Most Canadians Believe Human Beings on Earth Evolved

There is a deep divide on whether creationism should be part of the school curriculum across the provinces.

Vancouver, BC [December 3, 2019] – A majority of Canadians continue to point to evolution as the reason for the development of human beings on earth, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-five Canadians (61%) believe human beings “definitely” or “probably” evolved from less advanced life forms over millions of years, down five points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2018.

Conversely, almost one-in-four Canadians (23%, +2 since 2018) believe God created human beings in their present form within the last 10,000 years. Fewer than one-in-five Canadians (17%, +5) are undecided on this question.

British Columbia is home to the largest proportion of residents who side with evolution to explain the origin and development of human beings on the planet (67%), followed by Quebec (64%), Ontario (60%), Alberta (59%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (57%) and Atlantic Canada (54%).

When asked whether creationism—the belief that the universe and life originated from specific acts of divine creation—should be part of the school curriculum in their province, Canadians are deeply divided.

While 38% of Canadians think creationism should be taught in their province’s classrooms (unchanged since 2018), 39% think that it should not (-7) and 23% (=7) are undecided.

Fewer than two-in-five residents of Ontario (37%), Atlantic Canada (36%), Quebec (36%) and British Columbia (35%) are in favour of teaching creationism in schools. The proportion is slightly higher in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (43%) and Alberta (45%).

“Religious affiliation plays a role in how Canadians feel about discussing creationism in the classroom,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Canadians who identify themselves as Catholics or Protestants are significantly more likely to endorse the teaching of creationism in schools (48% each) than those who have no religion (22%) or identify as Atheists (20%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 4 to November 6, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Would Ban Mobile Phones in K-12 Classrooms

Public support for the measure that was implemented in Ontario earlier this year is high among parents and non-parents alike.

Vancouver, BC [November 29, 2019] – The notion of forbidding students from using their mobile phones in classrooms unreservedly is very popular in British Columbia, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 88% of British Columbians think the province should implement a ban on the use of mobile phones during instructional time in K-12 classrooms.

Earlier this year, the Province of Ontario restricted the use of mobile phones in K-12 classrooms, unless the devices are required for health or medical purposes, or to support educational needs as decided by an instructor.

In British Columbia, residents aged 55 and over are more likely to express support for a prohibition (85%) than those aged 35-to-54 (80%) and those aged 18-to-34 (68%).

At least four-in-five residents of Vancouver Island (86%), the Fraser Valley (83%) and Metro Vancouver (80%) are in favour of banning mobile phones during instructional time in K-12 classrooms. Support is lower, but still high, in Northern BC (75%) and Southern BC (62%).

“More than four-in-five British Columbians who have a child currently enrolled in K-12 are supportive of a classroom mobile phone ban (81%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is similar (77%) for those who have no children in school at this point.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 6 to November 8, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

BC Parents Partial to Kids Pursuing Medicine and Engineering

Almost two thirds of parents would try to discourage their children from seeking a career in politics.

Vancouver, BC [September 4, 2019] – Parents in British Columbia are more enthusiastic about their children pursuing a career in medicine or engineering than in politics, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of parents who have a child enrolled in K-12 in British Columbia, nine-in-ten respondents (91%) say they would “definitely” or “probably” try to encourage their child to become a doctor or nurse.

A similarly high proportion of parents in British Columbia (89%) would attempt to encourage their child to become an engineer.

Almost three-in-five parents in British Columbia (59%) would try to encourage their child to pursue a career path as a police officer.

More than half of parents in the province would try to steer their child to become a professional athlete (56%) or an arts performer (52%).

Conversely, fewer than three-in-ten parents in British Columbia (28%) would “definitely” or “probably” try to encourage their child to become a politician. 

“Almost two thirds of parents in British Columbia (65%) say they would attempt to discourage their children from pursuing a career in politics,” says Mario Canseco, President at Research Co. “The proportion is highest among parents in Vancouver Island (69%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 20 to May 28, 2019, among 700 parents in British Columbia who have a child enrolled in Kindergarten, Elementary School (Grades 1 to 7) or High School (Grades 8 to 12). The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Almost Two Thirds of Canadians OK with Same-Sex Marriage

More than three-in-five Canadians support the use of “SOGI-Inclusive Education” in their province.

Vancouver, BC [August 1, 2019] – A sizeable majority of Canadians support the notion of same-sex couples being able to legally enter wedlock, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 64% of Canadians believe that same-sex couples should continue to be allowed to legally marry in Canada.

One-in-ten Canadians (10%) think same-sex couples should not have any kind of legal recognition, while 15% would allow them to form civil unions and not marry and 11% are undecided.

“More than seven-in-ten Canadians of European descent (71%) approve of same-sex marriage,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But the proportion drops to 44% among Canadians of East Asian descent and 42% among Canadians of South Asian descent.”

Across the country, 45% of Canadians believe people who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, gender diverse, queer, and Two-Spirit are “born”, while 24% believe they “choose” to be LGBTQ2+. Three-in-ten Canadians (31%) are not sure.

Some school districts in Canada have relied on “SOGI-Inclusive Education”, which raises awareness of and welcomes students of all sexual orientations, gender identities and family structures. 

Most Canadians (62%) support the use of “SOGI-Inclusive Education” in their province, while just one-in-five (20%) are opposed and 18% are not sure.

Support for “SOGI-Inclusive Education” is highest among women (67%), Canadians aged 18-to-34 (64%) and Liberal Party voters in the 2015 federal election (70%).

Gay Straight Alliances (GSAs) and/or Queer Straight Alliances (QSAs) are peer support networks run by students and supported by school staff in order to promote a safe place for all students.

When asked if school districts should be compelled to inform parents if their child participates in a GSA or QSA in school, 45% of Canadians believe they “definitely” or “probably” should do so while 37% disagree.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from July 15 to July 17, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Support More Action on Child Care

Nine-in-ten consider the investments to build a quality affordable child care system as “very important” or “moderately important.”

Vancouver, BC [June 13, 2019] – In an online survey of a representative provincial sample, 76% of British Columbians think the province should move more quickly to achieve the established goals of more affordable parent fees, more spaces, and better wages and education for those who work in child care settings, a new Research Co. poll conducted on behalf of the $10aDay Child Care Plan has found.

When parents who currently have a child enrolled in child care were asked about their experience, 64% said the current government investments are having a positive impact on their situation.

There is still more to be done, as 70% of parents report that their return to work was delayed because of lack of access to child care.

“British Columbians of all ages, regions and political allegiances agree that children, parents and employers benefit when there’s access to quality affordable child care,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co.

Two thirds of British Columbians (66%) believe the provincial government should continue to put a priority on public funding for child care, to make it more affordable and available for families. 

“Some parents are experiencing benefits of new investments in child care, but many families are still struggling when it comes to cost, finding a licensed space, and educators are still earning low wages—BC need further investments,” says Sharon Gregson, spokesperson for the $10aDay Child Care Plan.

Across the province, almost two-in-five parents who currently have a child in child care (38%) say they waited at least five months before a space became available for their child. Three-in-four parents (76%) say the cost of child care has put a financial strain on their families.

Four-in-five British Columbians (81%) believe that, when child care is affordable and available to parents, more mothers work and pay taxes. An even larger proportion of residents (86%) agree with the notion that having children today costs a lot more than it did 40 years ago.

About the $10aDay Child Care Plan

Since 2011, supporters across the province have advanced the $10aDay Child Care Plan as the solution to BC’s child care chaos calling for parent fees of no more than $10aDay, access to licensed spaces for all families who choose child care, and fair wages for early childhood educators.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 9 to May 12, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Sharon Gregson, $10aDay Child Care Plan.
[c] 604.505.5725
[e] info@10aday.ca