Most in Canada and U.S. Friendly to Breastfeeding in Public

Agreement is lowest among Canadians who voted for the Conservatives and Americans who identify as Republican.

Vancouver, BC [March 20, 2020] – Sizeable majorities of Canadians and Americans have no problem with women breastfeeding in specific public spaces, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 82% of Canadians and 74% of Americans think women should have the right to breastfeed a baby in a park.

Most residents of the two countries believe women should be allowed to breastfeed a baby in a shopping mall (78% in Canada and 71% in the United States), in a restaurant (74% in Canada and 65% in the United States) and in a public transit vehicle (71% in Canada and 68% in the United States).

Conversely, more than one-in-five Canadians are not sympathetic to breastfeeding in public transit vehicles (23%) and at restaurants (21%), while fewer believe the practice should be allowed in shopping malls (16%) and parks (12%).

In the United States, at least one-in-five Americans voice opposition to breastfeeding in each of the four locations: restaurants (28%), public transit vehicles (27%), shopping malls (23%) and parks (20%).

“While most Canadians and Americans preserve the right of women to breastfeed in public, there are some nuances when it comes to opposition,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Some Americans are more likely to resist the practice inside a restaurant, while some Canadians are more hesitant about it happening inside a public transit vehicle.”

Among Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in last year’s federal election, the level of opposition climbs to 31% for breastfeeding in a public transit vehicle.

In the United States, at least a third of those who identify as Republicans are against breastfeeding inside a public transit vehicle (33%) and a restaurant (36%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 7 to February 9, 2020, among 1,000 Canadian adults, and an online study conducted from February 6 to February 8, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each study, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full Canadian dataset here, our full American dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Death Penalty Splits Views in Canada and the United States

More Canadians than Americans select life imprisonment without parole as their preferred punishment for murder.

Vancouver, BC [March 3. 2020] – More than half of Canadians and Americans are supportive of capital punishment, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 51% of Canadians are in favour of reinstating the death penalty for murder in their country, and 59% of Americans support the possibility of prosecutors relying on capital punishment for murder cases.

Support for reinstating the death penalty in Canada is highest among Canadians aged 55 and over (56%) and people who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election (68%).

In the United States, the groups that voice the highest support for prosecutors relying on the death penalty are people who voted for Republican Party nominee Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election (76%) and those who reside in the West (69%).

Supporters of the death penalty in the two North American countries believe that, if a convicted murdered has taken a life, the death penalty fits the crime (60% in Canada and 68% in the United States).

“A sizeable majority of Canadians who are in favour of the return of the death penalty (57%) believe it would save taxpayers money and the costs associated with having murderers in prison,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the United States, only 43% of supporters of capital punishment feel the same way.”

Opponents of the death penalty in both North American countries are primarily concerned with the possibility of executing a person who was wrongfully convicted (73% in Canada and 65% in the United States).

When asked about their personal point of view about the death penalty, Canadians are more likely to believe that it is “never appropriate” (27%) than Americans (18%).

Conversely, Americans are slightly more likely to say that capital punishment is “always appropriate” (16%) than Canadians (13%).

Almost half of Canadians (47%) select life imprisonment without the possibility of parole over the death penalty (34%) as their preferred punishment in cases of murder.

In the United States, respondents are evenly split when pondering the two approaches (42% for the death penalty and 42% for life imprisonment without parole).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 7 to February 9, 2020, among 1,000 Canadian adults, and an online study conducted from February 6 to February 8, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each study, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full Canadian dataset here, our full American dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Canadians and Americans Agree on Vaccinations for Children

Majorities in both countries believe individuals should decide if they want to get immunized against seasonal diseases.

Vancouver, BC [February 14, 2020] – While four-in-five Canadians endorse the concept of mandatory inoculations for children, the proportion of Americans who feel the same way is smaller, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 81% of Canadians—up three points since a similar study conducted in 2018—believe that vaccinations for children should “definitely” or “probably” be mandatory in their province.

The proportion of Americans who think immunizations for children should “definitely” or “probably” be mandatory in their state is lower (68%).

“More than one-in-four Americans (27%) believe decisions on childhood vaccinations should be made by parents,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion of Canadians who would follow this course of action is decidedly lower (12%).”

In Canada, Quebec has the highest proportion of residents (17%) who believe parents should choose whether their children should be vaccinated. In the United States, 30% of residents of the South and the West feel the same way.

When asked about inoculations and seasonal diseases (such as the flu), slim majorities of Canadians and Americans (51% in each country) believe each person should “definitely” or “probably” be allowed to decide whether they want to get vaccinated or not.

Just over two-in-five respondents in each country (44% in Canada and 43% in the United States) feel the flu vaccine should be mandatory for everybody in their province or state.

In the late 1990s, a study published in the weekly medical journal The Lancet—which has since been discredited and retracted—attempted to link childhood vaccination and autism.

In Canada, 26% of respondents to this survey think there is a connection between the childhood vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella and autism. The proportion of Americans who believe this is slightly higher, at 30%.

Respondents aged 18-to-34 in both countries (36% in Canada and 43% in the United States) are more likely to believe in the debunked connection between childhood immunization and autism than their older counterparts.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 7 to February 9, 2020, among 1,000 Canadian adults, and an online study conducted from February 6 to February 8, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each study, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full Canadian dataset here, our full American dataset here and download the press release here.

Photo Credit: John Keith

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two-in-Five Americans Say Economy is Better Now Than in 2016

Significantly fewer Americans see improvements in the areas of health care, education, ethics, environment and national unity.

Vancouver, BC [February 10, 2020] – Americans have mixed feelings about the effect of the administration headed by President Donald Trump on specific issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 41% of Americans think the domestic economy is better now than it was four years ago.

More than a third of Americans (35%) believe defense is better now than in 2016, while about one-in-four feel the same way about America’s role in global affairs (27%), taxation (26%) and America’s reputation in the world (24%).

The rating is lower for public safety (20%), health care (18%), education (17%), ethics and accountability (14%) and national unity (also 14%).

“As expected, there are some major political differences when Americans assess the current state of affairs,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 74% of Republicans believe the American economy is better now than four years ago, only 39% of Independents and 16% of Democrats concur.”

Respondents who usually watch Fox News are significantly more likely to say that America’s reputation in the world is better now than in 2016 (44%) than those who watch their local network (16%), MSNBC or CNBC (also 16%) and CNN (15%).

Among eight contenders in the 2020 presidential race, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders currently has the largest potential pool of voters, with 47% of Americans saying they would “definitely” or “probably” cast a ballot for him this year’s election. 

While almost two thirds of Americans aged 18-to-34 (64%) say they would consider voting for Sanders, he has the highest level of rejection among voters aged 55 and over (59%) of all candidates tested.

Just over two-in-five Americans would consider voting for former Vice President Joe Biden (43%), incumbent President Donald Trump (42%) and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg (also 42%) in November.

The voter pool is smaller at this stage for Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren (37%), former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg (35%), businessman Tom Steyer (25%) and Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar (23%).

More than three-in-five Americans who voted for Democratic Party nominee Hillary Clinton in 2016 are currently willing to support Sanders (73%), Biden (also 73%), Bloomberg (69%), Warren (65%) and Buttigieg (61%) in this year’s presidential election.

More than half of African Americans say they would consider casting a ballot for Sanders (75%), Biden (72%), Bloomberg (61%) and Warren (57%). Among Hispanic and Latino voters, the voter pool is larger for Sanders (59%), Biden (45%) and Bloomberg (42%).

Almost half of White voters (47%) are considering a vote to re-elect Trump. Only three other contenders can currently count on the potential support of more than a third of White voters: Sanders (41%), Biden (38%) and Bloomberg (37%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on February 5, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our datasets here and here and download the press release here.

Photo Credit: chensiyuan 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Americans Split on Pelosi’s Ripping of State of the Union Address

Just over a third of Americans think Donald Trump has accomplished much since he became President.

Vancouver, BC [February 6, 2020] – Americans are divided when assessing’s the decision of House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi to rip her copy of the State of the Union address in half after President Donald Trump finished his delivery, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 47% of Americans think the actions of the Speaker were “unjustified”, while 42% consider them “justified.”

“More than three-in-four Democrats (77%) stand by the Speaker, while a comparable proportion of Republicans (76%) suggest that she was out of line,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Independents are more likely to believe that Pelosi’s actions were unjustified (48%) than justified (36%).”

About two thirds of Americans were exposed to the latest State of the Union address, with 33% observing it in its entirety, 23% seeing parts of it and 11% only watching reports in the media.

Respondents who were familiar with the State of the Union were asked to select four feelings to describe the speech. The top emotions selected were pride (26%), enthusiasm (23%), trust (21%) and disgust (21%).

Sizeable proportions of Republicans said the speech elicited pride (53%), enthusiasm (47%) and trust (46%). Conversely, the most mentioned emotions by Democrats were disgust (33%) anger (27%) and shame (26%).

More than a third of Americans (35%, including 71% of Republicans) believe that Donald Trump has accomplished much since he became President. More than two-in-five (44%, including 67% of Democrats) think Trump has accomplished little since taking office.

The approval rating for President Trump stands at 45%, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2019. Half of Americans (51%, -7) currently disapprove of his performance.

Two-in-five Americans (41%) believe Trump deserves re-election as president, while 55% disagree—including 84% of Democrats and 59% of Independents.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on February 5, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Ingfbruno

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca