Views of Canadians on China and Huawei Clearly Worsen

Two thirds of respondents think Ottawa should not allow Huawei to participate in the development of Canada’s 5G mobile networks.

Vancouver, BC [July 17, 2019] – The perceptions of Canadians on China have deteriorated markedly over the past five months, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 67% of Canadians think Canada should not work to establish closer ties with China.

In December 2018, Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou was arrested in Vancouver. Meng faces charges in the United States—including bank fraud and obstruction of justice—and the U.S. has formally requested her extradition. 

After Meng’s arrest, China’s detained two Canadians—Michel Kovrig and Michael Spavor—on espionage allegations, and banned exports of Canadian canola, pork and beef.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (72%, +9 since a Research Co. poll conducted in February 2019) agree with the way Canadian authorities have acted in the Meng case.

Agreement with the way Ottawa has handled this matter is highest among women (76%), Canadians aged 55 and over (82%) and Liberal Party voters in the 2015 federal election (86%).

The federal government is currently reviewing the guidelines for the development of 5G (or “Fifth Generation”) mobile networks, which are expected to provide Canadians with larger data capacity and faster connections. 

Two thirds of Canadians (68%) think the federal government should not allow Huawei to participate in the development of Canada’s 5G mobile networks.

“In February, 57% of Canadians felt that Huawei should be barred from Canada’s 5G development,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “That proportion has increased by 11 points and now includes 81% of British Columbians and 74% of Ontarians.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from July 6 to July 9, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Desire for Abortion Debate is Higher in the U.S. than in Canada

British Columbians and Quebecers are more likely to say that the procedure should be legal under any circumstances.

Vancouver, BC [July 12, 2019] – Americans are more likely than Canadians to call for a nationwide discussion on abortion, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, almost half of Americans (46%) believe a debate about abortion is long overdue in the country and want the discussion to be re-opened. 

Conversely, over a third of Americans (36%) believe there is no point in re-opening a debate about abortion right now.

In Canada, a significantly smaller proportion of residents (37%) would welcome a debate on abortion, while a majority (53%) thinks there is no point in revisiting the issue.

“Democrats in the United States are more likely to wish for a new debate on abortion (42%) than Republicans (34%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In Canada, Conservative Party voters in 2015 are more eager for a discussion (44%) than those who cast a ballot for the New Democrats (33%) or the Liberals (27%).”

Almost half of Canadians (46%) believe abortion should be legal under any circumstances, while more than two-in-five (43%) would allow the procedure only under certain circumstances. 

In the United States, just under three-in-ten Americans (28%) believe abortion should be legal under any circumstances, while almost half (48%) would allow it only under certain circumstances.

While almost one-in-five Americans (19%) think abortion should be illegal in all circumstances, only 5% of Canadians agree with this point of view.

Canadians aged 18-to-34 (48%), British Columbians (54%), Quebecers (also 54%), as well as Liberal (58%) and New Democratic Party (NDP) (55%) voters in the 2015 federal election, are more likely to say that abortion should be legal under any circumstances.

In the United States, men (21%), Americans aged 18-to-34 (21%), residents of the Midwest (24%) and those who identify as Republicans (26%) are more likely to support a ban on abortion.

Methodology:

Results are based on online studies conducted from July 2 to July 5, 2019, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our full data set for Canada here, full data set for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most British Columbians Agree with Ottawa’s Pipeline Decision

Three-in-five residents are unconvinced that the re-approved expansion will bring lower gas prices to the province.

Vancouver, BC [July 3, 2019] – A majority of British Columbians believe the federal government made the right call in re-approving the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion, but a similar proportion voice dissatisfaction with Ottawa’s overall performance on this file, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 56% of British Columbians (+4 since May 2018) agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the pipeline expansion.

One third of British Columbians (33%) disagree with the decision, and 11% are undecided.

Agreement with Ottawa’s course of action is highest among men (66%), British Columbians aged 55 and over (also 66%), residents of the Southern Interior (67%) and BC Liberal voters in the 2017 provincial election (72%).

Almost three-in-five British Columbians (59%) say they are disappointed with the way the federal government has handled the expansion. 

“As expected, dissatisfaction with the way Ottawa handled this issue is practically universal among strong opponents (95%) and moderate opponents (73%) of the project,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But 50% of British Columbians who moderately or strongly support the expansion are also unhappy with the federal government.”

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (71%) think the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline will create hundreds of local jobs. 

Respondents are evenly divided on whether the pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of British Columbians, with 46% agreeing with the statement and 44% disagreeing with it. Two-in-five (41%) believe the provincial government should do anything necessary to ensure that the expansion does not happen.

Only 30% of British Columbians recall seeing advertisements in favour of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion over the past few weeks. Among those who were exposed to the ads, 32% said they made them “more likely” to support the expansion.

Only 39% of British Columbians think gas prices will be lower in the province now that the expansion has been re-approved—one of the key messages of the ad campaign undertaken by the Government of Alberta. Three-in-five residents (61%) either disagree with this thought (33%) or are not sure (28%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from June 22 to June 26, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Just Under Half of Canadians Would Ratify CUSMA Trade Deal

Only one-in-five believe Canada has benefitted the most from free trade in North America.

Vancouver, BC [June 26, 2019] – A plurality of Canadians believe the country’s legislature should ratify a recently signed trade agreement, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 48% of Canadians think the Canada–United States–Mexico Agreement (CUSMA) should be ratified, while more than a third (36%) disagree and 16% are undecided.

Canada, the United States and Mexico signed the CUSMA in 2018. At the time the survey was conducted, none of the three national legislatures had ratified the agreement.

Support for Canada’s ratification of the CUSMA is highest among men (53%), those aged 18-to-34 (57%), British Columbians (51%), Ontarians (50%) and Atlantic Canadians (also 50%).

“More than half of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2015 federal election (56%) want to see the CUSMA ratified,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This is significantly higher than what we see among those who voted for the Conservative Party (45%) or the New Democratic Party (NDP) (42%) four years ago.”

Canada, the United States and Mexico have been partners in the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) since 1994.

More than a third of Canadians (36%) believe the United States has benefitted the most from free trade in North America, while one-in-four (26%) select Mexico. 

Only 20% of Canadians believe Canada has been the biggest beneficiary in continental trade. The perception of Canada being the victor in North American trade is lowest among Albertans (6%), British Columbians (11%) and those aged 55 and over (15%).

Across the country, more than three-in-five Canadians (63%) say they are “very confident” or “moderately confident” that the Canadian federal government will do what’s best for the country when it comes to international trade.

Confidence in the federal government’s ability to handle international trade is highest among women (68%), Canadians aged 18-to-34 (66%) and British Columbians (63%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 31 to June 3, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Think Trump Presidency Has Been Bad for Canada

Justin Trudeau leads Andrew Scheer by a 2-to-1 margin on being best suited to deal with the current American president.

Vancouver, BC [June 19, 2019] – Most people in Canada regard the presidency of Donald Trump in a negative light, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 65% of Canadians think having Trump as President of the United States has been “bad” or “very bad” for Canada.

Negative views on the effect of Trump’s tenure on Canada are highest among women (68%), those aged 55 and over (69%), Quebecers (71%) and British Columbians (73%).

“Only 17% of Canadians think Trump’s presidency has been good for Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Albertans (32%) and people who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2015 federal election (30%) are more likely to have positive views on Trump’s term so far.”

When asked which one of the two main federal party leaders is better suited to handle Trump and Canada’s relationship with the United States, 35% of respondents select Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau, while 17% pick Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Andrew Scheer.

In Alberta, Scheer outranks Trudeau on this question (28% to 16%), but the incumbent prime minister is ahead of his key rival in all other regions of the country, including Quebec (40% to 17%), Ontario (33% to 20%) and British Columbia (35% to 19%).

Two-in-five Canadians (40%) think Trump has performed “worse” than they expected since becoming president, while 46% believe he has done “about the same” as they envisioned.

Only 10% of Canadians believe Trump has “accomplished much” since he became president. Significant proportions of residents think the current White House occupant has “accomplished little” (37%) or believe it is too early to judge his achievements (39%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 31 to June 3, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca