Criticism Towards Trudeau Increases in Western Canada

The proportion of Albertans who think the province would be better off as its own country fell to 26%.

Vancouver, BC [February 1, 2023] – Just over half of Canadians think their province would benefit from a change in the federal government, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Canadians think their province would be better off with a different Prime Minister in Ottawa, up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2022.

Majorities of Canadians who reside in Alberta (66%, +2), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (65%, +5), British Columbia (57%, +4)  and Ontario (52%, +4) believe their provinces would be better off with someone other than Justin Trudeau in charge. The proportions are lower in Atlantic Canada (44%, -8) and Quebec (42%, -3).

“Canadians aged 35-to-54 (56%) are more likely to believe that a change in the federal government would be beneficial to their province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The rating is slightly lower among their counterparts aged 55 and over (51%) and aged 18-to-34 (50%)”

Just over half of Canadians (51%, unchanged) believe their province would be better off with a different premier in charge.

Compared to June 2022, animosity towards Ontario’s Doug Ford has risen from 43% to 57%, while it has dropped for Quebec’s François Legault from 48% to 45%. These two premiers earned majorities in provincial elections held in June and October respectively.

In British Columbia, there is little change in the results posted by John Horgan in June (41%) and David Eby this month (40%). In Alberta, 55% of respondents think the province would be better off with a premier other than Danielle Smith. In June, 65% of Albertans felt this way about Jason Kenney.

The proportion of Albertans who think their province would be better off as its own country fell to 26% this month, down seven points since June and well below the all-time high of 40% registered in December 2019.

Separatist sentiment also dropped in Quebec, from 32% in June to 29% this month.

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians (17%, =) believe their province would be better off joining the United States and becoming an American state—a proportion that rises to 21% in Alberta.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from January 20 to January 22, 2023, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Optimistic About New Housing Regulations

Almost half of the province’s residents think the actions will be effective in making housing more affordable.

Vancouver, BC [January 27, 2022] – Practically half of British Columbians think the housing measures recently announced by the provincial government will help residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 48% of British Columbians believe the actions will be effective in making housing more affordable, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2021.

Just over two-in-five British Columbians (41%, -2) believe the actions of the provincial government will be ineffective, while 11% (-5) are undecided.

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians agree with three policies related to housing recently outlined by the provincial government: building more modular supportive homes in areas where people are experiencing homelessness (78%), implementing a three-business-day protection period for financing and home inspections (71%) and capping rent increases in 2023 at 2% (also 71%).

Majorities of British Columbians are also in favour of two other recent measures: ending most strata age restrictions (64%) and removing strata rental restrictions (59%).

Support remains high for the policies implemented by the provincial government before 2022, such as increasing the foreign buyers tax from 15% to 20% (77%, +2), expanding the foreign buyers tax to areas located outside of Metro Vancouver (75%, =) and introducing a “speculation tax” in specific urban areas targeting foreign and domestic homeowners who pay little or no income tax in BC, and those who own second properties that aren’t long-term rentals (72%, +2).

Most British Columbians also continue to agree with the introduction of a tax of 0.2% on the value of homes between $3 million and $4 million, and a tax rate of 0.4% on the portion of a home’s value that exceeds $4 million (68%, -1) and with the decision to increase the property transfer tax from 3% to 5% for homes valued at more than $3 million. The 5% portion only applies to the value greater than $3 million (65%, -2).

Just over seven-in-ten British Columbians (71%) support the federal government’s decision to ban non-Canadians (with exclusions for international students and temporary residents) from purchasing residential properties in Canada for the next two years.

More than three-in-five British Columbians (61%) think the federal government should tie immigration numbers to affordable housing targets and new housing starts.

“There is no political divide in British Columbia on the idea that housing and immigration should go hand-in-hand,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Sizeable majorities of residents who voted for the BC Liberals (63%), the BC Green Party (62%) and the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (59%) in the 2020 provincial election want the federal government to do its part.”

A majority of British Columbians (57%) call on the provincial government to implement a $400 renters’ rebate for households earning up to $80,000 a year. This proposed measure is particularly popular among those who currently rent (72%).

Only 30% of British Columbians would consent to the cancellation of the home owner grant, which reduces the amount of property tax people pay for their principal residence. Among respondents who own their primary residence, support for this policy stands at 23%.

Three-in-five British Columbians (60%) agree that municipal governments should immediately dismantle any encampment or “tent city” located within their municipality—a proportion that rises to 66% among those aged 55 and over.

Almost half of British Columbians (49%, -6 since a Research Co. survey conducted in December 2021) trust the provincial government under the BC NDP to deliver affordable housing in British Columbia. The rating is lower for prospective provincial administrations headed by the BC Greens (39%, +6) or the BC Liberals (33%, -3).

At the federal level, confidence on affordable housing is highest for a potential federal government headed by the NDP (40%, -11) than administrations assembled by the Liberal Party (37%, -2) or the Conservative Party (31%, -1).

Trust in municipal governments to deliver affordable housing stands at 46% in British Columbia this month (-1). Confidence remains higher for not-for-profit developers (49%, =) than for for-profit developers (21%, +2).

Methodology:Results are based on an online study conducted on January 9 to January 11, 2023, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Grow Pessimistic on Economy and Personal Finances

More than four-in-five Canadians expect to pay more for a week’s worth of groceries.

Vancouver, BC [January 20, 2023] – The perceptions of Canadians on the financial status of both the country and their household have worsened over the past six months, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 62% of Canadians say the economic conditions in Canada right now are “bad” or “very bad”, up five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in July 2022.

Just over a third of Canadians (35%, -5) deem the country’s economic standing as “very good” or “good”.

Fewer than a third of residents of Alberta (27%, -5), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (28%, -2) and Atlantic Canada (29%, -7) hold positive views on the Canadian economy at this point. The rating is higher in Ontario (37%, +3), British Columbia (35%, -2) and Quebec (41%, -14).

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%, +4) expect the national economy to decline over the next six months, while 38% (-2) foresee no changes and only 13% (=) predict an improvement.

“Most Canadians aged 55 and over (51%) think an economic recovery in the next six months is unattainable,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (43%) and aged 18-to-34 (38%).”

Just over half of Canadians (51%, -6) rate their own personal finances today as “very good” or “good”, while 47% (+6) define them as “poor” or “very poor.”

Majorities of Canadians think certain items will be more expensive over the next six months, including a week’s worth of groceries (85%, +4), gasoline (67%, +6), a new car (65%, -3) and a new television set (54%, -3). In addition, 43% (-1) think the price of real estate will be higher.

There is little change in the level of confidence on the Prime Minister. This month, 42% of Canadians (+1) trust Justin Trudeau to do the right thing to help the economy. The ratings are lower for Governor of the Bank of Canada Tiff Macklem (34%, -3) and federal Leader of the Opposition Pierre Poilievre (33%).

Just over half of Canadians acknowledge having worried “frequently” or “occasionally” about two financial matters in the past couple of months: the value of their investments (52%, +2) and the safety of their savings (also 52%, +2).

Fewer Canadians have been concerned “frequently” or “occasionally” about unemployment affecting their household (37%, +3), being able to pay their mortgage or rent (34%, =) or their employer running into serious financial trouble (29%, +5).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on January 13 to January 15, 2023, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Russia and North Korea Thoroughly Disliked by Canadians

At least seven-in-ten Canadians hold positive views on the United Kingdom, Italy, Japan and France. 

Vancouver, BC [January 17, 2023] – Two nations are clearly at the bottom when Canadians are asked to voice their feelings about 15 different countries, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, only 11% of Canadians have a positive opinion of Russia and North Korea.

“More than nine-in-ten Canadians aged 55 and over (93%) currently have a negative view of the Russian Federation,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of Canadians aged 35-to-54 (78%) and aged 18-to-34 (68%) feel the same way.”

Fewer than one-in-four Canadians have a positive opinion of Saudi Arabia (23%, -1 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2022), China (18%, -2) and Iran (13%, -3).

About one-in-four Atlantic Canadians (24%) hold positive views on China. The proportions are lower in Ontario (21%), Alberta (18%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (16%), British Columbia (also 16%) and Quebec (13%).

The perceptions of Canadians remain favourable for most fellow members of the G7, including the United Kingdom (74%, +1), Italy (71%, -2), Japan (70%, +1), France (also 70%, +1) and Germany (69%, -1).

Almost three-in-five Canadians (57%, -2) hold positive views on South Korea. The numbers are lower for Mexico (49%, -1), India (41%, +4) and Venezuela (30%, -1).

More than half of Canadians (54%, -2) have a positive view of the United States, while just under two-in-five (39%, +4) hold negative feelings.

Favourable opinions on the United States are highest in three Canadian regions: Quebec (55%, +1), Atlantic Canada (also 55%, +2) and Ontario (55%, -4), followed by British Columbia (52%, +4), Alberta (50%, -7) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (48%, -12).

Only 45% of Canadians (+2) who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) in 2021 hold positive views on the United States. The proportions are higher among their counterparts who supported the Liberal Party (61%, -5) or the Conservative Party (58%, -12) in the last federal election.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on January 2 to January 4, 2023, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Call for Action to Revamp the Justice System

Fewer than one-in-five of the province’s residents give the justice system high grades.

Vancouver, BC [December 28, 2022] – Residents of British Columbia are not particularly satisfied with the justice system, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, only 19% of British Columbians rate the justice system with a grade of 8, 9 or 10, while a larger proportion (25%) rate it as a 1, 2 or 3.

Half of the province’s residents (50%) provide grades ranging from 4 to 7 to the justice system.

“More than one-in-ten British Columbians (13%) give the lowest grade available to the justice system,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This includes 17% of British Columbians aged 55 and over and 23% of residents of Indigenous descent.”

More than four-in-five British Columbians (82%) think the justice system needs more resources because it takes too long to get cases dealt with.

Sizeable majorities of British Columbians who voted for the BC Liberals (88%), the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (85%) and the BC Green Party (73%) in the 2020 provincial election agree on calling for additional resources for the justice system.

Just under four-in-five British Columbians (79%) say the outcome of cases depends heavily on how good your lawyer is.

For almost three-in-four British Columbians (74%), the justice system is too soft on offenders when it comes to criminal cases—a proportion that jumps to 85% among those aged 55 and over.

Most British Columbians (58%) agree that the justice system has not done enough to address bias against Indigenous Canadians. Majorities of residents of Indigenous (72%), South Asian (61%), East Asian (60%) and European ancestry (51%) agree on this question.

Just under half of British Columbians (47%) have interacted with the justice system. One-in-ten (10%) went to small claims court, while more dealt with cases related to proceedings of criminal (17%), family (20%) or traffic and bylaw (22%) natures.

Majorities of British Columbians say the resolution during their last interaction with three components of the justice system was fair: traffic and bylaw (59%), small claims (53%) and family (also 53%).

British Columbians who interacted with the criminal justice system are split in their assessment of their last experience, with 46% calling the resolution fair and 45% deeming it unfair.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 16 to December 18, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca
 
Photo Credit: Wpcpey

Majority of Canadians Expect to Eventually Vote for Senators

One third would prefer to reform the Senate to allow for elections, while fewer favour abolishment or keeping the status quo.

Vancouver, BC [December 23, 2022] – While Canadians do not reach consensus about the best way to proceed with the upper house, more than half think voters will one day be able to choose the members of the Red Chamber, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 56% of Canadians (+2 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in February 2020) expect to one day be able to directly elect their senators, while 28% (-1) disagree and 17% (=) are not sure.

“Expectations of an elected Senate of Canada are highest in Alberta (64%), British Columbia (60%) and Ontario (59%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents of Atlantic Canada (52%), Quebec (49%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (49%) are more skeptical.”

One-in-four Canadians (24%, -3) think Canada does not need a Senate and want all legislation to be reviewed and authorized by the House of Commons—a proportion that reaches 35% among those aged 55 and over.

Just under one-in-ten Canadians (9%, =) believe Canada needs a Senate and the current guidelines that call for appointed senators should not be modified.

Fewer than half of Canadians (45%, =) think Canada needs a Senate, but Canadians should be allowed to take part in the process to choose senators.

When asked to consider specific options for the Red Chamber, only 6% of Canadians support allowing the Prime Minister to appoint senators, while 17% favour having a selection committee that would appoint non-partisan senators.

One third of Canadians (33%) would reform the Senate to allow Canadians to directly elect the members of the upper house, while 14% would abolish the Red Chamber altogether.

Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the last federal election are significantly more likely to support Senate reform (50%) than those who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (38%) and the Liberal Party (28%) in 2021.

Since 2015, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has only named senators that were recommended by an arm’s-length advisory body and not directly appointed by him.

Fewer than three-in-ten Canadians (28%, -9) think the changes implemented by Trudeau have made the Senate of Canada better than it was before he took office, while 31% (-1) see no change and 20% (+4) believe the situation is now worse.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on December 10 to December 12, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Pick “Merry Christmas” as Preferred Greeting

For the first time since 2018, more than half of the country’s residents foresee a holiday season with more fun than stress.

Vancouver, BC [December 20, 2022] – While the proportion of Canadians who are fond of saying “Happy Holidays” has risen since 2018, most of the country’s residents continue to rely on “Merry Christmas”, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 64% of Canadians say “Merry Christmas” is their preferred greeting for the season, up two points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in December 2021.

Just over one-in-five Canadians (21%, +1) say they prefer using “Happy Holidays”, while 15% (-3) are not sure or do not care either way.

Since 2018, the proportion of Canadians who prefer “Merry Christmas” has fallen by 10 points, while the number of those who rely on “Happy Holidays” has increased by seven points.

“Only 14% of Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in 2021 prefer to say Happy Holidays,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are higher among Canadians who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP) (22%) or the Liberal Party (24%).”

More than half of Canadians (52%, +3) say they expect the current holiday season to be “more fun than stressful”, while three-in-ten (29%, +2) think it will be “more stressful than fun.”

Four groups are more likely to predict a stressful holiday season in 2022: women (31%), Canadians aged 35-to-54 (33%), Atlantic Canadians (40%) and NDP voters in 2021 (35%).

At least three-in-five Canadians say they like three staples of holiday meals: turkey (84%, =), cranberry sauce (64%, =) and Brussels sprouts (60%, -2).

A majority of Canadians enjoy fruit cake (55%, -1) and egg nog (also 55%, +1), while fewer like mince pies (48%, -2), plum pudding (42%, -1) and mulled wine (36%, +2).

Egg nog is equally popular in Alberta (60%), British Columbia (59%), Atlantic Canada (also 59%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (58%) and Ontario (also 58%), but drops to 43% in Quebec.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on December 10 to December 12, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Think We Have Seen the Worst of COVID-19

Satisfaction with provincial governments remains higher in British Columbia and Quebec than in Ontario and Alberta.

Vancouver, BC [December 16, 2022] – Fewer than one-in-five Canadians are currently concerned about the possibility of declining conditions on account of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-four Canadians (75%) say the worst of the pandemic is “behind us”, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2022.

Only 17% of Canadians (-3) think the worst of COVID-19 is ahead of us, while 9% (-3) are not sure.

For seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) COVID-19 remains a real threat—a proportion that rises to 78% among those aged 55 and over and to 82% among those who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2021 federal election.

“We continue to see cautious optimism when Canadians think about COVID-19,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Significant majorities of Canadians are both convinced that the situation will not worsen but still consider the virus a real threat.”

Almost three-in-five Canadians (59%, +4) are satisfied with the way the federal government has dealt with COVID-19, while 58% (-1) feel the same way about their municipal government.

Most Canadians (58%, +5) are satisfied with how their provincial government has managed the pandemic. Among the four most populous provinces, the rating is highest in British Columbia (68%, +6), followed by Quebec (62%, +4), Ontario (54%, +6) and Alberta (46%, +7).

Since May 2022, satisfaction with the way federal chief public health officer Theresa Tam has managed the pandemic dropped from 66% to 60%. The average rating is similar for the country’s provincial health officers or chief medical officers (61%, -5).

In two provinces, the satisfaction rating for top doctors fell since May: Luc Boileau in Quebec (60%, -6) and Kieran Moore in Ontario (59%, -8). Two thirds of British Columbians (66%, +3) are satisfied with the work of Bonnie Henry.

In Alberta, the rating for Deena Hinshaw stood at 65% in May. This month, 53% of Albertans are satisfied with the way recently appointed chief medical officer of heath Mike Joffe is managing the pandemic.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on December 10 to December 12, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

A Third of Canadians Would Remove All Statues of Sir John

More than half of the country’s residents think the removal of statues of colonial figures is an attack on Canadian history.

Vancouver, BC [December 2, 2022] – Most Canadians are not particularly satisfied with the idea of withdrawing existing monuments from public view, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 54% of Canadians believe the removal of statues of colonial figures is an attack on Canadian history, while 21% disagree and 14% are undecided.

Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to feel that removing statues of colonial figures is an attack on the country’s history (61%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (54%) and aged 18-to-34 (48%).

Some municipalities—including Charlottetown, Kingston, Regina and Victoria—have removed statues of Sir John A. Macdonald, Canada’s first prime minister.

While just under a third of Canadians (32%) think all statues of Macdonald should be withdrawn from public view, almost half (47%) disagree and 20% are not sure.

Support for keeping statues of Macdonald in place is highest in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (55%), followed by Alberta (51%), Ontario (also 51%), Atlantic Canada (50%), British Columbia (48%) and Quebec (38%).

“Two thirds of Conservative Party voters in the 2021 federal election (65%) are against the removal of all monuments depicting Sir John A. Macdonald,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Two-in-five Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (41%) or the New Democratic Party (NDP) (40%) in the last election feel the same way.”

Across the country, 45% of Canadians have a favourable opinion of Sir John A. Macdonald, while 22% hold unfavourable views.

Positive opinions on Macdonald reach 51% in Ontario, but are lower in Alberta (45%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (44%), Atlantic Canada (43%), Quebec (42%) and British Columbia (36%).

Macdonald holds a higher favourability rating than five other former prime ministers included in the survey: John Diefenbaker (42%), Wilfrid Laurier (41%), William Lyon Mackenzie King (38%), Louis St. Laurent (33%) and Robert Borden (29%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 26, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca
 
Photo Credit: Nhl4hamilton (Rick Cordeiro)

Most Canadians Oblivious to Acts Proposed by Western Premiers

Half of residents (50%) agree with what Saskatchewan is trying to accomplish, while 39% feel the same way about Alberta’s actions.

Vancouver, BC [November 11, 2022] – Few Canadians are actively following stories related to the recent pronouncements issued by the premiers of Alberta and Saskatchewan, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 37% of Canadians say they are paying close attention to the Alberta Sovereignty Act.

Just over three-in-ten Canadians (31%) are following stories related to the Saskatchewan First Act “very closely” or “moderately closely”

The Alberta Sovereignty Act proposed by Premier Danielle Smith seeks to allow the province to refuse to follow specific federal laws if they are deemed not to be in Alberta’s best interests.

The Saskatchewan First Act proposed by Premier Scott Moe seeks to confirm Saskatchewan’s autonomy and exclusive jurisdiction over its natural resources.

“Half of Conservative Party voters in the last Canadian federal election (50%) are keeping an eye on news related to the Alberta Sovereignty Act,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower among Canadians who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (36%) or the Liberal Party (35%) in 2021.”

Just over half of Canadians (51%) are concerned about the Alberta Sovereignty Act, while 45% feel the same way about the Saskatchewan First Act.

Half of Canadians (50%) think the Government of Saskatchewan is right to confirm its autonomy and exclusive jurisdiction over its natural resources, while 27% disagree with this notion and 22% are undecided.

On a regional basis, residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (60%) and Alberta (57%) agree with the principle of the Saskatchewan First Act, along with 48% of those who live in Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia.

Only 34% of Canadians think the Government of Alberta is right to refuse to follow specific federal laws if they are deemed not to be in Alberta’s best interests, while 42% disagree with this assessment and 21% are not sure.

Just over half of Albertans (52%) agree with the ideals behind the Alberta Sovereignty Act. The numbers are lower in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (43%), British Columbia and Ontario (38% each), Atlantic Canada (34%) and Quebec (33 %).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from November 4 to November 6, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Florida and Ohio Are Red States in U.S. Midterm Election

Democratic incumbents in Illinois and New York head to Election Day with significant leads. 

Vancouver, BC [November 7, 2022] – The U.S. Senate contests in the states of Georgia, Nevada and Pennsylvania are remarkably close on the eve of the midterm election in the United States, according to a series of new polls conducted by Research Co. in ten American states.

The surveys of Americans who have already participated in the democratic process or plan to do so tomorrow also show Republican candidates dominating the Senate and Governor’s races in Florida and Ohio, and their Democratic counterparts with healthy leads in California, Illinois and New York

Arizona

In 2020, Democrat Mark Kelly defeated Republican Martha McSally in a U.S. Senate special election with 51,2% of the vote. In this month’s contest, Kelly holds a four-point lead over GOP challenger Blake Masters (51% to 47%), with Libertarian Marc Victor at 2%.

In the Grand Canyon State’s gubernatorial election, Republican Kari Lake has a two-point edge over Democrat Katie Hobbs (51% to 49%).

California

Voters in California will take part in two U.S. Senate elections: a special contest to fill a seat until January 2023 and a regular contest to choose a Senator for a six-year term. In each election, Democrat Alex Padilla holds a sizeable advantage over Republican Mark Meuser (63% to 37%).

Incumbent Gavin Newsom of the Democratic Party has a 20-point lead over Republican challenger Brian Dahle in the gubernatorial election (60% to 40%).

Practically seven-in-ten decided voters in the Golden State (69%) say they will vote “Yes” on Proposition 1 which seeks to amend the California Constitution to expressly include an individual’s fundamental right to reproductive freedom.

Florida

In the Sunshine State, incumbent U.S. Senator Marco Rubio of the Republican Party has a double-digit advantage over Democratic challenger Val Demmings (54% to 44%).

Incumbent Governor Ron DeSantis is also heavily favoured to win a new term in office in his contest against former governor Charlie Crist (56% to 42%).

Georgia

The U.S. Senate election in the Peach State may have to be decided in a run-off, with Libertarian candidate Chase Oliver garnering the support of 1% of decided voters. Challenger Herschel Walker of the Republican Party and incumbent U.S. Senator Raphael Warnock of the Democratic Party are tied with 49% each.

In the gubernatorial election, incumbent Republican Brian Kemp has a seven-point lead over Democratic challenger Stacey Abrams (53% to 46%).

Illinois

Democrat Tammy Duckworth appears headed to a new six-year term in the U.S. Senate, with a sizeable advantage over Republican challenger Kathy Salvi (58% to 40%).

In the Prairie State’s gubernatorial race, incumbent Democrat J. B. Pritzker is 20 points ahead of Republican rival Darren Bailey (59% to 39%).

Nevada

Democratic U.S. Senator Catherine Cortez Masto, first elected in 2016, is trailing GOP challenger Adam Laxalt by a single point (48% to 49%).

In the Silver State’s gubernatorial election, incumbent Democrat Steve Sisolak is also slightly behind Republican contender Joe Lombardo (47% to 49%).

New York

Voters in the Empire State give incumbent U.S. Senator Chuck Schumer of the Democratic Party a substantial lead over GOP challenger Joe Pinion (59% to 39%).

In the gubernatorial election, former Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul of the Democratic Party has a double-digit lead over Republican candidate Lee Zeldin (55% to 45%).

Ohio

In the Buckeye State’s election to the U.S. Senate, J.D. Vance holds an eight-point advantage over Democrat Tim Ryan (54% to 46%).

Incumbent Republican Governor Mike DeWine has a larger lead over Democratic challenger Nan Whaley (61% to 39%).

Pennsylvania

In the race to replace retiring U.S. Senator Pat Toomey, Democratic candidate John Fetterman is barely ahead of Republican contender Mehmet Oz (49% to 48%).

The contest for the governor’s office in the Keystone State is not as tight. Democrat Josh Shapiro has a 12-point lead over Republican Doug Mastriano (55% to 43%).

Wisconsin

Incumbent Republican U.S. Senator Ron Johnson, first elected in 2010, has a six-point lead over Democratic rival Mandela Barnes in the Badger State (53% to 47%).

In the race for governor, incumbent Tony Evers of the Democratic Party and challenger Tim Michels of the Republican Party are tied with the support of 50% of decided voters each.

Methodology:
Results are based on online surveys conducted from November 4 to November 6, 2022, among representative samples of 450 likely voters in ten American states: Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Nevada, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age and gender in each state. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.6 percentage points for each state, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Conservatives Have Four-Point Lead Over Liberals in Canada

Canadians are evenly split when assessing the accomplishments of the Liberals and the NDP following their March 2022 agreement.

Vancouver, BC [October 31, 2022] – The opposition Conservative Party is ahead in Canada’s federal political scene, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 35% of decided voters would cast a ballot for the Conservative candidate in their constituency.

The governing Liberal Party is in second place with 31%, followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 19%, the Bloc Québécois with 8%, the Green Party with 4% and the People’s Party with 2%.

The Conservatives hold sizeable leads in their traditional strongholds of Alberta (51%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (47%) and are also first in Ontario (41%) and British Columbia (37%). The Liberals are leading in Quebec (38%, with the Bloc at 32%) and Atlantic Canada (38%).

“Among Canadian decided voters aged 55 and over, the Conservatives have a double-digit lead over the Liberals (41% to 30%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The race is much closer among younger voters.”

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%) approve of the performance of Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau while just over half (51%) disapprove.

The approval rating is higher this month for NDP leader Jagmeet Singh (46%, -5 since the last Research Co. survey conducted before the 2021 federal election).

More than a third of Canadians (37%) approve of the way Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Pierre Poilievre has handled his duties, while 44% disagree and 19% are undecided.

The numbers are lower for Green interim leader Amita Kuttner (22%), Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (20%, and 38% in Quebec) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (18%).

Practically three-in-ten Canadians (29%, +7 since September 2021) identify the economy and jobs as the most important issue facing Canada, followed by housing, homelessness and poverty (21%, +6), health care (also 21%, -6), the environment (7%, -3), accountability and leadership (5%, -1), immigration (4%, +1) and crime and public safety (also 4%, +1).

The economy and jobs is regarded as the most pressing federal concern for residents of Alberta (38%), Quebec (33%), Ontario (30%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 30%).

Health care is the prevalent issue for Atlantic Canadians (35%), while housing, homelessness and poverty is the most important matter in British Columbia (33%).

When asked which one of the six main party leaders would make the best prime minister of Canada, Trudeau holds a six-point advantage over Poilievre (30% to 24%), followed by Singh (17%), Blanchet (4%), Bernier (2%) and Kuttner (1%).

Residents of two provinces are almost evenly divided on whether Trudeau or Poilievre would be the best head of government for Canada right now. In Ontario, Poilievre is a point ahead of Trudeau (30% to 29%). In British Columbia, the current prime minister edges the opposition leader by the same margin (27% to 26%).

More than two-in-five Canadians (43%) say they are comfortable with Trudeau being charge of Canada’s economy, a proportion that rises to 45% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 52% in Quebec.

Just under two-in-five Canadians (39%) say they would be comfortable with Poilievre being charge of Canada’s economy, including 48% of Albertans and 43% of Ontarians.

There is no clear consensus on what the March 2022 supply and confidence agreement between the Liberals and the NDP has meant to Canada so far. Across the country, 44% are satisfied with the accomplishments of this deal, while the same proportion (44%) are dissatisfied.

Liberal voters in the 2021 federal election are significantly more likely to hold positive views on the March 2022 supply and confidence agreement (80%) than those who voted for the New Democrats (51%) or the Conservatives (13%).

The country is also divided on whether a federal election should be called in the next six months now that the Conservatives have a full time leader (Agree 44%, Disagree 41%).

Canadians who voted for the Conservatives in the last federal election are more convinced about the need to hold a fresh ballot now (73%) than their counterparts who supported the NDP (44%) or the Liberals (30%) in 2021.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 24 to October 26, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Ponder Future Effect of BC NDP Leadership Race

Women are more likely to support the BC New Democrats if David Eby replaces John Horgan as leader.

Vancouver, BC [October 18, 2022] – The governing BC New Democratic Party (NDP) remains ahead of the opposition BC Liberals in British Columbia’s political scene, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 44% of decided voters would support the BC NDP candidate in their constituency if a provincial ballot were held today, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in February.

The BC Liberals are in second place with 35% (-3), followed by the BC Green Party with 15% (+2) and the BC Conservative Party with 4% (+2).

More than half of British Columbians (57%, -12) approve of the way Premier and BC NDP leader John Horgan has handled his duties. The numbers are lower for both BC Liberals leader Kevin Falcon (36%, -2) and BC Greens leader Sonia Furstenau (35%, -1).

The survey also asked about the two prospective candidates seeking to replace Horgan at the helm of the BC NDP. Just over two-in-five British Columbians (42%) approve of David Eby, while three-in-ten (30%) feel the same way about Anjali Appadurai.

Across British Columbia, a third of residents (33%) say it makes no difference to them who becomes the next leader of the BC NDP, while one-in-five (25%) are undecided. Eby is ahead of Appadurai among all residents of the province (30% to 12%) and among those who voted for the BC New Democrats in the 2020 provincial election (42% to 11%).

Respondents to this poll were asked about four different scenarios that could materialize upon the conclusion of the BC NDP leadership race.

In a match-up with Eby as leader, 43% of decided voters would support the BC NDP and 34% would back the BC Liberals. The race becomes much closer if Appadurai supplants Horgan: 38% for the BC NDP and 36% for the BC Liberals.

“The BC NDP would have an easier time connecting with female voters with David Eby as leader,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support for the governing party among women stands at 51% with him and at 44% under Appadurai.”

The results are also different if either of the losing contenders in the BC NDP leadership race decided to create their own political parties.

With Eby as leader, the BC NDP would keep the upper hand over the BC Liberals (40% to 34%), with lower support for the BC Greens (15%), the BC Conservatives (6%) and a new political party led by Appadurai (3%).

An Appadurai-led BC NDP would be four points behind the BC Liberals (31% to 35%). The BC Greens would be third with 16%, followed by a new provincial party led by Eby (10%) and the BC Conservatives (6%).

When asked about the most important issue facing the province, almost two-in-five British Columbians (38%, +5) select housing, homelessness and poverty—a proportion that jumps to 43% among women and to 47% among those aged 18-to-34.

Health care is second on the list of concerns with 28% (+5), rising to 44% among British Columbians aged 55 and over. The economy and jobs is third on the list with 11% (-5), followed by crime and public safety (8%, +4) and the environment (6%, -4).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 9 to October 11, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Governing CAQ Heavily Favoured by Voters in Quebec

More than half of Quebecers approve of the way François Legault is handling his duties as premier.

Vancouver, BC [September 23, 2022] – The ruling Coalition Avenir Québec (CAQ) is the top choice of voters in the upcoming provincial ballot, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Quebecers, 40% of decided voters say they will support the CAQ candidate in their constituency in next month’s provincial election.

The Conservative Party of Quebec is second with 18%, followed by the Liberal Party of Quebec with 17%, Québec solidaire with 14% and the Parti Québécois (PQ) with 10%.

Support is particularly impressive for the CAQ among decided voters aged 55 and over (60%). The governing party is also ahead among decided voters aged 35-to-54 (35%) while Québec solidaire is first among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (31%).

“The CAQ is holding on to more than three-in-four of its voters (77%) in the 2018 provincial election,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The retention rates are decidedly lower for the Liberals (52%), Québec solidaire (50%) and the PQ (47%).”

More than half of Quebecers (57%) approve of the way Premier and CAQ leader François Legault has performed in his job. The rating is lower for Québec solidaire co-spokesperson Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois (37%), PQ leader Paul St-Pierre Plamondon (36%), Official Opposition and Liberal leader Dominique Anglade (33%) and Conservative leader Éric Duhaime (31%).

Legault is also ahead on the “Best Premier” question (43%), with Duhaime (13%), Anglade (11%), Nadeau-Dubois (10%) and  Plamondon (6%) far behind.

Among the five main party leaders, only Plamondon manages a positive momentum score at this stage of the campaign (+1). Nadeau-Dubois (-4), Legault (-11), Duhaime (-15) and Anglade (-15) are in negative territory.

More than two-in-five Quebecers (45%) identify health care as the most important issue facing the province—a proportion that rises to 58% among those aged 55 and over. Only two other issues reach double-digits at the province-wide level: the economy and jobs (16%) and housing, homelessness and poverty (12%).

Legault is seen as the best party leader to handle six issues: the economy and jobs (39%), health care (36%), accountability (also 36%), crime and public safety (33%), education (30%) and energy and pipelines (28%).

The numbers are tighter on two other concerns: housing, poverty and homelessness (Legault 27%, Nadeau-Dubois 23%) and the environment (Legault 23%, Nadeau-Dubois 22%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 19 to September 21, 2022, among 700 Quebec adults, including 616 decided voters in the 2022 provincial election. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points for the entire sample and +/- 3.9 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

More in Canada and U.S. Feel Climate Change is Major Crisis

Most Canadians and Americans are willing to pay higher taxes in order to adequately address global warming.

Vancouver, BC [September 13, 2022] – The concerns of residents of Canada and the United States about global warming have increased over the past two years, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 68% of Canadians (+6 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2020) and 60% of Americans (+9) feel that climate change is a “major crisis”.

Almost seven-in-ten Canadians (69%, +5) and three-in-five Americans (60%, +7) think global warming is a fact and is mostly caused by emissions from vehicles and industrial facilities.

About one-in-five respondents in the two countries (20% in Canada and 21% in the United States) believe climate change is a fact and is mostly caused by natural changes. Only 5% of Canadians and 12% of Americans brand global warming as a theory that has not yet been proven.

“Belief in human-made climate change is low among Republicans in the United States (35%) and Conservatives in Canada (47%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are strikingly different among Democrats in the United States (80%) and Liberal Party voters in Canada (82%).”

Majorities of Canadians and Americans (59% and 61% respectively) say they are willing to pay higher taxes to adequately address climate change. Only two other issues come close to this level of acceptance for higher taxation: schools (CAN 57%, USA 64%) and homelessness (CAN 57%, USA 61%).

Fewer Canadians and Americans are willing to pay higher taxes in order to adequately address four other issues: forest fires (55% and 58% respectively), floods (52% and 56% respectively), housing improvements (51% each) and transit improvements (44% and 46% respectively).

Sizeable majorities of Canadians and Americans believe three groups should be doing more now to deal with issues related to climate change that are happening or impacting people directly now: companies and corporations (75% and 70% respectively), governments (69% and 65%) and individuals and consumers (67% and 65%).

Most residents of both countries also believe that more action is required to address issues related to climate change that may happen or impact people directly in the future from companies and corporations (76% in Canada and 70% in the United States), governments (72% and 66% respectively) and individuals and consumers (68% and 65%).

Parents of children under the age of 18 were asked about the effect of conversations they have had with their kids about climate change. Significant proportions of parents in Canada (85%) and the United States (79%) say they are recycling more as a result of these chats.

Practically half of American parents (49%) and a majority of Canadian parents (55%) claim to be driving less, and more than two-in-five (44% in the United States, 47% in Canada) say they are taking shorter showers as a result of conversations about global warming with their children.

Fewer parents in each country acknowledge taking other steps, such as reducing their consumption of meat (CAN 36%, USA 30%), changing the way they voted in a federal election (24% each) or changing the way they voted in a local election (CAN 18%, USA 21%).

Methodology: Results are based on online studies conducted from August 19 to August 21, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Stewart and Sim Are Frontrunners in Vancouver Mayoral Election

More than a third of likely voters believe housing is the most important issue facing the city right now.

Vancouver, BC [September 8, 2022] – Four mayoral candidates are in double-digits as voters in Vancouver ponder their choices in next month’s election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample, 35% of decided voters in the City of Vancouver would support incumbent Kennedy Stewart of Forward Vancouver, while 30% would cast their ballot for Ken Sim of A Better City (ABC).

Colleen Hardwick of TEAM for a Livable Vancouver is in third place with 17 per cent, followed by Mark Marissen of Progress Vancouver with 13% and Fred Harding of the Non-Partisan Association (NPA) with 4%.

More than a third of likely voters in Vancouver (35%) say housing is the most important issue facing the city, followed by drug overdoses (14%), crime (9%), poverty (also 9%) and property taxes (also 9%).

“Concerns about housing are particularly high among women (42%) and likely voters aged 35-to-54 (39%) in the City of Vancouver,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Drug overdoses are a more prevalent topic among likely voters who reside Downtown (19%) than among their counterparts who live on the West Side (13%) or the East Side (11%).”

Two thirds of likely voters in the City of Vancouver (67%) have followed the municipal electoral campaign “very closely” or “moderately closely.”

Over the past two months, a majority of likely voters in the City of Vancouver (52%) have seen, read or heard media stories where mayoral or council candidates discussed their position on issues. Almost three-in-ten (29%) have visited the website of a mayoral or council candidate.

While 16% of likely voters in the City of Vancouver have interacted with a mayoral or council candidate on social media (such as following on Twitter or liking on Facebook), the proportion rises to 25% among those aged 18-to-34.

Just over two thirds of likely voters in Vancouver (68%) support the use of “SOGI-Inclusive Education”, which raises awareness of and welcomes students of all sexual orientations, gender identities and family structures.

In national survey conducted by Research Co. in July 2019, 62% of Canadians supported the use of “SOGI-Inclusive Education” in their province.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from September 3 to September 5, 2022, among a representative sample of 400 municipal likely voters in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Fewer Than One-in-Four Albertans Support Outright Sovereignty

Public backing for the creation of an independent state rises if other western provinces join the new nation.

Vancouver, BC [September 2, 2022] – Few Albertans openly endorse the idea of their province becoming a sovereign entity, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 23% of Albertans support their province becoming a country independent from Canada, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in February 2021. Seven-in-ten Albertans (70%, +1) are opposed to this idea.

Support for establishing an independent country encompassing Alberta and Saskatchewan reaches 24% (-2). The same proportion of Albertans (24%) would welcome the creation of a sovereign state featuring their province, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

The notion of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and British Columbia becoming a country independent from Canada is supported by three-in-ten Albertans (30%), while just over three-in-five (61%) are opposed.

Almost three-in-four Albertans (73%, -3) oppose the idea of Alberta joining the United States, while 21% (+3) are supportive—including 26% of those aged 18-to-34.

Just over three-in-five Albertans (61%, +2 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in July 2019) consider themselves “Canadians first, Albertans second.” Fewer than three-in-ten (28%, +1) say they are “Albertans first, Canadians second.”

“There is a remarkable political divide when Albertans ponder their allegiance to province and country,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 17% of those who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) in the last provincial election say they are Albertans first, the proportion rises to 45% among those who supported the United Conservative Party (UCP).”

More than a third of Albertans (37%, -7) believe Ralph Klein is the best premier the province has had since November 1985. Rachel Notley is second on the list with 20% (+3).

When asked to name the worst recent premier of the province, two-in-five Albertans (40%, +37) select current head of government Jason Kenney. Notley (19%, -7) and Alison Redford (12%, -13) are the only former premiers to reach double-digits on this question.

Half of Albertans (50%) say they would move to British Columbia if they had to leave and relocate to another Canadian province. Saskatchewan is a distant second  with 11%, followed by Ontario with 10% and Nova Scotia with 4%.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 21 to August 23, 2022, among 700 adults in Alberta. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Alberta. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Americans More Upset Than Canadians When Pondering Freedom

Just over half of residents of each country feel their vote in federal elections does not make a difference.

Vancouver, BC [August 25, 2022] – Residents of the United States are significantly more likely than their counterparts in Canada to keep their political views to themselves, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 49% of Americans and 32% of Canadians say they cannot express their political views sometimes because they fear reprisals.

“Most Republicans in the United States (55%) claim to withhold their political views sometimes, compared to 47% of Democrats and 48% of Independents,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In Canada, this behaviour is more pronounced among those who voted for the People’s Party (68%), the Green Party (43%) and the Conservative Party (41%) in last year’s federal election.”

While more than seven-in-ten Americans (73%) feel that their freedoms are under attack by elected politicians, only 39% of Canadians hold the same sentiment.

More than three-in-five Americans (62%) and just over two-in-five Canadians (41%) believe their respective federal governments are oppressive and controlling.

More than half of Americans (52%) and Canadians (51%) feel that their vote in federal elections does not make a difference.

More than a third of Canadians think four issues are worse now than ten years ago: the ability of people to disagree with each other on social media (46%), the ability of people to disagree with each other in conversation (40%), the ability of people to convince others about looking at an issue differently (38%) and the ability of people to question stories they learn about in the media (37%).

Americans are significantly more likely to believe that certain elements of public discourse have deteriorated over the past decade, including the ability of people to disagree with each other on social media (63%), the ability of people to disagree with each other in conversation (62%), the ability of people to convince others about looking at an issue differently (58%) and the ability of people to question stories they learn about in the media (50%).

More than one-in-five Canadians say they find themselves disagreeing with other people “many times” about COVID-19 mandates and vaccines (26%), federal politics (24%) and provincial politics (22%).

In the United States, at least one-in-four residents disagree with other people “many times” about national politics (40%), COVID-19 mandates and vaccines (36%), state politics (28%), immigration (also 28%), morality (25%) and local politics (also 25%).

More than three-in-ten Canadians (31%) say they stopped talking to a person, or avoided a person, on account of a disagreement related to COVID-19 mandates and vaccines. Fewer Canadians chose the same route to deal with a person who they disagreed with on morality (22%), religion (20%), federal politics (19%) and immigration (18%).

In the United States, at least one-in-five Americans have ceased talking to a person, or avoided a person, due to a disagreement on national politics (32%), COVID-19 mandates and vaccines (30%), morality (25%), religion (24%), immigration (22%) and state politics (21%).

Methodology: Results are based on online studies conducted from August 19 to August 21, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Not All Metro Vancouverites Are Keen on Amalgamation

Almost two-in-five likely voters in the region think housing is the most important issue facing their municipality right now.

Vancouver, BC [August 12, 2022] – The idea of merging all Metro Vancouver municipalities into a single entity is not particularly attractive to all likely voters in the region, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of likely voters in Metro Vancouver, 44% of respondents think it would be worthwhile to explore the idea of amalgamating all of the municipalities in Metro Vancouver, like they did in Toronto or Montreal.

“Majorities of likely voters in Surrey (53%) and Vancouver (52%) favour the concept of amalgamation,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In all other regions of Metro Vancouver, the level of support for this concept is decidedly lower.”

In the North Shore municipalities, only 40% of likely voters think it is time to explore amalgamation. The proportions are lower in Burnaby, Richmond and New Westminster (37%), the Tri-Cities (35%), Delta, White Rock, the City of Langley and the Township of Langley (23%) and Pitt Meadows and Maple Ridge (13%).

More than two-in-five likely voters in Metro Vancouver (45%) think their municipality should abandon the “at-large system” (where voters select individual councillors) and move to a “ward system” (where councillors can be elected in specific constituencies).

The “ward system” is more popular in the two most populous municipalities: Vancouver (60%) and Surrey (53%).

Almost two-in-five likely voters in Metro Vancouver (38%) say housing is the most important issue facing their municipality, followed by property taxes (11%), crime (9%), climate change (also 9%) and COVID-19 (8%).

Housing is a particularly serious concern for likely voters in Burnaby, Richmond and New Westminster (55%), while concerns over crime are more prevalent in Surrey (18%) and Delta, White Rock, the City of Langley and the Township of Langley (13%) .

More than half of likely voters in the Tri-Cities (64%), the North Shore (61%), Vancouver (54%) and Burnaby, Richmond and New Westminster (53%) are satisfied with the performance of their mayors. The rating is lower in Delta, White Rock, the City of Langley and the Township of Langley (40%), Pitt Meadows and Maple Ridge (also 40%) and Surrey (23%).

More than three-in-five likely voters in the Tri-Cities (62%) and the North Shore (61%) are satisfied with the work of their councils. All other regions are below the 50% mark on this question, including Burnaby, Richmond and New Westminster (47%), Vancouver (37%), Pitt Meadows and Maple Ridge (36%), Delta, White Rock, the City of Langley and the Township of Langley (34%) and Surrey (28%).

Almost half of likely voters across Metro Vancouver (47%) say they are satisfied with the state of affairs in their municipality. Pitt Meadows and Maple Ridge hold the lowest ranking on this question (20%) while the Tri-Cities are at the top (68%).

More than half of likely voters in Metro Vancouver are satisfied with three other issues in their respective municipalities: public safety (55%), the quality of services (64%) and  cleanliness (67%).

The lowest rating for public safety is observed in Surrey, where 39% of likely voters are satisfied and a majority (57%) are dissatisfied.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 3 to August 6, 2022, among 800 likely voters in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

A Third of Canadian Households Experienced COVID-19 Recently

The country’s residents are divided on whether restrictions and mandates were lifted at the right time in their community.

Vancouver, BC [August 8, 2022] – A growing number of Canadians acknowledge that their household has been negatively impacted by COVID-19 over the past few weeks, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 37% of Canadians say themselves, or someone else in their household, became infected with COVID-19 after restrictions and mandates were lifted in their community, up 14 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2022.

Across the country 46% of Canadians (+3) believe restrictions and mandates were abandoned too early in their community, while 44% (-5) think the decision was made at the right time.

“More than half of Atlantic Canadians (55%) appear disappointed with the absence of restrictions and mandates related to COVID-19,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower in Alberta (48%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (47%), British Columbia (45%), Quebec (also 45%) and Ontario (43%).”

Compared to May, there is little fluctuation when Canadians are asked about the possible return of specific regulations. Two thirds (66%, -2) would be satisfied if they have to wear a mask or face covering when entering an indoor premise. Slightly smaller proportions of Canadians would feel the same way if a reduction of capacity at venues (such as cinemas, theatres, concert halls and sports arenas) is implemented (63%, -1) or if proof of vaccination is required once again to go to restaurants or public events (60%, -1).

Three-in-five Canadians (60%, +1) believe it is only a matter of time before everyone catches COVID-19, and a majority (54%, +2) claim that, as long as people are vaccinated, the virus is a minor nuisance. In addition, 63% of Canadians (+3) foresee being vaccinated against COVID-19 at least once again in the next six months.

Just over two thirds of Canadians (68%) state that the worst of COVID-19 is definitely or probably “behind us”, down eight points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2022.

More than three-in-four Canadians (77%, -1) continue to brand COVID-19 as a real threat—including 82% of those aged 55 and over.

Public satisfaction with the pandemic performance of the federal government dropped from 61% in May to 55% this month. The rating is highest in Quebec (60%) and Atlantic Canada (58%), followed by Ontario (53%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (52%), British Columbia (49%) and Alberta (48%).

The satisfaction rating also fell this month for provincial administrations (53%, -10) and municipal governments (59%, -6).

In the four most populous provinces of Canada, the level of satisfaction with COVID-19 management is highest in British Columbia (62%, =), followed by Quebec (58%, -9), Ontario (48%, -17) and Alberta (39%, -14).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 1 to August 3, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Great11