Appetite for Political Correctness Rises in Canada, Sinks in U.S.

One-in-five Americans (20%) claim to never act “politically correct”, compared to just 11% of Canadians.

Vancouver, BC [September 28, 2022] – Residents of Canada and the United States hold differing views on the concept of “political correctness”, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 55% of Canadians and 45% of Americans support the use of “political correctness” in their respective countries.

The term “political correctness” has been used to describe language and/or behaviour that seeks to minimize possible offenses to racial, cultural and gender identity groups, among others.

Since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2020, support for “political correctness” has increased by five points in Canada and fallen by eight points in the United States.

“Canadians who voted for the Conservatives in 2021 (41%) and Americans who identify as Independent (35%) or Republican (29%) are less likely to endorse political correctness,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are higher among (66%) in the United States (66%) and among Canadians who voted for the Liberals (64%) or the New Democrats (67%) in 2021.”

There is little change when Canadians are asked about their own behaviour, with just over a third (34%, +2) claiming to always act “politically correct” because it’s the right thing to do. Two-in-five (40%, =) sometimes act “politically correct” because it’s the safe thing to do, while only 11% (=) do not act “politically correct” because it’s the wrong thing to do.

In the United States, the proportion of Americans who claim to never act “politically correct” increased to 20% (+5), while those who sometimes act “politically correct” rose to 41% (+4). About one-in-four Americans (24%, -12) say they always act “politically correct” because it’s the right thing to do.

As was the case in 2020, more than half of Canadians and Americans think three groups in society should act in a “politically correct” manner “always” or “most of the time”: teachers (75% in Canada and 64% in the U.S.), politicians (72% in Canada and 60% in the U.S.) and journalists (67% in Canada and 55% in the U.S.).

Significantly fewer Canadians (41%) and Americans (28%) believe comedians should act in a “politically correct” way “always” or “most of the time”.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%, +5) and just under three-in-five Americans (59%, -3) are in favour of adding a disclaimer to explain that programs or movies are presented “as originally created” and “may contain outdated cultural depictions.”

Opposition grew in the United States toward the notion of printing new editions of books that remove words that may be deemed offensive to a specific race or ethnicity (65%, +6). More than half of Canadians (55%, -6) feel the same way (55%, -6).

A similar scenario ensues when residents of the two countries are asked about re-dubbing movies to remove words that may be deemed offensive to a specific race or ethnicity. Just under two thirds of Americans are opposed (64%, +7), along with a majority of Canadians (56%, -6).

Methodology: Results are based on online surveys conducted from September 16 to September 18, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More in Canada and U.S. Feel Climate Change is Major Crisis

Most Canadians and Americans are willing to pay higher taxes in order to adequately address global warming.

Vancouver, BC [September 13, 2022] – The concerns of residents of Canada and the United States about global warming have increased over the past two years, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 68% of Canadians (+6 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2020) and 60% of Americans (+9) feel that climate change is a “major crisis”.

Almost seven-in-ten Canadians (69%, +5) and three-in-five Americans (60%, +7) think global warming is a fact and is mostly caused by emissions from vehicles and industrial facilities.

About one-in-five respondents in the two countries (20% in Canada and 21% in the United States) believe climate change is a fact and is mostly caused by natural changes. Only 5% of Canadians and 12% of Americans brand global warming as a theory that has not yet been proven.

“Belief in human-made climate change is low among Republicans in the United States (35%) and Conservatives in Canada (47%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are strikingly different among Democrats in the United States (80%) and Liberal Party voters in Canada (82%).”

Majorities of Canadians and Americans (59% and 61% respectively) say they are willing to pay higher taxes to adequately address climate change. Only two other issues come close to this level of acceptance for higher taxation: schools (CAN 57%, USA 64%) and homelessness (CAN 57%, USA 61%).

Fewer Canadians and Americans are willing to pay higher taxes in order to adequately address four other issues: forest fires (55% and 58% respectively), floods (52% and 56% respectively), housing improvements (51% each) and transit improvements (44% and 46% respectively).

Sizeable majorities of Canadians and Americans believe three groups should be doing more now to deal with issues related to climate change that are happening or impacting people directly now: companies and corporations (75% and 70% respectively), governments (69% and 65%) and individuals and consumers (67% and 65%).

Most residents of both countries also believe that more action is required to address issues related to climate change that may happen or impact people directly in the future from companies and corporations (76% in Canada and 70% in the United States), governments (72% and 66% respectively) and individuals and consumers (68% and 65%).

Parents of children under the age of 18 were asked about the effect of conversations they have had with their kids about climate change. Significant proportions of parents in Canada (85%) and the United States (79%) say they are recycling more as a result of these chats.

Practically half of American parents (49%) and a majority of Canadian parents (55%) claim to be driving less, and more than two-in-five (44% in the United States, 47% in Canada) say they are taking shorter showers as a result of conversations about global warming with their children.

Fewer parents in each country acknowledge taking other steps, such as reducing their consumption of meat (CAN 36%, USA 30%), changing the way they voted in a federal election (24% each) or changing the way they voted in a local election (CAN 18%, USA 21%).

Methodology: Results are based on online studies conducted from August 19 to August 21, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Americans More Upset Than Canadians When Pondering Freedom

Just over half of residents of each country feel their vote in federal elections does not make a difference.

Vancouver, BC [August 25, 2022] – Residents of the United States are significantly more likely than their counterparts in Canada to keep their political views to themselves, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 49% of Americans and 32% of Canadians say they cannot express their political views sometimes because they fear reprisals.

“Most Republicans in the United States (55%) claim to withhold their political views sometimes, compared to 47% of Democrats and 48% of Independents,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In Canada, this behaviour is more pronounced among those who voted for the People’s Party (68%), the Green Party (43%) and the Conservative Party (41%) in last year’s federal election.”

While more than seven-in-ten Americans (73%) feel that their freedoms are under attack by elected politicians, only 39% of Canadians hold the same sentiment.

More than three-in-five Americans (62%) and just over two-in-five Canadians (41%) believe their respective federal governments are oppressive and controlling.

More than half of Americans (52%) and Canadians (51%) feel that their vote in federal elections does not make a difference.

More than a third of Canadians think four issues are worse now than ten years ago: the ability of people to disagree with each other on social media (46%), the ability of people to disagree with each other in conversation (40%), the ability of people to convince others about looking at an issue differently (38%) and the ability of people to question stories they learn about in the media (37%).

Americans are significantly more likely to believe that certain elements of public discourse have deteriorated over the past decade, including the ability of people to disagree with each other on social media (63%), the ability of people to disagree with each other in conversation (62%), the ability of people to convince others about looking at an issue differently (58%) and the ability of people to question stories they learn about in the media (50%).

More than one-in-five Canadians say they find themselves disagreeing with other people “many times” about COVID-19 mandates and vaccines (26%), federal politics (24%) and provincial politics (22%).

In the United States, at least one-in-four residents disagree with other people “many times” about national politics (40%), COVID-19 mandates and vaccines (36%), state politics (28%), immigration (also 28%), morality (25%) and local politics (also 25%).

More than three-in-ten Canadians (31%) say they stopped talking to a person, or avoided a person, on account of a disagreement related to COVID-19 mandates and vaccines. Fewer Canadians chose the same route to deal with a person who they disagreed with on morality (22%), religion (20%), federal politics (19%) and immigration (18%).

In the United States, at least one-in-five Americans have ceased talking to a person, or avoided a person, due to a disagreement on national politics (32%), COVID-19 mandates and vaccines (30%), morality (25%), religion (24%), immigration (22%) and state politics (21%).

Methodology: Results are based on online studies conducted from August 19 to August 21, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Armed Forces, Constitution and Flag Top Pride List in U.S.

Fewer than two-in-five Americans are proud of Congress and the state of race relations in the country.  

Vancouver, BC [March 29, 2021] – Significant proportions of Americans express pride in some of the country’s institutions and features, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 82% of Americans say the country’s Armed Forces make them proud.  

More than three-in-four Americans are proud of the Constitution (77%) and the flag (also 77%), while majorities feel the same way about the police (61%), American sports (55%) and the justice system (51%).  

“Republicans in the United States are more likely to say that they are proud of the police (81%) than Independents (60%) and Democrats (44%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “A similar scenario ensues when Americans are asked about the justice system, with 61% of Republicans stating they are proud of it, compared to 48% of Independents and 44% of Democrats.”  

More than two-in-five Americans are proud of the economy (44%), health care (also 44%), the state of democracy (42%) and the President (41%). The lowest ranked institutions and features are Congress (35%) and race relations (26%).  

While 33% of Americans of Hispanic or Latino descent are proud of the state of race relations in the United States, the numbers are lower among White Americans (26%) and African Americans (24%).  

Americans aged 18-to-34 are less likely to express pride about health care (38%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (46%) and aged 55 and over (45%).  

Across the United States, 42% of Americans approve of Joe Biden’s performance as president, down 11 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in April 2021.  

Biden’s approval reaches 75% among Democrats, but drops to 49% among Independents and to 15% among Republicans.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from March 25 to March 27, 2022, among 1,000 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Murphy Set for New Term in New Jersey’s Gubernatorial Election

In Virginia, the race is a statistical tie between Republican Glenn Youngkin and Democrat Terry McAuliffe.  

Vancouver, BC [November 1, 2021] – The Democratic Party stands to win one of the gubernatorial elections that will take place tomorrow in the United States, according to two new polls conducted by Research Co. in New Jersey and Virginia.  

The surveys of voters who have already cast their ballot in the elections or plan to do so tomorrow show the Democratic incumbent with a seven-point lead in the Garden State, and an extremely tight race in the Old Dominion State.  

New Jersey  

In the 2017 gubernatorial election, Democratic Party candidate Phil Murphy defeated Republican Party contender Kim Guadagno in the Garden State with 56% of all cast ballots.  

Murphy—who is seeking a new term in office—heads to tomorrow’s election with the backing of 53% of decided voters in New Jersey. Republican challenger Jack Ciattarelli is second with 46%.  

Murphy is supported by 88% of Garden State voters who cast a ballot for Joe Biden in last year’s United States presidential election. Ciattarelli is holding on to 91% of New Jersey voters who backed Donald Trump in 2020.  

Virginia  

Democratic Party candidate Ralph Northam won the 2017 gubernatorial election in the Old Dominion State with 54% of the vote, defeating Republican Party contender Ed Gillespie. Virginia does not allow incumbent governors to serve consecutive terms.  

Tomorrow’s election is a statistical tie, with 49% of decided voters supporting Republican candidate Glenn Youngkin and 48% backing Democratic contender Terry McAuliffe. In addition, 2% of decided voters would support Princess Blanding of the Liberation Party.  

McAuliffe served as Virginia’s Governor from 2014 to 2018, winning the 2013 election with 48% of the vote.

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted on October 31 and November 1, 2021, among representative samples of 450 likely voters in two American states: New Jersey and Virginia. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age and gender in each state. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.6 percentage points for each state.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Three-in-Five Americans Want Obamacare to Remain in Place

By a 2-to-1 margin, Americans would prefer to establish a national, publicly funded healthcare system.

Vancouver, BC [April 27, 2021] – A majority of Americans believe the Affordable Care Act should continue to exist, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The U.S. Supreme Court is scheduled to rule on the validity of the Affordable Care Act—sometimes referred to as Obamacare—in the next few months. 

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 61% of Americans say they would prefer for the Affordable Care Act to remain in place, while 28% would like to see the legislation repealed.

While 83% of Democrats and 60% of Independents support keeping the Affordable Care Act, only 41% of Republicans concur.

Almost three-in-five Americans (59%) agree with the United States moving to establish a national, publicly funded healthcare system, similar to the ones that currently exist in Canada and some European countries, while 30% disagree and 12% are not sure.

Support for this type of system is highest among men (65%), Americans aged 18-to-34 (67%), and residents of the West (70%).

“Seven-in-ten Americans who voted for Joe Biden last year (70%) are in favour of a move towards a national, publicly funded healthcare system,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Americans who voted for Donald Trump last year are deeply divided on this topic, with 45% agreeing and 47% disagreeing.”

Three-in-four Americans (75%) say they are “very confident” or “moderately confident” that America’s healthcare system would be there to provide the help and assistance that they would need if they had to face an unexpected medical condition or disease.

In addition, 71% of Americans say the healthcare system currently meets their needs and the needs of their family—a proportion that rises to 75% among men, 73% among Americans aged 55 and over and 76% among residents of the Northeast.

More than half of Americans (53%) approve of Joe Biden’s performance as president, while 42% disapprove and 5% are undecided.

Biden’s numbers are significantly high among Democrats (85%) but drop to 55% among Independents and to 21% among Republicans.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from April 23 to April 25, 2021, among 1,000 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views on Political Correctness Are Similar in Canada and the U.S.

Majorities in the two countries agree with adding disclaimers to programs that may contain “outdated cultural depictions.”

Vancouver, BC [January 1, 2021] – Most Canadians and Americans share analogous views on “political correctness” but would stop short of modifying books or movies by removing words that are considered offensive, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 50% of Canadians and 53% of Americans support the use of “political correctness” in their respective countries.

Conversely, 33% of Canadians and 32% of Americans are opposed to “political correctness.”

The term “political correctness” has been used to describe language and/or behaviour that seeks to minimize possible offenses to racial, cultural and gender identity groups, among others. 

Support for the use of “political correctness” is particularly high among Canadians and Americans aged 18-to-34 (55% and 59% respectively).

A third of Canadians (32%) and 36% of Americans say they always act “politically correct” because it’s the right thing to do—including 43% of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election and 45% of Democrats in the United States.

Two-in-five Canadians (40%) and 37% of Americans say they sometimes act “politically correct” because it’s the safe thing to do.

Only 11% of Canadians and 15% of Americans do not act “politically correct” because it’s the wrong thing to do—including 17% of Conservative voters in Canada and 22% of Republicans in the United States.

Significant majorities of Canadians and Americans believe three specific groups in society should act in a “politically correct” manner “always” or “most of the time”: teachers (74% in Canada and 71% in the U.S.), politicians (73% in Canada and 66% in the U.S.) and journalists (66% in Canada and 64% in the U.S.). 

Only 38% of Canadians and 35% of Americans think comedians should act in a “politically correct” manner “always” or “most of the time”.

More than three-in-five Canadians (65%) and Americans (62%) agree with adding a disclaimer to explain that programs or movies are presented “as originally created” and “may contain outdated cultural depictions.”

Canadians and Americans disagree with two other measures: printing new editions of books that remove words that may be deemed offensive to a specific race or ethnicity (61% in Canada and 59% in the U.S.) and re-dubbing movies to remove words that may be deemed offensive to a specific race or ethnicity (62% in Canada and 57% in the U.S.).

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted from December 3 to December 5, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Perceptions on the Benefits of Immigration Improve in Canada

While 54% of Canadians say immigration is having a positive effect in the country, only 43% of Americans hold the same view.

Vancouver, BC [December 22, 2020] – Canadians have developed a more positive opinion about immigration over the past two years, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 54% of Canadians think immigration is having a mostly positive effect in the country, up eight points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2019.

In the United States, 43% of Americans acknowledge that immigration is having a mostly positive effect, while 36% say it is mostly negative.

Just over two-in-five Canadians (43%, +8) think the number of legal immigrants who are allowed to relocate in their country should remain the same. One third of Canadians (32, -6) believe the level of legal immigration should be reduced, while 17% (-3) want it increased.

“Majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (51%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (51%) in last year’s federal election want legal immigration levels to stay as they are,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, a majority of Conservative voters (53%) call for a decrease.”

In the United States, the number of Americans who would maintain the current levels of legal immigration is akin to Canada’s (42%), while similar proportions favour either an increase (24%) or a reduction (25%).

Three-in-four Canadians (75%, +20) think the hard work and talent of immigrants makes Canada better—including 81% of residents of British Columbia and 87% of those who voted for the federal Liberals last year.

Almost two thirds of Canadians (65%, +15) believe immigrants should only be allowed in Canada if they adopt Canadian values—including 76% of those who voted for the Conservative Party last year.

While 46% of Americans think illegal immigrants are employed in jobs that American workers do not want, 40% believe they take jobs away from American workers—a proportion that rises to 62% among Republicans.

Practically half of Americans (49%) think illegal immigrants who are currently working in the United States should be allowed to stay in the country and eventually apply for citizenship. About one-in-five  Americans (19%) would continue to allow these workers on a temporary basis and without a path to citizenship, while just under one-in-four (23%) would opt for deportation. 

Democrats are significantly more likely to support the notion of illegal immigrants eventually becoming citizens (64%) than Independents (51%) and Republicans (34%).

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted from December 3 to December 5, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Religious Adherence Differs Greatly in Canada and United States

A third of Canadians (32%) say they are atheist, agnostic or have no religion, compared to only 19% of Americans.

Vancouver, BC [December 15, 2020] – Residents of Canada and the United States hold dissimilar views on the importance of specific aspects of their lives, including religion, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 48% of Americans say religion is “very important” to them personally. In Canada only 24% of respondents feel the same way.

“In the United States, residents aged 18-to-34 are the least likely to consider religion as a very important component of their lives (45%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In Canada, the number is lowest among residents aged 55 and over (22%).”

Four-in-five residents of each country are in agreement on the extreme importance of family (80% in Canada, 79% in the United States) and majorities (54% in each country) say friends are “very important.”

Americans are more likely to place three other aspects of their lives as “very important” than Canadians: country (62% to 54%), career (40% to 29%) and affluence (21% to 11%).

More than seven-in-ten Americans (73%) and a majority of Canadians (52%) describe themselves as “very spiritual” or “moderately spiritual”.

When asked to describe their religious faith, one-in-five Americans (19%) say they have no religion, are atheist or agnostic—compared to 32% of Canadians.

Quebec and Atlantic Canada have the largest proportion of residents who describe their religion as Christian (70% and 68% respectively), followed by Manitoba and Saskatchewan (62%), Alberta (54%), Ontario (51%) and British Columbia (49%).

Attendance to religious gatherings is significantly higher in the United States than in Canada. While 38% of Americans say they go to a church, temple or synagogue at least once a week, only 16% of Canadians follow the same path. 

In addition, 69% of Canadians either never attend religious services or do so only for special events such as weddings, funerals or baptisms, compared to 41% of Americans.

Two thirds of Canadians (68%) and three-in-five Americans (59%) say their preferred greeting for this season is “Merry Christmas”, while 14% of Canadians and 30% of Americans choose “Happy Holidays.”

More than a third of Canadians (37%) and almost half of Americans (48%) say they expect the holidays this year to be “more stressful than fun.” Fewer Canadians (30%) and Americans (36%) think the season will be “more fun than stressful.”

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted from November 14 to November 16, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

A Third of Americans Want to See Trump Run Again in 2024

Three-in-five (61%) believe the investigations into the outgoing president’s taxes should continue.

Vancouver, BC [December 9, 2020] – More than half of Americans would not welcome a new presidential bid by Donald Trump four years from now, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 34% of Americans say they would like to see Trump run again for president in 2024, while 58% disagree and 8% are undecided.

The possibility of a new Trump campaign is attractive for 66% of Republicans, 24% of Independents and 10% of Democrats.

Americans who watch Fox News are significantly more likely to endorse a Trump candidacy in 2024 (55%) than those who watch a local network (26%), CNN (also 26%) or MSNBC / CNBC (13%).

Only 15% of African Americans would like to see Trump become a presidential candidate again in the next election, compared to 32% of Latino / Hispanic Americans and 37% of White Americans. 

Three-in-five Americans (61%) believe the investigations into Trump’s taxes should continue—a proportion that includes 84% of Democrats, 63% of Independents and 34% of Republicans.

Democratic nominee Joe Biden won the 2020 United States Presidential election, with more than 51% of all cast ballots and 308 votes in the Electoral College.

More than two-in-five Americans (45%) believe president-elect Biden should commit to serving only one term in office, while 38% disagree with this course of action.

Americans aged 18-to-34 are more likely to wish for Biden’s commitment to be a one-term president (52%) than those aged 35-to-54 (44%) and those aged 55 and over (42%).

Two thirds of Americans (68%) are satisfied with the way their local governments have dealt with the COVID-19 outbreak, down one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in October

A majority of Americans (64%, -1) are satisfied with the performance of state governments, while only 44% (-1) are content with the way the federal government has managed the pandemic.

The approval rating for Trump stands at 42% this month, down four points since a Research Co. survey conducted in early November. More than half of Americans (54%, +2) disapprove of the way the president is handling his duties.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 3 to December 5, 2020, among 1,200 American adults.  The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here.

Photo Credit: Samson Katt

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians and Americans Would Ban “Conversion Therapy”

Two thirds of Canadians and almost three-in-five Americans are in favour of same-sex couples being allowed to legally marry.

Vancouver, BC [December 4, 2020] – Most residents of Canada and the United States are in favour of abolishing the practice of “conversion therapy”, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 56% of Canadians and Americans think “conversion therapy” should be banned in their respective countries.

Proponents of “conversion therapy” believe that individuals who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, gender diverse, queer, and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2+) can be “converted” into heterosexuals through psychological or spiritual intervention.

More than half of Canadians (55%) and more than two-in-five Americans (45%) think “conversion therapy” is impossible—a proportion that rises to 58% among Canadian women and 51% among American women.

Two thirds of Canadians (67%) think same-sex couples should continue to be allowed to legally marry, up three points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in July 2019

Conversely, 12% of Canadians think same-sex couples should only be allowed to form civil unions and not marry, and 10% would not offer any kind of legal recognition to same-sex couples.

Support for the continued legality of same-sex marriage in Canada is highest among women (70%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (71%). 

Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) and the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election are more likely to support same-sex marriage (78% and 69% respectively) than those who cast ballots for the Conservative Party (56%).

Almost three-in-five Americans (57%) believe same-sex couples should continue to be allowed to legally marry, while 17% prefer the concept of civil unions and 16% would grant no legal recognition to same-sex partnerships.

In the United States, women (59%) and Americans aged 18-to-34 (62%) are more likely to endorse same-sex marriage. Majorities of those who identify as Democrats (68%) and Independents (58%) are also in favour of  same-sex marriage, compared to just 44% of Republicans.

The proportion of Americans who would not grant any legal recognition to same-sex partnerships climbs to 26% among Americans who supported Republican candidate Donald Trump in the 2020 United States presidential election, compared to 9% among those who voted for Democratic nominee Joe Biden.

In Canada, almost two-in-five respondents (39%) think people are born as LGBTQ2+, a view shared by 35% of Americans. However, 28% of Canadians and 34% of Americans think people choose to be LGBTQ2+.

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted from November 14 to November 16, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians and Americans Would Allow Legal Immigrants to Vote

Support for allowing people aged 16 and 17 to cast ballots in federal elections is decidedly lower.

Vancouver, BC [November 27, 2020] – Sizeable majorities of adults in Canada and the United States are willing to allow permanent residents to participate in democratic processes that are currently accessible only to citizens, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 72% of Canadians agree with allowing permanent residents to vote in federal elections, while 20% disagree.

In the United States, 64% of respondents would allow permanent residents—sometimes referred to as “Green Card Holders”—to cast ballots in federal elections, while 27% are opposed to this idea.

“Support for extending federal voting rights to permanent residents of Canada encompasses majorities of voters who supported the Liberal Party (78%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (71%) and the Conservative Party (66%) in the last federal election,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the United States, the idea is attractive to 76% of Democrats, 62% of Republicans and 51% of Independents.”

More than three-in-five Canadians (62%) are opposed to allowing people aged 16 and 17 to vote in federal elections, while 29% agree with this idea.

Extending voting rights to people aged 16 and 17 is rejected by large proportions of Canadians aged 55 and over (72%). Albertans (78%) and Conservative Party voters in 2019 (also 78%).

In the United States, more than half of respondents (58%) disagree with allowing people aged 16 and 17 to cast ballots in federal elections, while 33% are in favour of this idea.

American residents aged 55 and over (77%) and Independents (74%) are more likely to believe that voting rights should not be extended to those aged 16 and 17.

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted from November 14 to November 16, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Biden Will Capture Popular Vote Win in U.S. Presidential Election

Almost three-in-five decided female voters in the United States would support, or have voted for, the Democratic nominee.

Vancouver, BC [November 2, 2020] – Democratic Party nominee Joe Biden stands to win a majority of the votes cast in the United States presidential election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of likely voters, 53% of decided voters would vote for Biden tomorrow or have already done so—unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in mid-October.

Republican incumbent Donald Trump is a distant second with 44%. Support is lower for both Jo Jorgensen of the Libertarian Party (1%) and Howie Hawkins of the Green Party (also 1%).

While Trump is barely ahead among male decided voters (48% to 47%), Biden holds a 20-point advantage among female decided voters (59% to 39%). 

Biden holds large leads among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (53% to 42%) and decided voters aged 55 and over (54% to 44%). The race is closer among decided voters aged 35-to-54 (Biden 50%, Trump 47%). 

“More than half of decided voters who identify as Independent (54%) will support Biden in the presidential election,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Trump is 13 points behind (41%) among this group.”

Sizeable majorities of decided voters in the Northeast (59%) and the West (59%) are voting for Biden. The Democratic nominee holds a three-point edge in the Midwest (50% to 47%), while Trump leads by the same margin in the South (50% to 47%).

The race remains tight among White decided voters (50% for Biden, 48% for Trump), while Biden is still ahead among African Americans (88%) and Hispanic / Latino decided voters (61%).

Only 29% of decided voters who watch Fox News will support Biden in the election. The Democratic nominee fares better among decided voters who get their news from CNN (70%) and MSNBC/CNBC (88%).

The primary motivation for decided voters in the United States (43%) continues to be the candidate’s ideas and policies, followed by a desire for stability (17%), the candidate’s political party (14%), disgust with other candidates (also 14%) and a desire for change (13%).

The approval rating for Donald Trump on the eve of the election stands at 46%, up three points since mid-October. More than half of Americans (52%, -2) disapprove of his performance as president.

The groups that provide the highest marks to Trump are men (51%), Americans aged 35-to-54 (49%), residents of the South (52%) and Fox News watchers (72%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 31 to November 2, 2020, among 1,100 American adults, including 1,025 likely voters in the United States and 974 decided voters in the 2020 presidential election. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.9 percentage points for American adults, +/- 3.0 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 3.1 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin Set to Flip in U.S. Election

Ohio remains too close to call, while there is little danger for the Democrats in Illinois, Minnesota, New Jersey and New York.

Vancouver, BC [November 2, 2020] – Democratic nominee Joe Biden holds the upper hand over Republican incumbent Donald Trump in the crucial states of Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin as American voters prepare to cast ballots in the United States presidential election, according to a series of new polls conducted by Research Co. in eight states.

The surveys of Americans who have already participated in the democratic process or plan to do so tomorrow also outline a tight race in Ohio, and give Biden the lead in Illinois, New Jersey, Minnesota and New York. 

Four Democrats who are seeking to retain their seats in the U.S. Senate are also ahead of their Republican rivals.

Illinois

No Republican nominee has carried the Prairie State since George H. W. Bush in 1988. In the 2016 presidential election, Hillary Clinton defeated Trump in Illinois with 55% of the vote. 

Biden holds a 19-point advantage over Trump among decided voters in Illinois (59% to 40%). Decided voters aged 18-to-34 prefer Biden over Trump by a 2-to-1 margin (66% to 32%).

In the election to the U.S. Senate, incumbent Democrat Dick Durbin holds a significant lead over GOP challenger Mark Curran (60% to 35%).

Michigan

Trump ended a streak of six consecutive presidential elections where the Great Lakes State was won by Democrats, defeating Hillary Clinton by 10,704 votes in 2016 (47.5% to 47.3%)

Biden heads to Election Day with an eight-point advantage over the Republican incumbent in Michigan (53% to 45%). Independent decided voters in Michigan are more likely to support Biden (49%) than Trump (44%).

Incumbent U.S. Senator Gary Peters is ahead of Republican candidate John James by six points (52% to 46%).

Minnesota

The last Republican nominee to carry the North Star State was Richard Nixon in 1972. Clinton defeated Trump by 44,593 votes to secure Minnesota for the Democrats in 2016 (46.4% to 44.9%).

Biden is ahead of Trump by nine points (54% to 45%). The Democratic nominee holds a higher level of support among female decided voters (61%) than among their male counterparts (47%).

Democratic U.S. Senator Tina Smith—who won a Special Election in 2018—stands to earn a full six-year term, with a 13-point advantage over Republican candidate Jason Lewis (55% to 42%).

New Jersey

No Republican nominee has emerged victorious in the Garden State since George H. W. Bush in 1988. Four years ago, Clinton carried New Jersey with 55% of the vote.

Biden currently leads Trump by 19 points (59% to 40%) and can count on the support of 54% of decided voters who identify as Independent.

In the race for the U.S. Senate seat, incumbent Democrat Cory Booker is ahead of Republican rival Rik Mehta by 26 points (62% to 36%).

New York

In the last 10 presidential elections, only Ronald Reagan has been able to carry the Empire State for the Republican Party in 1980 and 1984. In 2016, Clinton won New York with 59% of the vote.

Biden is ahead of Trump by a sizeable margin (64% to 34%). Practically three-in-four female voters in New York (73%) will cast a ballot for Biden or have already done so.

Ohio

The Buckeye State has given its electoral votes to the winner of every presidential election held in the United States since 1964. In 2016, Trump defeated Clinton by eight points (51% to 43%)

Biden and Trump are tied among decided voters in Ohio (49% and 49%). There is a higher level of undecided voters among women (6%) than among men (2%).

Pennsylvania

In 2016, Trump became the first Republican nominee to win the Keystone State since George H. W. Bush in 1988, defeating Clinton by 44,292 votes (48.2% to 47.5%).

Biden holds a six-point edge over Trump in Pennsylvania (52% to 46%). More than half of men (54%) and decided voters aged 35-to-54 (52%) intend to support the Republican nominee or have already cast a ballot for him.

Wisconsin

In 2016, Trump became the first Republican nominee to win the Badger State since Ronald Reagan in 1984, defeating Clinton by 22,748 votes 47.2% to 46.5%).

Biden is ahead of Trump by nine points in Wisconsin (54% to 45%). Support for the Democratic nominee is strongest among women (58%) and voters aged 18-to-34 (also 58%).

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted on October 31 and November 1, 2020, among representative samples of 450 likely voters in eight American states: Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age and gender in each state. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.6 percentage points for each state.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Appetite for Electric Vehicles Higher in the U.S. Than Canada

Price and the fear of becoming stranded are the major deterrents for motorists pondering a switch to a “carbon free” ride.

Vancouver, BC [October 22, 2020] – Vehicle owners in the United States are more likely to predict that their next car will be electric than their Canadian counterparts, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples of non-electric vehicle owners, 51% of American respondents and 42% of Canadian respondents say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that the next vehicle they acquire for themselves or their household will be electric.

“There is a significant gender gap on both North American countries when it comes to embracing the concept of electric vehicles,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Male non-electric vehicle owners are more likely to foresee an electric car in their future (48% in Canada and 68% in the United States) than their female counterparts (37% in Canada and 30% in the United States).”

In Canada, non-electric vehicle owners aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be considering a switch (61%) than those aged 35-to-54 (44%) and those aged 55 and over (37%).

In the United States, non-electric vehicle owners aged 35-to-54 are more likely to foresee a change in the future (78%) than those aged 18-to-34 (69%) and those aged 55 and over (21%).

When asked about specific issues that may make the purchase of an electric vehicle less likely, about three-in-five respondents in Canada (61%) say that the price is too expensive compared to non-electric options.

A majority of non-electric vehicle owners in Canada are fearful of becoming stranded if they cannot find a charging station (55%) and are worried about not having enough places to charge the vehicle in the areas where they usually drive (also 55%).

Fewer Canadian non-electric vehicle owners cited not having a place to charge the vehicle where they currently live (47%) and the “feel” of the vehicle compared to a non-electric one (14%).

In the United States, more than half of non-electric vehicle owners mentioned the fear of becoming stranded (53%) and price (51%) as the biggest hindrances to making a future purchase. 

More than two-in-five American respondents (45%) are concerned about a shortage of places to charge the vehicle where they usually drive, 37% lack a charging spot where they currently live, and 27% worried about the “feel” of an electric vehicle. 

The idea of the “feel” of the vehicle being a deal-breaker in the purchase of an electric car was more prevalent among non-electric vehicle owners who identify with the Republican Party in the United States (35%) and those who reside in the Canadian province of Alberta (23%).

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among representative samples of 797 adult non-electric vehicle owners in Canada and 804 adult non-electric vehicle owners in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for each country, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables for Canada here, our data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Steady National Lead for Biden as United States Election Nears

The main influences for American likely voters are party platforms, discussions with family and discussions with friends.

Vancouver, BC [October 21, 2020] – Joe Biden stands to capture a majority of the national vote in this year’s presidential election in the United States, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of likely voters, 53% of decided voters would cast a ballot for the Democratic Party nominee or have already done so, while 45% would support Republican Party incumbent Donald Trump.

Support for both Jo Jorgensen of the Libertarian Party and Howie Hawkins of the Green Party remains at 1%.

The popular vote forecast is practically unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September.

Biden holds 19-point leads over Trump among female decided voters (57% to 38%) and decided voters aged 18-to-34 (58% to 37%). The race is closer among male decided voters (50% to 48%), decided voters aged 35-to-54 (51% to 46%) and decided voters aged 55 and over (52% to 47%).

White decide voters are evenly split among the two main candidates(48% for Biden, 48% for Trump), while the level of support for the Democratic nominee is higher with Hispanic / Latino decided voters (58%) and African American decided voters (92%).

Across the country, 11% of decided voters who supported Trump in the 2016 presidential election are voting for Biden this year. Only 3% of decided voters who backed Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in 2016 are casting a ballot for Trump in 2020.

Almost two-in-five likely voters in the United States (39%) say their primary motivation when selecting who to back in the presidential election is the candidate’s ideas and policies, followed by the candidate’s political party (20%), a desire for stability (15%), disgust with other candidates (14%) and a desire for change (13%).

More than half of likely voters believe Biden is the best candidate to handle five issues: the environment (54%), race relations (53%), health care (52%), education (51%) and COVID-19 (also 51%).

The former Vice President holds the upper hand over the current President on nine other topics: government accountability (Biden 49%, Trump 34%), foreign policy (Biden 48%, Trump 38%), immigration (Biden 48%, Trump 38%), job creation (Biden 47%, Trump 41%), crime (Biden 46%, Trump 37%), the economy (Biden 45%, Trump 42%), managing the deficit (Biden 44%, Trump 35%), energy and oil (Biden 44%, Trump 39%) and national defense (Biden 44%, Trump 42%). 

Almost two thirds of likely voters in the United States (64%) say party platforms are “very influential” or “moderately influential” in their decision to support candidates in this year’s election, while 51% mention discussions with family and 48% mention cite discussions with friends.

Fewer American likely voters are swayed by endorsements from non-governmental organizations (44%), campaign ads on radio and television (43%), endorsements from unions (40%), endorsements from trade associations (39%), interaction with candidates on social media (also 39%), interaction with other people on social media (38%) and endorsements from newspapers (also 38%).

“More than half of Republican likely voters (54%) say campaign ads on radio and television are influential in their decision to support candidates,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among Democrats (45%) and Independents (28%).”

Sizeable majorities of American likely voters express confidence in the people responsible for conducting elections in their state being able to oversee the entire process (83%), enforce social distancing at polling stations (82%) and ensure that there is no fraudulent activity with mailed ballots (78%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 16 to October 18, 2020, among 1,035 likely voters in the United States and 973 decided voters in the 2020 presidential election. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.0 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 3.1 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Americans Divided on What’s Next in COVID-19 Pandemic

Satisfaction with how various levels of government have handled the situation has increased since September.

Vancouver, BC [October 19, 2020] – Adults in the United States are split in their assessment of the future during the COVD-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 44% of Americans believe the worst of the pandemic has been left “behind”, while 43% think it is still “ahead.”

“Most Americans aged 55 and over (56%) believe the worst of COVID-19 lies ahead,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among those aged 18-to-34 (32%) and those aged 35-to-54 (33%).”

Practically seven-in-ten Americans (69%) are satisfied with the way their local government has dealt with the COVID-19 outbreak, up 13 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September

The level of satisfaction also improved for state governments (65%, +9) and for the federal government (45%, +6). 

Americans who voted for Republican Party nominee Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election are more likely to be satisfied with the way the federal government has handled the pandemic (78%) than those who cast a ballot for Democratic Party contender Hillary Clinton (22%).

The approval rating for President Trump stands at 43% this month (-1), with 54% of Americans (-1) saying they disapprove of his performance.

There is a significant gender gap when it comes to public perceptions of the president. While 52% of men approve of the way Trump has handled his duties, only 36% of women concur.

In addition, while 48% of White Americans are satisfied with Trump’s performance, the rating drops to 28% among Hispanic / Latino Americans and 13% among African Americans.

Nine-in-ten Americans (90%, unchanged since September) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside, while only 8% disagree (+1) and 2% (-1) are undecided.

Three-in-five Americans (61%, -5) say they would take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available, while 26% (+4) would not follow this course of action.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 16 to October 18, 2020, among 1,100 American adults.  The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.0 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians and Americans Want Holistic Approach on Opioids

Information, rehabilitation, appropriate prescriptions and “safe supply” are supported by large majorities of residents.

Vancouver, BC [October 6, 2020] – Residents of Canada and the United States are supportive of several measures to curb the opioid crisis, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, two-in-five Canadians (39%) and more than half of Americans (53%) describe the current situation related to the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in their community as “a major problem.”

When asked about specific ideas to address the opioid crisis, more than four-in-ten respondents in the two countries (84% in Canada and 86% in the United States) agree with launching more education and awareness campaigns about drug use.

Support is also particularly high for creating more spaces for drug rehabilitation (78% in Canada and 81% in Canada), reducing the prescription of opioids by medical professionals (73% in Canada and 76% in the United States), and establishing “safe supply” programs where alternatives to opioids can be prescribed by health professionals (70% in Canada and 78% in the United States).

Three-in-five respondents (59% in Canada and 60% in the United States) agree with setting up more “harm reduction” strategies, such as legal supervised injection sites.

The notion of decriminalizing all drugs for personal use is more contentious. In Canada, 53% of respondents disagree with this idea, while 34% are in favour of it and 14% are not sure.

In the United States, 47% of respondents agree with decriminalizing all drugs for personal use, while 43% disagree and 10% are undecided.

Across North America, the decriminalization of all drugs for personal use is more popular with men (36% in Canada and 61% in the United States) and respondents aged 35-to-54 (37% in Canada and 69% in the United States).

“Only 25% of Conservative Party voters in Canada are willing to decriminalize all drugs for personal use, compared to 38% of those who supported the Liberal Party in the last federal election,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the United States, 55% of Republican Party supporters are in favour of decriminalization, along with 47% of Democrats.”

In Canada, just over a third of respondents (35%) say Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the federal government have done a “very good” or “good” job to come up with solutions to deal with the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs, while 39% deem it “bad” or “very bad” and 26% are not sure.

The rating on this issue is higher for premiers and provincial governments (43%), mayors and councils (40%), provincial legislators (39%) and the local Member of Parliament (38%).

In the United States, governors and state administrations have the highest satisfaction rating in dealing with the opioid crisis (58%), along with mayors and local governments (also 58%). The numbers are lower for President Donald Trump and the federal government (46%) and Congress (44%).

Methodology:

Results are based on online studies conducted from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States

Find our Canadian tables here, our American tables here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Race Relations Have Worsened for a Majority of Americans

The country is deeply divided on whether to rename U.S. Army installations christened after Confederate historical figures.

Vancouver, BC [September 30, 2020] – Adults in the United States hold ominous views on the issue of race relations, as considerable proportions of residents of specific ethnic background say they have experienced racism in the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 58% of Americans say race relations in the United States have worsened over the past two years, while only 30% believe they have improved.

Practically three-in-four respondents of Native American descent (73%) think race relations have worsened over the past two years—a view shared by 59% of White Americans, 58% of Asian and Pacific Islanders, 58% of African Americans and 46% of Hispanic and Latino Americans.

About three-in-five Americans say they have personally experienced behaviour that they would consider racist in the United States on social media (60%) and during day-to-day interactions with others (59%). 

Smaller proportions of Americans have endured racism at work (49%), at school (47%), during interactions with police or law enforcement officers (44%) and during interactions with the health care system (39%).

“Almost two thirds of Americans of African and Hispanic or Latino descent (64% each) say they have experienced racist behaviour when dealing with police and law enforcement in the United States,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower for Native Americans (51%), Asian and Pacific Islanders (42%) and White Americans (38%).”

More than half of Americans say they have witnessed racist behaviour on social media (68%), during day-to-day interactions with others (65%), at work (56%), at school (55%) and during interactions with police or law enforcement officers (also 55%). 

More than two-in-five Americans (46%) say they have witnessed racist behaviour during interactions with the health care system.

A majority of Americans (56%) have a positive opinion of the Black Lives Matter movement, while 35% hold negative views. 

Perceptions on Black Lives Matter vary greatly according to ethnicity, from a high of 71% among African Americans to a low of 40% among Native Americans.

Half of Americans (50%) hold positive views on the #MeToo and #TimesUp movement, while 30% have a negative opinion.

Positive perceptions of #MeToo and #TimesUp are higher with Americans aged 18-to-34 and aged 35-to-54 (56% each) than among those aged 55 and over (40%).

Respondents to this survey were also asked about four recent decisions and proposals. 

More than half of Americans agree with NASCAR’s decision to ban the Confederate Flag from events (56%) while 33% disagree.

On a regional basis, agreement with NASCAR’s choice is highest in the West (64%), followed by the Midwest (58%), the South (54%) and the Northeast (52%).

The nationwide results are similar for the State of Mississippi’s decision to change its flag to a new one that will not feature the Confederate battle emblem. A majority of Americans (56%) agree with this decree, while one third (33%) disagree.

On this particular decision, support is also highest from Americans who reside in the West (64%), followed by the Midwest (57%), the South (55%) and the Northeast (50%).

Two other proposals are decidedly more contentious. While 46% of respondents agree with the removal of monuments and sculptures that feature Americans who owned slaves, 46% disagree and 8% are undecided.

Support for the removal of these monuments and sculptures stands at 63% among Democrats and 74% among African Americans, but drops to 42% among Independents, 30% among Republicans and 40% among White Americans.

The results are similar for the notion of renaming U.S. Army installations named after Confederate historical figures. Across the country, 45% of Americans agree with this proposal, while 44% disagree.

Support for changing the names of these installations is higher among Democrats (65%) and African Americans (61%) and lower among Republicans (28%) and White Americans (39%).

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted on August 3 and August 4, 2020, and from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among 2,400 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.0 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Photo: Life Matters

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians and Americans Would Shun Debate on Abortion

The proportion of Conservatives in Canada and Republicans in the U.S. who want a discussion on this topic fell by double digits.

Vancouver, BC [September 25, 2020] – The appetite for national discussions on abortion has dropped drastically in North America, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 58% of Canadians and Americans believe there is no point in re-opening a debate about abortion in their respective countries.

Only three-in-ten Americans (30%) and one-in-four Canadians (25%) think a debate on abortion is long overdue and the discussion should be re-opened.

This represents a 16-point drop in the United States and a 12-point drop in Canada since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in July 2019.

Majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (64%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (63%) and the Conservative Party (56%) in the last federal election believe there is no point in reopening a debate about abortion right now.

“Republicans in the United States and Conservatives in Canada are not particularly convinced that this is the right time to debate abortion,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 55% of Republicans were willing to engage in a national discussion about this topic in 2019, the proportion has fallen to 40% this year. Among Canadian Conservatives, appetite for this debate dropped from 44% to 28%.”

In Canada, just under half of residents (48%, +2 since 2019) think abortion should be legal under any circumstances. More than a third of Canadians (36%, -7) think the procedure should only be allowed under certain circumstances.

In the United States, more than two-in-five respondents (44%, -4) believe abortion should be legal only under certain circumstances, while more than a third (37%, +9) think the procedure should be legal under any circumstances.

Few Americans (13%, -6) and Canadians (8%, +3) endorse the concept of abortion being illegal in all circumstances.

Americans aged 35-to-54 (43%), residents of the West (46%) and Democrats (also 46%) are more likely to believe that abortion should be legal under any circumstances.

Methodology:

Results are based on online studies conducted from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States.

Find our Canadian tables here, our American tables here and download the press release here.

Photo by Josh Hild.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca