Most Canadians Have Favourable View of UK, Split on USA

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians have a positive opinion of Saudi Arabia, Iran and North Korea.

Vancouver, BC [January 10, 2020] – More than four-in-five Canadians hold a favourable opinion of the United Kingdom, but just under half feel the same way about the United States, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 83% of Canadians have a positive view of the United Kingdom.

At least seven-in-ten Canadians hold positive opinions on four other nations: Germany (73%), Italy (72%), Japan (also 72%) and France (70%). More than half of Canadians (52%) have a positive view of South Korea.

Canadians are split when assessing the United States, with 47% saying they have a positive opinion of the country and 48% stating they have a negative one.

Canadian men are more likely to have a positive opinion of the United States than Canadian women (50% to 42%). Canadians aged 18-to-34 are also more likely to hold favourable views on the United States (53%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (43%) and 55 and over (45%). 

“A majority of Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in last year’s federal election (64%) have a positive opinion of the United States,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are decidedly lower among Canadians who voted for the Liberals (42%) or the New Democrats (31%) last year.”

Just under half of Canadians (46%) have a positive view of Mexico, while more than a third (36%) have a positive opinion of India and three-in-ten (30%) have a favourable view of Venezuela.

Just over one-in-four Canadians have a positive opinion of China (27%) and Russia (26%), while more than three-in-five (61%) have a negative view of each country.

In the specific case of China, the proportion of positive opinions varies greatly around the country: 29% in Atlantic Canada, Ontario and Quebec, 28% in Alberta, 22% in British Columbia and 17% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians have a positive view of Saudi Arabia (17%), Iran (14%) and North Korea (11%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 18 to December 20, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Ontarians and Albertans Dismayed by Their Current Premiers

More than half of residents of each province say they would be “better off” with a different person in charge.

Vancouver, BC [January 8, 2020] – As a debate over national unity continues in Canada, a large proportion of Albertans and Ontarians are dissatisfied with their current provincial heads of government, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Canadians believe their province would be better off with a different premier in charge.

The proportion of residents who are unhappy with their provincial head of government is highest in Ontario (60%), Alberta (57%), Atlantic Canada (52%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 52%). Fewer than half of residents of Quebec (44%) and British Columbia (42%) feel the same way.

In addition, 50% of Canadians believe their province would be better off with a different Prime Minister in Ottawa. 

Majorities of residents of Alberta (65%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (59%), British Columbia (53%) and Ontario (51%) believe their province would be better off with someone other than Justin Trudeau in charge of the federal government. Fewer than half of those living in Atlantic Canada (48%) and Quebec (38%) concur.

One-in-four Canadians (25%) believe their province would be better off as its own country, including 40% of residents of both Alberta and Quebec. 

Separatist sentiment in Alberta has increased by 10 points since a Research Co. survey conducted in July 2019 and by six points in Quebec since a Research Co. survey conducted in October 2018.

Finally, 16% of Canadians say their province would be better off joining the U.S. and becoming an American state—a feeling that is more pronounced in Alberta (22%) and Quebec (20%).

“The level of disagreement with the notion of a province joining the United States is highest among Canadians aged 55 and over at 87%,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers also amount to a majority among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (71%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (66%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 18 to December 20, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Than Seven-in-Ten British Columbians Endorse Housing Taxes

Almost half of residents think these actions will be effective in making housing more affordable in the province.

Vancouver, BC [January 3, 2020] – The “speculation tax” introduced by the Government of British Columbia is still backed by a sizeable proportion of the province’s residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 76% of British Columbians agree with the implementation of the “speculation tax” in specific urban areas targeting foreign and domestic homeowners who pay little or no income tax in BC, and those who own second properties that aren’t long-term rentals.

The survey outlines an eight-point increase in agreement with the “speculation tax” since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March 2019.

“Agreement with this particular tax is strong among voters of all three major political parties in the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “It encompasses 86% for those who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in 2017, as well as 75% of those who cast ballots for candidates from the BC Liberals and the BC Green Party.”

More than three-in-four British Columbians agree with two other policies: Increasing the foreign buyers tax from 15% to 20% (77%, -3) and expanding the foreign buyers tax to areas located outside of Metro Vanncouver (also 77%, +2).

Agreement is also strong with two other measures: increasing the property transfer tax from 3% to 5% for homes valued at more than $3 million. The 5% portion only applies to the value greater than $3 million (72%, +8) and introducing a tax of 0.2% on the value of homes between $3 million and $4 million, and a tax rate of 0.4% on the portion of a home’s value that exceeds $4 million (also 72%, +6).

Across the province, 49% of residents think the actions of the provincial government will be “effective”, in making housing more affordable in British Columbia, while 39% consider they will be ”ineffective.”

There is a pronounced regional divide on this question. While majorities of residents of Northern BC (56%) and Metro Vancouver (52%) think the provincial government’s actions will help make housing more affordable, the proportion is lower in the Fraser Valley (45%), Vancouver Island (44%) and Southern BC (40%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 12 to December 16, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two Thirds of British Columbians Unaffected by Carbon Tax

Residents are divided on whether the goal of making people more mindful of their carbon consumption has been achieved.

Vancouver, BC [November 6, 2019] – Most British Columbians believe the provincial carbon tax—originally implemented on July 1, 2008—has not been detrimental to their domestic assets, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 66% of British Columbians believe that the provincial carbon tax has not negatively affected the finances of their household, while one-in-five (21%) think it has.

Men (28%) are more likely to believe that the carbon tax has negatively affected their household finances than women (15%). Residents aged 18-to-34 are also more likely to have an adverse opinion on this issue (26%) than those aged 35-to-54 (20%) and those aged 55 and over (15%).

When asked if they think the introduction of the carbon tax in British Columbia has led people to be more mindful of their carbon consumption, residents of the province are deeply divided.

While 45% of British Columbians believe the carbon tax has led people to change their behaviour, 44% disagree and 13% are undecided.

“Residents of Northern BC (63%) are more likely to believe that the carbon tax has made residents more mindful,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are significantly lower in the Fraser Valley (45%), Southern BC (44%), Metro Vancouver (43%) and Vancouver Island (42%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 25 to October 28, 2019, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error — which measures sample variability — is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Canadian Voters Are Open to Proportional Representation

Two-in-five would welcome implementing the mixed member system for the next election to the House of Commons.

Vancouver, BC [November 1, 2019] – A significant proportion of Canadian voters would be open to conducting the next federal ballot under a different electoral system, a new Research Co. “exit poll” has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of Canadians who cast a ballot in this year’s federal election, 51% of respondents would agree to elect all members of the House of Commons through party-list proportional representation.

Under this system, parties make lists of candidates to be elected, and seats get allocated to each party in accordance with the number of total votes the party receives.

Majorities of voters in Quebec and Alberta (58% in each province) would be open to electing their Members of Parliament this way. Party-list proportional representation would also be endorsed by 59% of voters aged 18-to-34.

Views on the mixed member proportional representation system are more nuanced, with 39% of Canadian voters agreeing with its implementation for elections to the House of Commons. Just under three-in-ten (28%) disagree and a 33% are undecided.

Under this system, a hybrid method is utilized with the first-past-the-post system for a portion of the legislature, and party-list proportional representation for a another.

Respondents were also asked how they would have voted if the most recent Canadian election had been held under each one of these systems.

In an election held with party-list proportional representation, the Conservative Party would have finished in first place with the support of 33% of decided voters, followed by the Liberal Party with 32%, the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 18%, the Green Party and the Bloc Québécois each with 6%, and the People’s Party with 4%.

“While the level of support does not change dramatically for the five parties that will be represented in the incoming House of Commons under the party-list proportional representation system, there are some differences,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support for the Liberals is slightly higher in British Columbia than it was on Election Day, and in Ontario, the Conservatives would fare significantly better.”

When asked who would get their party vote under a mixed member proportional representation system, a third of decided voters (34%) would support the Liberal list, followed by the Conservatives with 31%, the New Democrats with 17%, the Greens with 7%, the Bloc with 6% and the People’s Party with 3%.

In a mixed member election, Liberals and Conservatives would retain practically nine-in-ten of their voters under the first-past-the-post system for the other portion of the legislature.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 20 to October 21, 2019, among 803 adults in Canada who voted in the federal election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca