More in Canada and U.S. Feel Climate Change is Major Crisis

Most Canadians and Americans are willing to pay higher taxes in order to adequately address global warming.

Vancouver, BC [September 13, 2022] – The concerns of residents of Canada and the United States about global warming have increased over the past two years, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 68% of Canadians (+6 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2020) and 60% of Americans (+9) feel that climate change is a “major crisis”.

Almost seven-in-ten Canadians (69%, +5) and three-in-five Americans (60%, +7) think global warming is a fact and is mostly caused by emissions from vehicles and industrial facilities.

About one-in-five respondents in the two countries (20% in Canada and 21% in the United States) believe climate change is a fact and is mostly caused by natural changes. Only 5% of Canadians and 12% of Americans brand global warming as a theory that has not yet been proven.

“Belief in human-made climate change is low among Republicans in the United States (35%) and Conservatives in Canada (47%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are strikingly different among Democrats in the United States (80%) and Liberal Party voters in Canada (82%).”

Majorities of Canadians and Americans (59% and 61% respectively) say they are willing to pay higher taxes to adequately address climate change. Only two other issues come close to this level of acceptance for higher taxation: schools (CAN 57%, USA 64%) and homelessness (CAN 57%, USA 61%).

Fewer Canadians and Americans are willing to pay higher taxes in order to adequately address four other issues: forest fires (55% and 58% respectively), floods (52% and 56% respectively), housing improvements (51% each) and transit improvements (44% and 46% respectively).

Sizeable majorities of Canadians and Americans believe three groups should be doing more now to deal with issues related to climate change that are happening or impacting people directly now: companies and corporations (75% and 70% respectively), governments (69% and 65%) and individuals and consumers (67% and 65%).

Most residents of both countries also believe that more action is required to address issues related to climate change that may happen or impact people directly in the future from companies and corporations (76% in Canada and 70% in the United States), governments (72% and 66% respectively) and individuals and consumers (68% and 65%).

Parents of children under the age of 18 were asked about the effect of conversations they have had with their kids about climate change. Significant proportions of parents in Canada (85%) and the United States (79%) say they are recycling more as a result of these chats.

Practically half of American parents (49%) and a majority of Canadian parents (55%) claim to be driving less, and more than two-in-five (44% in the United States, 47% in Canada) say they are taking shorter showers as a result of conversations about global warming with their children.

Fewer parents in each country acknowledge taking other steps, such as reducing their consumption of meat (CAN 36%, USA 30%), changing the way they voted in a federal election (24% each) or changing the way they voted in a local election (CAN 18%, USA 21%).

Methodology: Results are based on online studies conducted from August 19 to August 21, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca