British Columbians Support More Action on Child Care

Nine-in-ten consider the investments to build a quality affordable child care system as “very important” or “moderately important.”

Vancouver, BC [June 13, 2019] – In an online survey of a representative provincial sample, 76% of British Columbians think the province should move more quickly to achieve the established goals of more affordable parent fees, more spaces, and better wages and education for those who work in child care settings, a new Research Co. poll conducted on behalf of the $10aDay Child Care Plan has found.

When parents who currently have a child enrolled in child care were asked about their experience, 64% said the current government investments are having a positive impact on their situation.

There is still more to be done, as 70% of parents report that their return to work was delayed because of lack of access to child care.

“British Columbians of all ages, regions and political allegiances agree that children, parents and employers benefit when there’s access to quality affordable child care,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co.

Two thirds of British Columbians (66%) believe the provincial government should continue to put a priority on public funding for child care, to make it more affordable and available for families. 

“Some parents are experiencing benefits of new investments in child care, but many families are still struggling when it comes to cost, finding a licensed space, and educators are still earning low wages—BC need further investments,” says Sharon Gregson, spokesperson for the $10aDay Child Care Plan.

Across the province, almost two-in-five parents who currently have a child in child care (38%) say they waited at least five months before a space became available for their child. Three-in-four parents (76%) say the cost of child care has put a financial strain on their families.

Four-in-five British Columbians (81%) believe that, when child care is affordable and available to parents, more mothers work and pay taxes. An even larger proportion of residents (86%) agree with the notion that having children today costs a lot more than it did 40 years ago.

About the $10aDay Child Care Plan

Since 2011, supporters across the province have advanced the $10aDay Child Care Plan as the solution to BC’s child care chaos calling for parent fees of no more than $10aDay, access to licensed spaces for all families who choose child care, and fair wages for early childhood educators.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 9 to May 12, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Sharon Gregson, $10aDay Child Care Plan.
[c] 604.505.5725
[e] info@10aday.ca

Class Sizes, Teacher Shortage Worry Parents in British Columbia

Three-in-ten parents describe their own child’s class size as “too big”, while 60% say it is “about right.”

Vancouver, BC [June 5, 2019] – While a sizeable majority of parents in British Columbia are content with the education their children are receiving in school, certain concerns about the system persist, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of parents who have a child enrolled in K-12, 83% of respondents say the experience of their child with the education system has been “very positive” or “moderately positive.”

A majority of parents say they are “very satisfied” or “moderately satisfied” with the quality of instruction their child is getting in English (73%), Science (72%), Social Studies (also 72%), Math (68%), and French (60%). 

In addition, half of parents (50%) are satisfied with what their child is learning in other languages, but 21% are either undecided or say this particular subject is not applicable to their child.

One-in-five parents (21%) identify “large class sizes” as the biggest problem facing the education system right now, while 16% mention a “shortage of teachers” and 15% say it is “lack of safety in schools and bullying”. 

Other issues detected by parents as pressing concerns are an “outdated curriculum” (12%), “inadequate resources and facilities for children” (11%), “labour disputes between teachers and the government” (also 11%) and “bureaucracy and poor management” (9%).

“The education system faces different challenges across British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Large class sizes are an enormous anxiety in Northern BC, while residents of Southern BC are more likely to point to bureaucracy and mismanagement.”

Across the province, three-in-ten parents (31%) say their child’s class sizes are or have been “too big” while 60% describe them as “about right.”

Parents in Northern BC are more likely to say that class sizes are or have been “too big” (43%), followed by those who reside in Southern BC (35%), Vancouver Island (33%), the Fraser Valley (30%) and Metro Vancouver (28%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 20 to May 28, 2019, among 700 parents in British Columbia who have a child enrolled in Kindergarten, Elementary School (Grades 1 to 7) or High School (Grades 8 to 12). The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two Thirds of Canadians Side with Evolution, Not Creationism

Only one-in-five respondents think God created human beings in their present form.

Vancouver, BC [November 28, 2018] – Most Canadians share the same point of view regarding the origin and development of human beings on earth, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, two thirds of Canadians (66%) say that human beings “definitely” or “probably” developed from less advanced forms of life over millions of years.

Conversely, one-in-five Canadians (21%) think that God “definitely” or “probably” created human beings in their present form within the last 10,000 years.

In Manitoba and Saskatchewan, 41% of residents believe in creationism—a significantly higher number than in all other provinces. Quebec has the smallest proportion of respondents who identify with creationism (10%).

“Age appears to play a role in shaping the perceptions of Canadians on the origin of life,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While half of those aged 18-to-34 (50%) definitely concur with evolution, the proportion drops among those aged 35-to-54 (45%) and those aged 55 and over (26%).”

Canadians hold more nuanced views on whethercreationism—the belief that the universe and life originated from specific acts of divine creation—should be part of the school curriculum in their province.

Across the country, almost half of respondents (46%) believe creationism should not be taught in schools, while more than a third (38%) think it should be.

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to believe that creationism should not be part of the school curriculum in their province (54%) than those aged 35-to-54 (44%) and those aged 55 and over (42%).

In British Columbia, a majority of residents (55%) are opposed to teaching creationism in schools, followed by Quebec (49%), Manitoba and Saskatchewan (45%), Ontario (44%), Alberta (43%) and Atlantic Canada (41%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 27 to August 30, 2018, among 1,001 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Becris from the Noun Project

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca