Views on the Death Penalty Mostly Stagnant in Canada

More than half of supporters of capital punishment think it would serve as a deterrent for potential murderers.  

Vancouver, BC [March 11. 2022] – Half of Canadians continue to believe that it is time to bring back capital punishment, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 51% of Canadians are in favour of reinstating the death penalty for murder in Canada, while 37% are opposed and 12% are undecided.  

Support for capital punishment is highest among Canadians aged 55 and over (55%), and drops slightly among those aged 35-to-54 (51%) and those aged 18-to-34 (47%).  

More than three-in-five Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in last year’s federal election (63%) are in favour of reinstating the death penalty for murder in Canada, along with 52% of those who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP) and 49% of those who cast ballots for Liberal Party candidates.  

This year’s findings are in harmony with polls conducted by Research Co. in 2021 and 2020, where 50% and 51% of Canadians respectively backed the return of capital punishment.  

When asked about the suitable punishment for a person convicted of murder, more than a third of Canadians (36%, +2) select the death penalty while a majority (52%, +1) choose life imprisonment without the possibility of parole.  

“For the past three years, there has been consistency when Canadians are asked about capital punishment,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While about half are in favour of reinstating the death penalty, support drops when the concept of life imprisonment is introduced.”  

A majority of Canadians (54%, +3 since 2021) believe that the death penalty is sometimes appropriate. Smaller proportions of Canadians consider capital punishment as never appropriate (27%, -2) or always appropriate (11%, +1).  

More than half of Canadians who support bringing back the death penalty believe it would serve as a deterrent for potential murderers (57%) and save taxpayers money and the costs associated with keeping a person behind bars (55%).  

Many supporters of capital punishment in Canada also think it is a penalty that fits the crime because a convicted murderer has taken a life (51%) and say it would provide closure to the families of murder victims (49%). One-in-four (26%) believe murderers cannot be rehabilitated.  

Two thirds of Canadians who oppose the death penalty (67%) are concerned about the possibility of a person being wrongly convicted and executed.  

About two-in-five opponents of capital punishment consider it wrong to take a convicted murderer’s own life (42%), doubt that it will work as a deterrent (39%), and call for murderers to do their time in prison, as indicated by a judge (also 39%). Fewer than one-in-five (17%) think murderers can be rehabilitated.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from February 25 to February 27, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Want Federal Government to Support Ukraine in Crisis

More than half of Canadians agree with the decisions taken by Ottawa before and after the Russian invasion.  

Vancouver, BC [March 3, 2022] – A majority of Canadians have a clear idea of the role they want the federal government to play during the international crisis between Ukraine and Russia, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 53% of Canadians think Ottawa should “definitely” (34%) or “probably” (19%) support Ukraine.  

About a third of Canadians (32%) think the federal government should do nothing or avoid getting involved in the conflict, while only 1% believe Ottawa should back Russia.  

“Canadians aged 55 and over (68%) are particularly empathetic of the federal government’s involvement in support of Ukraine,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Canadians aged 18-to-34 are evenly divided, with 43% wanting to support Ukraine and 41% preferring neutrality.”  

Sizeable proportions of Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (67%) and the Liberal Party (65%) in the 2021 election want the federal government to side with Ukraine at this point. The proportion is smaller, albeit still a majority, among those who voted for the Conservative Party last year (53%).  

Two thirds of Canadians (66%) have followed news stories related to the international crisis between Ukraine and Russia “very closely” or “moderately closely.”  

At least two thirds of residents of British Columbia (66%), Quebec (69%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (71%) have been paying attention to the situation in Ukraine, along with majorities of those who reside in Ontario (65%), Alberta (63%) and Atlantic Canada (also 63%).  

At the time the survey was conducted, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau had announced that Canada would send $7.8 million in lethal equipment and provide a $500 million loan to Ukraine. Trudeau also established economic sanctions against the President of Russia and his inner circle.  

More than half of Canadians (52%) agree with Trudeau’s decisions, while 32% disagree and 17% are undecided.  

Canadians who voted for the Conservatives in 2021 are more likely to disagree with the actions of the prime minister on this file (44%) than those who supported the New Democrats or the Liberals (35% and 27% respectively).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from February 25 to February 27, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Perceptions of Royal Family Worsen Considerably in Canada

Almost half of Canadians would prefer to have an elected head of state, while only one-in-five would keep the monarchy.  

Vancouver, BC [March 1, 2022] – Only one-in-five Canadians express an outright preference for Canada to remain a monarchy, while almost half continue to yearn for an elected head of state, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, only 21% of Canadians say that, thinking of Canada’s constitution, they would prefer for the country to remain a monarchy, down three points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in February 2021 and the lowest level recorded in six separate surveys since 2009.  

For the first time in 13 years, almost half of Canadians (49%, +4) express a preference for Canada to have an elected head of state—a proportion that rises to 55% among men, 51% among those aged 55 and over and 59% among Quebecers.  

Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party and the New Democratic Party (NDP) in last year’s federal election are more likely to prefer having an elected head of state in Canada (each at 51%) than those who cast ballots for the Conservative Party (45%).  

Over the past year, the views of Canadians on seven members of the Royal Family have worsened markedly. Queen Elizabeth II is regarded favourably by 64% of Canadians, down four points. The rating fell more dramatically for Prince Harry (50%, -14) and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex (44%, -10).  

About three-in-five Canadians hold positive views of Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge (60%, -4) and Prince William (58%, -9). As has been the case for the past four years, the lowest favourability numbers are posted by Prince Charles (35%, -6) and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall (27%, -3).  

Just over one third of Canadians (34%, -1) would like to see Prince William take over as king from Queen Elizabeth II, while fewer than one-in-five (17%, -8) would rather have Prince Charles—the first in line—as monarch.  

Since 2019, there has been a steady growth in the proportion of Canadians who, when asked about the future king, steer clear of both Prince Charles and Prince William,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Four years ago, only 19% of Canadians envisioned a Canada without a monarch, but now 34% feel this way.”  

The notion of Prince William as the next king is particularly popular in Atlantic Canada (39%), British Columbia (38%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 38%).  

Among Canadians who express a preference for the continuation of the monarchy, Prince William is regarded as a superior option to Prince Charles (50% to 36%).  

There was little movement on a question related to Canada’s future. Fewer than half of Canadians (48%, -1) believe the country will “definitely” or “probably” be a monarchy two decades from now, while 30% (-1) expect Canada to have an elected head of state by that time.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from February 18 to February 20, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Back Reliance on Emergencies Act By 2-to-1 Margin

Almost three-in-five oppose the protests and blockades against restrictions and mandates related to the COVID-19 pandemic.  

Vancouver, BC [February 24, 2022] – Most Canadians are not supportive of the people who have participated in protests and blockades against restrictions and mandates related to the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 59% of Canadians oppose the protests and blockades, while 35% are in favour of them and 6% are not sure.  

The highest level of rejection to the protests and blockades is observed in Atlantic Canada (66%), followed by British Columbia (62%), Alberta (also 62%), Quebec (60%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (59%) and Ontario (55%).  

A slight majority of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (52%) oppose the protests and blockades. The proportion is higher among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (54%) and aged 55 and over (71%).  

“Almost two thirds of Canadians who have been vaccinated against COVID-19 (64%) voice opposition to the protests and blockades,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, seven-in-ten Canadians who have not been vaccinated (70%) are supportive.”  

More than four-in-five Canadians (81%) say they are following news stories related to the protests and blockades “very closely” or “moderately closely.”  

More than three-in-five Canadians (63%) think the federal government was justified in invoking the Emergencies Act to deal with the protests and blockades against restrictions and mandates related to the COVID-19 pandemic, while 28% think Ottawa’s actions were unjustified.  

Majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (83%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (67%) and the Green Party (53%) in the September 2021 federal election endorse the government’s invocation of the Emergencies Act. Support is lower among Canadians who cast ballots for the Conservative Party (46%) and the People’s Party (30%) last year.  

Just over four-in-five Canadians (81%) are “very concerned” or “moderately concerned” about violence breaking out at the site of protests and blockades. Slightly smaller proportions of Canadians are worried about foreign money being used to fund the activities of protestors (71%), Canada’s image in the world being negatively affected by the protests and the federal government’s actions (70%), and the federal government relying on the Emergencies Act to end other protests in the future (65%).

More than three-in-five Canadians (65%) disagree with the notion that the federal government should be overthrown. Just over one-in-four Canadians (26%) agree with this statement, including 30% of Albertans, 30% of Ontarians, 46% of Conservative voters and 55% of People’s Party voters.  

Majorities of Canadians disagree with three other ideas: that the people protesting against restrictions and mandates are fighting for freedom (64%), that the actions of the people protesting against restrictions and mandates are justified (58%) and that all COVID-19 mandates and restrictions should be repealed (54%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from February 18 to February 20, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Continue to Have Positive Views on Immigration

Canadians who supported the Liberals and the New Democrats in 2021 are more likely to feel this way than Conservative voters.  

Vancouver, BC [February 15, 2022] – A majority of Canadians hold favourable views on immigration, although some political and regional disparities persist, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 54% of Canadians think immigration is having a mostly positive effect in the country, unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2020.  

Just over one-in-four Canadians (26%, -4) think immigration is having a mostly negative effect, while 19% (+3) are not sure.  

Majorities of Canadians who reside in Ontario (58%), Quebec (56%), Alberta (also 56%), Atlantic Canada (54%) and British Columbia (also 51%) hold favourable views on immigration.  

In Saskatchewan and Manitoba, 40% of residents think immigration is having a mostly positive effect in Canada, while 39% believe it is having a mostly negative effect.  

Almost seven-in-ten Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2021 federal election (69%) think immigration is having a mostly positive effect in Canada, compared to 60% among those who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP) and 46% among those who cast ballots for Conservative Party candidates.  

Just under two-in-five Canadians (39%, -4) think the number of legal immigrants who are allowed to relocate in Canada should remain the same, while 25% (+8) would increase this amount and 25% (-7) would decrease it.  

“More than a third of Quebecers (36%) are in favour of allowing a larger number of immigrants to settle in Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, 36% of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba call for a reduction in immigration levels.”  

Three-in-four Canadians (75%, =) believe the hard work and talent of immigrants makes Canada better, and practically two thirds (65%, =) believe immigrants should only be allowed in Canada if they adopt Canadian values.  

Canadians who voted for the Conservatives in the 2021 federal election are more likely to call for newcomers to Canada to adopt Canadian values (80%) than those who cast ballots for the Liberals (65%) or the New Democrats (55%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on February 6 and February 7, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Bad Breath Equals Break Up for More Than One-in-Four Canadians

A similar proportion would stop dating a person because of their manners at the dinner table.  

Vancouver, BC [February 11, 2022] – More than a quarter of Canadians would not be interested in continuing a romantic relationship with a person who had bad breath or poor etiquette at the dinner table, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 28% of Canadians say they would stop going out with a person because they have bad breath.  

More than three-in-ten Canadians aged 55 and over (31%) would forego a relationship with a person with bad breath. The proportion is lower among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (24%) and those aged 18-to-34 (also 24%).  

There is no political divide on this particular matter. Similar proportions of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (30%), the Conservative Party (28%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (27%) in last year’s federal election would break up with a person who had bad breath.  

More than a quarter of Canadians (27%) would stop dating a person because of their manners at the dinner table.   “A third of Canadian women (32%) are willing to call off a relationship with a person because of the way they eat,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 22% of Canadian men would follow the same course of action.”  

Residents of British Columbia are more likely to stop going out with a person who had inferior etiquette at the dinner table (33%) than their counterparts in Atlantic Canada (27%), Ontario (also 27%), Quebec (26%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (25%) and Alberta (23%).  

Only 9% of Canadians say they would break up with a person because they have a different diet than theirs, and 8% would not date a person who ate animal products.  

Fewer than one-in-ten Canadians acknowledge already calling off a relationship because their partner had bad breath (7%), inferior table manners (6%), a diet they disagreed with (3%) or consumed animal products (also 3%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from January 28 to January 30, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Perceive “Booster Shot” Campaign Positively

Just over three-in-five are satisfied with the current pace of COVID-19 vaccination efforts in their province.  

Vancouver, BC [February 8, 2022] – Significant proportions of Canadians are content with the way in which governments are managing the campaign to provide COVID-19 “booster shots”, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 68% of Canadians are satisfied with the procurement of “booster shot” doses from the federal government while 22% are dissatisfied and 9% are undecided.  

More than four-in-five Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in last year’s federal election (84%) are satisfied with the procurement of “booster shots”, along with two thirds of those who cast ballots for candidates representing the New Democratic Party (NDP) (69%) and the Conservative Party (68%).  

Almost two thirds of Canadians (65%) are satisfied with the “booster shot” plans and phases outlined by their province and just over three-in-five (61%) are content with the pace of “booster shot” vaccination efforts.  

“As was the case in the early stages of the COVID-19 vaccination rollout in 2021, older Canadians are more likely to believe that the current effort is proceeding at the proper pace,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 55% of Canadians aged 18-to-34 are satisfied with how vaccines are being provided in their province, the proportion rises to 61% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 67% among those aged 55 and over.”  

In Quebec, 68% of residents are satisfied with the “booster shot” plans and phases outlined by the provincial government. The rating is similarly high in British Columbia (67%), Ontario (65%) and Atlantic Canada (64%), but lower in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (60%) and Alberta (55%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from January 28 to January 30, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

COVID-19 Rating for Governments Drops Markedly Across Canada

Satisfaction with the federal government fell by seven points since December, while Quebec experienced a 17-point drop.  

Vancouver, BC [February 4, 2022] – Fewer Canadians are content with the way various levels of government are dealing with COVID-19, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 56% of Canadians are satisfied with the way the federal government has managed the pandemic, down seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2021.  

Fewer Canadians are also content with the way municipal governments (57%, -7) and provincial governments (51%, -11) are handling COVID-19.  

Satisfaction with the performance of the provincial administration fell drastically in Quebec, from 72% in December to 55% in late January. The numbers also declined in three other provinces: from 68% to 60% in British Columbia, from 56% to 51% in Ontario, and from 42% to 33% in Alberta.  

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%) believe the measures that are in place in their province to deal with COVID-19 are correct for the situation, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2021. In addition, 27% (-2) think the measures do not go far enough and 23% (+4) say they go too far.  

“In Quebec, where the government hinted at taxing the unvaccinated, 34% of residents believe the COVID-19 measures go too far,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In Alberta, 42% of residents think their provincial administration has not done enough.”

Compared to May 2021, fewer Canadians endorse their provincial governments on specific competencies. Fewer than three-in-ten Canadians trust their provincial administration to respond to a natural disaster (57%, -3), establish public health guidelines (55%, -3), release accurate information (53%, -8), release complete information (51%, -5) and ensure the sustainability of the health care system (50%, -5). Even fewer Canadians have confidence in their provincial governments to spend tax dollars wisely (38%, -5).  

Sizeable proportions of Canadians both consider COVID-19 as a real threat (85%, =) and support requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside (84%, +1). In addition, just under three-in-four (72%, -4) acknowledge wearing a mask every time they go out.  

Just over three-in-five Canadians (61%, -8) agree with the decision to allow K-12 students to go back to in-class learning in their province. Support for this measure is highest in British Columbia, Quebec and Atlantic Canada (each at 63%).  

Just over half of Canadians (52%, +5) think the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic is “behind us”, while 29% (-4) believe it is still “ahead of us.”  

The concept of “vaccine passports” continues to be backed by majorities of Canadians for travel abroad (70%, -3), to a different province (68%, -3) and within the same province (62%, -2).  

Practically two thirds of Canadians also think it is a good idea to rely on  “vaccine passports” to go to live sporting events (69%, -2), visit a gym or fitness facility (68%, -3), go to live concerts (also 68%, -3), go to the cinema or theater (67% -5) or work at an office (65%, -3).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from January 28 to January 30, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Almost Half of Canadians Will Ignore Beijing 2022 Winter Games

Practically three-in-five (59%) think Canada should boycott this year’s Winter Olympics—including 65% of those aged 55 and over.  

Vancouver, BC [February 1, 2022] – The proportion of Canadians who will avoid coverage of the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics has increased slightly across the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 47% of Canadians say they will make a conscious effort to refrain from watching the sporting event, up two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2021.  

Half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (50%) and a majority of Quebecers (53%) say they will consciously avoid this year’s Winter Olympics.  

Almost three-in-five Canadians (59%, +3) think Canada should boycott the 2022 Winter Olympics over China’s human rights record—a proportion that rises to 62% among men, 65% among Canadians aged 55 and over and 67% among those who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2021 federal election.  

“Sizeable majorities of Canadians who reside in Quebec (66%) and British Columbia (also 66%) are in favour of a full boycott of the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support for a full boycott is also high in Atlantic Canada (58%), Ontario (57%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (56%).”  

More than seven-in-ten Canadians (72%, +2) are worried about  the health and safety of Canadian athletes who participate in the Beijing Winter Olympics, including 74% of women and 83% of those aged 55 and over.  

Across Canada, 72% of respondents (+2) believe athletes who wish to protest China’s human rights record during the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics should be able to do so. The same proportion (72%, +1) believe the International Olympic Committee (IOC) should not punish athletes who decide to speak out.  

Just over half of Canadians (51%, -1) say they check labels “all the time” or “most of the time” to review where the products they purchase for their home or family were manufactured.  

More than half of Canadians never avoid goods made in Europe (62%, -6), the United States (57%, -5) and Mexico (54%, -2). The proportion is slightly lower for products manufactured in Russia (44%, -5) and India (43%, -5).  

Compared to December, there is little change in the perception of Canadians about goods manufactured in China. Only 30% (-2) never refrain from buying them, while seven-in-ten (70%, +2) avoid Chinese products “all the time” (16%, +1), “most of the time” (25%, +5) or “some of the time” (29%, -4).  

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from January 21 to January 23, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Than Half of Canadians Rate Economic Conditions as Bad

Canadians are split when asked if they have confidence in Justin Trudeau to do the right thing to help the economy.  

Vancouver, BC [January 28, 2022] – Many Canadians appear dissatisfied with the current state of the nation’s finances, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 54% of Canadians rate the economic conditions in Canada today as “bad” or “very bad”, while 41% consider them “very good” or “good.”  

Economic confidence is particularly low in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (26%) and Alberta (33%). At least two-in-five residents of British Columbia (40%), Ontario (43%), Atlantic Canada (also 43%) and Quebec (48%) think the economic conditions in Canada today are “very good” or “good.”  

Only one-in-five Canadians (20%) expect the Canadian economy to improve over the next six months, while 30% foresee a decline and 41% believe it will remain the same.  

Almost three-in-five Canadians (58%) say their own personal finances today are “very good” or “good”, while almost two-in-five (38%) state that they are “bad” or “very bad.”  

Compared to a survey conducted by Research Co. in April 2020, Canadians are not as concerned about possible financial setbacks.  

More than two-in-five Canadians acknowledge worrying “frequently” or “occasionally” about two issues in the past couple of months: the safety of their savings (44%, -8) and the value of their investments (41%, -9).  

Fewer Canadians are concerned about unemployment affecting their household (31%, -15), being able to pay their mortgage or rent (31%, -10) or their employer running into serious financial trouble (26%, -11).  

More than four-in-five Canadians expect the price of a week’s worth of groceries (83%) and gasoline (82%) to go up in the next six months. At least three-in-five Canadians also foresee rising costs for real estate (72%), a new car (71%) and a new television set (62%).  

While 47% of Canadians trust Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to do the right thing to help the economy, 48% express no confidence in his leadership.  

More than a third of Canadians (37%) trust Governor of the Bank of Canada Tiff Macklem to make the right decisions, while only 29% feel the same way about Federal Leader of the Opposition Erin O’Toole.

“Canadians are not particularly thrilled with the current economic conditions and are not expecting a quick fix to address inflation,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However, they are less likely to express grave concerns about meeting existing financial commitments or losing their job than in the early stages of the pandemic.”

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from January 21 to January 23, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians, Hockey Fans Agree on Banning Head Shots

Two thirds of Canadians and three-in-four hockey fans believe the game would be “better off” if this regulation is implemented.  

Vancouver, BC [January 14, 2022] – A significant proportion of Canadians and hockey fans are ready to take a significant step to make the professional game safer, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 80% of Canadians—and 89% of self-described “hockey fans”—support banning heads shots in professional hockey.  

“At least four-in-five residents of British Columbia (83%), Ontario (81%), Quebec (also 81%) and Atlantic Canada (80%) are in favour of a head shot ban in professional hockey,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “They are joined by 75% of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba and 68% of Albertans.”  

When asked about a ban on fighting in professional hockey, Canadians favour the idea by a 2-to-1 margin (60% to 29%). Hockey fans are divided, with 49% opposing this course of action and 46% supporting it.  

The idea of banning fights in professional hockey is particularly popular in Quebec (69%). Majorities in Ontario (59%), British Columbia (57%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 57%), Atlantic Canada (55%) and Alberta (51%) are also supportive.  

Two thirds of Canadians (66%) and three-in-four hockey fans (74%) believe hockey would be better off if heads shots are banned from the professional game.  

The numbers are lower for a ban on fighting, with 43% of Canadians and 28% of hockey fans thinking this regulation would be beneficial.  

More than half of Canadians (52%) rate the efforts of the National Hockey League (NHL) in looking after the safety of its players as “very good” or “good”—a proportion that rises to 76% among fans.  

More than a quarter of Canadians (27%) think professional hockey has become a more violent sport over the past five years. Women (29%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (31%) are more likely to believe that the sport is now more violent.  

One-in-five Canadians (20%) say they would encourage their kids to avoid playing hockey as a result of recent violent incidents in the sport. The same proportion (20%) would refrain from buying products from companies that sponsor professional hockey, while one-in-four (25%) would watch fewer hockey games than they currently do.  

Methodology:  Results are based on an online study conducted from December 15 to December 17, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and here, and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Positive Perceptions on China Remain Low Across Canada

Only Iran and North Korea post a lower favourability ranking among the 15 nations included in the semi-annual survey.  

Vancouver, BC [January 7, 2022] – As has been the case for the past year, only one-in-five Canadians hold favourable views on the People’s Republic of China, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 20% of Canadians have a positive opinion of China. The results are similar to the ones reported by Research Co. after nationwide polls conducted in July 2021 (21%) and December 2020 (19%).  

“Just a few weeks before Beijing hosts the Winter Olympics, two thirds of Canadians (68%) say their perception of China is negative,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion rises to 71% in British Columbia and to 77% among Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2021 federal election.”

Half of Canadians (50%, =) hold a positive opinion of the United States, while 41% (+1) express negative views.  

The favourability rating for the United States on this question is highest in Alberta (58%), followed by Quebec (56%), Ontario (51%), Atlantic Canada (44%), British Columbia (43%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (36%).  

Canadians who voted for the Conservatives and the Liberal Party last year are more likely to express positive views on the United States (59% and 55% respectively) than those who cast ballots for New Democratic Party (NDP) candidates (31%).  

Sizeable majorities of Canadians continue to hold favourable perceptions on the five other countries that—along with the United States and Canada—are part of the G7: the United Kingdom (71%, -2), Germany (69%, =), Japan (69%, +1), Italy (69%, -4) and France (68%, -5).  

A majority of Canadians (55%, -2) have a positive opinion of South Korea. The rating dropped markedly for two other nations: Mexico (45%, -4) and India (37%, -4).  

Fewer than three-in-ten Canadians hold favourable views on Venezuela (28%, -1), Russia (24%, -4), Saudi Arabia (23%, =), Iran (16%, -1) and North Korea (14%, -1).  

While just over three-in-ten Canadians aged 18-to-34 (31%) express positive opinions on Russia, the proportion drops to 26% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 16% among those aged 55 and over.  

Methodology:  Results are based on an online study conducted from December 15 to December 17, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Belief in Astrology and Other Concepts Falls in Canada

Only 14% of Canadians say they currently pay attention to astrology, while 58% claim to have never followed it.  
 
Vancouver, BC [January 4, 2022] – Fewer Canadians believe in astrology than two years ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 32% of Canadians believe in the concept of studying the movements and relative positions of celestial objects to make observations about human affairs and terrestrial events, down four points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2019.  
 
Two-in-five Albertans (40%, +13) say they believe in astrology, along with 34% of British Columbians (+3) and 31% of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (+3). The numbers are lower in Ontario (38%, -4), Atlantic Canada (30%, -7) and Quebec (22%, -14).  
 
“While belief in astrology is down at the national level, there is significant growth among Canada’s youngest adults,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (55%, +6) believe in the concept, compared to 36% among those aged 25-to-54 (-1) and 23% among those aged 55 and over (-4).”  
 
When asked about their behaviour, 14% of Canadians (-6) say they currently pay attention to astrology—a proportion that includes 26% of those aged 18-to-34, 18% of Ontarians and 16% of women.  
 
Larger proportions of Canadians say they used to pay attention to astrology at some point in their lives (28%, +1) or claim to have never paid attention to it (58%, +4).  
 
The proportion of Canadians who believe in three other concepts is also lower than it was in 2019. Just under one third of the country’s residents (32%, -1) believe in haunted houses, or buildings being inhabited by spirits of dead people.  
 
Belief in haunted houses is highest in British Columbia (38%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (37%) and Alberta (36%), and lower in Ontario (32%), Atlantic Canada (30%) and Quebec (24%).  
 
Fewer than three-in-ten Canadians (28%, -3) believe in clairvoyance, or the ability to gain information about an object, person, location or physical event through extrasensory perception.  
 
Women are more likely to believe in clairvoyance (35%) than men (21%).  
 
More than one-in-four Canadians (26%, -5) believe in mediumship, or mediating communication between living human beings and spirits of dead people.  
 
While almost half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 believe in mediumship (48%), the proportion drops to 30% among those aged 35-to-54 and 16% among those aged 55 and over.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 15 to December 17, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Majorities in Alberta and Ontario Would Prefer a Different Premier

Since August, the proportion of Albertans who feel they would be “better off” as a country increased by 10 points to 38%.  

Vancouver, BC [December 28, 2021] – As the year draws to an end, residents of Alberta and Ontario are particularly dissatisfied with their premiers, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 51% of Canadians think their province would be better off with a different head of government in charge.  

Majorities of Albertans (73%, +5 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2021) and Ontarians (57%, +3) suggest that the state of affairs would be more satisfactory under a different premier. The proportion is lower in Quebec (42%, +4) and British Columbia (35%, +1).  

Practically half of Canadians (49%, +2) believe their province would be better off with a different Prime Minister in Ottawa, while 36% disagree and 15% are undecided.  

Criticism of the current prime minister is strongest in Alberta (65%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (56%) and British Columbia (53%), followed by Ontario (49%), Quebec (42%) and Atlantic Canada (38%).  

Just under one-in-five Canadians (18%) believe their province would be better off joining the United States and becoming an American state—a proportion that rises to 25% in Alberta and 24% in Quebec.  

Almost two-in-five Albertans (38%, +10) and three-in-ten Quebecers (30%, +5) believe their province would be better off as its own country.  

“Separatist sentiment in Alberta is currently near the levels observed in December 2019 (40%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Across the province, 16% of residents strongly agree with the idea that they would be better off as an independent nation.”  

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 15 to December 17, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Half of Canadians Expect Fun, Not Stressful, Holiday Season

“Merry Christmas” is still the preferred greeting, but “Happy Holidays” is gaining ground among the youngest adults.  

Vancouver, BC [December 21, 2021] – Compared to last year, more Canadians think the holiday season will be a time of joy and excitement, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians say they expect this time of the year to be “more fun than stressful”, up 19 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2020.  

Only 27% of Canadians (-10) believe this holiday season will be “more stressful than fun”, while 24% (+9) are undecided.  

“Majorities of Quebecers (53%) and Ontarians (51%) expect the current holiday season to be more fun than stressful,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower in Alberta (46%) and British Columbia (41%).”  

More than three-in-five Canadians (62%, -6) state that “Merry Christmas” is their preferred greeting for the season, while 20% (+6) say “Happy Holidays” is their favourite.  

Significant majorities of Canadians of all age groups favour “Merry Christmas“ as a greeting. “Happy Holidays” is more popular with Canadians aged 18-to-34 (24%) than among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (21%) and 55 and over (14%).  

When Canadians are asked about six components of their lives, majorities say that “family” (78%, -2) and “friends” (54%, =) are “very important” to them personally.  

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%) say “country” is “very important” to them, down 10 points since 2020. Fewer of the country’s residents feel the same way about  “career” (29%, =), “religion” (22%, -2) and “affluence” (11%, =).  

Practically half of Canadians (49%, -3) say they are “very” or “moderately” spiritual—a proportion that rises to 52% among women, 53% among those aged 55 and over and 53% among Albertans.  

Across Canada, almost one-in-five residents (18%) say they are “atheist” or “agnostic”, including 23% of Ontarians and 24% of British Columbians. Half of Canadians (50%, -6) describe themselves as Christian.  

One third of Canadians (33%, +3) say they never attend religious services. The proportion rises to 35% in Quebec and 38% in British Columbia.  

When asked about specific delicacies that are usually enjoyed during the holiday season, at least half of Canadians say they like turkey (84%), cranberry sauce (64%), Brussels sprouts (62%), fruit cake (56%), egg nog (54%) and mince pies (50%). Fewer Canadians express a preference for plum pudding (43%) and mulled wine (34%).  

There is a marked gender gap when Canadians ponder egg nog, with 60% of men saying they like the beverage compared to only 48% of women. In fact, Canadian women are more likely to “definitely dislike” egg nog (32%) than to “definitely like” it (27%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 8 to December 10, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Views on Pandemic Worsen Considerably Across Canada

Only 47% of Canadians think the worst of COVID-19 is “behind us”, down 18 points since November.  

Vancouver, BC [December 17, 2021] – Fewer than half of Canadians are optimistic about the future ramifications of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 47% of Canadians say that the worst of the pandemic is “behind us”, down 18 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November.  

A third of Canadians (33%, +12) believe the worst of COVID-19 is “ahead of us”, while 20% (+5) are not sure.  

“More than half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (55%) and aged 35-to-54 (52%) believe that the pandemic will not worsen,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 37% of those aged 55 and over feel the same way.”  

Across the country, 85% of Canadians (=) consider COVID-19 as a real threat.There is little movement in the level of satisfaction that Canadians express when asked to rate the way their municipal (64%, +1), federal (63%, +1) and provincial governments (62%, +3) have dealt with the pandemic.  

More than two thirds of residents of Quebec (72%, -4) and British Columbia (68%, +6) believe that their provincial administrations have handled COVID-19 well. The rating is stagnant in Ontario (56%, =). Alberta continues to hold the lowest numbers among the four most populous provinces, but saw its standing improve markedly, from 29% in December to 42% this month.  

More than four-in-five Canadians (83%, +2) are in favour of requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside. Just over three-in-four Canadians (76%, +6) say they wear a mask every time they go out.  

The notion of allowing K-12 students to go back to in-class learning is supported by 69% of Canadians (-5).  

Sizeable proportions of Canadians continue to support the use of a “vaccine passport” for specific endeavours, including travel to other countries (73%, -1 since November), to go to the theatre or cinema (72%, +3), to go to live concerts (also 71%, +1), to go to live sporting events (also 71%, +1), to visit a gym or fitness facility (also 71%, +1), for travel to other Canadian provinces (also 71%, +1), to be able to work at an office (68%, +1) and for travel inside the same province (66%, +1).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 8 to December 10, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Canadians Continue to Back Boycott of Beijing 2022 Winter Games

Two thirds of Canadians (68%) say they refrain from buying products made in China at least some of the time.  

Vancouver, BC [December 9, 2021] – More than half of Canadians think the country’s athletes should avoid taking part in the next edition of the Winter Olympics, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 56% of Canadians think Canada should boycott the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing over China’s human rights record.  

The level of support for a boycott of the 2022 Winter Olympics is exactly the same as it was in a survey conducted by Research Co. in August 2021.  

“The idea of a Canadian boycott of the Beijing Winter Olympics is more attractive in Ontario (60%), British Columbia (59%) and Quebec (56%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are lower in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (51%), Atlantic Canada (50%) and Alberta (49%).”  

Similar proportions of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (61%), the Conservative Party (59%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (58%) in this year’s federal election are in favour of a boycott of the 2022 Winter Olympics.  

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) are worried about the health and safety of Canadian athletes who participate in the Beijing Winter Olympics, and 45% say they will make a conscious effort to refrain from watching the games.  

Almost three-in-four Canadians (74%) believe athletes who want to protest China’s human rights record during the 2022 Winter Olympics should be able to do so, and a slightly smaller proportion (71%) think the International Olympic Committee (IOC) should not punish those who actually speak out.  

Across the country, 52% of Canadians claim to check labels “all the time” or “most of the time” to see where the products they buy for the home or family were manufactured.  

More than three-in-five Canadians say they never refrain from buying products made in Europe (68%), the United States (62%) and Mexico (56%), while just under half follow the same course of action for goods manufactured in Russia (49%) and India (48%).  

Only 32% of Canadians say they never refrain from buying products manufactured in China, with two thirds of residents (68%) saying they avoid purchasing Chinese goods “all the time” (15%), “most of the time” (20%) or “some of the time” (33%).  

Women (70%), British Columbians (71%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (75%) are more likely to avoid acquiring products manufactured in China at least “some of the time.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 4 to December 6, 2021, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Canadians Are More Interested in Super Bowl Than Grey Cup

More than half of Canadians (55%) say they are fans of the National Hockey League (NHL).  
 
Vancouver, BC [December 7, 2021] – Canadians are more likely to say that they plan to watch the final game of the National Football League (NFL) season than its equivalent for the Canadian Football League (CFL), a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 40% of Canadians say they will “definitely” or “probably” watch the Grey Cup on December 12, while a slight majority (52%) will not.  
 
When Canadians are asked about the Super Bowl—which will take place on February 13, 2022—half (50%) say they intend to tune in while 44% say they will not.  
 
“Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to say they will watch the Grey Cup (45%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (36%) and aged 18-to-34 (39%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The country’s youngest adults are more likely to say they will tune in to the Super Bowl (53%) than those who are middle aged (47%) or older (49%).”  
 
In Saskatchewan and Manitoba, a majority of residents (55%) intend to watch the Grey Cup this Sunday. The proportion is lower in Alberta (43%), Quebec (41%), British Columbia (40%), Ontario (39%) and Atlantic Canada (26%).  
 
A majority of Canadians (55%) say they consider themselves fans of the National Hockey League (NHL), up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September 2020.  
 
More than a third of Canadians (36%, +5) are fans of the NFL. The numbers are lower for the CFL (32%, -1), the National Basketball Association (NBA) (31%, -6), Major League Baseball (MLB) (31%, -2) and Major League Soccer (22%, +1).  
 
Over the past two years, about one-in-five Canadians (19%) say their interest in the NHL has increased. Fewer of the country’s residents report paying more attention to the NBA (12%), the NFL (10%), MLB (8%), the CFL (also 8%) and MLS (also 8%).  
 
The Edmonton CFL franchise changed its name this year from Eskimos to Elks. Just under half of Canadians (46%) agree with this decision, while 28% disagree.  
 
In Alberta, almost half of residents (47%) disagree with changing the name of Edmonton’s CFL franchise, while 40% agree with this modification.  
 
In a survey conducted by Research Co. in September 2019, 60% of Canadians and 71% of Albertans thought the Edmonton Eskimos name was “acceptable” for the CFL franchise.  
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 20 to November 22, 2021, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20..
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Confidence in Local Drivers Improving Across Canada

The proportion of Canadians who say drivers are “worse” than five years ago has fallen from 50% in 2018 to 39% this year.  
 
Vancouver, BC [November 30, 2021] – The proportion of Canadians who believe drivers in their city or town are getting worse has reached the lowest level recorded over the past four years, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 30% of Canadians say drivers in their city or town are worse now than five years ago, while half (50%) report no change and 10% believe they are better.  
 
“When we first asked this question in 2018, half of Canadians (50%) felt that drivers were worse than in the past,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion has fallen each year, to 47% in 2019, then to 39% in 2020 and now to 30% in 2021.”  
 
At least a third of Canadians who reside in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (35%, -7), British Columbia (34%, -6) and Alberta (33%, -9) believe drivers in their city or town are worse now than five years ago. The proportion is lower among Canadians who live in Ontario (30%, -13), Atlantic Canada (25%, -14) and Quebec (24%, -8).  
 
Canadians aged 55 and over are more critical of drivers in their city or town, with 36% believing that the situation is worse now than five years ago, compared to 32% among those aged 35-to-54 and 21% among those aged 18-to-34.  
 
The survey also tracks the incidence of six specific occurrences on the country’s roads. A majority of Canadians (55%, +1) report seeing a driver not signalling before a turn over the past month, a proportion that climbs to 62% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.  
 
Almost two-in-five Canadians (38%, +2) witnessed a driver not stopping at an intersection and a third (32%, -1) saw a driver turning right or left from an incorrect lane, including 37% of British Columbians.
 
Fewer than three-in-ten Canadians (28%, +2) experienced a close call, or having to slam the brakes or steer violently to avoid a collision. In addition, 41% of Canadians (+3) say they saw a car taking up two or more stops at a parking lot, including a majority of Albertans (51%).  
 
Just over half of Canadians (51%, -5) say that there are specific groups or people in their city or town who are worse drivers than others.  
 
The top four responses among Canadians who blamed a specific group for bad driving behaviours are “young” (32%, -11), “elderly” (21%, -4), “Asian (16%, -1) and “immigrant” (6%, +1).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 20 to November 22, 2021, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20..
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Two Thirds of Canadians Endorse Vaccine Passports in Offices

Only 9% of Canadians say they do not plan to get vaccinated against COVID-19, unchanged since September.  

Vancouver, BC [November 19, 2021] – More Canadians are in favour of implementing “vaccine passports” in order to allow employees to return to the country’s workplaces, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 67% of Canadians think it is a “good idea” to rely on COVID-19 “Proof of Vaccination” certificates for people to be able to work at an office.  

“In May 2021, when we first asked about COVID-19 vaccine certificates, just over half of Canadians (52%) were in favour of their use in offices,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support grew to 63% in September 2021 and once again this month to 67%.”  

Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to welcome “vaccine passports” in the workplace (77%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (66%) and aged 18-to-34 (59%).  

Support for the use of COVID-19 “Proof of Vaccination” certificates is highest in Quebec (73%), followed by British Columbia (70%), Ontario (68%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 68%), Alberta (64%) and Atlantic Canada (58%).  

Just over four-in-five Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in this year’s federal election (81%) are in favour of using “vaccine passports” in offices, along with 73% of those who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP), 64% of those who supported the Conservative Party and 58% of those who supported the Green Party. Only 19% of Canadians who voted for the People’s Party agree with this course of action.  

More than two thirds of Canadians continue to endorse the use of “vaccine passports” for people to go to live concerts as spectators (70%, +2), to go to live sporting events as spectators (also 70%, +4), to visit a gym or fitness facility (also 70%, +3) and to go to the theatre or cinema (69%, +3).  

Sizeable proportions of Canadians are also in favour of relying on  “Proof of Vaccination” certificates for travel to other countries (74%, +1), for travel to other Canadian provinces (70%, +2) and for travel inside the same province (65%, +3).  

Across the country, seven-in-ten Canadians (70%, -1) say they wear a mask every time the leave their home. As has been the case throughout the pandemic, women (74%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (81%) are more likely to be observing this guideline.  

There is little movement on some of the habits that Canadians may have developed as a result of the pandemic. More than one-in-ten Canadians say they are losing their temper more than usual at home (15%, =), having a bath or shower less often (14%, +2), drinking more alcohol than usual at home (13%, =), not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection (12%, -2) or brushing their teeth less often than before the pandemic (6%, -1).  

More than one-in-five Canadians continue to clean the groceries they buy to prevent infection (23%, +2) and admit to overeating or eating more than usual at home (22%, -1).  

Only 9% of Canadians (unchanged since September) say they do not plan to get inoculated against COVID-19, while 89% (+1) have already done so or intend to do so.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 8 to November 10, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490