Fewer Canadians Hold a Positive View of the United States

Only one-in-five Canadians (21%) have a favourable opinion of China, down six points since January.

Vancouver, BC [July 28, 2020] – The perceptions of Canadians on the United States have become more negative during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 32% of Canadians have a positive opinion of the United States, down 15 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted In December 2019.

More than three-in-five Canadians (62%, +14) currently have a negative opinion of the United States—including 75% of women, 64% of Canadians aged 55 and over and 71% of British Columbians.

“When we compare the results of this survey with what Research Co. found late last year, the most drastic fluctuation is seen with the United States,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “At the end of 2019, almost half of Canadians held positive views about the neighbouring nation, but now the proportion has fallen to only one third—slightly higher than Russia and on par with Venezuela.”

At least two thirds of Canadians hold favourable views on five countries that are part of the Group of Seven (G7): the United Kingdom (73%, -10), Japan (70%, -2), Italy (69%, -3), France (69%, -1) and Germany (67%, -6).

Majorities of respondents also have a positive opinion of South Korea (61%, +9) and Mexico (54%, +8). The rating is lower for India (37%, +1) and Venezuela (33%, +3).

Only 26% of Canadians (unchanged) have a positive view of Russia, while 57% hold negative views. Russia has a higher unfavourability rating from Canadians aged 55 and over (63%) and men (61%).

Perceptions of China have also dropped, from 27% in December 2019 to 21% this month. In a separate survey conducted in May 2020, Research Co. found that three-in-four Canadians opposed the participation of Chinese telecommunications company Huawei in Canada’s 5G spectrum.

Across Canada, 67% of respondents have a negative view of China, including 75% of Canadians aged 55 and over, 75% of Atlantic Canadians and 74% of those who voted for the Conservative Party or the New Democratic Party (NDP) in the last federal election.

The lowest ranked nations are Saudi Arabia (20%, +3), Iran (16%, +2) and North Korea (13%, +2).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from July 6 to July 8, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Photo Credit: AlWhiteash429

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Pierre Trudeau Leads as Canadians Rank Recent Prime Ministers

Stephen Harper (16%) and Justin Trudeau (15%) are next, followed by Jean Chrétien (11%) and Brian Mulroney (8%).

Vancouver, BC [July 24, 2020] – About one-in-four Canadians believe Pierre Trudeau has been the best head of government of the past five decades, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 23% of Canadians select Pierre Trudeau as the best prime minister since 1968—a proportion that climbs to 27% among Atlantic Canadians, and 26% among both Ontarians and Quebecers.

Stephen Harper is next on the list with 16%, followed by Justin Trudeau with 15%, Jean Chrétien with 11% and Brian Mulroney with 8%.

Justin Trudeau has his best numbers with Canadians aged 18-to-34 (26%), but drops to 14% among those aged 35-to-54 and 5% among those aged 55 and over.

When asked who the worst prime minister since 1968 has been, 23% of Canadians pick Harper, followed by Justin Trudeau with 18% and Pierre Trudeau with 7%.

“The regional disparities are evident on the worst prime minister question,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Three-in-ten Atlantic Canadians (31%) select Harper, while 25% of Albertans choose Justin Trudeau.”

Canadians were also asked about nine different politicians who served as leaders of the Official Opposition in Ottawa over the past five decades.

Three-in-ten Canadians (30%) believe Robert Stanfield—who led the Progressive Conservatives from 1967 to 1976 and faced off against Pierre Trudeau in three federal elections—would have made a good prime minister, while 11% think he would have been bad.

Canadians are more nuanced when asked to assess former Reform Party leader Preston Manning (Good 26%, Bad 27%) and interim Conservative Party leader Rona Ambrose (Good 27%, Bad 25%).

Respondents are more likely to hold negative feelings about three politicians: Canadian Alliance leader in the 2000 election Stockwell Day (Good 22%, Bad 33%), Liberal leader in the 2008 election Stéphane Dion (Good 22%, Bad 33%) and Liberal leader in the 2011 election Michael Ignatieff (Good 20%, Bad 30%). The review is better for former New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Tom Mulcair (Good 32%, Bad 26%).

The best rated politician on this list of former opposition leaders is the NDP’s Jack Layton. A majority of Canadians (54%) think Layton would have made a good prime minister, and only 14% feel he would have been bad.

While one-in-four Canadians (26%) think outgoing Conservative leader Andrew Scheer would have made a good head of government, almost half (48%) disagree with this point of view.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from July 6 to July 8, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Photo Credit: Alasdair McLellan

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Canadians Have Experienced Racism in Social Interactions

Three-in-four Canadians (74%) think the policy of multiculturalism has been good for the country, up 15 points since January 2019. 

Vancouver, BC [July 21, 2020] – Racist behaviour in day-to-day social interactions has impacted half of Canadians, with a significantly higher incidence reported among those who identify as First Nations, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians say they have experienced racist behaviour in day-to-day social interactions with others, such as shopping and taking public transit.

More than four-in-five Canadians who identify as First Nations, Métis or Inuit (86%) say they have endured racism in day-to-day social interactions, along with 78% of Canadians of African descent, 68% of South Asians, 63% of East Asians and 58% of Southeast Asians.

Slightly lower proportions of Canadians acknowledge experiencing racist behaviour on social media (46%), at school (43%) or at work (41%).

A third of Canadians say they have endured racism during interactions with police or law enforcement officers (33%) and the health care system (29%).

“Canadians of European ancestry are less likely to have endured racism, and the numbers on specific settings go through significant fluctuations according to a person’s ethnicity,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Three-in-five Canadians of African descent (61%) have experienced racism during interactions with police, and seven-in-ten Canadians who identify as First Nations (70%) have endured racism at work.”

Majorities of Canadians of First Nations (56%), South Asian (also 56%) and African descent (58%) say they have faced racism during interactions with the health care system.

When asked if they have witnessed behaviour that they would describe as racist, more than half of Canadians say they have perceived it in day-to-day social interactions (58%) and social media (57%), while fewer have seen it at school (50%), at work (47%), dealing with police and law enforcement (41%) and engaging with the health care system (34%).

Half of Canadians (49%) believe race relations in Canada have improved over the past two years, while 29% feel they have worsened. Men (56%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (61%) are more likely to think that the situation is getting better.

Three-in-four Canadians (74%) believe the policy of multiculturalism has been “very good” or “good” for Canada—up 14 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in January 2019.

The proportion of Canadians who think multiculturalism has been “bad” or “very bad” for the country fell to 18% (-15).

As was the case last year, Canadians are divided when assessing two distinct concepts. Almost half (46%, -3 since January 2019) believe Canada should be a melting pot and immigrants should assimilate and blend into Canadian society.

A smaller proportion of Canadians (41%, -1) believe the country should be a mosaic and think cultural differences within Canadian society are valuable and should be preserved.

Quebecers (51%), Ontarians (48%) and Albertans (also 48%) are more likely to endorse the concept of the melting pot for Canada. Smaller proportions of residents of British Columbia (43%), Atlantic Canada (38%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 38%) concur.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from July 3 to July 8, 2020, among 2,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.2 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Perceive Gun Violence as a Serious Problem

More than three-in-four think taking action to stop illegal gun smuggling from the U.S. would be an effective measure.

Vancouver, BC [July 15, 2020] – Many Canadians are concerned about crimes committed with firearms in the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 63% of Canadians believe gun violence in Canada is a “very serious” or “moderately serious” problem.

Ontarians (76%), Women (69%), Canadians aged 55 and over (68%) and British Columbians (67%) are more likely to regard gun violence as a “serious” matter in the country.

In Canada, it is not legal for a person to own or carry a firearm for the purpose of self defence against human beings. Fewer than one-in-five Canadians (18%) disagree with this precept, while 77% agree with it and 5% are undecided.

“There are not many Canadians who are willing to entertain the notion of allowing ordinary citizens to possess firearms for self-defence,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 30% of Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the last federal election disagree with existing guidelines for the possession of firearms, the proportion drops among those who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (15%) and the Liberal Party (12%) last year.”

Respondents were also asked to rate the effectiveness of four different measures to reduce the number of crimes committed with firearms in Canada.

More than three-in-four Canadians (77%) believe taking action to reduce gun smuggling from the United States would be “very effective” or “moderately effective” in curbing gun violence.

Residents of Ontario and British Columbia are more convinced that stopping illegal gun smuggling from the United States would be an effective measure (83% and 80% respectively) than those in Atlantic Canada (76%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (74%), Quebec (72%) and Alberta (70%).

Practically three-in-four Canadians also believe two other ideas would be effective: imposing mandatory jail terms for crimes committed with firearms (74%) and introducing new outreach programs to steer youth away from gangs (also 74%).

Just over three-in-five Canadians (62%) believe enacting a complete ban on handguns would be effective in reducing gun violence in Canada—including 66% of women and 71% of British Columbians.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from July 3 to July 5, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Four Canadians Would Take a COVID-19 Vaccine

Satisfaction with how provincial governments have handled the pandemic increased to 75% across the country.

Vancouver, BC [July 7, 2020] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians would welcome the idea of inoculation against COVID-19, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-four Canadians (75%) would take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available, up two points since a similar survey conducted in April.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) say they are satisfied with the way the federal government has handled the COVID-19 outbreak, up one point since May. The same proportion (70%) are satisfied with the performance of their municipal administrations during the pandemic.

Satisfaction with the way provincial governments have managed COVID-19 increased by 11 points to 75% across Canada. The rating improved in the four most populous provinces: British Columbia, (83%, +14), Ontario (76%, +23), Quebec (69%, +3) and Alberta (62%, +6).

The proportion of Canadians who say they wear a mask every time they go out has increased dramatically, from 14% in May to 48% in late June.

“There is a big gender gap when it comes to wearing protective masks outside the home,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While more than half of women in Canada (57%) are not leaving their home without a mask, only 39% of men are partaking in the same behaviour.”

Two-in-five Canadians (40%, -7) are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection, and about one-in-four (23%, -17) say they are not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection.

The proportion of Canadians who acknowledge eating more than usual at home remained at 29%, while 18% (+5) are drinking more at home and 16% (-2) are losing their temper more often.

Across the country, only 37% of Canadians expect to be able to attend or host a large social gathering before December, while fewer believe they will be able to shake the hand of a person who is not at their home (33%), attend a live sporting event (26%) or travel abroad (21%).

Half of Canadians (49%, +25 since May) believe the worst of the COVID-19 outbreak is “behind us”—a proportion that rises to 57% in Quebec.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 26 to June 28, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Flag First, Monarchy Last in List of What Makes Canadians Proud

The proportion of Canadians who say the monarchy makes them proud fell by seven points since 2019.

Vancouver, BC [July 3, 2020] – The perceptions of Canadians on specific institutions and features of the country went through noticeable changes over the past year, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than four-in-five Canadians (82%) say they are proud of the Canadian flag. This represents an 11-point decrease since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2019.

More than seven-in-ten Canadians express pride in the health care system (75%, -2), the Canadian Armed Forces (74%, -15) and multiculturalism (71%, +5).

More than three-in-five Canadians say they are proud of the state of democracy in Canada (66%, -4), hockey (64%, -8) indigenous culture (62%, +6) and bilingualism (61%, +6).

“Compared to last year, there are significant fluctuations in the way Canadians feel about features and institutions of the country that elicit inclusiveness and togetherness,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There is a deeper appreciation this year for multiculturalism, Indigenous culture and bilingualism than what we saw in 2019.”

Just over half of Canadians express pride in the Canadian justice system (55%, +15), the Canadian economy (53%, -27), Parliament (53%, +8) and the monarchy (40%, -7).

The monarchy is once again the lowest rated item on this list. Women (45%) and British Columbians (50%) are more likely to say that this particular institution elicits feelings of pride than men (35%) and Quebecers (31%).

Quebec posts the highest rating of any region for bilingualism (71%) and the lowest for the health care system (61%).

Two thirds of Ontarians and British Columbians (67% each) say that indigenous culture elicits feelings of pride, followed by residents of Atlantic Canada (60%), Quebec (58%), Alberta (56%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (55%).

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be proud of multiculturalism (77%) than those aged 35-to-54 (70%) and those aged 55 and over (66%).

There are some major differences along political lines on two items. Large majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election say they are proud of Parliament (72%) and the Canadian justice system (66%).

Significantly fewer Canadians who cast ballots for the Conservative Party and the New Democratic Party (NDP) feel the same way about Parliament (41% and 42% respectively) and the Canadian justice system (54% and 43% respectively).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 26 to June 28, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians and Americans Agree on Climate Change Fight

62% of Canadians and 51% of Americans personally believe global warming is a “major crisis.”

Vancouver, BC [June 26, 2020] – Most Canadians and Americans would consent to providing larger fiscal contributions to their governments in order to combat global warming, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 60% of Canadians and 54% of Americans say they are willing to pay higher taxes in order to adequately deal with climate change.

More than three-in-five Canadians (64%) and a majority of Americans (53%) believe global warming is a fact and is mostly caused by emission from vehicles and industrial facilities.

About one-in-four respondents in the two countries (23% in Canada and 25% in the United States) think climate change is a fact and is mostly caused by natural changes.

Only 7% of Canadians and 14% of Americans believe global warming is a theory that has not yet been proven—including 12% of Conservative Party voters in the 2019 Canadian federal election and 26% of Republican Party supporters in the United States.

About three-in-five Canadians (62%) and half of Americans (51%) describe global warming as a “major crisis”, including 70% of those aged 18-to-34 in Canada and 54% of those aged 55 and over in the United States.

When asked about specific actions that could be taken now to deal with climate change, most Canadians and Americans feel companies and corporations (75% and 59% respectively), governments (69% and 56%) and individuals and consumers (64% and 55%) should be doing more.

Residents of both countries are also supportive of actions to mitigate climate change in the future from companies and corporations (76% in Canada and 61% in the United States), governments (71% and 58%) and individuals and consumers (66% and 55%).

Parents of children under the age of 18 were asked about the effect of conversations about climate change with their kids. Two thirds of Canadian parents (67%) and more than half of American parents (54%) say they are recycling more after chatting with their children about climate change.

Smaller proportions of parents in Canada and the United States say they are driving less than usual (38% and 32% respectively) and taking shorter showers (34% and 31%) after chatting with their kids about global warming.

Methodology:

Results are based on online studies conducted from June 1 to June 3, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our full Canadian dataset here, our full American dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Lockdown Exposes Areas Where Canadian Couples Are Struggling

Men get significantly lower grades from their partners on cooking meals, taking care of children and keeping the home clean.

Vancouver, BC [June 23, 2020] – While most Canadians who live with their spouse or partner appear happy with the way their significant others have behaved during the COVID-19 pandemic, there are certain aspects where men are faring worse than women, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of adults in Canada who live with a spouse or partner, 69% say they “strongly approve” of the performance of their significant other, while 22% “moderately approve.”

“Ontario (66%), Quebec (64%) and British Columbia (also 64%) are the regions of Canada with the lowest proportion of men and women who strongly approve of their spouses of partners,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are significantly higher in Alberta (75%), Atlantic Canada (80%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (83%).”

The level of “strong approval” of a spouse or partner is higher from men (73%) than women (65%). Both genders currently have the same level of “strong disapproval” (6%).

A majority of Canadians who are living with a spouse or partner say they are “very satisfied” with the way their significant other has handled eight issues:

  • Personal hygiene (69%)
  • Taking care of pets (57%)
  • Cooking meals (56%)
  • Taking care of children (55%)
  • Keeping the home clean and tidy (54%)
  • Overall attitude and demeanour (also 54%)
  • Making decisions about what to do (53%)
  • Providing emotional support when they need it (also 53%).

While 62% of men are “very satisfied” with their spouse or partner on keeping the home clean and tidy, the proportion drops to 46% when women answer the same question. In addition, 64% of men are “very satisfied” with their partner when it comes to cooking meals, but just 48% of women concur.

A similar gap is observed on taking care of children, with just 46% of women saying they are “very satisfied” with their partners—compared to 63% when men are asked.

On all eight issues, the level of strong satisfaction is higher among Canadians who have lived with their current spouse or partner for more than 10 years.

Almost half of Canadians who are living with a spouse or partner (46%) say the experience of the COVID-19 pandemic has made them grow closer as a couple. A similar proportion (47%) report no change in their relationship, while 6% say they have become more distant.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 8 to June 17, 2020, among 796 adults in Canada who live with a spouse or partner. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

COVID-19 Significantly Affects Exercise Routines in Canada

The proportion of Canadians who meet the recommended guidelines for physical activity fell to 29% during the pandemic.

Vancouver, BC [June 16, 2020] – Half of Canadians are having a tougher time exercising due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians say their physical activity routines were affected by the lockdown and they had to avoid specific actions.

A third of Canadians (33%) say they had to stop going to a gym or community centre since the start of the pandemic, while one-in-five (21%) had to stop going to a pool for swimming.

More than one-in-ten Canadians say they had to stop participating in an organized sports league (15%), had to stop going to a yoga studio (13%) or had to stop participating in pick-up sports that are not part of a league (12%).

“More than half of men in Canada (53%) say their exercise routine had to be modified because of the lockdown,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of Canadians who live in Ontario (56%), British Columbia (54%) and Alberta (51%) were affected.”

Just over two-in-five Canadians (42%) took action in order to exercise differently during the COVID-19 pandemic—including 45% of women, 48% of Ontarians and 70% of those aged 18-to-34.

One-in-four Canadians (25%) say they followed workouts or routines online, while 17% took up a sport that does not require equipment, such as running or jogging.

Smaller proportions of Canadians acquired weightlifting equipment (12%) or cardio machines (9%) for their home.

The poll also asked Canadians about their exercise routines before and after the COVID-19 pandemic.

Across the country, 36% of Canadians acknowledged meeting the Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines—accumulating at least two and a half hours of moderate- to vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity per week—every week before the pandemic started.

The proportion of Canadians who were able to meet the guidelines was higher among Canadians aged 18-to-34 (38%), Canadians aged 35-to-54 (also 38%), Ontarians (also 38%), Albertans (37%) and British Columbians (36%).

When asked about their physical activity after the pandemic began, only 29% of Canadians acknowledged that they have met the guidelines every week.

The proportion of Canadians who are able to currently meet the exercise guidelines dropped in Ontario (from 38% to 30%), Alberta (from 37% to 31%), British Columbia (from 36% to 29%) and Quebec (from 33% to 24%).

More than one-in-four Canadians (27%) say they never meet the recommended guidelines for physical activity. up from 23% before the lockdown.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 8 to June 10, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Ten Canadians Have Gained Weight During Pandemic

Only 41% of respondents say they follow the recommendations of Canada’s Food Guide “all the time” or “most of the time.”

Vancouver, BC [June 9, 2020] – The COVID-19 pandemic has changed some of the eating and food preparation habits of Canadians, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 31% of Canadians say they have personally gained weight during the pandemic, while 52% report no change and 14% say they have lost weight.

Women (33%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (36%) are more likely to acknowledge weight gain during the pandemic.

While two thirds of Canadians (66%) are “very familiar” or “moderately familiar” with Canada’s Food Guide, only 41% say they follow the document’s recommendations “all the time” or “most of the time” when choosing what to eat in an average week.

“Half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (50%) are paying attention to the recommendations of Canada’s Food Guide,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Smaller proportions of Canadians aged 35-to-54 (42%) and aged 55 and over (34%) are following the same course of action.”

Across the country, 36% of Canadians say they prepare dinner for themselves and others in their household in less than 30 minutes—up six points since a similar Research Co. survey completed in June 2019.

Most Canadians (56%, -4) are in the kitchen for 31 to 60 minutes on an average weeknight, while 8% (-2) devote more than an hour to making dinner,

Three-in-ten Canadians (29%) say they are baking desserts—such as cakes or cookies—at home more often than they did before the COVID-19 pandemic. One-in-five (21%) bake bread at home more often now than a few months ago.

Residents of Ontario are more likely to be baking bread at home more often than residents of other regions (27%), while Albertans are more likely to be baking homemade desserts (35%).

While most Canadians do not report a significant change to their consumption of six different foods since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, there are some nuances.

Almost one-in-five Canadians (15%) are eating less fish and shellfish, and 15% report eating less meat. Conversely, 24% of Canadians say they are eating both fruits and vegetables more often than before the pandemic began.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 1 to June 3, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Perceptions of Trudeau Improve Across Canadian Provinces

The proportion of Albertans who hold separatist feelings has fallen markedly since December 2019.

Vancouver, BC [June 2, 2020] – The views of Canadians on the way the federal government can benefit their province have shifted during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 38% of Canadians believe that their province would be “better off” with a different Prime Minister in Ottawa, while 47% disagree.

A similar Research Co. survey conducted in December 2019 found that 50% of Canadians believed that their province would be “better off” with a different person heading the federal government.

The proportion of Canadians who wish for a person other than Justin Trudeau as Prime Minister is currently highest in Alberta (54%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (48%), and drops in British Columbia (37%), Quebec (also 37%), Ontario (35%) and Atlantic Canada (31%).

Almost two-in-five Canadians (38%) believe their province would be better off with a different premier in charge, down 14 points nationally since December 2019.

“In three of the four most populous provinces of Canada, the premiers have connected with residents in a meaningful way and saw their standing improve over the past six months,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In Alberta, there was little movement for the premier and a slight recovery for the prime minister.”

The proportion of Ontarians who think the province would be better off with a premier other than Doug Ford fell from 60% in December 2019 to 38% in May 2020. There is also an improvement for François Legault in Quebec (from 44% to 29%) and for John Horgan in British Columbia (from 42% to 36%).

In Alberta, 56% of residents would rather have a premier other than Jason Kenney, down one point since December 2019. In this province, negative views of Justin Trudeau dropped by 11 points over the same span.

Across the country, 24% of Canadians (-1) think their province would be better off as its own country. Since December 2019, separatist feelings have fallen by four points in Quebec (36%) and by 12 points in Alberta (28%).

Only 17% of Canadians (+1) believe their province would be better off joining the United States, including 20% of Quebecers, 19% of Albertans and 18% of British Columbians.

Photo Credit: WinterE229 

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on May 26 and May 27, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Four Canadians Reject Huawei in 5G Mobile Networks

Almost four-in-five think Canada should not work to establish closer ties with China, up 10 points since January.

Vancouver, BC [May 27, 2020] – The proportion of Canadians who disagree with the notion of allowing a telecommunications company from the People’s Republic of China to take part in the development of Canada’s 5G network has reached a new high, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The federal government is currently reviewing the guidelines for 5G (or “Fifth Generation”) mobile networks, which are expected to provide Canadians with larger data capacity and faster connections.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-four Canadians (75%) believe Ottawa should not allow Huawei to participate in Canada’s 5G spectrum.

This month’s survey marks the highest level of rejection for Huawei’s involvement in the 5G network. Majorities of Canadians had expressed this feeling in surveys conducted by Research Co. in February 2019 (57%), July 2019 (68%) and January 2020 (66%).

Today, B.C. Supreme Court associate justice Heather Holmes ruled that the extradition hearing process for Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou will continue. Meng was detained in December 2018, has remained under house arrest in Vancouver, and faces charges in the United States, including bank fraud and obstruction of justice.

Following Meng’s arrest, China detained two Canadians—Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor—on espionage allegations, and banned exports of Canadian canola, pork and beef.

“In four rounds of nationwide polling, most Canadians have never regarded Huawei as a welcome addition to Canada’s 5G network,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Now, with the COVID-19 pandemic in the background and as the court decision on Meng’s extradition was about to be rendered, this view has hardened considerably.”

Three-in-four Canadians (75%, +8 since January 2020) agree with the way Canadian authorities have acted in the Meng case. Sizeable proportions of Canadians who voted last year for the Liberal Party (91%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (75%) and the Conservative Party (59%) feel this way.

Almost four-in-five Canadians (78%, up 10 points since January) think Canada should not work to establish closer ties with China, including 90% of Canadians aged 55 and over and 82% of women.

Photo Credit: Jeff Hitchcock

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on May 26 and May 27, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Credit Card Purchases Increase Dramatically in Canada

Half of Canadians say they expect to utilize biometrics to buy things within the next decade.

Vancouver, BC [May 26, 2020] – Canadians are relying heavily on their credit cards to pay for things during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, Canadians say they used a credit card to complete 50% of their purchases over the past month, a 26-point increase since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in February 2019.

Three-in-ten purchases from Canadians (31%, -3) were finalized through a debit card. Across the country, 12% of purchases were conducted with a cheque (+9), 4% with an e-transfer or through a smartphone, and only 3% (-28) with cash.

Residents of British Columbia and Quebec report that 53% of their purchases over the past month were conducted through a credit card. The proportion is lower in Ontario (51%), Alberta (45%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (44%) and Atlantic Canada (40%).

Canadian women report that about a third of their transactions (34%) involved a debit card, compared to 27% for Canadian men.

“These numbers outline a drastic transformation from 2019, and show that the COVID-19 lockdown has decidedly altered the way Canadians are buying things,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This change in behaviour is also leading many Canadians to believe that biometrics will be required to complete purchases in the near future.”

In February 2019, only 8% of Canadians said they expected to rely on biometrics (such as iris scans, fingerprints or palm recognition) to make purchases within the next 10 years.

This month, more than half of Canadians (58%) believe people will use biometrics to buy things in the next decade, a 50-point increase since last year.

Across the country, half of Canadians (50%) say they would like to see people utilizing biometrics to make purchases in their lifetimes, while 35% disagree and 15% are undecided.

British Columbians and Ontarians are more likely to personally welcome the use of biometrics for buy things in their lifetimes (54% and 53% respectively) than residents of Quebec (48%), Atlantic Canada (47%), Alberta (46%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (41%).

Photo Credit: Tony Webster 

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 18 to May 20, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Satisfaction with COVID-19 Handling Drops in Ontario and Quebec

The rating for the federal government remains high, as more than seven-in-ten Canadians seek accountability from China.

Vancouver, BC [May 19, 2020] – Almost seven-in-ten Canadians are content with way the federal government has managed the COVID-19 pandemic, but the approval rating for two provincial administrations has fallen markedly since April, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 69% of Canadians are satisfied with the way the federal government has dealt with the outbreak—including 76% of residents aged 55 and over.

“The numbers have been extremely consistent for the federal government as the COVID-19 pandemic continues,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “It is also worth noting that majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberals (86%), the New Democrats (72%) and the Conservatives (54%) last year remain pleased with Ottawa’s work on this file.”

While 64% of Canadians are satisfied with the performance of their municipal and provincial governments, the numbers vary in specific regions of the country.

In a similar Research Co. survey conducted in April, 88% of Quebecers and 78% of Ontarians were content with the way their provincial administrations were managing the COVID-19 outbreak. This month, the rating for both governments dropped by double-digits, to 66% in Quebec and to 63% in Ontario.

The numbers are stable for the provincial governments of British Columbia (from 72% in April to 69% this month) and Alberta (from 57% in April to 56% this month).

Across the country, 64% of Canadians believe we should reopen the economy slowly and ensure that COVID-19 infection rates remain low. Conversely, 29% of Canadians think we should reopen the economy quickly and ensure that no more jobs are lost due to COVID-19.

A “wet market” in Wuhan, China, which sells live animals for human consumption has been mentioned as the place where COVID-19 may have originated.

More than seven-in-ten Canadians (72%) think the Government of the People’s Republic of China should take responsibility for its role in the COVID-19 outbreak. This represents a six-point increase since Research Co. survey conducted in March.

About three-in-ten Canadians (31%) agree with the Government of Canada considering legal action against the People’s Republic of China on account of the COVID-19 outbreak, while practically half (49%) disagree.

Three-in-four Canadians (75%, +14) consider it unacceptable to refer to COVID-19 as the “Chinese virus” or “Chinese flu”. This includes majorities of Canadians who voted for the New Democrats (83%), the Liberals (77%) and the Conservatives (66%) in the 2019 federal election.

Just over three-in-ten Canadians (31%) believe more people will consider adopting vegetarian or vegan diets once the COVID-19 outbreak ends, up 10 points since Research Co. first measured this sentiment in April.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 11 to May 13, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Split on “Family Bubbles” During COVID-19 Pandemic

While 82% would take advantage of an opportunity to expand their social circle, only 44% believe the concept is a good idea.

Vancouver, BC [May 12, 2020] – Fewer than half of Canadians agree with the notion of allowing two households a chance to socialize and interact during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 44% of Canadians believe the “family bubbles” are a good idea, while 35% disagree and 21% are undecided.

The “two-household bubble” or “family bubble” concept was originally introduced last month in New Brunswick as an effort to reduce social isolation.

There are some drastic discrepancies across the country when Canadians ponder this concept. While two thirds of Quebecers (68%) think the “family bubbles” are a good idea, the proportion of residents who feel the same way drops to 40% in Ontario, 39% in British Columbia, 37% in Atlantic Canada, 25% in Alberta and 18% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

If their province allowed it, more than four-in-five Canadians (82%) say they would take advantage of the opportunity to have a “family bubble”—including 84% of those aged 55 and over, 83% of those aged 18-to-34 and 77% of those aged 35-to-54.

However, while 50% of Canadians say they know exactly which household they would ask to become part of their “family bubble”, 37% disagree and 13% are not sure.

“There is a significantly large proportion of Canadians who would jump at the chance to expand their social circle during the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However, most are not entirely convinced that this is the right course of action at this time, and half are currently unable to select who to join.”

Canadians are not particularly optimistic of two particular milestones happening before the end of the summer.

Only 41% of Canadians expect people to go to the office and not work from home anymore before the end of August, and just 31% foresee being able to attend or host a large social gathering during the same period.

Across the country, 48% of Canadians expect things in their city or town to go back to the way they were before the COVID-19 outbreak in January 2021 or later.

Only 11% of Canadians believe a return to normalcy will happen before the end of August, Including 17% of those aged 18-to-34 and 17% of Quebecers.

More than two thirds of Canadians (68%) believe the worst is “definitely” or “probably” ahead of us when it comes to the COVID-19 outbreak—a four-point drop since Research Co. asked this question for the first time in March 2020.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 4 to May 6, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca