Three-in-Ten Canadians Have Gained Weight During Pandemic

Only 41% of respondents say they follow the recommendations of Canada’s Food Guide “all the time” or “most of the time.”

Vancouver, BC [June 9, 2020] – The COVID-19 pandemic has changed some of the eating and food preparation habits of Canadians, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 31% of Canadians say they have personally gained weight during the pandemic, while 52% report no change and 14% say they have lost weight.

Women (33%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (36%) are more likely to acknowledge weight gain during the pandemic.

While two thirds of Canadians (66%) are “very familiar” or “moderately familiar” with Canada’s Food Guide, only 41% say they follow the document’s recommendations “all the time” or “most of the time” when choosing what to eat in an average week.

“Half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (50%) are paying attention to the recommendations of Canada’s Food Guide,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Smaller proportions of Canadians aged 35-to-54 (42%) and aged 55 and over (34%) are following the same course of action.”

Across the country, 36% of Canadians say they prepare dinner for themselves and others in their household in less than 30 minutes—up six points since a similar Research Co. survey completed in June 2019.

Most Canadians (56%, -4) are in the kitchen for 31 to 60 minutes on an average weeknight, while 8% (-2) devote more than an hour to making dinner,

Three-in-ten Canadians (29%) say they are baking desserts—such as cakes or cookies—at home more often than they did before the COVID-19 pandemic. One-in-five (21%) bake bread at home more often now than a few months ago.

Residents of Ontario are more likely to be baking bread at home more often than residents of other regions (27%), while Albertans are more likely to be baking homemade desserts (35%).

While most Canadians do not report a significant change to their consumption of six different foods since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, there are some nuances.

Almost one-in-five Canadians (15%) are eating less fish and shellfish, and 15% report eating less meat. Conversely, 24% of Canadians say they are eating both fruits and vegetables more often than before the pandemic began.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 1 to June 3, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Americans Prefer Biden Over Trump on Seven Policy Issues

A third of Americans consider Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris and Amy Klobuchar as “good choices” for Vice President.

Vancouver, BC [June 3, 2020] – Prospective Democratic Party nominee Joe Biden remains ahead of incumbent Donald Trump of the Republican Party with five months to go before the United States presidential election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 51% of decided voters in the United States (+1 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in April) would support Biden, while 46% (+2) would vote for Trump. Libertarian Party nominee Jo Jorgensen garners the backing of 2% of decided voters.

In 2016, Trump received 46% of the popular vote, two points behind Hillary Clinton (48%). Trump secured 306 votes in the Electoral College to Clinton’s 232.

Trump currently holds an 11-point lead over Biden among White decided voters (54% to 43%). Sizeable proportions of African American (83%) and Hispanic / Latino decided voters (67%) are planning to vote for Biden.

“Compared to what we reported on in April, there is significant movement among Independent voters,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “At this stage of the campaign, 15% of these voters are undecided, and among those who choose a candidate, Biden is nearly tied with Trump (47% to 45%).”

Most viewers of CNN and MSNBC / CNBC would vote for Biden (74% and 78% respectively), while more than seven-in-ten Fox News watchers (72%) would cast a ballot for Trump.

Biden is regarded by a plurality of Americans as the presidential candidate best suited to deal with seven policy issues:

  • The environment (46%).
  • Health care (45%).
  • Race relations (44%).
  • Education (also 44%).
  • Foreign policy (42%).
  • Government accountability (40%).
  • COVID-19 (also 40%).

Trump is ahead on three issues:

  • Job creation (43%).
  • The economy (also 43%).
  • National defense (41%).

The two contenders are virtually tied on four other issues:

  • Crime (Biden 38%, Trump 37%).
  • Managing the deficit (both at 36%).
  • Energy and oil (Biden 38%, Trump 37%).
  • Immigration (Biden 40%, Trump 39%).

When Americans are asked about nine characteristics that people may find in politicians, Biden has a higher score than Trump on eight items:

  • Being able to unite America and not divide it (47% to 30%).
  • Being in touch with the problems ordinary Americans face in their daily lives (47% to 35%).
  • Generally agreeing with respondents on issues they care about (45% to 40%).
  • Being able to bring the kind of change America needs (45% to 42%).
  • Being able to deal with labour unions effectively in the event of a dispute (45% to 41%).
  • Sharing the values of respondents (44% to 34%).
  • Being a good speaker and communicator (42% to 33%).
  • Being honest and trustworthy (42% to 32%).

Trump holds the upper hand on only one trait:

  • Being a good economic manager (47%, with Biden at 39%).

Biden has said he intends to choose a woman as his running mate. Across the United States, 40% of respondents think Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren would be a “good choice” for Vice President, followed by California Senator Kamala Harris at 39%, Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar at 35%, former Georgia Congresswoman Stacey Abrams at 29% and New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand at 26%.

More than three-in-five Democrats thin Warren (64%) and Harris (62%) would be good choices for the party’s ticket in 2020, while almost half feel the same way about Klobuchar (48%) and Abrams (46%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on June 1 and June 2, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our datasets here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Some British Columbians Perceive More Crime in Their Community

Since March, one-in-four residents of East Asian and South Asian descent have endured racial slurs or insults.

Vancouver, BC [June 4, 2020] – Almost two-in-five British Columbians believe that delinquency has risen where they live, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 38% of British Columbians say the level of criminal activity in their community has increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. A similar proportion (37%) report no change, while 13% think crime has decreased.

Men (49%) and Metro Vancouverites (47%)—as well as residents of East Asian and South Asian descent (55% and 50% respectively)—are more likely to claim that criminality has risen during the pandemic.

“More than half of British Columbians who voted for the BC Liberals in the 2017 provincial election (52%) believe crime has increased recently in their community,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “About a third of those who cast ballots for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (32%) and the BC Green Party (29%) concur with this assessment.”

When asked about specific law-breaking experiences since March, one-in-five British Columbians (20%) say someone attempted to extort them in an email or text message—a proportion that rises to 24% in Metro Vancouver.

Other instances of crime endured by the province’s residents include someone breaking into their workplace or office (16%), someone attempting to extort them by phone (also 16%), someone breaking into or stealing something from their car (15%) and someone breaking into or stealing something from their home (14%).

Across the province, 11% of residents say someone directed racial slurs or insults at them since March. While only 7% of residents of European descent acknowledge that this happened to them, the proportion rises to 24% among those of East Asian and South Asian descent.

There are some remarkable differences among specific groups. More than seven-in-ten residents of Vancouver Island (73%), Southern BC (79%) and Northern BC (92%) have not experienced any of these problems during the COVID-19 pandemic. The proportion is significantly lower in the Fraser Valley (55%) and Metro Vancouver (42%).

When asked about the factors that are to blame for the current situation regarding criminal activity in their communities, British Columbians primarily cite addiction and mental health issues (43%), gangs and the illegal drug trade (38%), poverty and inequality (36%) and an inadequate court system (32%).

Fewer British Columbians place “a great deal” of blame on lack of values and the improper education of youth (28%), bad economy and unemployment (28%), insufficient policing and lack of resources to combat crime (27%) and immigrants and minorities (19%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from May 8 to May 17, 2020, among 1,600 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadian Parents Mix Learning and Games in COVID-19 Outbreak

One-in-four parents (26%) have not set a time limit for their kids to have access to non-educational entertainment options.

Vancouver, BC [April 24, 2020] – Canadian parents are relying on a variety of options to educate and entertain their young children as the COVID-19 keeps schools closed, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of parents with children aged 14 or under at home, 65% of respondents say their kids are participating in entertainment activities that do not involve electronics, such as board games and puzzles.

Similar proportions of Canadian parents are relying on educational activities that involve electronics, such as tablets or smartphones (64%) and educational activities that do not involve electronics (62%).

Three-in-five parents (61%) are giving their kids access to tablets, smartphones or video game consoles for non-educational purposes, and a majority (53%) are allowing children to have access to non-educational streaming content.

Parents in Manitoba and Saskatchewan are decidedly ahead of all others when it comes to letting children to rely on tablets, smartphones or video game consoles for non-educational purposes (94%). The incidence is significantly lower in Atlantic Canada (65%), British Columbia (64%), Ontario (62%), Alberta (61%) and Quebec (47%).

“The notion of allowing children aged 14 and under to stream non-educational content at home during the COVID-19 outbreak is more popular among parents in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (83%) and British Columbia (62%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer parents in Alberta (52%), Ontario (49%), Quebec (47%) and Atlantic Canada (also 47%) favour this approach.”

Two in five parents (41%) say they have established a time limit for their child (or children) to have access to entertainment options for non-educational purposes and it has been met.

One third of parents (33%) acknowledge setting a time limit for their kids to be entertained, but say it has been difficult to meet. One-in-four (26%) did not establish a time limit at all.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 9 to April 15, 2020, among 824 adults in Canada who have a child aged 14 or under at home. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Canadians and Americans Agree on Vaccinations for Children

Majorities in both countries believe individuals should decide if they want to get immunized against seasonal diseases.

Vancouver, BC [February 14, 2020] – While four-in-five Canadians endorse the concept of mandatory inoculations for children, the proportion of Americans who feel the same way is smaller, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 81% of Canadians—up three points since a similar study conducted in 2018—believe that vaccinations for children should “definitely” or “probably” be mandatory in their province.

The proportion of Americans who think immunizations for children should “definitely” or “probably” be mandatory in their state is lower (68%).

“More than one-in-four Americans (27%) believe decisions on childhood vaccinations should be made by parents,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion of Canadians who would follow this course of action is decidedly lower (12%).”

In Canada, Quebec has the highest proportion of residents (17%) who believe parents should choose whether their children should be vaccinated. In the United States, 30% of residents of the South and the West feel the same way.

When asked about inoculations and seasonal diseases (such as the flu), slim majorities of Canadians and Americans (51% in each country) believe each person should “definitely” or “probably” be allowed to decide whether they want to get vaccinated or not.

Just over two-in-five respondents in each country (44% in Canada and 43% in the United States) feel the flu vaccine should be mandatory for everybody in their province or state.

In the late 1990s, a study published in the weekly medical journal The Lancet—which has since been discredited and retracted—attempted to link childhood vaccination and autism.

In Canada, 26% of respondents to this survey think there is a connection between the childhood vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella and autism. The proportion of Americans who believe this is slightly higher, at 30%.

Respondents aged 18-to-34 in both countries (36% in Canada and 43% in the United States) are more likely to believe in the debunked connection between childhood immunization and autism than their older counterparts.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 7 to February 9, 2020, among 1,000 Canadian adults, and an online study conducted from February 6 to February 8, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each study, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full Canadian dataset here, our full American dataset here and download the press release here.

Photo Credit: John Keith

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Believe Human Beings on Earth Evolved

There is a deep divide on whether creationism should be part of the school curriculum across the provinces.

Vancouver, BC [December 3, 2019] – A majority of Canadians continue to point to evolution as the reason for the development of human beings on earth, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-five Canadians (61%) believe human beings “definitely” or “probably” evolved from less advanced life forms over millions of years, down five points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2018.

Conversely, almost one-in-four Canadians (23%, +2 since 2018) believe God created human beings in their present form within the last 10,000 years. Fewer than one-in-five Canadians (17%, +5) are undecided on this question.

British Columbia is home to the largest proportion of residents who side with evolution to explain the origin and development of human beings on the planet (67%), followed by Quebec (64%), Ontario (60%), Alberta (59%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (57%) and Atlantic Canada (54%).

When asked whether creationism—the belief that the universe and life originated from specific acts of divine creation—should be part of the school curriculum in their province, Canadians are deeply divided.

While 38% of Canadians think creationism should be taught in their province’s classrooms (unchanged since 2018), 39% think that it should not (-7) and 23% (=7) are undecided.

Fewer than two-in-five residents of Ontario (37%), Atlantic Canada (36%), Quebec (36%) and British Columbia (35%) are in favour of teaching creationism in schools. The proportion is slightly higher in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (43%) and Alberta (45%).

“Religious affiliation plays a role in how Canadians feel about discussing creationism in the classroom,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Canadians who identify themselves as Catholics or Protestants are significantly more likely to endorse the teaching of creationism in schools (48% each) than those who have no religion (22%) or identify as Atheists (20%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 4 to November 6, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Would Ban Mobile Phones in K-12 Classrooms

Public support for the measure that was implemented in Ontario earlier this year is high among parents and non-parents alike.

Vancouver, BC [November 29, 2019] – The notion of forbidding students from using their mobile phones in classrooms unreservedly is very popular in British Columbia, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 88% of British Columbians think the province should implement a ban on the use of mobile phones during instructional time in K-12 classrooms.

Earlier this year, the Province of Ontario restricted the use of mobile phones in K-12 classrooms, unless the devices are required for health or medical purposes, or to support educational needs as decided by an instructor.

In British Columbia, residents aged 55 and over are more likely to express support for a prohibition (85%) than those aged 35-to-54 (80%) and those aged 18-to-34 (68%).

At least four-in-five residents of Vancouver Island (86%), the Fraser Valley (83%) and Metro Vancouver (80%) are in favour of banning mobile phones during instructional time in K-12 classrooms. Support is lower, but still high, in Northern BC (75%) and Southern BC (62%).

“More than four-in-five British Columbians who have a child currently enrolled in K-12 are supportive of a classroom mobile phone ban (81%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is similar (77%) for those who have no children in school at this point.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 6 to November 8, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

BC Parents Partial to Kids Pursuing Medicine and Engineering

Almost two thirds of parents would try to discourage their children from seeking a career in politics.

Vancouver, BC [September 4, 2019] – Parents in British Columbia are more enthusiastic about their children pursuing a career in medicine or engineering than in politics, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of parents who have a child enrolled in K-12 in British Columbia, nine-in-ten respondents (91%) say they would “definitely” or “probably” try to encourage their child to become a doctor or nurse.

A similarly high proportion of parents in British Columbia (89%) would attempt to encourage their child to become an engineer.

Almost three-in-five parents in British Columbia (59%) would try to encourage their child to pursue a career path as a police officer.

More than half of parents in the province would try to steer their child to become a professional athlete (56%) or an arts performer (52%).

Conversely, fewer than three-in-ten parents in British Columbia (28%) would “definitely” or “probably” try to encourage their child to become a politician. 

“Almost two thirds of parents in British Columbia (65%) say they would attempt to discourage their children from pursuing a career in politics,” says Mario Canseco, President at Research Co. “The proportion is highest among parents in Vancouver Island (69%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 20 to May 28, 2019, among 700 parents in British Columbia who have a child enrolled in Kindergarten, Elementary School (Grades 1 to 7) or High School (Grades 8 to 12). The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Almost Two Thirds of Canadians OK with Same-Sex Marriage

More than three-in-five Canadians support the use of “SOGI-Inclusive Education” in their province.

Vancouver, BC [August 1, 2019] – A sizeable majority of Canadians support the notion of same-sex couples being able to legally enter wedlock, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 64% of Canadians believe that same-sex couples should continue to be allowed to legally marry in Canada.

One-in-ten Canadians (10%) think same-sex couples should not have any kind of legal recognition, while 15% would allow them to form civil unions and not marry and 11% are undecided.

“More than seven-in-ten Canadians of European descent (71%) approve of same-sex marriage,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But the proportion drops to 44% among Canadians of East Asian descent and 42% among Canadians of South Asian descent.”

Across the country, 45% of Canadians believe people who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, gender diverse, queer, and Two-Spirit are “born”, while 24% believe they “choose” to be LGBTQ2+. Three-in-ten Canadians (31%) are not sure.

Some school districts in Canada have relied on “SOGI-Inclusive Education”, which raises awareness of and welcomes students of all sexual orientations, gender identities and family structures. 

Most Canadians (62%) support the use of “SOGI-Inclusive Education” in their province, while just one-in-five (20%) are opposed and 18% are not sure.

Support for “SOGI-Inclusive Education” is highest among women (67%), Canadians aged 18-to-34 (64%) and Liberal Party voters in the 2015 federal election (70%).

Gay Straight Alliances (GSAs) and/or Queer Straight Alliances (QSAs) are peer support networks run by students and supported by school staff in order to promote a safe place for all students.

When asked if school districts should be compelled to inform parents if their child participates in a GSA or QSA in school, 45% of Canadians believe they “definitely” or “probably” should do so while 37% disagree.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from July 15 to July 17, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Support More Action on Child Care

Nine-in-ten consider the investments to build a quality affordable child care system as “very important” or “moderately important.”

Vancouver, BC [June 13, 2019] – In an online survey of a representative provincial sample, 76% of British Columbians think the province should move more quickly to achieve the established goals of more affordable parent fees, more spaces, and better wages and education for those who work in child care settings, a new Research Co. poll conducted on behalf of the $10aDay Child Care Plan has found.

When parents who currently have a child enrolled in child care were asked about their experience, 64% said the current government investments are having a positive impact on their situation.

There is still more to be done, as 70% of parents report that their return to work was delayed because of lack of access to child care.

“British Columbians of all ages, regions and political allegiances agree that children, parents and employers benefit when there’s access to quality affordable child care,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co.

Two thirds of British Columbians (66%) believe the provincial government should continue to put a priority on public funding for child care, to make it more affordable and available for families. 

“Some parents are experiencing benefits of new investments in child care, but many families are still struggling when it comes to cost, finding a licensed space, and educators are still earning low wages—BC need further investments,” says Sharon Gregson, spokesperson for the $10aDay Child Care Plan.

Across the province, almost two-in-five parents who currently have a child in child care (38%) say they waited at least five months before a space became available for their child. Three-in-four parents (76%) say the cost of child care has put a financial strain on their families.

Four-in-five British Columbians (81%) believe that, when child care is affordable and available to parents, more mothers work and pay taxes. An even larger proportion of residents (86%) agree with the notion that having children today costs a lot more than it did 40 years ago.

About the $10aDay Child Care Plan

Since 2011, supporters across the province have advanced the $10aDay Child Care Plan as the solution to BC’s child care chaos calling for parent fees of no more than $10aDay, access to licensed spaces for all families who choose child care, and fair wages for early childhood educators.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 9 to May 12, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Sharon Gregson, $10aDay Child Care Plan.
[c] 604.505.5725
[e] info@10aday.ca

Class Sizes, Teacher Shortage Worry Parents in British Columbia

Three-in-ten parents describe their own child’s class size as “too big”, while 60% say it is “about right.”

Vancouver, BC [June 5, 2019] – While a sizeable majority of parents in British Columbia are content with the education their children are receiving in school, certain concerns about the system persist, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of parents who have a child enrolled in K-12, 83% of respondents say the experience of their child with the education system has been “very positive” or “moderately positive.”

A majority of parents say they are “very satisfied” or “moderately satisfied” with the quality of instruction their child is getting in English (73%), Science (72%), Social Studies (also 72%), Math (68%), and French (60%). 

In addition, half of parents (50%) are satisfied with what their child is learning in other languages, but 21% are either undecided or say this particular subject is not applicable to their child.

One-in-five parents (21%) identify “large class sizes” as the biggest problem facing the education system right now, while 16% mention a “shortage of teachers” and 15% say it is “lack of safety in schools and bullying”. 

Other issues detected by parents as pressing concerns are an “outdated curriculum” (12%), “inadequate resources and facilities for children” (11%), “labour disputes between teachers and the government” (also 11%) and “bureaucracy and poor management” (9%).

“The education system faces different challenges across British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Large class sizes are an enormous anxiety in Northern BC, while residents of Southern BC are more likely to point to bureaucracy and mismanagement.”

Across the province, three-in-ten parents (31%) say their child’s class sizes are or have been “too big” while 60% describe them as “about right.”

Parents in Northern BC are more likely to say that class sizes are or have been “too big” (43%), followed by those who reside in Southern BC (35%), Vancouver Island (33%), the Fraser Valley (30%) and Metro Vancouver (28%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 20 to May 28, 2019, among 700 parents in British Columbia who have a child enrolled in Kindergarten, Elementary School (Grades 1 to 7) or High School (Grades 8 to 12). The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two Thirds of Canadians Side with Evolution, Not Creationism

Only one-in-five respondents think God created human beings in their present form.

Vancouver, BC [November 28, 2018] – Most Canadians share the same point of view regarding the origin and development of human beings on earth, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, two thirds of Canadians (66%) say that human beings “definitely” or “probably” developed from less advanced forms of life over millions of years.

Conversely, one-in-five Canadians (21%) think that God “definitely” or “probably” created human beings in their present form within the last 10,000 years.

In Manitoba and Saskatchewan, 41% of residents believe in creationism—a significantly higher number than in all other provinces. Quebec has the smallest proportion of respondents who identify with creationism (10%).

“Age appears to play a role in shaping the perceptions of Canadians on the origin of life,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While half of those aged 18-to-34 (50%) definitely concur with evolution, the proportion drops among those aged 35-to-54 (45%) and those aged 55 and over (26%).”

Canadians hold more nuanced views on whether creationism—the belief that the universe and life originated from specific acts of divine creation—should be part of the school curriculum in their province.

Across the country, almost half of respondents (46%) believe creationism should not be taught in schools, while more than a third (38%) think it should be.

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to believe that creationism should not be part of the school curriculum in their province (54%) than those aged 35-to-54 (44%) and those aged 55 and over (42%).

In British Columbia, a majority of residents (55%) are opposed to teaching creationism in schools, followed by Quebec (49%), Manitoba and Saskatchewan (45%), Ontario (44%), Alberta (43%) and Atlantic Canada (41%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 27 to August 30, 2018, among 1,001 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Becris from the Noun Project

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca