electronic devices of repeat offenders.

Vancouver, BC [April 19, 2022] – While the proportion of British Columbians who are detecting distracted drivers has dropped since 2020, most of the province’s residents think it is time for tougher penalties to deal with this issue, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 46% of British Columbians say they witnessed a driver talking on a hand-held cell phone or texting while driving over the past four weeks, down nine points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2020.

Men (50%) and British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (52%) are more likely to say that they crossed paths with a distracted driver than women (43%) and British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (47%) and aged 55 and over (42%).

Drivers caught emailing, texting, or using an electronic device while driving in British Columbia face a fine of $368 and four penalty points (equivalent to $252) in their insurance penalty point premium. This means a total of $620 for a first-time infraction.

A majority of British Columbians (56%, +4) say the current fine for distracted driving in the province is “about right”, while 24% (-6) deem it “too low” and 15% (+1) consider it “too high.”

While one third of residents of Vancouver Island (33%) believe the current penalty for distracted driving is “too low”, the proportion is lower in Northern BC (29%), the Fraser Valley (22%), Southern BC (21%) and Metro Vancouver (also 21%).

More than half of British Columbians are in favour of three different penalties for drivers caught emailing, texting, or using an electronic device in the province, although the level of support for each one is lower in 2022 than in 2020.

Across the province, 52% of British Columbians (-2) support suspending drivers who break the law for a year, while 41% (+4) are opposed to this course of action.

“The notion of suspending distracted drivers for 12 months is contentious on a regional basis,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 54% of residents of Metro Vancouver, Southern BC and Vancouver Island like the idea, the proportion drops to 44% in Northern BC and to 42% in the Fraser Valley.”

More than half of the province’s residents (55%, -4) are in favour of doubling the current first-time fine to $1,240, while almost two thirds (64%, -6) support seizing the electronic devices of repeat offenders.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 1 to April 5, 2022, among 650 adults in British Columbia who are employed full time or part time. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Human Beings Evolved for Almost Two Thirds of Canadians

Support for including creationism in the school curriculum dropped from 44% in 2021 to 38% in 2022.  

Vancouver, BC [April 5, 2022] – A sizeable majority of Canadians believe that human beings evolved from less advanced life forms over millions of years, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 65% of Canadians say evolution is closest to their own point of view when thinking about the origin and development of human beings on earth, up eight points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March 2021.  

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians (18%, -8) think God created human beings in their present form within the last 10,000 years.  

“Almost one-in-four Canadians aged 55 and over (23%) believe in creationism,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (17%) and aged 18-to-34 (13%).”  

Only 12% of Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) in the 2021 federal election side with creationism when pondering the origin and development of human beings on the planet. The proportion is higher among Canadians who cast ballots for the Liberal Party (18%) and the Conservative Party (22%).  

Canadians are split when asked whether the belief that the universe and life originated from specific acts of divine creation should be taught in schools. While just under two-in-five Canadians (38%, -6) believe that this should be the case, a higher proportion (42%, +6) disagree.  

On a regional basis, more than two residents of Ontario (44%) and Quebec (41%) believe creationism should be taught in the classroom. The proportion is lower in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (37%), Atlantic Canada (31%), Alberta (also 31%) and British Columbia (28%).  

Conservative voters and Liberal voters are more likely to be in favour of including creationism in the school curriculum (42% and 40% respectively) than those who voted for the New Democrats (24%).

Methodology:Results are based on an online study conducted from March 25 to March 27, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Still Back Proposed Ban on Single-Use Plastics

Three-in-four of the province’s residents say they rely on their own re-usable bags to transport groceries out of a store.  
 
Vancouver, BC [December 31, 2021] – Public support remains high in British Columbia for the federal government’s plan to reduce plastic use across Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 82% of British Columbians are in favour of banning single-use plastics, unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2021.
 
The federal government’s proposed regulation focuses on items such as grocery checkout bags, straws, stir sticks, six-pack rings, plastic cutlery and food takeout containers made from hard-to-recycle plastics. Several municipalities in British Columbia have already implemented their own guidelines for specific items, such as grocery checkout bags.  
 
Just over three-in-four British Columbians (76%, -1) acknowledge relying on their own reusable bag to transport groceries out of a store after purchasing them. Significantly smaller proportions of the province’s residents use bags provided by the store, either made out of paper (11%) or plastic (9%).  
 
“There is a generational gap in the adoption of reusable bags in British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Practically nine-in-ten residents aged 55 and over (88%) are already using their own bags at grocery stores, compared to 73% among those aged 35-to-54 and 62% among those aged 18-to-34.”  
 
Just over half of British Columbians (51%, -3) say they go out of their way to recycle “all of the time”, such as holding on to bottles and cans until they can be placed into a proper recycling bin. Once again, this behaviour is more common among the province’s residents aged 55 and over (66%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (50%) and aged 18-to-34 (32%).  
 
More than three-in-five residents of Vancouver Island (65%) and Northern BC (63%) claim to go out of their way to recycle “all of the time.” The proportion is lower in Southern BC (58%), the Fraser Valley (57%) and Metro Vancouver (44%).  
 
One-in-five British Columbians (20%, -6) acknowledge limiting hot water usage in their home “all the time” by taking shorter showers or running washing machines or dishwashers with full loads only.  
 
Fewer British Columbians say they unplug electrical devices in their home—such as TVs, computers and cell phone chargers—when they are not in use (12%, -1), buy biodegradable products (5%, -2) or eat organic or home-grown foods (also 5%, -2) “all of the time.”
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 21 to December 23, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Two Thirds of Canadians Endorse Vaccine Passports in Offices

Only 9% of Canadians say they do not plan to get vaccinated against COVID-19, unchanged since September.  

Vancouver, BC [November 19, 2021] – More Canadians are in favour of implementing “vaccine passports” in order to allow employees to return to the country’s workplaces, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 67% of Canadians think it is a “good idea” to rely on COVID-19 “Proof of Vaccination” certificates for people to be able to work at an office.  

“In May 2021, when we first asked about COVID-19 vaccine certificates, just over half of Canadians (52%) were in favour of their use in offices,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support grew to 63% in September 2021 and once again this month to 67%.”  

Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to welcome “vaccine passports” in the workplace (77%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (66%) and aged 18-to-34 (59%).  

Support for the use of COVID-19 “Proof of Vaccination” certificates is highest in Quebec (73%), followed by British Columbia (70%), Ontario (68%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 68%), Alberta (64%) and Atlantic Canada (58%).  

Just over four-in-five Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in this year’s federal election (81%) are in favour of using “vaccine passports” in offices, along with 73% of those who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP), 64% of those who supported the Conservative Party and 58% of those who supported the Green Party. Only 19% of Canadians who voted for the People’s Party agree with this course of action.  

More than two thirds of Canadians continue to endorse the use of “vaccine passports” for people to go to live concerts as spectators (70%, +2), to go to live sporting events as spectators (also 70%, +4), to visit a gym or fitness facility (also 70%, +3) and to go to the theatre or cinema (69%, +3).  

Sizeable proportions of Canadians are also in favour of relying on  “Proof of Vaccination” certificates for travel to other countries (74%, +1), for travel to other Canadian provinces (70%, +2) and for travel inside the same province (65%, +3).  

Across the country, seven-in-ten Canadians (70%, -1) say they wear a mask every time the leave their home. As has been the case throughout the pandemic, women (74%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (81%) are more likely to be observing this guideline.  

There is little movement on some of the habits that Canadians may have developed as a result of the pandemic. More than one-in-ten Canadians say they are losing their temper more than usual at home (15%, =), having a bath or shower less often (14%, +2), drinking more alcohol than usual at home (13%, =), not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection (12%, -2) or brushing their teeth less often than before the pandemic (6%, -1).  

More than one-in-five Canadians continue to clean the groceries they buy to prevent infection (23%, +2) and admit to overeating or eating more than usual at home (22%, -1).  

Only 9% of Canadians (unchanged since September) say they do not plan to get inoculated against COVID-19, while 89% (+1) have already done so or intend to do so.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 8 to November 10, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Canadians Hearing and Uttering Fewer Swear Words Than in 2019

Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely than their younger counterparts to say that they never alter the way they speak.  

Vancouver, BC [November 11, 2021] – Compared to two years ago, fewer adults in Canada say they are having conversations with people who swear, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 64% of Canadians say they hear their friends swear “frequently” or “occasionally” when they are engaged in conversation, down four points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in April 2019.  

About half of Canadians say they listen to swear words “frequently” or “occasionally” when talking to strangers (50%, -5), relatives (49%, -5) and co-workers (48%, -4).  

When asked about their own use of swear words, almost half of Canadians (49%, -3) say they rely on this kind of language “frequently” or “occasionally” when they are conversing with friends.  

Fewer Canadians say they swear “frequently” or “occasionally” when chatting with relatives (36%, -4), co-workers (31%, -3) and strangers (17%, -6).  

Just over two-in-five residents of British Columbia (41%) say they “never” swear during conversations with relatives. The proportion is lower in Alberta (37%), Ontario (33%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (30%), Quebec (27%) and Atlantic Canada (26%).  

Ontario is home to the highest proportion of residents who “never” utter swear words around co-workers (45%), followed by Alberta (44%), British Columbia (41%), Quebec (40%), Atlantic Canada (39%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (38%).  

“More than half of Canadians who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP) and the Conservative Party in the last federal election (52% and 51% respectively) say they swear frequently or occasionally when chatting with friends,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion drops to 46% among those who voted for the Liberal Party.”  

Across the country, more than a third of Canadians (36%, -2) claim to always alter the way they speak to make sure they do not swear in public—including 39% of women.  

Practically half of Canadians (49%, +1) acknowledge that they sometimes alter the way they speak so as not to swear in front of certain people—a proportion that reaches 62% among those aged 18-to-34.

Only 14% of Canadians say they never alter the way they speak and do not worry if a curse word comes out—including 18% of Atlantic Canadians, 18% of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba and 17% of Canadians aged 55 and over.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 1 to November 3, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

The Opioid Crisis is a Major Problem for Almost Half of Canadians

More than three-in-four Canadians believe more action is needed on education and awareness, as well as drug rehabilitation.  

Vancouver, BC [November 5, 2021] – The level of concern expressed by Canadians about the opioid crisis has increased over the past year, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 45% of Canadians describe the current situation related to the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in their community as “a major problem”, up six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September 2020.  

More than half of British Columbians (58%) and Albertans (55%) refer to the current state of affairs as ”a major problem.”  

Canadians are not overly satisfied with the actions of elected politicians on this file. Just over a third of Canadians (34%, -1) believe Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the federal government are doing a “very good” or “good” coming up with solutions to deal with the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs.  

Premiers and provincial governments have a slightly better rating on this question (39%, -4), with a higher level of satisfaction reported in British Columbia (43%, +7) than in Ontario (35%, -6), Quebec (34%, -10) and Alberta (28%, -19).  

Fewer Canadians are satisfied with the job their mayors and councils (37%, -3), their own Member of Parliament (33%, -5) and their own members of provincial legislatures (33%, -6) are doing to come up with solutions to deal with the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs.  

“The preoccupation of Canadians with the opioid crisis has grown, particularly in Western Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “At the same time, the level of satisfaction with the work of elected officials is stagnant or in a downward trend.”  

More than three-in-four Canadians agree with launching more education and awareness campaigns about drug use (77%, -7) and creating more spaces for drug rehabilitation (76%, -2).  

A majority of Canadians are also in favour of three other ideas: reducing the prescription of opioids by medical professionals (69%, -4), establishing “safe supply” programs where alternatives to opioids can be prescribed by health professionals (61%, -9) and setting up more “harm reduction” strategies, such as legal supervised injection sites (56%, -3).  

A proposal to decriminalize all drugs for personal use remains decidedly more contentious, with 33% of Canadians (-1) saying they favour this idea and 54% (+1) voicing disagreement.  

Support for the decriminalization of all drugs for personal use is highest in Ontario (37%), followed by British Columbia (33%), Atlantic Canada (also 33%), Quebec (31%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (30%) and Alberta (26%).  

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 25 to October 27, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Most British Columbians Doing Poorly on Emergency Preparedness

The number of residents who have an emergency kit, a plan and a meeting place is down markedly since 2019.
 
Vancouver, BC [August 10, 2021] – The proportion of British Columbians who have taken steps to prepare for an emergency has fallen over the past two years, a new Research Co. poll has found.
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 38% of British Columbians say they have purchased or prepared an emergency kit with supplies they might need in case of an emergency, down eight points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2019.
 
Only 28% of British Columbians (-11) have prepared an emergency plan that includes how to get in touch with family or friends in case of an emergency and just 22% (-13) have established a meeting place with family or friends in case of an emergency.
 
“Fewer than half of British Columbians across all regions have purchased or prepared an emergency kit,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is highest on Vancouver Island (45%), but drops in the Fraser Valley (41%), Metro Vancouver (39%), Southern BC (30%) and Northern BC (29%).”
 
British Columbians aged 18 to 34 are more likely to have both prepared an emergency plan (31%) and established a meeting place (27%) than their counterparts aged 55 and over (26% and 17% respectively).
 
Majorities of British Columbians have confidence in the ability of their provincial government (66%), their municipal government (63%) and the federal government (59%) to successfully deal with an emergency (such as a natural disaster, a serious accident, or incident caused by human error).
 
Three-in-four British Columbians (75%, -1) think it is likely that an earthquake strong enough to damage buildings will occur in British Columbia in the next 50 years.
 
When asked about their level of concern about being personally affected by 10 different emergencies, majorities of British Columbians are worried about facing a fire (80%), an earthquake (72%), high winds (58%), intense rainfall (53%) or a flood (51%).
 
Fewer of the province’s residents are preoccupied with encountering a toxic spill (47%), heavy snowfall (also 47%), a terrorist attack (46%), a tsunami (42%) or a landslide (39%).
 
 

Methodology:Results are based on an online study conducted from July 31 to August 3, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Believe Systemic Discrimination is a Problem

Fewer than half of Canadians say they know who to contact in order to file a human rights complaint.

Vancouver, BC [August 6, 2021] – A majority of Canadians believe that some of the country’s institutions exhibit policies or practices that contribute to less favourable outcomes for minority groups, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, almost two thirds of Canadians (64%) believe systemic discrimination is a problem in the country.

Women (67%), Canadians aged 55 and over (65%) and residents of Ontario (67%) and British Columbia (also 67%) are more likely to agree that systemic discrimination is a problem in Canada.

More than four-in-five Canadians of African descent (86%) believe systemic discrimination is a problem in the country, along with majorities of respondents whose origins are Southeast Asian (72%), South Asian (71%), First Nations (70%), East Asian (65%) and European (63%).

While three-in-four Canadians (76%) say they know what systemic discrimination is, only half (50%) believe that most Canadians have a sense of what systemic discrimination is.

“There is an evident disconnect in the personal views of Canadians on systemic discrimination and what they think the rest of the country’s residents are aware of,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The survey outlines a 26-point gap between what Canadians feel individually and what they assume is true collectively.”

Across the country, three-in-four Canadians (75%) say they know when their human rights have been violated—a proportion that rises to 77% among those aged 55 and over and to 79% in Atlantic Canada.

When asked if they know who to contact in order to file a human rights complaint, only 45% of Canadians answered affirmatively.

Majorities of Canadians of four different ethnicities say they know who to talk to if their human rights are violated: South Asian (66%), First Nations (60%), Southeast Asian (56%) and African (55%). The proportion is lower for respondents of European (44%) and East Asian (37%) descent.

Methodology: Results are based on an online survey conducted from July 9 to July 18, 2021, among 2,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.2 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Give Mixed Reviews to Horgan After Four Years

Almost three-in-five residents (59%) think it has become harder for them to make ends meet in the province.

Vancouver, BC [August 3, 2021] – A significant proportion of British Columbians are concerned about affordability issues four years after the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) formed the provincial government, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 59% of British Columbians say it has become harder to make ends meet over the course of the past four years.

“The concerns about the high cost of living in British Columbia are significant across the political spectrum,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of residents who voted for the BC Green Party (70%), the BC NDP (59%) and the BC Liberals (55%) in last year’s provincial election state that making ends meet is more difficult now than in 2017.”

Almost three-in-four British Columbians (74%) think buying a house is now harder than it was in 2017, and more than three-in-five (63%) feel the same way about saving money for retirement.

Roughly half of British Columbians think paying for post-secondary education (52%) and finding a job (49%) are now more difficult than four years ago.

In a Canada-wide Research Co. survey conducted in June 2021, 14% of Canadians—and 19% of British Columbians—identified housing, homelessness and poverty as the most important issue facing the country.

Just over seven-in-ten British Columbians (71%) believe the housing situation in the province is worse now than it was in 2017, and a majority (53%) feel the same way about taxation.

Just under half of British Columbians (48%) think that public safety is worse now than it was four years ago.

More than two-in-five British Columbians believe there has been no change on four other government files: public schools (49%), health care (48%), the justice system (46%) and the environment (42%).

Half of British Columbians (50%) believe BC NDP leader John Horgan has performed “about the same” as they expected after he became the province’s premier in July 2017.

Similar proportions of British Columbians think Horgan has performed better (20%) or worse (19%) than they originally envisioned.

One third of British Columbians (33%) believe it is too early to judge Horgan’s accomplishments since he became premier, while 26% think he has done little and 21% say he has achieved much.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from July 17 to July 19, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Split on the State of Race Relations in the Country

Almost half of Canadians think the country should be a mosaic, where cultural differences within society are preserved.
 

Vancouver, BC [July 30, 2021] – While a large proportion of Canadians continue to voice support for multiculturalism, the public is deeply divided when assessing the current state of affairs in the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, just over two-in-five Canadians (41%,) think race relations in Canada have improved over the past two years, down eight points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in July 2020.

A similar proportion of Canadians (38%, +9) believe race relations have worsened since 2019.

Majorities of Canadians whose ancestry is South Asian (58%), First Nations (53%) and African (also 53%) feel race relations have improved since 2019. The numbers are lower among respondents of Southeast Asian (43%), East Asian (41%) and European (34%) origins.

Almost half of Canadians (47%, +6) think Canada should be a mosaic, where cultural differences within society are valuable and should be preserved.

Conversely, just over a third of Canadians (35%, -11) prefer the concept of the melting pot, where immigrants assimilate and blend into Canadian society.

Almost three-in-four Canadians (73%, -1) think the policy of multiculturalism has been “very good” or “good” for the country, while 16% (-2) consider it “bad” or “very bad.”

“Support for multiculturalism is highest among women (75%), Canadians aged 18-to-34 (79%) and British Columbians (81%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The concept is endorsed by majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (84%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (79%) and the Conservative Party (66%) in the 2019 federal election.”

Almost half of Canadians have personally experienced racism on social media (49%) and on day-to-day social interactions (49%), while fewer say they have endured racism at school (41%), at work (40%), during interactions with police or law enforcement officers (35%) or during interactions with the health care system (32%).

Just under three-in-five Canadians of First Nations descent (59%) say they have endured racism during interactions with the health care system—along with 62% of South Asians and 68% of Africans.

More than seven-in-ten Canadians of African descent (72%) have experienced racism on social media, along with at least three-in-five of their counterparts of First Nations (68%), South Asian (61%) and Southeast Asian (60%) origins.

More than half of Canadians say they have witnessed racism on social media (58%) and on day-to-day social interactions (53%). More than a third have also perceived racism at school (47%), at work (43%), engaging with police and law enforcement officers (42%) and dealing with the health care system (36%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online survey conducted from July 9 to July 18, 2021, among 2,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.2 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Almost Half of British Columbians Back Territory Acknowledgments

Just over two-in-five of the province’s residents have attended an event that featured a territory acknowledgement.

Vancouver, BC [July 27, 2021] – A significant proportion of British Columbians are in favour of territory acknowledgements, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 48% of British Columbians think territory acknowledgements should be adopted before ceremonies, lectures and public events held in the province, while 26% disagree and 26% are undecided.

Territory acknowledgements are usually worded this way: “I want to acknowledge that we are on the traditional territory of [nation names].”

“There are some significant differences when it comes to the implementation of territory acknowledgements,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While more than three-in-five British Columbians of First Nations and South Asian origins endorse this course of action (62% and 61% respectively), the numbers are lower among respondents of East Asian and European descent (49% and 45% respectively).”

More than two-in-five British Columbians (44%) say they have attended a ceremony, lecture or public event that featured a territory acknowledgement—a proportion that rises to 60% in Northern BC.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to have been at a venue where a territory acknowledgement was made (58%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (40%) and aged 55 and over (37%).

A majority of British Columbians (54%) believe territory acknowledgments are a positive step towards reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, while 24% disagree and 22% are undecided.

Three-in-five British Columbians (60%) think territory acknowledgements do little to address the problems facing Indigenous peoples—a proportion that rises to 65% among male respondents and to 77% among residents of Vancouver Island.

Roughly the same proportions of British Columbians regard territory acknowledgements as a lip-service gesture (50%) and as a sincere and important practice (49%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from July 17 to July 19, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Satisfaction with COVID-19 Management Falls Across Canada

Fewer than half of Ontarians and Albertans are content with the way their provincial governments have handled the pandemic.

Vancouver, BC [April 5, 2021] – The proportion of Canadians who are pleased with the way the federal government has managed the pandemic has dropped to the lowest level recorded, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 51% of Canadians are satisfied with the way the federal government has dealt with COVID-19, down seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January.

A slightly higher proportion of Canadians are content with how their municipal governments (54%, -6) and their own provincial government (53%, -5) have handled the pandemic.

British Columbia continues to have the highest level of satisfaction among the four most populous provinces (65%, -7), followed by Quebec (58%, -7). The rating is significantly lower for Ontario (45%, -8) and Alberta (37%, +3).

Almost half of Canadians (47%, +14) think the worst of the pandemic is “definitely” or “probably” behind us, while one third (33%, -17) believe the worst of COVID-19 is “definitely” or “probably” ahead of us.

Practically four-in-five Canadians (79%, +5) are either already vaccinated against COVID-19 or will “definitely” or “probably” be inoculated when they get the chance, while 14% (-2) would not and 8% (-1) are not sure.

In December 2020, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) stated that it expected to have enough COVID-19 vaccine doses to inoculate every willing Canadian by the end of September 2021.

This month, half of Canadians (50%, +5 since a similar Research Co. survey completed in February) think the September vaccination goal set by the PHAC will be attained, while almost two-in-five (38%, -8) believe it will not be reached.

Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election are significantly more likely to think that the federal government’s vaccination goal will be attained (66%) than those who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (48%) and the Conservative Party (35%).

A majority of Canadians (54%, +3) are content with the vaccination plans and phases outlined by their province. The level of satisfaction on this matter is highest in Quebec (64%, +11), followed by Atlantic Canada (63%, +9), British Columbia (57%, +1), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (53%, -4), Alberta (46%, +4) and Ontario (44%, -1).

The results are lower when Canadians are asked about the pace of vaccination efforts in their province. Almost half of Canadians (48%, +7) are satisfied, while 41% (-8) are dissatisfied.

Quebec also has the highest level of satisfaction on the pace of vaccination efforts (60%, +14), followed by Atlantic Canada (56%, +14), British Columbia (50%, +5), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (46%, +6), Alberta (45%,+8) and Ontario (37%, +3).

Almost half of Canadians (48%, +2) are content with the procurement of vaccines from the federal government, while 43% (=) are not. 

While sizeable proportions of Canadians continue to voice support for specific travel restrictions, the proportions are lower this month than in January.

More than four-in-five Canadians are in favour of keeping the border with the United States closed to non-essential travel (83%, -5) and placing all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period (82%, -8).

In addition, 74% of Canadians (-6) are in favour of forbidding non-essential travel from one province to another, and 66% (-6) agree with prohibiting non-essential travel inside their own province.

More than four-in-five Canadians (83%, -5) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside.

There is a slight drop in the proportion of Canadians who are wearing a mask every time they go out (77%, -4). Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to always be taking this measure (83%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (77%) and aged 18-to-34 (72%). 

Across the country, 29% of Canadians (=) are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection, while 19% (-2) are not ordering food from restaurants at all for the same reason.

Compared to January, fewer Canadians report overeating (25%, -5) or drinking alcohol more often at home (14%, -4). Almost one-in-five (18%, +1) admit that they are losing their temper more often.

One-in-ten Canadians (10%, =) continue to acknowledge that they are brushing their teeth less often than before COVID-19, while 17% (-1) are having showers or baths less often.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted on March 29 and March 30, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Support for Teaching Creationism in Schools Rises in Canada

A majority of Canadians (57%) believe human beings evolved from less advanced forms of life over millions of years.

Vancouver, BC [March 30, 2021] – The proportion of Canadians who think creationism should be part of the school curriculum in their province has increased over the past two years, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 44% of Canadians think the belief that the universe and life originated from specific acts of divine creation should be taught in schools, up six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2019.

Conversely, one third of Canadians (34%, -5) would not allow teachers to discuss creationism in the classroom, while 23% (=) are not sure.

Support for including creationism in the provincial school curriculum is highest among men (46%), Canadians aged 18-to- 34 (51%), Albertans (53%) and Quebecers (50%).

“A majority of Canadians who identify as Christians (55%) are in favour of the teaching of creationism in Canada’s schools,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion drops dramatically among those who have no religion (22%), agnostics (15%) and atheists (12%).”

Almost half of Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election (49%) are in favour of teaching creationism in schools, along with 47% of those who supported the Liberal Party and 44% of those who voted for New Democratic Party (NDP) candidates.

Most Canadians (57%, -4) believe human beings evolved from less advanced forms of life over millions of years.

Just over one-in-four Canadians (26%, +3) think God created human beings in their present form within the last 10,000 years.

Belief in creationism reaches 36% in Alberta and is lower in all other regions of the country: Atlantic Canada (33%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (26%), Quebec (25%), Ontario (24%) and British Columbia (22%).

Majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberals (67%), New Democrats (59%) and Conservatives (51%) in the 2019 federal election believe in evolution.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from March 17 to March 19, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Opposition NDP Edges Ahead of Governing UCP in Alberta

Almost two thirds of the province’s residents (65%) oppose the introduction of a provincial sales tax (PST).

Vancouver, BC [December 7, 2020] – The New Democratic party (NDP) holds the upper hand in Alberta’s political scene, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 43% of decided voters would cast a ballot for the opposition NDP if a provincial election were held today, while 40% would support the governing United Conservative Party (UCP).

The Alberta Party is third with 9%, followed by the Green Party (2%), the Liberal party (also 2%) and the Wildrose Independence Party (also 2%).

The NDP holds a 10-point lead over the UCP among female decided voters (46% to 36%), while the governing party is ahead among male voters (43% to 41%).

The UCP is the top choice for decided voters aged 55 and over (48% to 38%) while the NDP leads among those aged 18-to-34 (45% to 36%) and those aged 35-to-54 (42% to 39%).

The NDP has a sizeable lead in Edmonton (55% to 30%), while the UCP is slightly ahead in Calgary (44% to 42%) and holds a substantial advantage in the rest of the province (49% to 32%).

“The United Conservative Party is holding on to 74% of its voters from the 2019 election,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Some former UCP voters are currently looking at supporting the New Democrats (11%), the Alberta Party (7%) and the Wildrose Independence Party (5%).”

Across the province, just over two-in-five Albertans (42%) approve of the way Premier and UCP leader Jason Kenney is handling his duties while half (50%) disapprove. Residents are split when assessing the performance of official opposition and NDP leader Rachel Notley (Approve 45%, Disapprove 46%). 

The approval ratings are significantly lower for Green Party leader Jordan Wilkie (16%), interim Wildrose Independence Party leader Paul Hinman (also 16%) and Alberta Party interim leader Jacquie Fenske (15%).

The economy and jobs is identified as the most important issue facing the province by 43% of Albertans, followed by health care (27%), government accountability (7%), COVID-19 (6%) and energy and pipelines (4%).

When asked about the possible introduction of a provincial sales tax (PST) given Alberta’s fiscal challenges, almost two thirds of residents (65%) voiced opposition to the idea, while 28% supported it.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 2 to December 4, 2020, among 600 adults in Alberta. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Alberta. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.0 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Saskatchewan Party Keeps Sizeable Edge in Provincial Election

More than three-in-five likely voters in the province approve of the way Premier Scott Moe has handled his duties

Vancouver, BC [October 25, 2020] – The Saskatchewan Party remains ahead of all challengers in the Prairie Province’s election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 56% of decided voters would cast a ballot for the Saskatchewan Party candidate in their constituency or have already done so in Advance Voting or through the mail, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted earlier this month.

The New Democratic Party (NDP) is in second place with 38%, up two points since the start of the campaign. There was no movement for the other contending parties, with the Green Party at 2%, the Progressive Conservative Party also at 2%, the Liberal Party at 1% and the Buffalo Party also at 1%.

On a regional basis, the New Democrats have a four-point edge over the Saskatchewan Party in Regina among decided voters (50% to 46%). The Saskatchewan Party leads in Saskatoon (53% to 42%) and in the rest of the province (68% to 23%).

About one-in-five decided voters who will be casting their ballot tomorrow in Saskatchewan (18%) say they may change their mind about which party or candidate to support, while 82% are certain of their choice.

At the end of the campaign, almost half of decided voters in Saskatchewan (47%) acknowledge that their main motivation is a party’s ideas and policies. The party’s leader is a distant second with 24%, followed by a desire for change (10%), the party’s candidate in the riding (9%), a desire for stability (7%) and disgust with other contending candidates (3%).

More than three-in-five likely voters (61%, -4) approve of the performance of Premier and Saskatchewan Party leader Scott Moe, while one third (33%, +5) disapprove. 

The rating for Official Opposition and NDP leader Ryan Meili improved by three points to 48%. The numbers are significantly lower for Green leader Naomi Hunter (22%), Progressive Conservative leader Ken Grey (17%), Liberal leader Robert Rudachyk (16%) and Buffalo leader Wade Sira (15%).

The leaders of Saskatchewan’s two main parties reach the end of the campaign with a negative momentum score: -9 for Moe (17% say their opinion of the incumbent premier has improved, while 26% say it has worsened) and -4 for Meilli (23% say their opinion of the opposition leader has improved, while 27% say it has worsened).

On the “Best Premier” question, Moe remains in first place with 51% (+2), followed by Meilli with 29% (+8). The other party leaders are in single digits.

As was the case at the start of the campaign, more than a third of likely voters (35%, =) say the economy and jobs is the most important issue facing Saskatchewan, followed by heath care (31%, +3), crime and public safety (7%, +2), housing, poverty and homelessness (also 7%, +2) and COVID-19 (also 7%, +2).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 23 to October 25, 2020, among 500 likely voters in Saskatchewan, including 456 decided voters in the 2020 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Saskatchewan. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.4 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 4.6 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

New Democrats Headed for Outright Victory in British Columbia

Almost half of likely voters in the province pick John Horgan as the best person to head the provincial government.

Vancouver, BC [October 23, 2020] – The BC New Democratic Party (NDP) stands to make significant gains in British Columbia’s provincial election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 50% of decided voters in British Columbia would cast a ballot for the BC NDP candidate in their constituency or have already done so in Advance Voting or through the mail. This represents a two-point increase for the New Democrats since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in early October.

The BC Liberals remain in second place with 35%, followed by the BC Green Party with 13% and the BC Conservative Party with 2%.  

The New Democrats maintain a nine-point lead over the BC Liberals among decided male voters (48% to 39%) and have a 21-point advantage among decided female voters (52% to 31%).

The BC NDP is also ahead of the main opposition party among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (54% to 29%), decided voters aged 35-to-54 (49% to 36%) and decided voters aged 55 and over (47% to 40%).

Only 11% of decided voters who will be casting their ballot tomorrow say they may change their mind about which party or candidate to support, while 89% are certain of their choice.

Almost half of decided voters in British Columbia (47%) say a party’s ideas and policies is the main motivator for their choice in this provincial election. This includes 66% of BC Green voters and 51% of BC NDP voters, but just 37% of those who will support the BC Liberals.

Other factors cited by decided voters are the party’s leader (22%), the party’s candidate in the riding (11%), a desire for stability (9%), a desire for change (7%) and disgust with other contending candidates (4%).

On the eve of the election, more than three-in-five likely voters (62%, -3) approve of the way Premier and BC NDP leader John Horgan is handling his duties, while 33% disapprove.

There was no change in the approval rating for BC Liberals leader Andrew Wilkinson since early October (40%), while BC Greens leader Sonia Furstenau improved markedly to 46% (+13).

Furstenau posts a momentum score of +13 (27% of likely voters say their opinion of her has improved since the start of the campaign, while 14% say it has worsened). The numbers are also in positive territory for Horgan (+2), while Wilkinson’s score is -21 (with 36% of likely voters reporting a worsening opinion of the BC Liberals leader).

When asked who would make the best premier of the province, Horgan remains on top with the endorsement of almost half of likely voters (48%, +1), followed by Wilkinson with 24% (-3) and Furstenau with 12% (+6).

While 81% of likely voters who supported the BC NDP in the 2017 ballot feel Horgan is the best person to act as British Columbia’s head of government, only 53% of BC Liberal voters in the last election feel the same way about Wilkinson.

The issue landscape did not shift dramatically in the final week of the campaign. One-in-four likely voters (25%, =) say the economy and jobs is their main preoccupation right now, followed by housing, poverty and homelessness (23%, -2) and health care (also 23%, =). 

Fewer likely voters mentioned COVID-19 (13%, +5), the environment (7%, =), crime and public safety (4%, =), education (2%, +1), accountability (1%, -2), and energy (also 1%, +1) as the top issue facing the province.

As has been the case throughout the past five weeks, likely voters aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be concerned about housing, homelessness and poverty (33%), while those aged 35-to-54 gravitate towards the economy and jobs (29%) and those aged 55 and over select health care (28%).

At least two-in-five likely voters pick Horgan over Wilkinson as the best party leader to handle health care (49% to 22%), the economy and jobs (43% to 31%), education (42% to 22%), housing, poverty and homelessness (40% to 22%) and accountability (40% to 25%), 

On the issue of handling the COVID-19 pandemic, likely voters in British Columbia choose Horgan over Wilkinson by a 3-to-1 margin (53% to 17%). The incumbent premier is also ahead of the opposition leader on two other matters: crime and public safety (38% to 30%) and energy (32% to 25%). 

Furstenau extended her lead as the best leader to manage the environment (44%, +11), with Horgan at 24% and Wilkinson at 14%.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on October 22 and October 23, 2020, among 750 likely voters in British Columbia, including 705 decided voters in the 2020 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.6 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 3.7 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by Adi kavazovic

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca