Canadians Pick Trudeau to Manage Pandemic, O’Toole for Jobs

One-in-ten Conservative Party voters from 2019 say they will cast a ballot for the People’s Party in this month’s election.
 
There is no clear leader on two matters: housing, homelessness and poverty, and transportation projects.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 15, 2021] – The incumbent prime minister is the first choice of Canadians to handle issues such as health care and the COVID-19 pandemic, while the leader of the official opposition is preferred for financial and public safety concerns, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
The online survey of a representative national sample asked Canadians to select which one of the five federal party leaders who are running nationwide campaigns is the best person to manage 16 different issues.  
 
More than a third of Canadians (36%) think Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is better suited to handle the COVID-19 pandemic, followed by Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole with 22%, New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Jagmeet Singh with 12%, People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier with 6% and Green Party leader Annamie Paul with 2%.  
 
More than three-in-ten Canadians also pick Trudeau to manage foreign affairs (31%), child care (also 31%) and regulations related to firearms (also 31%).  
 
Earlier in the campaign, Erin O’Toole was tied with Justin Trudeau on the foreign affairs file,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the final week before votes are cast, Trudeau has a five-point lead on this particular issue.”  
 
The Liberal leader is also ahead of all rivals on being the best person to handle immigration (29%), health care (also 29%), the environment (28%), Indigenous issues and reconciliation (27%), seniors care (26%), and racism and discrimination (also 26%).  
 
One third of Canadians (33%) believe O’Toole would be the best leader to manage the economy and jobs, followed by Trudeau with 29%, Singh with 15%, Bernier with 4% and Paul with 2%.  
 
The Conservative leader is in first place on three other issues: crime and public safety (29%), accountability and leadership (27%), and energy and pipelines (also 27%).  
 
There is a tie on two specific concerns. Across the country, 25% of Canadians select either Trudeau or Singh as the best leaders to manage housing, homelessness and poverty. When asked about transportation projects, equal proportions of respondents pick Trudeau and O’Toole (25% each).  
 
Paul gets her best rating on the environment (14%), while Bernier scores highest on the COVID-19 pandemic (6%).  
 
In a survey released by Research Co. this week, health care, the economy and jobs, housing homelessness and poverty, and the environment were identified as the most important issues facing Canada.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 13, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Tobi 87
 
 

Liberals Regain Lead, Conservatives and NDP Drop in Canada

One-in-ten Conservative Party voters from 2019 say they will cast a ballot for the People’s Party in this month’s election.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 14, 2021] – As Canada heads to the final week of campaigning in the 2021 federal election, the governing Liberal Party is ahead of its competitors, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 34% of decided voters in Canada would support the Liberal candidate in their constituency, up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in late August.  
 
The Conservative Party is second with 30% (-2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (-2), the Bloc Québécois with 7% (+1), the People’s Party with 5% (+2) and the Green Party with 3% (-1). In addition, 1% of decided voters in the country would back a different party or an independent candidate.  
 

The Conservatives remain ahead of the Liberals among male voters (36% to 31%) and voters aged 55 and over (35% to 31%). The Liberals hold the upper hand over the Conservatives among female voters (38% to 25%) and voters aged 35-to-54 (39% to 30%). The Liberals are also in first place among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (37%, with the NDP at 27% and the Conservatives at 18%).  
 
In Atlantic Canada, the Liberals remain the most favoured option for voters (40%, with the Conservatives at 34%). In Quebec, the governing party holds an eight-point lead over the Bloc (37% to 29%).  
 
Half of decided voters in Alberta (50%) would support the Conservative candidate in their constituency, along with more than two-in-five (43%) of those who reside in Saskatchewan and Manitoba.  
 
The race remains closely contested in Ontario, where the Liberals are slightly ahead of the Conservatives (37% to 34%) and in British Columbia, where the three main federal parties are virtually tied (30% for the Conservatives, 29% for the New Democrats and 28% for the Liberals).  
 
The People’s Party is benefiting from a higher level of support in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (9%), Alberta (7%) and Ontario (6%). In fact, 10% of Canadians who supported the Conservatives in the 2019 federal election say they will be voting for the People’s Party in 2021.  
 
Almost one-in-four Canadians (23%, -3) think health care is the most important issue facing the country today, followed by the economy and jobs (22%, +2), housing, homelessness and poverty (16%, +1) and the environment (12%, -1).  
 
Across Canada, the NDP’s Jagmeet Singh continues to post the highest approval rating among the five leaders who are running nationwide campaigns (49%, -2), followed by Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau (43%, -2), Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole (40%, -1), Annamie Paul of the Green Party (23%, +2) and Maxime Bernier of the People’s Party (15%, =).  
 
Singh also remains ahead on personal momentum, with 27% of Canadians saying their opinion of him has improved since the start of the campaign. The numbers on this indicator are lower for O’Toole (22%), Trudeau (15%), Paul (12%) and Bernier (8%).  
 
On the “Best Prime Minister” question, Trudeau remains in first place with 33% (+1), followed by O’Toole (26%, =), Singh (18%, -2), Bernier (5%, +2) and Paul (2%, +1).  
 
“A third of Canadian women (33%) feel Justin Trudeau is the best person to manage the federal government, while only one-in-five (19%) select Erin O’Toole,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The race is significantly tighter among male voters on this same question, with Trudeau at 34% and O’Toole at 33%.”
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 13, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Dave Doe
 

Canadians Hold Mixed Views on Which Leader is Best on Issues

Just under one-in-five Canadians (17%) say they intend to vote by mail in this year’s federal election.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 6, 2021] – As the federal election campaign continues, the three main federal party leaders are connecting in different ways with Canadians on the most important issues facing the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, just under a third of Canadians (32%) think Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is the best person to handle crime and public safety.  
 
Trudeau is also the preferred choice of Canadians to manage immigration (30%), health care (29%) and the environment (28%).  
 
Official opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole is the top option for Canadians to handle the economy and jobs (34%), energy and pipelines (32%), and accountability and leadership (27%). O’Toole and Trudeau are tied, with 30% each, when Canadians are asked about the best leader to manage foreign affairs (30%).  
 
New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Jagmeet Singh is the most popular leader to deal with housing, homelessness and poverty (27%), with Trudeau and O’Toole tied at 24%.  
 
Health care is identified as the most important issue facing Canada for 26% of respondents, followed by the economy and jobs with 20%, housing, homelessness and poverty with 15% and the environment with 13%.  
 
The survey also asked Canadians about other characteristics and topics related to the three main federal party leaders. Trudeau emerged as the most popular option to be the Prime Minister in the event of another Quebec referendum (31%) and to represent Canada at the next round of climate change talks (30%).  
 
The incumbent prime minister is also ahead on four personality traits: having a drink with you at the local bar (28%), being on your sports team (also 28%), babysitting your kids or a relative’s kids (25%) and being part of your trivia quiz team (23%, with Singh close behind at 21%).  
 
Singh is practically tied with Trudeau on two of the items tested: having a coffee or tea with you at the local coffee shop (27%, with Trudeau at 26%) and giving you a good recommendation on a book to read (22%, with Trudeau at 21%).  
 
More than three-in-ten Canadians express a preference for O’Toole on three separate matters: negotiating with U.S. President Joe Biden on trade and security issues (34%), being the Prime Minister in the event of a terrorist attack (32%) and negotiating with Russia over Arctic sovereignty (31%).  
 
“There is a theme developing when it comes to the perceptions of Canadians on the three main party leaders,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While Trudeau and Singh score highly on some of the personality traits, like hanging around at a bar or coffee shop, O’Toole has a decisive advantage on foreign policy items.”  
 
This week, there will be two televised debates organized by the Leaders’ Debate Commission. More than two-in-five Canadians (42%) agree with the Commission’s decision to not extend an invitation to these debates to People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier, while 33% disagree and 25% are undecided.  
 
The results are similar when Canadians are asked about the presence of Maverick Party leader Jay Hill on the televised meetings, with 44% agreeing with the decision to leave him out, 27% disagreeing and 29% saying they are not sure.  
 
Almost half of Quebecers (49%) are in favour of the Commission’s decision to leave both Bernier and Hill off the stage.  
 
Across the country, 17% of Canadians say they plan to vote by mail this year—a proportion that includes 30% of British Columbians and 21% of Albertans.  
 
While more than one-in-four Canadians (26%) plan to cast their ballot during Advance Voting from September 10 to September 13, more than two-in-five (44%) intend to vote on Election Day (September 20).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Conservatives Close Gap in Canada as Liberal Lead Disappears

Justin Trudeau’s approval rating fell to 45% (-5 since June), but he is still ahead of Erin O’Toole in the “Preferred PM” question.
 
Vancouver, BC [August 31, 2021] – The federal election in Canada is currently a dead heat between the two most prominent parties in the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 33% of Canadian decided voters would cast a ballot for the candidate of the Liberal Party in their riding, down five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June.
 
The Conservative Party remains in second place with 32% (+2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 22% (+2), the Bloc Québécois with 6% (+1), the Green Party with 4% (-1) and the People’s Party with 3% (+2). Fewer than 1% of decided voters would vote for the Maverick Party, for another party or for an independent candidate.
 
In June, the Liberals were ahead of the Conservatives by 15 points among female decided voters in Canada. This month, the advantage has narrowed to just eight points (36% to 28%). The Tories are now in first place among male decided voters (36% to 31%).
 
The Liberals are still popular among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (34%, followed by the NDP with 29%) and among decided voters aged 35-to-54 (38%, with the Conservatives at 32%). The Tories hold a seven-point advantage over the Liberals among decided voters aged 55 and over (37% to 30%).
 
The Liberals are in first place among decided voters in Atlantic Canada (40%) and Quebec (also 40%). The Conservatives have outright leads in Alberta (49%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (46%).
 
There are close races developing in two Canadian provinces. In Ontario, the Conservatives and the Liberals are essentially tied (36% and 35% respectively). In British Columbia, the Liberals—who were leading in a Research Co. survey conducted in early August—have fallen to third place (28%), with both the Conservatives and the New Democrats at 32%.
 
There is some movement when Canadians are asked about the most important issue facing the country. Health care is first with 26% (-3), followed by the economy and jobs with 20% (-3) and housing, homelessness and poverty with 15% (+1). The environment is fourth on the list with 13% (+6).
 
“While health care remains the dominant issue for Atlantic Canadians and Quebecers, financial matters are crucial for those who reside in Alberta,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “One-in-five Ontarians and British Columbians are worried about housing, but the issue that has seen the biggest gains since June is the environment.”
 
The approval rating for Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau stands at 45% at the end of the month. This is higher than the numbers posted by Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole (41%, +7) and lower than NDP leader Jagmeet Singh (51%, +1).
 
Just over one-in-five Canadians (21%, -11) approve of the way Green Party leader Annamie Paul is handling her duties, while there was no significant movement for People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (15%, +1).
 
When Canadians are asked which one of the five leaders who are running nationwide campaigns would make the best head of government, the incumbent prime minister also lost some ground. Trudeau is in first place with 32% (-5), followed by O’Toole (26%, +11), Singh (20%, +4), Bernier (3%, =) and Paul (1%, -1).
 
Since the start of the campaign, Trudeau posts a negative momentum score (-24, with 39% of Canadians saying their opinion of him has worsened). Paul and Bernier are also in negative territory (-18 and -19 respectively), while O’Toole is even and Singh is at +10 (with 27% of Canadians reporting a better assessment of the current NDP leader).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Separatist Feelings Drop in Quebec, Remain Stagnant in Alberta

Most Albertans and Ontarians believe their provinces would be better off with a different premier in charge.  
 
Vancouver, BC [August 20, 2021] – While almost half of Canadians believe their province would benefit from having a different prime minister, fewer residents of Quebec are expressing sympathy towards secession, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 25% of Quebecers believe their province would be better off as its own country, down 11 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2020.  
 
Only Alberta has a larger proportion of residents who believe they would be better off as a nation (28%, unchanged since May 2020, and lower than the 40% observed in December 2019).  
 
Almost half of Canadians (47%) think their province would be better off with a different Prime Minister in Ottawa, up nine points since May 2020.  
 
More than half of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (58%) yearn for someone other than Justin Trudeau to have responsibility over the federal government. The proportion is lower in Alberta (50%), Ontario (48%), British Columbia (46%), Atlantic Canada (38%) and Quebec (37%).  
 
When asked is their province would be better off with a different premier in charge, 47% of Canadians agreed, while just over a third (37%) disagreed.   Two thirds of Albertans (68%) and a majority of Ontarians (54%) think their provinces would be better off with a different head of government.  
 
“Since May 2020, the numbers for the premiers of Alberta and Ontario have worsened on this question,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There is an increase in negative perceptions of eight points for Jason Kenney in Alberta and of 16 points for Doug Ford in Ontario.”  
 
The proportion of residents who are not particularly pleased with their premiers is lower in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (50%), Quebec (38%), Atlantic Canada (37%) and British Columbia (36%).
 
Across Canada, only 13% of respondents believe their province would be better off joining the United States and becoming an American state, down four points since May 2020. This feeling is more prevalent among residents of Alberta and Quebec (each at 17%).
 
Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 12 to August 14, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Feel Trudeau is Better for Province Than Harper

Roughly the same proportion of the province’s residents would be “very upset” with a win for the Liberals or the Conservatives.
 
Vancouver, BC [August 17, 2021] – Most residents of British Columbia believe the tenure of Justin Trudeau as Prime Minister of Canada has been beneficial for the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 54% of British Columbians think the province has been treated “very well” or “well” by Trudeau, while one third (34%) believe it has been treated “poorly” or “very poorly.
 
Respondents are almost evenly split when assessing the effect of the federal government headed by Stephen Harper on British Columbia, with 38% saying he treated the province “very well” or “well” and 42% believing he behaved “poorly” or “very poorly.”
 
“Almost half of British Columbians aged 55 and over (48%) hold a favourable view on the way the current federal government is treating the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Just over a third (35%) feel the same way about the previous federal administration.”
 
Across British Columbia, just over half of residents (51%) say they would be “very upset” if the Conservative Party forms the government again in Ottawa. Animosity towards a Tory administration rises to 53% among Green Party voters in 2019, 68% among Liberal voters and 72% among New Democratic Party (NDP) voters.
 
Just under half of British Columbians (48%) say they would be “very upset” if the Liberals win the next election and remain in power, including 85% of Conservative voters, 61% of Green voters and 54% of NDP voters.
 
Only 35% of British Columbians would be “very upset” if the NDP forms the government for the first time in Ottawa after the next federal election. This includes two thirds of Conservative voters (66%), but significantly lower proportions of those who voted for the Liberals (43%) or the Greens (32%) in 2019.
 
Four of the current ministers in the federal government represent constituencies located in British Columbia and are seeking re-election this year as candidates for the Liberal Party.
 
Minister of National Defence Harjit Sajjan has the best approval rating of the four BC-based federal ministers (37%), followed by Minister of Environment and Climate Change Jonathan Wilkinson (31%), Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion Carla Qualtrough (29%) and Minister of Digital Government Joyce Murray (27%).
 
Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 7 to August 9, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca
 

Liberals Ahead of NDP as British Columbians Ponder Federal Ballot

A majority of British Columbians approve of the way Justin Trudeau and Jagmeet Singh are handling their duties.
 
Vancouver, BC [August 11, 2021] – The governing Liberal Party is currently the most popular federal political organization in British Columbia, a new Research Co. poll has found.
 
In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 37% of decided voters in British Columbia say they would cast a ballot for the Liberal candidate in their constituency if a federal election were held tomorrow.
 
The New Democratic Party (NDP) is second with 29%, followed by the Conservative Party with 23%, the Green Party with 8% and the People’s Party with 2%. Fewer than 1% of decided voters would support the Maverick Party or vote for another party or an independent candidate.
 
The Liberals are in first place in Metro Vancouver (40%) and Southern BC (32%). The races are tighter in the Fraser Valley (Liberals 34%, NDP 32%) and on Vancouver Island (Liberals 33%, NDP 32%).
 
“There is a significant gender gap when British Columbians assess Canada’s main opposition party,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 27% of male decided voters in the province would back the Conservatives, only 19% of female decided voters share the same view.”
 
Just over half of British Columbians (51%) approve of the way Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau has performed in his job. The rating is slightly higher for NDP leader Jagmeet Singh (53%) and significantly lower for Conservative leader Erin O’Toole (29%), Green Party leader Annamie Paul (24%), People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (13%) and Maverick Party leader Jay Hill (9%).
 
A third of British Columbians (33%) believe Trudeau would make the best Prime Minister of Canada. Singh has a six-point edge over O’Toole (22% to 16%), with Paul and Bernier in the low single digits (3% and 2% respectively).
 
Housing, homelessness and poverty is the most important issue facing Canada for 26% of British Columbians, followed by the economy and jobs (20%), health care (19%) and the environment (13%).
 
Trudeau is regarded as the best party leader to manage foreign affairs (32%), the economy and jobs (31%), immigration (28%), crime and public safety (25%), the environment (also 25%) and accountability and leadership (also 25%).
 
Singh is seen as the best person to handle housing, homelessness and poverty (29%, with Trudeau at 21%).
 
Trudeau is virtually tied with O’Toole on energy and pipelines (23% to 21%) and with Singh on health care (26% to 28%).
 
Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 7 to August 9, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca
 
Photo Credit: Dllu

British Columbians Give Mixed Reviews to Horgan After Four Years

Almost three-in-five residents (59%) think it has become harder for them to make ends meet in the province.

Vancouver, BC [August 3, 2021] – A significant proportion of British Columbians are concerned about affordability issues four years after the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) formed the provincial government, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 59% of British Columbians say it has become harder to make ends meet over the course of the past four years.

“The concerns about the high cost of living in British Columbia are significant across the political spectrum,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of residents who voted for the BC Green Party (70%), the BC NDP (59%) and the BC Liberals (55%) in last year’s provincial election state that making ends meet is more difficult now than in 2017.”

Almost three-in-four British Columbians (74%) think buying a house is now harder than it was in 2017, and more than three-in-five (63%) feel the same way about saving money for retirement.

Roughly half of British Columbians think paying for post-secondary education (52%) and finding a job (49%) are now more difficult than four years ago.

In a Canada-wide Research Co. survey conducted in June 2021, 14% of Canadians—and 19% of British Columbians—identified housing, homelessness and poverty as the most important issue facing the country.

Just over seven-in-ten British Columbians (71%) believe the housing situation in the province is worse now than it was in 2017, and a majority (53%) feel the same way about taxation.

Just under half of British Columbians (48%) think that public safety is worse now than it was four years ago.

More than two-in-five British Columbians believe there has been no change on four other government files: public schools (49%), health care (48%), the justice system (46%) and the environment (42%).

Half of British Columbians (50%) believe BC NDP leader John Horgan has performed “about the same” as they expected after he became the province’s premier in July 2017.

Similar proportions of British Columbians think Horgan has performed better (20%) or worse (19%) than they originally envisioned.

One third of British Columbians (33%) believe it is too early to judge Horgan’s accomplishments since he became premier, while 26% think he has done little and 21% say he has achieved much.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from July 17 to July 19, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Pierre Trudeau Ahead of Harper as Best Recent PM for Canadians

More than one-in-five Canadians select either Justin Trudeau or Stephen Harper as the worst of the past nine prime ministers.

Vancouver, BC [July 23, 2021] – Pierre Trudeau remains the most liked of Canada’s nine recent heads of government, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 20% of Canadians select Pierre Trudeau as the best prime minister since 1968, down three points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in July 2020.

Stephen Harper is second on the list with 16% (=), followed by Justin Trudeau with 13% (-2), Jean Chrétien with 7% (-4) and Brian Mulroney also with 7% (-1).

Fewer Canadians mentioned Paul Martin (3%, +1), Joe Clark (2%, +1), John Turner (2%, +1) or Kim Campbell (1%, -1). Almost three-in-ten (29%, -7) are undecided.

Justin Trudeau is the preferred choice for Canadians aged 18-to-34 (18%, with his father at 15% and Harper at 12%). Harper leads among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (18%, with Pierre Trudeau at 15% and Justin Trudeau at 14%). Canadians aged 55 and over pick Pierre Trudeau (29%, with Harper at 18%).

When asked who the country’s worst head of government since 1968 has been, 22% of Canadians select Justin Trudeau (+4), while 21% pick Harper (-2).

All of the remaining past prime ministers are in single digits: Mulroney (7%, +1), Pierre Trudeau (6%, -1), Campbell (5%, -1), Clark (4%, =), Chrétien (3%, -1), Martin (2%, -1) and Turner (also 2%, -1). More than a quarter of Canadians (27%, =) are undecided.

“The regional disparities are evident when Canadians assess their least favourite recent prime ministers,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than two-in-five Albertans (44%) select Justin Trudeau on this question, while just over one-in-four Quebecers (26%) pick Harper.”

Canadians were also asked about nine different politicians who served as leaders of the Official Opposition in Ottawa over the past five decades.

Half of Canadians (50%, -4) think former New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Jack Layton would have made a good prime minister. About three-in-ten Canadians feel the same way about former Progressive Conservative leader Robert Stanfield (31%, +1) and former NDP leader Tom Mulcair (30%, -2).

The rating is slightly lower for former Reform Party leader Preston Manning (28%, +2), and former Conservative Party leaders Rona Ambrose (24%, -3) and Andrew Scheer (23%, -3).

The lowest ranked former opposition leaders on this question are Stockwell Day of the Canadian Alliance (20%, -2) and former Liberal Party leaders Stéphane Dion (also 20%, -2) and Michael Ignatieff (19%, -1).

Methodology:  Results are based on an online survey conducted from July 16 to July 18, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Liberals Have Eight-Point Lead Over Tories in Canada

Health care is the most important issue facing the country for three-in-ten Canadians, followed by the economy and jobs.

Vancouver, BC [June 17, 2021] – The governing Liberal Party remains ahead of its rivals in Canada’s federal political scene, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 38% of Canadian decided voters would support the Liberal candidate in their constituency if a federal election were held tomorrow, up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March.

The Conservative Party is second with 30% (+2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (=), the Bloc Québécois with 5% (-2), the Green Party also with 5% (-1) and the People’s Party with 1% (=).

The Liberals are ahead of the Conservatives by 15 points among female decided voters (40% to 25%). Among male decided voters, the Liberals are barely ahead of the Conservatives (37% to 35%).

This month, the Liberal Party fares best with decided voters aged 55 and over (41%, with the Conservatives at 36%) and decided voters aged 18-to-34 (40%, with the NDP at 29%). The race is closer among decided voters aged 35-to-54 (36% for the Liberals, and 34% for the Conservatives).

The Liberals remain the most popular federal party among decided voters in Atlantic Canada (49%), Ontario (42%) and Quebec (39%). The Conservatives continue to dominate in Alberta (50%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (also 50%). In British Columbia, the New Democrats are in first place (34%), followed by the Liberals (31%) and the Conservatives (27%).

Half of Canadians (50%, -6) approve of the way Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is handling his duties.

NDP leader Jagmeet Singh posted the same approval rating as Trudeau (50%, +4). The numbers are lower for Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole (34%, +1), Green Party leader Annamie Paul (32%, +2) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (14%, -1).

More than a third of Canadians select Trudeau when asked which one of the main party leaders would make the best prime minister (37%, -3). For the first time, Singh is in second place on this indicator (17%, +5), followed by O’Toole (15%, =), Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (3%, +1), Bernier (3%, +1) and Paul (2%, -1).

Health care is identified as the most important issue facing the country by 29% of Canadians (-4), followed by the economy and jobs (23%, -1), housing, homelessness and poverty (14%, +5), the environment (9%, +2) and COVID-19 (7%, -4).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from June 12 to June 14, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Makaristos

Vaccine Rollout Opinions Improve in Some Canadian Provinces

Almost two thirds of respondents think the goal to inoculate every willing Canadian by the end of September 2021 will be attained.

Vancouver, BC [May 28, 2021] – The perceptions of Canadians on the way COVID-19 vaccination efforts are advancing have improved markedly this month, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 57% of Canadians are satisfied with the procurement of COVID-19 vaccine doses from the federal government, up nine points since a similar survey conducted in March 2021.

Majorities of Canadians are also content with the vaccination plans and phases outlined by their province (61%, +7) and with the pace of vaccination efforts in their province (58%, +10).

“The same regional differences that we currently see across Canada when it comes to COVID-19 management are also present on the vaccine rollout,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While more than three-in-five residents of Quebec (69%) and British Columbia (62%) are satisfied with the pace of vaccination efforts, only 48% of those in Ontario and Alberta feel the same way.”

In December 2020, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) stated that it expected to have enough COVID-19 vaccine doses to inoculate every willing Canadian by the end of September 2021.  

Almost two thirds of Canadians (65%) believe the vaccination goal outlined by the PHAC will be attained, up 20 points since a similar survey completed in February 2021.  

This month, 83% of Canadians say they have already been vaccinated against COVID-19, or plan to have a first shot when it becomes available to them, while 13% will “definitely” or “probably” not get inoculated—including 20% of those who voted for Conservative Party candidates in the 2019 federal election.  

More than four-in-five Canadians (84%, +1) agree with regulations that require all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask while inside.  

Three-in-four Canadians (75%, -2) say they wear a mask every time they go out, a proportion thar rises to 82% among women and 80% among Canadians aged 55 and over.  

Sizeable proportions of Canadians continue to endorse specific measures to deal with COVID-19, including keeping the border with the United States closed to non-essential travel (80%, -3) and placing all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period (79%, -3). In addition, 74% (=) would prohibit non-essential travel from one province to another and 67% (-1) would prohibit non-essential travel inside provinces.  

Just under a third of Canadians say they are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection (30%, +1) and acknowledge they are overeating or eating more than usual at home (29%, +4).  

Fewer Canadians admit to losing their temper more than usual at home (20%, including 28% of those aged 18-to-34), having a bath or shower less often than before the pandemic (16%, -1), not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection (15%, -4), drinking more alcohol than usual at home (13%, -1) and brushing their teeth less often than before the pandemic (11%, but rising to 21% among Albertans).  

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 17 to May 19, 2021, among 1,000 Canadian adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Views on Governments Falter as Canadians See Pandemic’s End

Ontarians and Albertans are the least likely to express confidence in the measures implemented by their provincial administrations.

Vancouver, BC [May 25, 2021] – For the first time since the start of the pandemic, a majority of Canadians believe the most vicious moments of COVID-19 have passed, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 55% of Canadians think the worst of the COVID-19 outbreak is behind us, up eight points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in March.

Conversely, 27% of Canadians think the worst of the pandemic is ahead of us, down six points in two months.

Just over half of Canadians (51%) are satisfied with how the federal government has managed the pandemic, unchanged since March. The numbers are similar for provincial governments (52%, -1) and municipal governments (55%, +1).

Among the four most populous provinces, the satisfaction rating remains below the 50% threshold in Ontario (42%, -3) and Alberta (34%, -3). More than three-in-five residents of British Columbia (62%, -3) and Quebec (61%, +3) are content with how their governments have managed COVID-19.

Almost half of Canadians (46%) think the measures that are currently in place in their province to deal with COVID-19 are correct for the situation. While three-in-ten (29%) believe the measures do not go far enough, one-in-five (19%) claim they go too far.

“Residents of Ontario and Alberta are more likely to be dissatisfied with the measures implemented to deal with COVID-19,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Just over a third of residents in each jurisdiction endorse the course of action outlined by their provincial governments.”

Canadians were also asked about the level of confidence they have in their provincial government to handle specific tasks.

Majorities of respondents trust their provincial administration to release accurate (61%) and complete (56%) information about COVID-19 cases and hospitalization rates to the media and the public.

Most Canadians also trust their provincial administrations to respond to a natural disaster (60%), establish public health guidelines and restrictions (58%) and ensure the sustainability of the health care system (55%). Fewer respondents (43%) express confidence in their provincial government to spend tax dollars wisely.

On the matter of establishing public health guidelines, the level of confidence is highest in British Columbia (66%), followed by Quebec (63%), Atlantic Canada (also 63%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (58%), Ontario (52%) and Alberta (45%).

Across the country, 84% of Canadians believe that COVID-19 is “definitely” or “probably” a real threat, while 12% disagree with this assessment.

Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election are more likely to be skeptical of the threat posed by COVID-19 (20%) than those who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP) (11%) or the Liberal Party (8%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 17 to May 19, 2021, among 1,000 Canadian adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Satisfaction with COVID-19 Management Falls Across Canada

Fewer than half of Ontarians and Albertans are content with the way their provincial governments have handled the pandemic.

Vancouver, BC [April 5, 2021] – The proportion of Canadians who are pleased with the way the federal government has managed the pandemic has dropped to the lowest level recorded, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 51% of Canadians are satisfied with the way the federal government has dealt with COVID-19, down seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January.

A slightly higher proportion of Canadians are content with how their municipal governments (54%, -6) and their own provincial government (53%, -5) have handled the pandemic.

British Columbia continues to have the highest level of satisfaction among the four most populous provinces (65%, -7), followed by Quebec (58%, -7). The rating is significantly lower for Ontario (45%, -8) and Alberta (37%, +3).

Almost half of Canadians (47%, +14) think the worst of the pandemic is “definitely” or “probably” behind us, while one third (33%, -17) believe the worst of COVID-19 is “definitely” or “probably” ahead of us.

Practically four-in-five Canadians (79%, +5) are either already vaccinated against COVID-19 or will “definitely” or “probably” be inoculated when they get the chance, while 14% (-2) would not and 8% (-1) are not sure.

In December 2020, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) stated that it expected to have enough COVID-19 vaccine doses to inoculate every willing Canadian by the end of September 2021.

This month, half of Canadians (50%, +5 since a similar Research Co. survey completed in February) think the September vaccination goal set by the PHAC will be attained, while almost two-in-five (38%, -8) believe it will not be reached.

Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election are significantly more likely to think that the federal government’s vaccination goal will be attained (66%) than those who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (48%) and the Conservative Party (35%).

A majority of Canadians (54%, +3) are content with the vaccination plans and phases outlined by their province. The level of satisfaction on this matter is highest in Quebec (64%, +11), followed by Atlantic Canada (63%, +9), British Columbia (57%, +1), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (53%, -4), Alberta (46%, +4) and Ontario (44%, -1).

The results are lower when Canadians are asked about the pace of vaccination efforts in their province. Almost half of Canadians (48%, +7) are satisfied, while 41% (-8) are dissatisfied.

Quebec also has the highest level of satisfaction on the pace of vaccination efforts (60%, +14), followed by Atlantic Canada (56%, +14), British Columbia (50%, +5), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (46%, +6), Alberta (45%,+8) and Ontario (37%, +3).

Almost half of Canadians (48%, +2) are content with the procurement of vaccines from the federal government, while 43% (=) are not. 

While sizeable proportions of Canadians continue to voice support for specific travel restrictions, the proportions are lower this month than in January.

More than four-in-five Canadians are in favour of keeping the border with the United States closed to non-essential travel (83%, -5) and placing all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period (82%, -8).

In addition, 74% of Canadians (-6) are in favour of forbidding non-essential travel from one province to another, and 66% (-6) agree with prohibiting non-essential travel inside their own province.

More than four-in-five Canadians (83%, -5) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside.

There is a slight drop in the proportion of Canadians who are wearing a mask every time they go out (77%, -4). Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to always be taking this measure (83%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (77%) and aged 18-to-34 (72%). 

Across the country, 29% of Canadians (=) are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection, while 19% (-2) are not ordering food from restaurants at all for the same reason.

Compared to January, fewer Canadians report overeating (25%, -5) or drinking alcohol more often at home (14%, -4). Almost one-in-five (18%, +1) admit that they are losing their temper more often.

One-in-ten Canadians (10%, =) continue to acknowledge that they are brushing their teeth less often than before COVID-19, while 17% (-1) are having showers or baths less often.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted on March 29 and March 30, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Support Boycotting the Beijing Winter Olympics

Almost half of Canadians think it is “not safe” to hold the Summer Olympics in Tokyo, Japan, later this year.

Vancouver, BC [April 1, 2021] – More than half of Canadians believe the country’s athletes should not take part in the 2022 Winter Olympics over China’s human rights record, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 54% of Canadians think the country should boycott the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing, while 24% believe it should not and 21% are not sure.

The 2022 Winter Olympics will be held in Beijing, China, in February of next year. Over the past few months, there have been calls for athletes and Olympic Committees around the world to boycott the games.

Support for a Canadian boycott of the next Winter Olympics is highest among men (57%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (61%), but also encompasses 51% of women, 53% of Canadians aged 18-to-34 and 50% of Canadians aged 35-to-54.

“The highest level of support for keeping Canadian athletes out of the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics is observed in Quebec (59%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is slightly lower in Alberta (56%), Ontario (54%), British Columbia (53%), Atlantic Canada (51%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (50%).”

Majorities of Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (62%), the Liberal Party (59%) and the Conservative Party (57%) in the 2019 federal election are in favour of a Canadian boycott of the 2022 Winter Olympics.

Support for a boycott of the Beijing Winter Olympics reaches 49% among Canadians of East Asian descent. Majorities of respondents who describe their ancestry as European (56%) or South Asian (67%) are also in agreement.

The 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, Japan, were postponed to 2021 on account of the COVID-19 pandemic. The organizers have decided that only spectators from Japan will be allowed to attend the event this year. Almost two thirds of Canadians (65%) support this decision, while 18% are opposed and 16% are not sure.

Almost half of Canadians (49%) think it is “not safe” to hold the Summer Olympics in Tokyo later this year—including 52% of women and 55% of Canadians aged 55 and over.

In a survey conducted by Research Co. in December 2020, 19% of Canadians held a positive opinion of China and 71% held a positive opinion of Japan. 

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on March 27 and March 28, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Liberals Stay Ahead as Conservative Support Falls in Canada

Two-in-five Canadians think Justin Trudeau would make the best Prime Minister, as Erin O’Toole drops to 15% on this question.

Vancouver, BC [March 18, 2021] – Public support for the governing Liberal Party remains stable in Canada since the end of last year, while fewer voters are willing to cast a ballot for the Conservative Party, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 37% of decided voters in Canada would back the Liberal candidate in their constituency if a federal election were held tomorrow, unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2020.

The Conservatives are in second place with 28% (-3), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (=), the Bloc Québécois with 7% (=), the Green Party with 6% (+3) and the People’s Party with 1% (=).

The Liberals hold a three-point edge over the Conservatives among male decided voters (34% to 31%). Among female decided voters, the Liberals are also first (40%), with the Conservatives and New Democrats tied at 24%.

Support for the Liberal Party is strongest among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (41%, with the NDP in second place with 27%). The governing party is also ahead among decided voters aged 35-to-54 (35%, with the Conservatives at 30%) and aged 55 and over (37% to 29%).

More than two-in-five decided voters in Atlantic Canada (46%), Quebec (43%) and Ontario (42%) are currently backing the Liberals, while the Conservatives are leading in Alberta (46%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (41%). In British Columbia, the New Democrats are slightly ahead of the Liberals (31% to 29%), with the Conservatives in third place (26%).

The approval rating for Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau stands at 56% this month (+1) and is higher among women (60%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (67%).

A third of Canadians (33%, -2) are satisfied with the performance of Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole, a proportion that jumps to 47% among Albertans.

“In September 2020, Canadians were divided in three identical groups when assessing O’Toole’s performance as leader,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Since then, disapproval has risen by 12 points to 46%, and the level of undecideds has fallen from 33% to 21%.”

Since December, the approval rating for NDP leader Jagmeet Singh remains stable (46%, =). The numbers improved for Green Party leader Annamie Paul (30%, +5) and fell slightly for People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (15%, -2).

Trudeau maintains a sizeable advantage over his rivals when Canadians are asked who would make the best prime minister of the country (40%, +1). O’Toole is a distant second on this question with 15% (-7), followed by Singh (12%, -1), Paul (3%, +1), Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (2%, =) and Bernier (2%, -1).

A third of Canadians (33%, +5) believe health care is the most important issue facing the country today, followed by the economy and jobs (24%, -3), COVID-19 (11%, -4), housing, homelessness and poverty (9%, =) and the environment (7%, +1).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from March 13 to March 15, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

One-in-Four Albertans Support Becoming an Independent Nation

The idea of independence is more appealing to the province’s residents if Saskatchewan and British Columbia join in.

Vancouver, BC [February 16, 2021] – Support for the formation of a country independent of Canada grows in both Alberta and Saskatchewan if British Columbia is included in the territory, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative sample of Canadians in the three western provinces gauged support for sovereignty under various scenarios.

The idea of an independent country that would encompass British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan is appealing to 29% of both Albertans and Saskatchewanians, but only to 12% of British Columbians.

Almost half of Albertans who voted for the United Conservative Party (UCP) in the 2019 provincial election (47%), more than a third of men in Saskatchewan (35%) and almost three-in-ten residents of Northern BC (28%) voice support for an independent country encompassing the three western provinces.

In this survey, one-in-four Albertans (25%) are in favour of their province becoming a country independent from Canada. This level of support is consistent with what was observed in similar questions asked by Research Co. in December 2018 (25%) but lower than the numbers registered in July 2019 (30%).

Fewer than one-in-six residents of Saskatchewan (16%) and British Columbia (12%) are in favour of their respective provinces becoming sovereign on their own.

When asked about the possibility of an independent nation encompassing Alberta and Saskatchewan, one-in-four Albertans (26%) and one-in-five Saskatchewanians (21%) are in favour.

Only 13% of British Columbians agree with the prospect of forming a sovereign nation with Alberta. While 18% of Albertans support their province joining the United States, only 7% of British Columbians concur.

Residents of the three provinces were also asked about their perceptions of specific levels of government. At least three-in-five Saskatchewanians (62%) and British Columbians (60%) consider their own provincial government as “very responsive” or moderately responsive” to their needs and the needs of other residents. In Alberta, only 43% of respondents feel the same way.

“In Alberta, the criticism towards the provincial government is not coming exclusively from supporters of opposition parties,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Half of those who voted for the UCP in 2019 (50%) believe that the current administration is responsive, but two-in-five (41%) do not.”

The responsiveness of local governments was rated positively by majorities of residents in each of the three provinces (64% in Saskatchewan, 60% in British Columbia and 58% in Alberta). 

While more than two-in-five British Columbians (45%) believe the federal government is responsive to their needs, the proportion drops to 32% in Alberta and 26% in Saskatchewan.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from February 7 to February 9, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia, 600 adults in Alberta and 600 adults in Saskatchewan. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in each province. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for British Columbia and +/- 4.0 percentage points for Alberta and Saskatchewan, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables for British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Want Data Access and Decorum in Legislature

More than three-in-five of the province’s residents believe it is time to eliminate heckling during Question Period.

Vancouver, BC [January 29, 2021] – Many residents of British Columbia are on board with some changes recently suggested by the outgoing Speaker of the Legislative Assembly, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In December, Darryl Plecas—who served as speaker from  September 2017 to December 2020—issued a report outlining several recommendations for the future of the Legislative Assembly.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, four-in-five British Columbians (80%) are in favour of providing public access, wherever possible, to the data and information being used to make decisions in accessible and manageable ways.

In addition, seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%) agree with establishing a non-partisan “fact-checker” of statements made by MLAs in the Chamber, and more than three-in-five (63%) want to develop strategies for civic organizations to engage with the Legislative Assembly.

There is also wide support for specific measures aimed at fostering respectful behaviour inside the legislature. More than half of British Columbians (57%) support establishing an all-party parliamentary committee to examine parliamentary decorum, including heckling. This includes majorities of British Columbians who voted for the BC Green Party (57%), the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (62%) and the BC Liberals (66%) in last year’s provincial election.

There is no definite consensus on what type of behaviour British Columbians would like to banish from Question Period in the legislature. While only 41% of British Columbians would eliminate clapping, there is majority support for abandoning two other practices: the banging of desks (55%) and heckling (63%).

The idea of lowering the voting age for provincial elections to 16 years is supported by 28% of British Columbians, while 64% are opposed. 

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be in favour of lowering the voting age (38%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (31%) and aged 55 and over (17%).

“There is very little opposition from British Columbians to the proposals that seek to address information transparency and public participation in the legislature,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The most contentious idea is the one related to lowering the voting age.”

In a two-country survey conducted by Research Co. in November 2020, 62% of Canadians and 58% of Americans rejected the notion of allowing people aged 16 and 17 to vote in federal elections.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from January 16 to January 18, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Would Ban Non-Essential Travel During Pandemic

Practically three-in-four of the country’s residents say they will “definitely” or “probably” take a COVID-19 vaccine.

Vancouver, BC [January 25, 2021] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians believe it would be wise to impose travel restrictions inside and across provinces during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 80% of Canadians agree with prohibiting non-essential travel from one province to another. 

In addition, 72% of Canadians are in favour of prohibiting non-essential travel inside their own province—a proportion that rises to 78% among those aged 55 and over and 81% among those who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election.

During the holiday season, some elected politicians travelled outside of their home province in contravention of a federal public health guidance to avoid all non-essential travel.

Three-in-five Canadians (61%) think this is a very serious offence and want elected politicians who travelled during the holiday season to resign from their legislatures or face a recall vote.

Nine-in-ten Canadians (90%) are in favour of placing all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period and a similarly high proportion (88%) would keep the border with the United States closed to non-essential travel.

While 51% of Canadians agree with allowing K-12 students to go back to in-class learning in their province, 39% disagree with this course of action.

Almost three-in-four Canadians (74%, +1 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November) say they will “definitely” or “probably” take a vaccine against COVID-19, while 16% (+2) would not and 9% (-4) are not sure.

Almost nine-in-ten Canadians (88%) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside. Slightly fewer respondents (81%) say they wear a mask every time they leave their home.

Across the country, 58% of Canadians (-5) are satisfied with the way the federal government has managed the COVID-19 pandemic. Similar proportions of residents are content with the performance of their provincial governments (58%, -6) and their municipal governments (60%, -2).

Satisfaction with the way provincial administrations have handled the pandemic is highest in British Columbia (72%, +2), followed by Quebec (65%, -3), Ontario (53%, -15) and Alberta (34%, -12).

When it comes to personal behaviours to prevent infection, about three-in-ten Canadians (29%) say they clean the groceries they buy and 21% do not order food from restaurants at all.

This month saw increases in the proportion of Canadians who say they are overeating or eating more than usual at home (30%, +9), drinking alcohol more often (18%, +6) and losing their temper more often (17%, +2).

In addition, 18% of Canadians (+5) are having baths or showers less often than before the pandemic and one-in-ten (10%, +3) are brushing their teeth less often.

Half of Canadians (50%, -14) believe the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic is “definitely” or “probably” ahead of us, while 33% (+11) think the worst is “definitely” or “probably” behind us.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from January 18 to January 20, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Positive Perceptions on China Plummet to New Low in Canada

Two-in-five Canadians hold favourable views on the United States, up 10 points since July 2020.

Vancouver, BC [January 8, 2021] – Just under one-in-five Canadians currently have a favourable view of the People’s Republic of China, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, only 19% of Canadians hold a positive opinion of China, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in July 2020. Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%, +3) hold negative views on this particular country.

One-in-four Atlantic Canadians (25%) have a favourable opinion of China. The rating is lower in Quebec (23%), British Columbia (20%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (19%), Ontario (16%) and Alberta (13%).

“Canadians aged 55 and over are the least likely to currently have a positive view of China (16%)”, says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are slightly higher among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (19%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (25%).”

At least three-in-five Canadians currently have favourable views on seven different nations: the United Kingdom (78%, +5), Italy (75%, +6), Germany (72%, +5), Japan (71%, +1), France (71%, +1), South Korea (60%, -1) and Mexico (51%, -3).

Just over two-in-five Canadians hold a positive opinion of India (44%, +7) and the United States (42%, +10).

Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election are more likely to have a favourable view of India (54%) than those who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP) (44%) or the Conservative Party (35%).

In Canada, positive views on the United States are highest among men (47%), Albertans (54%) and those who voted for the Conservatives in the last federal ballot (61%).

Significantly fewer women (36%), Quebecers (37%) and British Columbians (36%) hold a favourable opinion on the United States, along with Canadians who voted for the Liberals (38%) or the New Democrats in 2019 (24%) 

Fewer than a third of Canadians have a positive view of five other countries: Venezuela (31%, -2), Russia (26%, =), Saudi Arabia (23%, +3), Iran (15%, -2) and North Korea (12%, -1).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 12 to December 14, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views on Safety in British Columbia Unchanged Since 2019

Four-in-five residents support enacting municipal bans on handguns and military-style assault weapons.

Vancouver, BC [January 5, 2021] – The perceptions of British Columbians on the possibility of being affected by criminal activity have not gone through a significant fluctuation over the past year and a half, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two thirds of British Columbians (68%) say they would feel “very safe” or “moderately safe” walking alone in their own neighbourhood after dark—unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2019.

More than seven-in-ten residents of the Fraser Valley (72%) and Metro Vancouver (71%) say they would feel safe walking alone in their own neighbourhood after dark, compared to 67% in Southern BC and 56% in both Vancouver Island and Northern BC.

Just over two-in-five British Columbians (41%, +1 since August 2019) say they fear becoming victims of a crime in their community “a great deal” or “a fair amount”, while almost three-in-five (58%) do not.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to fear becoming victims of crime (53%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (46%) and aged 55 and over (33%).

When asked about the current situation regarding crime in their community, more than a third of British Columbians blame addiction and mental health issues (45%) and gangs and the illegal drug trade (38%).

Smaller proportions of the province’s residents point the finger at poverty and inequality (26%), an inadequate court system (26%), lack of values and the improper education for youth (24%),  a bad economy and unemployment (19%), insufficient policing and a lack of resources to combat crime (16%) and immigrants and minorities (9%).

In April, 27% of British Columbians suggested that insufficient policing was one of the factors to blame for criminal activity in their community,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In December, only 16% feel the same way.” 

Four-in-five British Columbians (80%, +1 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in September 2018) support enacting a ban on handguns within the limits of their municipality, while a slightly higher proportion (83%, -3) would prohibit military-style assault weapons.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 14 to December 16, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca