Most Canadians Say Horses Are Not Food, Reject Exports to Asia

Only 16% knew that Canadian horses have been exported for slaughter and human consumption in Japan and South Korea.

Vancouver, BC [February 18, 2021] – The export of Canadian horses for slaughter and human consumption abroad is rejected by a large majority of Canadians, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, two thirds of Canadians (67%) oppose this practice, while 22% support it and 12% are undecided.

Opposition to the export of Canadian horses for slaughter and human consumption abroad is highest among women (76%). Significant majorities of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (65%), aged 35-to-54 (66%) and aged 55 and over (68%) also hold unfavourable views.

On a regional basis, Alberta posts the highest level of aversion to this practice (74%), followed by Atlantic Canada (73%), Ontario (70%), British Columbia (66%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 66%) and Quebec (62%).

Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election are slightly more likely to oppose the export of Canadian horses for slaughter and human consumption abroad (69%) than those who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (66%) and the Liberal Party (63%)

Since 2013, more than 30,000 Canadian horses have been exported for slaughter and human consumption in Japan and South Korea. 

More than four-in-five Canadians (84%) were unaware of this fact before taking the survey—a proportion that rises to 86% among women, 88% among Canadians aged 35-to-54 and 88% among Atlantic Canadians.

When asked a separate question about food sources, only 27% of Canadians consider it appropriate for humans to consume horses, while 65% deem this as inappropriate and 8% are undecided.

In stark contrast, at least three-in-four Canadians think chickens (88%), pigs (79%), turkeys (75%) and cattle (also 75%) are suitable food sources for humans.

Majorities of Canadians also think that the consumption of six other animals is appropriate: ducks (71%), sheep (69%), fish (68%), goats (64%), rabbits (58%) and geese (also 58%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from February 11 to February 13, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Stealthy Thermostat Fiddling Continues in Some Canadian Homes

Women are more likely to change the temperature at home without telling their spouse or significant other than men.

Vancouver, BC [February 12, 2021] – Half of Canadians who are cohabiting with a spouse or partner claim that setting the temperature at home is a joint effort, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians who are married or live with a significant other say that both partners are equally in charge of setting the thermostat.

Similar proportions of respondents say the responsibility for setting the temperature at home is theirs alone (26%) or in the hands of their spouse or partner (23%).

“The idea of an equal partnership for managing the thermostat is more prevalent in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (61%), Alberta (58%), Atlantic Canada (56%) and British Columbia (53%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer than half of Ontarians (46%) and Quebecers (41%) behave in the same fashion.”

Since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November 2018, there is a 19-point increase in the proportion of Canadians who are cohabiting with a spouse or partner who say setting the temperature is a joint effort.

Two-in-five Canadians who are married or live with a significant other (39%, +9) admit that they change the temperature at home without telling their spouse or partner “all of the time” or “most of the time”.

Women are more likely to touch the home thermostat without telling their spouse or partner “all of the time” or “most of the time” (45%) than men (34%).

Conversely, 28% of men say they “never” fiddle with the home thermostat without informing their spouse or partner, compared to 22% of women.

More than a third of Canadians (37%, -4) acknowledge that their energy and heating use at home has increased over the past few weeks. Only 13% (-2) report that it has decreased, while 45% (+7) say it has not changed.

Residents of British Columbia are more likely to state that their home energy and heating use has increased (44%), followed by those who reside in Alberta (40%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 40%), Ontario (39%), Quebec (28%) and Atlantic Canada (also 28%).

There are some shifts in the preferred temperature of homes when compared to 2018. Just over one-in-ten Canadians (12%, +3) typically set their thermostat at 18C or lower.

A third of residents (33%, +5) select 19C or 20C, while two-in-five (39%, -1) choose 21C or 22C and 10% (+4) set the temperature at 23C or higher.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from February 1 to February 3, 2021, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Divided Over Vaccine Rollout and Expectations

Fewer than one-in-four respondents believe the vaccines developed in Russia, China and India are safe for them.

Vancouver, BC [February 4, 2021] – Canadians are split on the notion that every resident of the country who wants to have a vaccine against COVID-19 will be able to get one in the timeline specified by the federal government, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In December 2020, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) stated that it expected to have enough COVID-19 vaccine doses to inoculate every willing Canadian by the end of September 2021.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 45% of Canadians believe this goal will be attained, while 46% think it will not be attained.

“More than half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (53%) expect everyone in the country to be vaccinated in the next eight months,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer Canadians aged 35-to-54 (46%) and aged 55 and over (37%) have the same optimism.”

About three-in-four Canadians (74%) say they would take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available to them, while 18% would not and 8% are undecided. These proportions are consistent with what Research Co. has found in surveys conducted in September 2020November 2020 and January 2021.

Canadians are divided in their assessment of various aspects of the COVID-19 vaccine rollout. While 46% say they are satisfied with the procurement of vaccine doses from the federal government, 43% are not.

Canadians who supported the Conservative Party in the 2019 election are particularly critical of the federal government, with 65% saying they are dissatisfied with the procurement of vaccine doses—compared to 44% for those who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) and 30% for those who voted for the Liberal Party.

More than half of Canadians (51%) are satisfied with the vaccination plans and phases outlined by their province. 

While majorities of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (57%), British Columbia (56%), Atlantic Canada (54%) and Quebec (53%) are satisfied with this aspect of the vaccine rollout, the proportion is lower in Ontario (45%) and Alberta (42%).

Across the country, 41% of Canadians say they are satisfied with the pace of vaccination efforts in their province, 49% are dissatisfied. 

The level of satisfaction with the pace of vaccination efforts is highest in Quebec (46%), followed by British Columbia (45%), Atlantic Canada (42%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (40%), Alberta (37%) and Ontario (34%).

Health authorities around the world have allowed the emergency use of nine vaccines against COVID-19. When this survey was conducted, Canada had only allowed two vaccines: the Pfizer–BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine and the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. 

More than two thirds of Canadians consider the Moderna (69%) and Pfizer (67%) vaccines as “safe” for them personally. These two vaccines are considered “not safe” by 12% and 15% of Canadians respectively.

Almost half of Canadians (48%) feel the Oxford-Astra Zeneca COVID-19 vaccine is “safe” for them personally, while 16% consider it “not safe” and 35% are not sure.

Fewer than one-in-four Canadians deem six other vaccines as “safe” for them: the KeeGam-COVID-Vac (Sputnik V) from Russia (20%), the EpiVacCorona from Russia (also 20%), the BBV152 (Varat Biotech) from India (also 20%), the CoronaVac (Sinovac) from China (18%), the Ad5-nCoV (Cansino Biologics) from China (17%) and the BBIBP-CorV (Sinopharm) from China (15%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from January 30 to February 1, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Life Getting Noisier for More Than a Quarter of Canadians

Three-in-ten respondents say they were bothered at home by unnecessary noise from vehicles over the past year.

Vancouver, BC [February 2, 2021] – More than one-in-four Canadians believe their surroundings are noisier now than they were a year ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 27% of Canadians say their city or town has become noisier over the past year.

Similar proportions of Canadians believe their home (28%) and their street (23%) are noisier now than they were a year ago.

Women (28%), Canadians aged 18-to-34 (33%), British Columbians (31%) and respondents of South Asian descent (36%) are more likely to feel that the city or town where they live is noisier now than in early 2020.

When asked about specific sounds that have bothered them at home over the past year, at least one-in-five Canadians mention unnecessary noise from vehicles (such as motorcycles and cars revving up) (30%), dogs barking (24%), loud people outside their home (20%) and car alarms (also 20%).

Fewer Canadians report being disturbed by 10 other noises at home: yard work (such as lawnmowers and leaf blowers) (19%), yelling or screaming at a nearby home (18%), loud music playing inside a vehicle (also 18%), power tools (such as electric saws and sanders) (also 18%), loud music at a nearby home (17%), fireworks (16%), a loud gathering or party at a nearby home (15%), drivers honking the horn excessively (12%), home alarms (9%) and cats meowing (5%).

“More than three-in-four Canadians aged 18-to-34 (78%) say that they were bothered by outside noises when they were at home,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion drops to 65% among those aged 35-to-54 and 60% among those aged 55 and over.”

Over the past year, more than one-in-ten Canadians (12%) wore earplugs or earmuffs to mitigate noise while inside their home—including 19% of those aged 18-to-34 and 14% of Ontarians.

Smaller proportions of Canadians acquired hardware to mitigate noise while inside their home (such as noise cancelling headphones or earphones) (7%), reported noise concerns to the police (5%) or moved away from their previous home because of noise (4%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from January 24 to January 26, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Would Ban Non-Essential Travel During Pandemic

Practically three-in-four of the country’s residents say they will “definitely” or “probably” take a COVID-19 vaccine.

Vancouver, BC [January 25, 2021] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians believe it would be wise to impose travel restrictions inside and across provinces during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 80% of Canadians agree with prohibiting non-essential travel from one province to another. 

In addition, 72% of Canadians are in favour of prohibiting non-essential travel inside their own province—a proportion that rises to 78% among those aged 55 and over and 81% among those who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election.

During the holiday season, some elected politicians travelled outside of their home province in contravention of a federal public health guidance to avoid all non-essential travel.

Three-in-five Canadians (61%) think this is a very serious offence and want elected politicians who travelled during the holiday season to resign from their legislatures or face a recall vote.

Nine-in-ten Canadians (90%) are in favour of placing all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period and a similarly high proportion (88%) would keep the border with the United States closed to non-essential travel.

While 51% of Canadians agree with allowing K-12 students to go back to in-class learning in their province, 39% disagree with this course of action.

Almost three-in-four Canadians (74%, +1 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November) say they will “definitely” or “probably” take a vaccine against COVID-19, while 16% (+2) would not and 9% (-4) are not sure.

Almost nine-in-ten Canadians (88%) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside. Slightly fewer respondents (81%) say they wear a mask every time they leave their home.

Across the country, 58% of Canadians (-5) are satisfied with the way the federal government has managed the COVID-19 pandemic. Similar proportions of residents are content with the performance of their provincial governments (58%, -6) and their municipal governments (60%, -2).

Satisfaction with the way provincial administrations have handled the pandemic is highest in British Columbia (72%, +2), followed by Quebec (65%, -3), Ontario (53%, -15) and Alberta (34%, -12).

When it comes to personal behaviours to prevent infection, about three-in-ten Canadians (29%) say they clean the groceries they buy and 21% do not order food from restaurants at all.

This month saw increases in the proportion of Canadians who say they are overeating or eating more than usual at home (30%, +9), drinking alcohol more often (18%, +6) and losing their temper more often (17%, +2).

In addition, 18% of Canadians (+5) are having baths or showers less often than before the pandemic and one-in-ten (10%, +3) are brushing their teeth less often.

Half of Canadians (50%, -14) believe the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic is “definitely” or “probably” ahead of us, while 33% (+11) think the worst is “definitely” or “probably” behind us.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from January 18 to January 20, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Streaming Options Gain Ground Among Canadian Music Listeners

The proportion of Canadians who listen to music on a streaming service grew from 32% in 2019 to 40% in 2021.

Vancouver, BC [January 19, 2021] – While radio remains the most favoured choice for Canadians who want to listen to music, streaming platforms have gained prominence across the country over the past two years, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 66% of Canadians say they listened to music on a regular radio over the past week, down three points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March 2019.

Two-in-five Canadians (40%, +8 since 2019) listened to music on a streaming service over the past seven days, while three-in-ten (30%, -1) listened to music stored in a computer or a phone.

Fewer Canadians listened to music on an LP record, cassette or CD (16%, -5) or on satellite radio (12%, -3) over the past week.

“Canadians aged 55 and over prefer to listen to music on the radio (70%) than on a streaming service (28%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, those aged 18-to-34 are more likely to stream (64%) than to listen to the radio (53%).”

While one-in-five Canadians (20%) paid to access a music streaming service in the last month, the proportion rises to 40% among those aged 18-to-34.

Fewer Canadians paid for and downloaded a song online (11%) or bought a compact disc or LP record (10%) in the last month.

When asked if they think that, in this day and age, music creators are being fairly compensated for their work, Canadians are almost evenly split. While 40% believe they are (-11 since 2019), (41%, +8) believe they are not.

A majority of Canadians aged 18-to-34 think music creators are being fairly compensated right now (54%), compared to 42% among those aged 35 to 54 and 32% among those aged 55 and over.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from January 9 to January 11, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Four Canadians Back Medical Assistance in Dying Rules

Almost three-in-five respondents personally think the practice should be permitted, but only under specific circumstances.

Vancouver, BC [January 15, 2021] – The regulations that allow people in Canada to seek medical assistance in dying under specific conditions are endorsed by a large majority of the country’s residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 76% of Canadians support the practice under the current guidelines specified by the federal government:

  • Being eligible for health services funded by the federal government, or a province or territory (or during the applicable minimum period of residence or waiting period for eligibility).
  • Being at least 18 years old and mentally competent.
  • Having a grievous and irremediable medical condition.
  • Making a voluntary request for medical assistance in dying that is not the result of outside pressure or influence.
  • Giving informed consent to receive medical assistance in dying.

Support for the regulations to seek medical assistance in dying is high across all groups, but the measure is particularly accepted among Canadians aged 55 and over (82%).

At least four-in-five residents of Alberta (84%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (80%) are in favour of the current guidelines to seek medical assistance in dying, along with 79% of British Columbians, 77% of Quebecers, 74% of Ontarians and 74% of Atlantic Canadians.

When asked about their personal feelings on this issue, almost three-in-five Canadians (58%) believe medical assistance in dying should be allowed, but only under specific circumstances. 

Only one-in-five Canadians (20%) would always allow the practice regardless of who requests it, while one-in-ten (11%) would never permit it.

“Majorities of Canadians who voted for each of the three major parties in the last federal election are personally in favour of permitting medical assistance in dying under specific circumstances,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This includes 64% of those who voted for the Liberal Party and 58% of those who voted for either the Conservative Party or the New Democratic Party (NDP).”

Just over two-in-five Canadians (43%) say they are satisfied with the regulations that are currently in place in Canada to deal with the issue of medical assistance in dying, while 26% are dissatisfied and 31% are undecided.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from January 9 to January 11, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Positive Perceptions on China Plummet to New Low in Canada

Two-in-five Canadians hold favourable views on the United States, up 10 points since July 2020.

Vancouver, BC [January 8, 2021] – Just under one-in-five Canadians currently have a favourable view of the People’s Republic of China, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, only 19% of Canadians hold a positive opinion of China, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in July 2020. Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%, +3) hold negative views on this particular country.

One-in-four Atlantic Canadians (25%) have a favourable opinion of China. The rating is lower in Quebec (23%), British Columbia (20%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (19%), Ontario (16%) and Alberta (13%).

“Canadians aged 55 and over are the least likely to currently have a positive view of China (16%)”, says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are slightly higher among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (19%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (25%).”

At least three-in-five Canadians currently have favourable views on seven different nations: the United Kingdom (78%, +5), Italy (75%, +6), Germany (72%, +5), Japan (71%, +1), France (71%, +1), Mexico (61%, +7) and South Korea (60%, -1).

Just over two-in-five Canadians hold a positive opinion of India (44%, +7) and the United States (42%, +10).

Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election are more likely to have a favourable view of India (54%) than those who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP) (44%) or the Conservative Party (35%).

In Canada, positive views on the United States are highest among men (47%), Albertans (54%) and those who voted for the Conservatives in the last federal ballot (61%).

Significantly fewer women (36%), Quebecers (37%) and British Columbians (36%) hold a favourable opinion on the United States, along with Canadians who voted for the Liberals (38%) or the New Democrats in 2019 (24%) 

Fewer than a third of Canadians have a positive view of five other countries: Venezuela (31%, -2), Russia (26%, =), Saudi Arabia (23%, +3), Iran (15%, -2) and North Korea (12%, -1).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 14 to December 16, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views on Political Correctness Are Similar in Canada and the U.S.

Majorities in the two countries agree with adding disclaimers to programs that may contain “outdated cultural depictions.”

Vancouver, BC [January 1, 2021] – Most Canadians and Americans share analogous views on “political correctness” but would stop short of modifying books or movies by removing words that are considered offensive, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 50% of Canadians and 53% of Americans support the use of “political correctness” in their respective countries.

Conversely, 33% of Canadians and 32% of Americans are opposed to “political correctness.”

The term “political correctness” has been used to describe language and/or behaviour that seeks to minimize possible offenses to racial, cultural and gender identity groups, among others. 

Support for the use of “political correctness” is particularly high among Canadians and Americans aged 18-to-34 (55% and 59% respectively).

A third of Canadians (32%) and 36% of Americans say they always act “politically correct” because it’s the right thing to do—including 43% of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election and 45% of Democrats in the United States.

Two-in-five Canadians (40%) and 37% of Americans say they sometimes act “politically correct” because it’s the safe thing to do.

Only 11% of Canadians and 15% of Americans do not act “politically correct” because it’s the wrong thing to do—including 17% of Conservative voters in Canada and 22% of Republicans in the United States.

Significant majorities of Canadians and Americans believe three specific groups in society should act in a “politically correct” manner “always” or “most of the time”: teachers (74% in Canada and 71% in the U.S.), politicians (73% in Canada and 66% in the U.S.) and journalists (66% in Canada and 64% in the U.S.). 

Only 38% of Canadians and 35% of Americans think comedians should act in a “politically correct” manner “always” or “most of the time”.

More than three-in-five Canadians (65%) and Americans (62%) agree with adding a disclaimer to explain that programs or movies are presented “as originally created” and “may contain outdated cultural depictions.”

Canadians and Americans disagree with two other measures: printing new editions of books that remove words that may be deemed offensive to a specific race or ethnicity (61% in Canada and 59% in the U.S.) and re-dubbing movies to remove words that may be deemed offensive to a specific race or ethnicity (62% in Canada and 57% in the U.S.).

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted from December 3 to December 5, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Perceptions on the Benefits of Immigration Improve in Canada

While 54% of Canadians say immigration is having a positive effect in the country, only 43% of Americans hold the same view.

Vancouver, BC [December 22, 2020] – Canadians have developed a more positive opinion about immigration over the past two years, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 54% of Canadians think immigration is having a mostly positive effect in the country, up eight points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2019.

In the United States, 43% of Americans acknowledge that immigration is having a mostly positive effect, while 36% say it is mostly negative.

Just over two-in-five Canadians (43%, +8) think the number of legal immigrants who are allowed to relocate in their country should remain the same. One third of Canadians (32, -6) believe the level of legal immigration should be reduced, while 17% (-3) want it increased.

“Majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (51%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (51%) in last year’s federal election want legal immigration levels to stay as they are,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, a majority of Conservative voters (53%) call for a decrease.”

In the United States, the number of Americans who would maintain the current levels of legal immigration is akin to Canada’s (42%), while similar proportions favour either an increase (24%) or a reduction (25%).

Three-in-four Canadians (75%, +20) think the hard work and talent of immigrants makes Canada better—including 81% of residents of British Columbia and 87% of those who voted for the federal Liberals last year.

Almost two thirds of Canadians (65%, +15) believe immigrants should only be allowed in Canada if they adopt Canadian values—including 76% of those who voted for the Conservative Party last year.

While 46% of Americans think illegal immigrants are employed in jobs that American workers do not want, 40% believe they take jobs away from American workers—a proportion that rises to 62% among Republicans.

Practically half of Americans (49%) think illegal immigrants who are currently working in the United States should be allowed to stay in the country and eventually apply for citizenship. About one-in-five  Americans (19%) would continue to allow these workers on a temporary basis and without a path to citizenship, while just under one-in-four (23%) would opt for deportation. 

Democrats are significantly more likely to support the notion of illegal immigrants eventually becoming citizens (64%) than Independents (51%) and Republicans (34%).

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted from December 3 to December 5, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Liberals Stay Ahead in Canada as Trudeau’s Rating Improves

Health care (28%, +3) is regarded as the most important issue facing the country, followed by the economy and jobs (27%, -2).

Vancouver, BC [December 17, 2020] – The governing Liberal Party maintains the upper hand in Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 37% of decided voters would support the Liberal candidate in their riding if a federal election were held today, down one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September.

The Conservative Party is second with 31% (-1), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (+3), the Bloc Québécois with 7% (-1), the Green Party with 3% (=) and the People’s Party with 1% (=).

The Liberals are nine points ahead of the Conservatives among female decided voters (38% to 29%) and hold a three-point edge among male decided voters (36% to 33%).

The Conservatives are the most popular federal party in Alberta (51%) and in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (48%). The Liberals are ahead in Atlantic Canada (44%), Quebec (45%, with the Bloc at 35%) and Ontario (37%). In British Columbia, the New Democrats and the Conservatives are essentially tied (34% and 33% respectively), with the Liberals at 29%.

Health care is regarded as the most important issue facing the country by 28% of Canadians (+3), followed by the economy and jobs (27%, -2), COVID-19 (15%), housing, homelessness and poverty (9%, -3) and the environment (6%, -1).

“Concerns about health care are more prevalent among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (30%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (29%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Those aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be preoccupied with the economy and jobs (36%).”

The approval rating for Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is 55%, up five points since September, while 40% of Canadians disapprove of his performance (-5).

Trudeau’s rating is highest in Atlantic Canada (60%), followed by Ontario (59%), British Columbia (58%), Quebec (55%), Manitoba and Saskatchewan (42%) and Alberta (37%).

Just over one third of Canadians (35%, +2) approve of the way Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole has handled his duties, while 38% (+4) disapprove—including 45% of Quebecers.

Almost half of Canadians (46%, +2) approve of the performance of Jagmeet Singh as leader of the NDP. The numbers are lower for Green Party leader Annamie Paul (25%) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (17%, +3).

Trudeau remains ahead of all other leaders when Canadians are asked who would make the best prime minister of the country (39%, +1), followed by O’Toole (22%, -1), Singh (13%, =), Bernier (3%, +1), Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (2%, -1) and Paul (2%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 12 to December 14, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Religious Adherence Differs Greatly in Canada and United States

A third of Canadians (32%) say they are atheist, agnostic or have no religion, compared to only 19% of Americans.

Vancouver, BC [December 15, 2020] – Residents of Canada and the United States hold dissimilar views on the importance of specific aspects of their lives, including religion, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 48% of Americans say religion is “very important” to them personally. In Canada only 24% of respondents feel the same way.

“In the United States, residents aged 18-to-34 are the least likely to consider religion as a very important component of their lives (45%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In Canada, the number is lowest among residents aged 55 and over (22%).”

Four-in-five residents of each country are in agreement on the extreme importance of family (80% in Canada, 79% in the United States) and majorities (54% in each country) say friends are “very important.”

Americans are more likely to place three other aspects of their lives as “very important” than Canadians: country (62% to 54%), career (40% to 29%) and affluence (21% to 11%).

More than seven-in-ten Americans (73%) and a majority of Canadians (52%) describe themselves as “very spiritual” or “moderately spiritual”.

When asked to describe their religious faith, one-in-five Americans (19%) say they have no religion, are atheist or agnostic—compared to 32% of Canadians.

Quebec and Atlantic Canada have the largest proportion of residents who describe their religion as Christian (70% and 68% respectively), followed by Manitoba and Saskatchewan (62%), Alberta (54%), Ontario (51%) and British Columbia (49%).

Attendance to religious gatherings is significantly higher in the United States than in Canada. While 38% of Americans say they go to a church, temple or synagogue at least once a week, only 16% of Canadians follow the same path. 

In addition, 69% of Canadians either never attend religious services or do so only for special events such as weddings, funerals or baptisms, compared to 41% of Americans.

Two thirds of Canadians (68%) and three-in-five Americans (59%) say their preferred greeting for this season is “Merry Christmas”, while 14% of Canadians and 30% of Americans choose “Happy Holidays.”

More than a third of Canadians (37%) and almost half of Americans (48%) say they expect the holidays this year to be “more stressful than fun.” Fewer Canadians (30%) and Americans (36%) think the season will be “more fun than stressful.”

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted from November 14 to November 16, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Many Canadians Willing to Avoid Office Life When Pandemic Ends

Four-in-five “provisional home workers” (80%)  say that working from home has been easier than they originally thought.

Vancouver, BC [December 11, 2020] – A vast majority of Canadians who are currently working from home instead of at their regular workplace say they would like to continue to explore this possibility after the COVID-19 pandemic has disappeared, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 80% of Canadian “provisional home workers” say they hope to be able to work from home more often after the COVID-19 outbreak has passed, up 15 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in April.

Almost nine-in-ten Canadian “provisional home workers” (89%, +9) feel their company trusts they are carrying on with their duties from home, and 78% (+9) think their company is perfectly equipped for them to do their work from home.

Four-in-five “provisional home workers” (80%, +18) acknowledge that working from home has been easier than they originally thought—including 87% of those aged 55 and over and 83% of Quebecers.

“Back in April, the notion of working from home was definitely intimidating for some Canadians,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Eight months later, most say they have all they need in order to fulfil their duties away from the office and acknowledge that the experience has been positive.”

Almost half of “provisional home workers” (46%, =) say they are having a difficult time working due to distractions at home.

There is a sizeable generational gap when it comes to focusing on the tasks at hand while at home. While only 25% of those aged 55 and over claim to have a tough time with distractions, the proportion rises to 45% among those aged 35-to-54 and 54% among those aged 18-to-34.

Two thirds of “provisional home workers” in Canada (68%, +1) say they miss interacting with other people at their regular office, including 73% of men, 73% of those aged 18-to-34 and 86% of British Columbians.

Almost half of “provisional home workers” (47%, +3) say they miss commuting to their regular office or workplace. Those aged 18-to-34 are more likely to yearn for their daily commute (54%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (43%) and aged 55 and over (44%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 2 to December 6, 2020, among 803 Canadian adults who are currently working from home instead of at their regular office. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians and Americans Would Ban “Conversion Therapy”

Two thirds of Canadians and almost three-in-five Americans are in favour of same-sex couples being allowed to legally marry.

Vancouver, BC [December 4, 2020] – Most residents of Canada and the United States are in favour of abolishing the practice of “conversion therapy”, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 56% of Canadians and Americans think “conversion therapy” should be banned in their respective countries.

Proponents of “conversion therapy” believe that individuals who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, gender diverse, queer, and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2+) can be “converted” into heterosexuals through psychological or spiritual intervention.

More than half of Canadians (55%) and more than two-in-five Americans (45%) think “conversion therapy” is impossible—a proportion that rises to 58% among Canadian women and 51% among American women.

Two thirds of Canadians (67%) think same-sex couples should continue to be allowed to legally marry, up three points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in July 2019

Conversely, 12% of Canadians think same-sex couples should only be allowed to form civil unions and not marry, and 10% would not offer any kind of legal recognition to same-sex couples.

Support for the continued legality of same-sex marriage in Canada is highest among women (70%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (71%). 

Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) and the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election are more likely to support same-sex marriage (78% and 69% respectively) than those who cast ballots for the Conservative Party (56%).

Almost three-in-five Americans (57%) believe same-sex couples should continue to be allowed to legally marry, while 17% prefer the concept of civil unions and 16% would grant no legal recognition to same-sex partnerships.

In the United States, women (59%) and Americans aged 18-to-34 (62%) are more likely to endorse same-sex marriage. Majorities of those who identify as Democrats (68%) and Independents (58%) are also in favour of  same-sex marriage, compared to just 44% of Republicans.

The proportion of Americans who would not grant any legal recognition to same-sex partnerships climbs to 26% among Americans who supported Republican candidate Donald Trump in the 2020 United States presidential election, compared to 9% among those who voted for Democratic nominee Joe Biden.

In Canada, almost two-in-five respondents (39%) think people are born as LGBTQ2+, a view shared by 35% of Americans. However, 28% of Canadians and 34% of Americans think people choose to be LGBTQ2+.

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted from November 14 to November 16, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Endorse Travel Restrictions During COVID-19 Pandemic

More than four-in-five Canadians say they wear a mask every time they go out, up 12 points since September.

Vancouver, BC [December 1, 2020] – Almost two thirds of Canadians hold negative views on what the COVID-19 pandemic has in store, and three-in-four believe it is time to restrict travel inside their province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 64% of Canadians say the worst of the pandemic is “definitely” or “probably” ahead of us. This represents an 18-point increase since September, and the second highest level recorded on this question (68% in a poll conducted in April 2020). 

Public support for two regulations established by the federal government remains extremely high, with 92% of Canadians agreeing with the decision to keep the border with the United States closed to non-essential travel and 90% in favour of placing all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period.

Sizeable majorities of Canadians also endorse two other measures: prohibiting non-essential travel from one province to another (82%) and prohibiting non-essential travel inside their province (75%).

Nine-in-ten Canadians (90%) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside, while 50% are in favour of allowing K-12 students to go back go in-class learning in their province.

Across the country, 63% of Canadians are satisfied with the performance of the federal government in handling the COVID-19 pandemic, down one point since September. More than three-in-five respondents also provide a positive assessment of their provincial administrations (64%) and their municipal governments (62%).

“In the four most populous provinces, the highest level of satisfaction with the way COVID-19 has been managed is observed in British Columbia (70%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are slightly lower in Quebec and Ontario (each at 68%), while Alberta fell to an all-time low (46%).”

More than seven-in-ten Canadians (73%, +1) say they will “definitely” or “probably” take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available, while 14% would not and 13% are not sure.

More than four-in-five Canadians (82%) say they are wearing a mask every time they go out, up from 70% in September. Just under a third (31%) are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection, and one-in-five (20%) are not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection.

Just over one-in-five Canadians (21%) say they are overeating more than usual at home, while 15% are losing their temper more often and 12% are drinking alcohol more often.

About one-in-seven Canadians (13%) are having a bath or shower less often than before the pandemic and 7% acknowledge that they are brushing their teeth less often than before.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from November 22 to November 24, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians and Americans Would Allow Legal Immigrants to Vote

Support for allowing people aged 16 and 17 to cast ballots in federal elections is decidedly lower.

Vancouver, BC [November 27, 2020] – Sizeable majorities of adults in Canada and the United States are willing to allow permanent residents to participate in democratic processes that are currently accessible only to citizens, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 72% of Canadians agree with allowing permanent residents to vote in federal elections, while 20% disagree.

In the United States, 64% of respondents would allow permanent residents—sometimes referred to as “Green Card Holders”—to cast ballots in federal elections, while 27% are opposed to this idea.

“Support for extending federal voting rights to permanent residents of Canada encompasses majorities of voters who supported the Liberal Party (78%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (71%) and the Conservative Party (66%) in the last federal election,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the United States, the idea is attractive to 76% of Democrats, 62% of Republicans and 51% of Independents.”

More than three-in-five Canadians (62%) are opposed to allowing people aged 16 and 17 to vote in federal elections, while 29% agree with this idea.

Extending voting rights to people aged 16 and 17 is rejected by large proportions of Canadians aged 55 and over (72%). Albertans (78%) and Conservative Party voters in 2019 (also 78%).

In the United States, more than half of respondents (58%) disagree with allowing people aged 16 and 17 to cast ballots in federal elections, while 33% are in favour of this idea.

American residents aged 55 and over (77%) and Independents (74%) are more likely to believe that voting rights should not be extended to those aged 16 and 17.

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted from November 14 to November 16, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Support Strict Regulations for Smoking and Vaping

More than half of Canadians say they would not consider dating a person who used electronic cigarettes.

Vancouver, BC [October 27, 2020] – Many Canadians are in favour of existing federal legislation that seeks to make electronic cigarettes less appealing to the country’s youth, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 86% of Canadians agree with prohibiting the sale of vaping products to minors.

The federal government passed Bill S-5, which is an overhaul of the Tobacco Act. Other components of this legislation are supported by large majorities of Canadians.

More than seven-in-ten Canadians agree with the federal government’s decision to restrict any reference to e-cigarettes as healthier than standard tobacco products (77%, +4 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in October 2019) and to restrict the use of testimonials and “lifestyle” advertising for vaping products (75%).

Almost four-in-five Canadians (79%, +6) believe there should be a ban on the use of e-cigarettes in public places where smoking is currently prohibited, and a larger proportion (86%, +1) want vaping products that contain nicotine to display a warning, similar to the one used for tobacco products.

More than two thirds of Canadians (69%) agree with banning certain flavours of vaping products, such as cannabis and “confectionery.”

Across the country, one-in-ten Canadians (10%, -1) say they vaped in the past year, a proportion that rises to 19% among those aged 18-to-34 and 14% in British Columbia. 

“A majority of Canadians (56%, -4) say they would not consider dating a person who used electronic cigarettes,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This group includes 57% of women and 62% of Ontarians.”

Almost three-in-four Canadians (73%, +4 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in January 2019) agree with giving Health Canada the power to implement plain and standardized tobacco packaging. 

More than four-in-five Canadians continue to endorse two regulations related to tobacco consumption that have been in place for years: banning smoking in indoor public spaces, public transit facilities and workplaces (including restaurants, bars and casinos) (87%, -2%) and banning smoking in private vehicles occupied by children (85%, +9).

Almost seven-in-ten of Canadians (69, -3%) support banning smoking (tobacco and marijuana) in multi-family buildings, while 20% (-5) are opposed to this course of action.

Support for a regulation that would ban smoking in multi-family dwellings is highest in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (85%), followed by Ontario (72%), British Columbia (68%), Atlantic Canada (67%), Alberta (62%) and Quebec (60%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 18 to September 20, 2020, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Appetite for Electric Vehicles Higher in the U.S. Than Canada

Price and the fear of becoming stranded are the major deterrents for motorists pondering a switch to a “carbon free” ride.

Vancouver, BC [October 22, 2020] – Vehicle owners in the United States are more likely to predict that their next car will be electric than their Canadian counterparts, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples of non-electric vehicle owners, 51% of American respondents and 42% of Canadian respondents say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that the next vehicle they acquire for themselves or their household will be electric.

“There is a significant gender gap on both North American countries when it comes to embracing the concept of electric vehicles,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Male non-electric vehicle owners are more likely to foresee an electric car in their future (48% in Canada and 68% in the United States) than their female counterparts (37% in Canada and 30% in the United States).”

In Canada, non-electric vehicle owners aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be considering a switch (61%) than those aged 35-to-54 (44%) and those aged 55 and over (37%).

In the United States, non-electric vehicle owners aged 35-to-54 are more likely to foresee a change in the future (78%) than those aged 18-to-34 (69%) and those aged 55 and over (21%).

When asked about specific issues that may make the purchase of an electric vehicle less likely, about three-in-five respondents in Canada (61%) say that the price is too expensive compared to non-electric options.

A majority of non-electric vehicle owners in Canada are fearful of becoming stranded if they cannot find a charging station (55%) and are worried about not having enough places to charge the vehicle in the areas where they usually drive (also 55%).

Fewer Canadian non-electric vehicle owners cited not having a place to charge the vehicle where they currently live (47%) and the “feel” of the vehicle compared to a non-electric one (14%).

In the United States, more than half of non-electric vehicle owners mentioned the fear of becoming stranded (53%) and price (51%) as the biggest hindrances to making a future purchase. 

More than two-in-five American respondents (45%) are concerned about a shortage of places to charge the vehicle where they usually drive, 37% lack a charging spot where they currently live, and 27% worried about the “feel” of an electric vehicle. 

The idea of the “feel” of the vehicle being a deal-breaker in the purchase of an electric car was more prevalent among non-electric vehicle owners who identify with the Republican Party in the United States (35%) and those who reside in the Canadian province of Alberta (23%).

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among representative samples of 797 adult non-electric vehicle owners in Canada and 804 adult non-electric vehicle owners in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for each country, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables for Canada here, our data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Than Half of Canadians Have Endured Workplace Abuse

One-in-four Canadians who endured harassment say the experience compelled them to switch jobs or leave a company.

Vancouver, BC [October 20, 2020] – A majority of Canadians have endured abuse at the workplace during their careers, including overwork, name calling and intimidation, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than half of Canadians (53%) acknowledge having experienced at least one of five different negative actions during the course of their working lives.

One-in-four Canadians (25%) faced actions that amount to overwork, such as being placed under undue pressure or given impossible deadlines.

Similar proportions of Canadians have experienced actions that threatened their personal standing, such as innuendo, sarcasm and jokes (22%) and actions that threatened their professional status, such as belittling opinions in a public setting or public professional humiliation (also 22%).

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians faced actions that are meant to destabilize, such as allocation of meaningless tasks and being set up for failure (18%) and actions that amount to isolation, such as withholding necessary information, ignoring or excluding (16%).

“Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to have had their professional status threatened in the workplace (28%) than their older counterparts,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, Canadians aged 35-to-54 are more likely to have experienced overwork (29%) and threats to their personal standing (26%).”

A third of Canadians who experienced any one of the five types of negative actions at work (33%) discussed the situation with family and/or friends, while one-in-four (25%) decided to leave the company or switch jobs. 

Fewer Canadians who endured negative actions at work chose to report the behaviour to the appropriate department or person (19%), took time off work or went on an extended leave (12%) or sought professional help to deal with health problems, such as low moods or depression (10%).

More than four-in-five Canadians (82%) think it is necessary for Canada to enact legislation that would provide protection to all workers from repeated abusive mistreatment at the workplace.

Just under one-in-four Canadians have experienced verbal abuse from a superior or boss at work (23%) or verbal abuse from a teacher at school (21%). 

While only 11% of Canadians have experienced verbal abuse from a sports coach, the proportion climbs to 19% among those aged 18-to-34.

Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to report enduring physical abuse from a teacher at school (12%, compared to the Canada-wide average of 8%). 

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 18 to September 20, 2020, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Report Fewer Blunders from Drivers Than Last Year

The proportion of Canadians who say drivers are “worse” than five years ago dropped from 47% in 2019 to 39% this year.

Vancouver, BC [October 16, 2020] – Canadians are expressing a higher level of satisfaction with drivers, and there is a decline on the incidence of specific negative behaviours on the country’s roads, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 39% of Canadians think drivers in their city or town are “worse” than five years ago, down eight points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2019.

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%, +4) say the quality of drivers has not changed, while 7% (=) believe they are “better” than five years ago.

“Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to have a pessimistic view of drivers, with 50% believing they are worse now,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer Canadians aged 35-to-54 (43%) and aged 18-to-34 (20%) share this point of view.”

The survey, which tracks the incidence of six specific behaviours, shows significant drops in some categories. 

More than half of Canadians (54%, -7 since 2019) saw a driver not signaling before a turn in the past month, and more than two-in-five (44%, -3) witnessed a car taking up two or more spots in a parking lot.

More than a third of Canadians (36%, -8) saw a driver not stopping at an intersection over the past month. Fewer respondents witnessed “lane tracking” or vehicles turning right or left from an incorrect lane (33%, -1) or experienced a “close call” on the road, such as slamming the breaks or having to steer violently to avoid a collision (26%, -9).

On a regional basis, British Columbia had the largest proportion of respondents who observed drivers not signaling before a turn (61%) or failing to stop at intersections (48%) in the past month. 

The proportion of respondents who saw vehicles taking up two or more spots in a parking lot was highest in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (53%) and Alberta (50%).

As was the case last year, 56% of Canadians believe that there are specific groups or people in their city or town who are worse drivers than others. 

More than two-in-five respondents who blamed a specific group for bad driving (43%) mentioned “young”, while 25% wrote “elderly.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 18 to September 20, 2020, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca