Most Metro Vancouver Commutes Pleasant, But Three-in-Ten Suffer

A majority of commuters (51%) would be willing to make less money if they can get a job that is closer to their home.

Vancouver, BC [May 14, 2019] – Metro Vancouverites who have to get to school or work on weekdays report different experiences from their commute, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two thirds of commuters in Metro Vancouver (68%) describe their weekday commute as “pleasant”, while three-in-ten (29%) consider it “annoying.”

While half of commuters in Metro Vancouver (49%) report no major changes in their trips to school or work compared to five years ago, 20% consider their commute “better” now, while 25% think it is “worse.”

“The mode of transportation plays a role in defining the perceptions of Metro Vancouver’s commuters,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Those who drive to school or work are more likely to say that their commute is now worse than in 2014 (31%) than those who take public transit (19%),” 

Commuters who say their trips to school or work are “very” or “moderately” pleasant are primarily satisfied with being in control of the entertainment (19%), dealing with traffic that is usually manageable (15%) and getting things done on the way, such as reading the paper or answering e-mails (14%).

Conversely, the aspects that frustrate annoyed commuters are traffic (28%), dealing with bad drivers (20%) and overcrowding at public transit vehicles (16%).

Four-in-five commuters in Metro Vancouver (81%) say living close to their workplace is important to them, and 78% concede that they would work from home more often if they could to avoid commuting.

Three-in-four commuters in Metro Vancouver (75%) would choose a prospective employer based on where the office they would work at is located. More than half would seriously consider moving from their current home if they changed jobs and had a longer commute (55%) and would be willing to make less money if they can get a job that is closer to their home (51%).

Commuters are divided on the issue of paying for tolls on roads and bridges if it guaranteed a shorter time to get to school or work, with 48% disagreeing with this course of action and 43% agreeing with it.

Almost half of commuters (48%) say their ideal choice to get to school or work would be to drive, while 28% would prefer to take public transit, 14% would walk and 7% would bike.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 29 to May 1, 2019, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Support Having Seatbelts in School Buses

More than half of residents “strongly support” the measure, while a third express “moderate support.”

Vancouver, BC [May 7, 2019] – A sizeable majority of British Columbians would like to see a modification inside the school buses that currently operate in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, almost nine-in-ten British Columbians (88%) support making seatbelts mandatory for school buses in the province.

The level of “strong support” for the proposal reaches 55%, while 33% of British Columbians “moderately support the idea.”

“There are very few British Columbians who voice opposition to the notion of installing seatbelts in the province’s school buses,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The level of support for the proposal is high across all regions.”

Earlier this year, federal Transport Minister Marc Garneau announced the creation of a task force that will study whether school buses operating in Canada should be retrofitted with seatbelts.

An online petition on change.org has garnered more than 95,000 signatures in support of making seatbelts in school buses mandatory in Canada.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 4 to April 7, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Metro Vancouverites Ponder Best Way to Enjoy Granville Island

While 44% would turn the venue into a pedestrian zone, 61% say they would visit more often if parking were easier.

Vancouver, BC [January 8, 2019] – Granville Island remains a popular destination for Metro Vancouverites, but there is no clear consensus on whether personal vehicles should be allowed inside the venue, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 22% say they have gone to Granville Island six times or more over the past two years, while 42% have visited two to five times.

Among those who have visited the venue, 29% say their main reason was to go shopping at the Public Market, while 25% went sightseeing. Other reasons cited by visitors to Granville Island are going for a meal ort snack (17%), going to an Arts and Culture performance (16%) or shopping at a store that is not located inside the Public Market (5%).

Respondents were provided with three statements about the future of Granville Island. Metro Vancouverites are almost evenly split on whether the venue should be turned into a pedestrian zone where no personal vehicles would be allowed (44% agree with this idea, and 47% disagree).

Three-in-five Metro Vancouverites (61%) say they would visit Granville Island more often if it were easier to find a parking spot, and a majority (58%) disagrees with making all parking spaces at the venue paid.

“Residents of the City of Vancouver are decidedly more likely to support the notion of a car-free Granville Island,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But more than three-in-five of those who live in Surrey and other Metro Vancouver municipalities say they would actually make the trip to Granville Island more often if it were easier to find a place to park their vehicles.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 25, 2018, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Metro Vancouver Drivers Say It Is Harder to Find Parking Spots

Drivers aged 35-to-54 are more likely to say they ignore parking tickets than those aged 18-to-34 and those aged 55 and over.

Vancouver, BC [December 18, 2018] – A sizeable proportion of drivers in Metro Vancouver think it is tougher to find parking spots in the region, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites who drive to school or work on weekdays, four-in-five (81%) say it is “moderately harder” or “much harder” to find a parking spot in their municipality when they need one.

Across Metro Vancouver, 18% of drivers say they have received a parking ticket from a municipality over the past two years, while 20% have received a ticket from a parking management company.

While 76% of drivers say they quickly paid the fine from the last parking ticket they received from a municipality, only 51% of those who received a ticket from a parking management company behaved in the same fashion.

In addition, while 13% of drivers say they never paid the fine from the last ticket issued by a municipality, the proportion jumps to 34% for tickets issued by a parking management company.

“Some drivers are clearly not taking parking tickets seriously,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This is particularly significant among drivers aged 35-to-54, who are more likely to say they never pay any type of parking fine, compared with their younger and older counterparts.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 25, 2018, among 513 adults in Metro Vancouver who drive to school or work on weekdays. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.3 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Metro Vancouverites Ponder Regulations for Ride-Hailing

Most residents support having a cap on the number of drivers, as well as a Class 4 license requirement.

Vancouver, BC [November 26, 2018] – Most residents of Metro Vancouver believe people who want to operate a ride-hailing service should hold a driver’s license that requires more training, a medical exam and security checks, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 57% say they are in favour of only allowing drivers with a commercial (or Class 4) license to operate a ride-hailing service.

Conversely, three-in-ten respondents (30%) would allow drivers with a standard (or Class 5) license to operate a ride-hailing service.

Two thirds of Metro Vancouverites (66%) want the provincial government to cap the number of ride-hailing drivers to reduce traffic congestion.

In contrast, one-in-four (23%) think the provincial government should have no restrictions on the number of ride-hailing drivers, even if this creates traffic congestion.

Earlier this month, the Government of British Columbia announced that ride-hailing services will be allowed to operate in the province by the Fall of 2019.

Almost half of Metro Vancouverites (49%) believe this is a reasonable timeline, because it takes time to review the effect of ride-hailing on existing transportation options.

Two-in-five Metro Vancouverites (42%) believe this is not a reasonable timeline and think ride-hailing should be allowed in the province earlier than the Fall of 2019.

“Women (55%), residents aged 55+ (53%) and voters who supported the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the last election (59%) are more likely to think the government’s ride-hailing timeline is reasonable,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Men (47%), residents aged 18-to-34 (also 47%) and voters who supported the BC Liberals in the last election (52%) are more likely to say the timeline is not reasonable”.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 25, 2018, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Wpcpey

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca