Most Canadians Agree with Nationwide “Conversion Therapy” Ban

Strong majorities of residents of all regions are in favour of the legislation that came into effect in January 2022.

Vancouver, BC [April 29, 2022] – The recently enacted prohibition of the practice of “conversion therapy” is endorsed by more than three-in-five Canadians, a new Research Co. poll has found.

Proponents of “conversion therapy” believe that individuals who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, gender diverse, queer, and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2+) can be “converted” into heterosexuals through psychological or spiritual intervention.

Legislation that came into effect in January 2022 makes it illegal to promote, advertise, or profit from providing “conversion therapy”, or to subject a person, consenting or not, to “conversion therapy” in Canada.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 62% of Canadians agree with “conversion therapy” being illegal in Canada, while 21% disagree and 17% are undecided.

Support for the nationwide ban on “conversion therapy” is highest in Atlantic Canada (66%), followed by British Columbia (64%), Ontario (63%), Alberta (62%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (61%) and Quebec (57%).

“At least seven-in-ten Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (71%) and the Liberal Party (70%) in the last federal election are in favour of the new guidelines,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “They are joined by a majority of those who supported the Conservative Party in 2021 (57%).”

Most Canadians (57%, +2 since a similar Research Co poll conducted in November 2020) continue to believe that individuals who identify themselves as LGBTQ2+ cannot be “converted” into heterosexuals through psychological or spiritual intervention. This includes 69% of Atlantic Canadians, 63% of Canadians aged 55 and over and 60% of women.

Compared to 2020, there is little fluctuation when Canadians are asked about the legal recognition of same-sex couples in the country.

Two thirds of Canadians (66%, -1) believe same-sex couples should continue to be allowed to legally marry. Significantly fewer side with the notion of same-sex couples being allowed to form civil unions and not marry (12%, =) or not granting any kind of legal recognition to same-sex couples (10%, =).

More than two-in-five Canadians (42%, +3) think people are born as LGBTQ2+. However, 28% (=) believe people choose to be LGBTQ2+, while 31% (-2) are not sure.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 16 to April 18, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Call for Public Inquiry into COVID-19 Response

The proportion of Canadians who are “anxious” about the end of pandemic restrictions and mandates increased to 56%.

Vancouver, BC [April 22, 2022] – A majority of Canadians believe a thorough review of the performance of various levels of government during the COVID-19 pandemic is warranted, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample, 66% of Canadians support holding a public inquiry into the way the COVID-19 pandemic was managed by the federal government, while 23% are opposed and 12% are undecided.

The Government of the United Kingdom has announced a public inquiry into the COVID-19 pandemic. The terms of reference intend to cover preparedness, the public health response, the response in the health care sector and the economic response. 

Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2021 federal election are more likely to endorse the call for a public inquiry into Ottawa’s pandemic management (77%) than those who voted for the Conservative Party (67%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (66%).

More than three-in-five Canadians believe that public inquiries into the way COVID-19 was handled by their provincial governments (64%) and their municipal governments (61%) are in order.

“More than two thirds of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (70%) and Ontario (68%) are in favour of holding a public inquiry into how their provincial governments managed the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support is slightly lower in Quebec (64%), British Columbia (61%), Alberta (also 61%) and Atlantic Canada (59%).”

This month, 82% of residents (+1 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March 2022) believe COVID-19 is a real threat. In addition, 62% of Canadians (-10) believe that the worst of COVID-19 is “behind us”.

Satisfaction with the way the federal government is handling the pandemic fell by four points to 57%. The rating is exactly the same for provincial administrations across Canada (57%, +1) and slightly higher for municipal governments (60% =).

Among the four most populous provinces, satisfaction is highest in British Columbia (61%, -2) and Ontario (also 61%, +4), followed by Quebec (59%, -4) and Alberta (37%, =).

There is little movement on the satisfaction of Canadians with the performance of the federal chief public health officer (61%, -2) and their provincial health officer or chief medical officer (60%, -1).

Most Canadians (56%) acknowledge feeling “very anxious” or “moderately anxious” about the end of COVID-19 restrictions and mandates in their community, up four points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in March 2022.

Three-in-five Canadians (60%, -5) plan to continue wearing a mask or face covering when entering an indoor premise in the next fortnight, while 45% (=) will do so every time they leave their home.

The proportion of Canadians who intend to visit relatives or friends in person over the next two weeks remains at 58%. Just over two-in-five Canadians are planning to have dinner (44%, -1) or lunch (43%, +4) at a sit-down restaurant in the next fortnight.

Fewer than one-in-four Canadians are planning to attend the theatre or cinema (22%, +1), a live sporting event as a spectator (11%, =) or a live concert as a spectator (also 11%, +2). 

While 22% of Canadians are planning to travel by car for an overnight stay in the next two weeks, only 13% are currently willing to travel by airplane.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 16 to April 18, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Armed Forces, Constitution and Flag Top Pride List in U.S.

Fewer than two-in-five Americans are proud of Congress and the state of race relations in the country.  

Vancouver, BC [March 29, 2021] – Significant proportions of Americans express pride in some of the country’s institutions and features, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 82% of Americans say the country’s Armed Forces make them proud.  

More than three-in-four Americans are proud of the Constitution (77%) and the flag (also 77%), while majorities feel the same way about the police (61%), American sports (55%) and the justice system (51%).  

“Republicans in the United States are more likely to say that they are proud of the police (81%) than Independents (60%) and Democrats (44%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “A similar scenario ensues when Americans are asked about the justice system, with 61% of Republicans stating they are proud of it, compared to 48% of Independents and 44% of Democrats.”  

More than two-in-five Americans are proud of the economy (44%), health care (also 44%), the state of democracy (42%) and the President (41%). The lowest ranked institutions and features are Congress (35%) and race relations (26%).  

While 33% of Americans of Hispanic or Latino descent are proud of the state of race relations in the United States, the numbers are lower among White Americans (26%) and African Americans (24%).  

Americans aged 18-to-34 are less likely to express pride about health care (38%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (46%) and aged 55 and over (45%).  

Across the United States, 42% of Americans approve of Joe Biden’s performance as president, down 11 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in April 2021.  

Biden’s approval reaches 75% among Democrats, but drops to 49% among Independents and to 15% among Republicans.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from March 25 to March 27, 2022, among 1,000 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Seven-in-Ten Canadians Think Worst of COVID-19 is Behind Us

Vancouver, BC [March 22, 2022] – The perceptions of Canadians on the future of COVID-19 are now better than at any other moment of the pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 72% of Canadians think the worst of COVID-19 is “behind us”, up 20 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2022. Only 15% of Canadians (-14) believe the worst of the pandemic is “ahead of us” while 14% (-6) are not sure.  

“There is a remarkable regional consistency in the way Canadians are looking at the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Practically seven-in-ten residents of each province believe that the worst of COVID-19 is now behind us.”  

Across Canada, 81% of residents (-4) believe COVID-19 is a real threat—a proportion that rises to 86% among those aged 55 and over.   Just over three-in-five Canadians (61%, +5) are satisfied with the way the federal government has dealt with COVID-19. The rating is slightly lower for municipal governments (60%, +3) and provincial governments (56%, +6) across the country.  

This month, the governments of Quebec (63%, +8) and British Columbia (also 63%, +3) post the highest satisfaction levels across the four most populous Canadian provinces, followed by Ontario (57%, +6) and Alberta (37%, +4).

More than three-in-five Canadians (63%) are satisfied with the way the federal chief public health officer has managed the COVID-19 pandemic, and 61% feel the same way about their provincial health officer or chief medical officer.  

Majorities of residents of Quebec (63%), British Columbia (also 63%), Ontario (61%) and Alberta (53%) are content with the performance of their provincial health officer or chief medical officer.  

Just over two thirds of Canadians (68%) say they are wearing a mask every time they go out, including 76% of those aged 55 and over.  

More than seven-in-ten residents of Atlantic Canada (73%), Ontario (72%) and Quebec (71%) acknowledge wearing a mask every time they go out. The proportion is lower in British Columbia (62%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (60%) and Alberta (57%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from March 14 to March 16, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Support for Governing United Conservative Party Drops in Alberta

Just over one-in-four of the province’s residents approve of the performance of Jason Kenney as premier.  

Vancouver, BC [March 14, 2022] – The opposition New Democratic Party (NDP) holds a significant lead over the governing United Conservative Party (UCP) in Alberta, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 45% of decided voters in Alberta would support the NDP candidate in their constituency if a provincial election were held today, up two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2020.  

The governing UCP is a distant second with 30% (-10), followed by the Wildrose Independence Party with 8% (+6), the Alberta Party with 7% (-2), the Liberal Party with 5% (+3), the Green Party with 3% (+1) and the Independence Party with 1%.  

The NDP is ahead of the UCP by eight points among male decided voters (40% to 32%) and by 21 points among female decided voters (49% to 28%).  

The New Democrats hold significant advantages over the United Conservatives in Edmonton (50% to 25%) and Calgary (47% to 34%). In all other areas of the province, the UCP is barely ahead of the NDP (33% to 31%).  

“The UCP is evidently having difficulties maintaining the base together,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While the NDP is keeping 89% of its supporters in the 2019 provincial election, the UCP is only managing to hold on to 51% of their voters.”  

Only 26% of Albertans (-16) approve of the way Premier and UCP leader Jason Kenney is managing his duties, while 66% (+16) disapprove.  

Almost half of the province’s residents (49%, +4) are satisfied with the performance of Official Opposition and NDP leader Rachel Notley.  

The approval rating is lower for interim Liberal Party leader John Roggeveen (22%), Green Party leader Jordan Wilkie (20%, +4), Alberta Party leader Barry Morishita (18%), Wildrose Independence Party leader Paul Hinman (18%, +2) and Independence Party leader Vicky Bayford (13%).  

More than a third of Albertans (36%) believe Notley would make the best premier among seven party leaders. Kenney is second with 17%, with all other contenders in single digits.  

When Albertans are asked about the most important issue facing the province, similar proportions select health care (30%, +3) and the economy and jobs (29%, -14). Government accountability is third (13%, +6) followed by housing, poverty and homelessness (7%, +4) and COVID-19 (6%, =).  

Animosity towards the idea of implementing a provincial sales tax (PST) has grown in Alberta since December 2020. This month, more than seven-in-ten residents of the province (72%, +7) voice opposition to this idea—including 86% of UCP voters and 65% of NDP voters in 2019.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from March 11 to March 13, 2022, among 600 adults in Alberta. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Alberta. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.0 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views on the Death Penalty Mostly Stagnant in Canada

More than half of supporters of capital punishment think it would serve as a deterrent for potential murderers.  

Vancouver, BC [March 11. 2022] – Half of Canadians continue to believe that it is time to bring back capital punishment, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 51% of Canadians are in favour of reinstating the death penalty for murder in Canada, while 37% are opposed and 12% are undecided.  

Support for capital punishment is highest among Canadians aged 55 and over (55%), and drops slightly among those aged 35-to-54 (51%) and those aged 18-to-34 (47%).  

More than three-in-five Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in last year’s federal election (63%) are in favour of reinstating the death penalty for murder in Canada, along with 52% of those who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP) and 49% of those who cast ballots for Liberal Party candidates.  

This year’s findings are in harmony with polls conducted by Research Co. in 2021 and 2020, where 50% and 51% of Canadians respectively backed the return of capital punishment.  

When asked about the suitable punishment for a person convicted of murder, more than a third of Canadians (36%, +2) select the death penalty while a majority (52%, +1) choose life imprisonment without the possibility of parole.  

“For the past three years, there has been consistency when Canadians are asked about capital punishment,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While about half are in favour of reinstating the death penalty, support drops when the concept of life imprisonment is introduced.”  

A majority of Canadians (54%, +3 since 2021) believe that the death penalty is sometimes appropriate. Smaller proportions of Canadians consider capital punishment as never appropriate (27%, -2) or always appropriate (11%, +1).  

More than half of Canadians who support bringing back the death penalty believe it would serve as a deterrent for potential murderers (57%) and save taxpayers money and the costs associated with keeping a person behind bars (55%).  

Many supporters of capital punishment in Canada also think it is a penalty that fits the crime because a convicted murderer has taken a life (51%) and say it would provide closure to the families of murder victims (49%). One-in-four (26%) believe murderers cannot be rehabilitated.  

Two thirds of Canadians who oppose the death penalty (67%) are concerned about the possibility of a person being wrongly convicted and executed.  

About two-in-five opponents of capital punishment consider it wrong to take a convicted murderer’s own life (42%), doubt that it will work as a deterrent (39%), and call for murderers to do their time in prison, as indicated by a judge (also 39%). Fewer than one-in-five (17%) think murderers can be rehabilitated.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from February 25 to February 27, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Ponder Changes to Political Processes

Seven-in-ten residents would place political parties under the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.  

Vancouver, BC [March 8, 2022] – Significant proportions of British Columbians are in favour of changing some rules pertaining to leadership races and Freedom of Information requests, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, more than three-in-five British Columbians (63%) agree with using an independent professional accounting firm to administer leadership processes in provincial political parties.  

Support for this change is highest among men (68%) and British Columbians aged 55 and over (also 68%).  

Most residents of the province who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (71%), the BC Liberals (66%) and the BC Green Party (54%) in the 2020 provincial election support relying on an independent professional accounting firm to administer leadership processes.  

Support is not as strong when British Columbians are asked about giving Elections BC the power to administer leadership processes in provincial political parties. While a majority of the province’s residents (53%) agree with this idea, 19% disagree and 27% are undecided.  

“There are some significant regional fluctuations when British Columbians ponder whether Elections BC should oversee party leadership processes,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While majorities of residents of Metro Vancouver (56%) and Vancouver Island (55%) would welcome this change, agreement is lower in the Fraser Valley (48%), Northern BC (45%) and Southern BC (43%).”  

Seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%) are in favour of subjecting all political parties represented in the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia to the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA).  

Support is exactly the same (70%) for bringing all political parties represented in the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia under FIPPA.  

More than two thirds of British Columbians (69%) support only allowing adults to vote in party leadership elections, and not any individual aged 12 to 17, even if they are party members.  

British Columbians aged 55 and over are more likely to reject the possibility of minors participating in party leadership races (80%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (63%) and aged 18-to-34 (also 63%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from February 12 to February 14, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Want Federal Government to Support Ukraine in Crisis

More than half of Canadians agree with the decisions taken by Ottawa before and after the Russian invasion.  

Vancouver, BC [March 3, 2022] – A majority of Canadians have a clear idea of the role they want the federal government to play during the international crisis between Ukraine and Russia, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 53% of Canadians think Ottawa should “definitely” (34%) or “probably” (19%) support Ukraine.  

About a third of Canadians (32%) think the federal government should do nothing or avoid getting involved in the conflict, while only 1% believe Ottawa should back Russia.  

“Canadians aged 55 and over (68%) are particularly empathetic of the federal government’s involvement in support of Ukraine,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Canadians aged 18-to-34 are evenly divided, with 43% wanting to support Ukraine and 41% preferring neutrality.”  

Sizeable proportions of Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (67%) and the Liberal Party (65%) in the 2021 election want the federal government to side with Ukraine at this point. The proportion is smaller, albeit still a majority, among those who voted for the Conservative Party last year (53%).  

Two thirds of Canadians (66%) have followed news stories related to the international crisis between Ukraine and Russia “very closely” or “moderately closely.”  

At least two thirds of residents of British Columbia (66%), Quebec (69%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (71%) have been paying attention to the situation in Ukraine, along with majorities of those who reside in Ontario (65%), Alberta (63%) and Atlantic Canada (also 63%).  

At the time the survey was conducted, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau had announced that Canada would send $7.8 million in lethal equipment and provide a $500 million loan to Ukraine. Trudeau also established economic sanctions against the President of Russia and his inner circle.  

More than half of Canadians (52%) agree with Trudeau’s decisions, while 32% disagree and 17% are undecided.  

Canadians who voted for the Conservatives in 2021 are more likely to disagree with the actions of the prime minister on this file (44%) than those who supported the New Democrats or the Liberals (35% and 27% respectively).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from February 25 to February 27, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Back Reliance on Emergencies Act By 2-to-1 Margin

Almost three-in-five oppose the protests and blockades against restrictions and mandates related to the COVID-19 pandemic.  

Vancouver, BC [February 24, 2022] – Most Canadians are not supportive of the people who have participated in protests and blockades against restrictions and mandates related to the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 59% of Canadians oppose the protests and blockades, while 35% are in favour of them and 6% are not sure.  

The highest level of rejection to the protests and blockades is observed in Atlantic Canada (66%), followed by British Columbia (62%), Alberta (also 62%), Quebec (60%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (59%) and Ontario (55%).  

A slight majority of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (52%) oppose the protests and blockades. The proportion is higher among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (54%) and aged 55 and over (71%).  

“Almost two thirds of Canadians who have been vaccinated against COVID-19 (64%) voice opposition to the protests and blockades,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, seven-in-ten Canadians who have not been vaccinated (70%) are supportive.”  

More than four-in-five Canadians (81%) say they are following news stories related to the protests and blockades “very closely” or “moderately closely.”  

More than three-in-five Canadians (63%) think the federal government was justified in invoking the Emergencies Act to deal with the protests and blockades against restrictions and mandates related to the COVID-19 pandemic, while 28% think Ottawa’s actions were unjustified.  

Majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (83%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (67%) and the Green Party (53%) in the September 2021 federal election endorse the government’s invocation of the Emergencies Act. Support is lower among Canadians who cast ballots for the Conservative Party (46%) and the People’s Party (30%) last year.  

Just over four-in-five Canadians (81%) are “very concerned” or “moderately concerned” about violence breaking out at the site of protests and blockades. Slightly smaller proportions of Canadians are worried about foreign money being used to fund the activities of protestors (71%), Canada’s image in the world being negatively affected by the protests and the federal government’s actions (70%), and the federal government relying on the Emergencies Act to end other protests in the future (65%).

More than three-in-five Canadians (65%) disagree with the notion that the federal government should be overthrown. Just over one-in-four Canadians (26%) agree with this statement, including 30% of Albertans, 30% of Ontarians, 46% of Conservative voters and 55% of People’s Party voters.  

Majorities of Canadians disagree with three other ideas: that the people protesting against restrictions and mandates are fighting for freedom (64%), that the actions of the people protesting against restrictions and mandates are justified (58%) and that all COVID-19 mandates and restrictions should be repealed (54%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from February 18 to February 20, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

BC NDP Remains Ahead of BC Liberals in British Columbia

The approval rating for Premier John Horgan stands at 69%, while Kevin Falcon starts his tenure as BC Liberal leader at 38%.  

Vancouver, BC [February 18, 2022] – The BC New Democratic Party (NDP) holds an eight-point advantage over the opposition BC Liberals among decided voters in British Columbia, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 46% of decided voters would cast a ballot for the BC NDP candidate in their constituency if a provincial election were held today.  

The BC Liberals are in second place with 38%, followed by the BC Green Party with 13% and the BC Conservative Party with 2%.  

The BC NDP holds substantial leads over the BC Liberals among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (43% to 36%) and decided voters aged 35-to-54 (48% to 35%). The race is closer among decided voters aged 55 and over (BC NDP 46%, BC Liberals 42%).  

While the two main parties are separated by just three points among male decided voters (BC NDP 44%, BC Liberals 41%), the New Democrats have a substantial lead over the BC Liberals among female decided voters (47% to 35%).  

Almost seven-in-ten British Columbians (69%) approve of the performance of Premier and BC NDP leader John Horgan, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted just before the last provincial election in October 2020.  

The approval rating for Kevin Falcon—who became the leader of the BC Liberals earlier this month—stands at 38%. The indicator is similar for BC Greens leader Sonia Furstenau (36%, -10) and lower for BC Conservative leader Trevor Bolin (19%).  

“British Columbia’s two main party leaders are not having difficulties connecting with their base of support,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Nine-in-ten BC NDP voters in 2020 approve of Horgan (90%), while two thirds of BC Liberal voters in the last provincial ballot approve of Falcon (67%).”  

A third of British Columbians (33%, +10) identify housing, homelessness and poverty as the most important issue facing the province today—a proportion that rises to 41% among those aged 18-to-34.   Health care is second on the list of concerns with 23% (+2), followed by the economy and jobs (16%, -9), the environment (10%, +3), COVID-19 (6%, -7) and crime and public safety (4%, =).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from February 12 to February 14, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Xue Dong

COVID-19 Rating for Governments Drops Markedly Across Canada

Satisfaction with the federal government fell by seven points since December, while Quebec experienced a 17-point drop.  

Vancouver, BC [February 4, 2022] – Fewer Canadians are content with the way various levels of government are dealing with COVID-19, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 56% of Canadians are satisfied with the way the federal government has managed the pandemic, down seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2021.  

Fewer Canadians are also content with the way municipal governments (57%, -7) and provincial governments (51%, -11) are handling COVID-19.  

Satisfaction with the performance of the provincial administration fell drastically in Quebec, from 72% in December to 55% in late January. The numbers also declined in three other provinces: from 68% to 60% in British Columbia, from 56% to 51% in Ontario, and from 42% to 33% in Alberta.  

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%) believe the measures that are in place in their province to deal with COVID-19 are correct for the situation, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2021. In addition, 27% (-2) think the measures do not go far enough and 23% (+4) say they go too far.  

“In Quebec, where the government hinted at taxing the unvaccinated, 34% of residents believe the COVID-19 measures go too far,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In Alberta, 42% of residents think their provincial administration has not done enough.”

Compared to May 2021, fewer Canadians endorse their provincial governments on specific competencies. Fewer than three-in-ten Canadians trust their provincial administration to respond to a natural disaster (57%, -3), establish public health guidelines (55%, -3), release accurate information (53%, -8), release complete information (51%, -5) and ensure the sustainability of the health care system (50%, -5). Even fewer Canadians have confidence in their provincial governments to spend tax dollars wisely (38%, -5).  

Sizeable proportions of Canadians both consider COVID-19 as a real threat (85%, =) and support requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside (84%, +1). In addition, just under three-in-four (72%, -4) acknowledge wearing a mask every time they go out.  

Just over three-in-five Canadians (61%, -8) agree with the decision to allow K-12 students to go back to in-class learning in their province. Support for this measure is highest in British Columbia, Quebec and Atlantic Canada (each at 63%).  

Just over half of Canadians (52%, +5) think the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic is “behind us”, while 29% (-4) believe it is still “ahead of us.”  

The concept of “vaccine passports” continues to be backed by majorities of Canadians for travel abroad (70%, -3), to a different province (68%, -3) and within the same province (62%, -2).  

Practically two thirds of Canadians also think it is a good idea to rely on  “vaccine passports” to go to live sporting events (69%, -2), visit a gym or fitness facility (68%, -3), go to live concerts (also 68%, -3), go to the cinema or theater (67% -5) or work at an office (65%, -3).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from January 28 to January 30, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Almost Half of Canadians Will Ignore Beijing 2022 Winter Games

Practically three-in-five (59%) think Canada should boycott this year’s Winter Olympics—including 65% of those aged 55 and over.  

Vancouver, BC [February 1, 2022] – The proportion of Canadians who will avoid coverage of the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics has increased slightly across the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 47% of Canadians say they will make a conscious effort to refrain from watching the sporting event, up two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2021.  

Half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (50%) and a majority of Quebecers (53%) say they will consciously avoid this year’s Winter Olympics.  

Almost three-in-five Canadians (59%, +3) think Canada should boycott the 2022 Winter Olympics over China’s human rights record—a proportion that rises to 62% among men, 65% among Canadians aged 55 and over and 67% among those who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2021 federal election.  

“Sizeable majorities of Canadians who reside in Quebec (66%) and British Columbia (also 66%) are in favour of a full boycott of the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support for a full boycott is also high in Atlantic Canada (58%), Ontario (57%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (56%).”  

More than seven-in-ten Canadians (72%, +2) are worried about  the health and safety of Canadian athletes who participate in the Beijing Winter Olympics, including 74% of women and 83% of those aged 55 and over.  

Across Canada, 72% of respondents (+2) believe athletes who wish to protest China’s human rights record during the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics should be able to do so. The same proportion (72%, +1) believe the International Olympic Committee (IOC) should not punish athletes who decide to speak out.  

Just over half of Canadians (51%, -1) say they check labels “all the time” or “most of the time” to review where the products they purchase for their home or family were manufactured.  

More than half of Canadians never avoid goods made in Europe (62%, -6), the United States (57%, -5) and Mexico (54%, -2). The proportion is slightly lower for products manufactured in Russia (44%, -5) and India (43%, -5).  

Compared to December, there is little change in the perception of Canadians about goods manufactured in China. Only 30% (-2) never refrain from buying them, while seven-in-ten (70%, +2) avoid Chinese products “all the time” (16%, +1), “most of the time” (25%, +5) or “some of the time” (29%, -4).  

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from January 21 to January 23, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Than Half of Canadians Rate Economic Conditions as Bad

Canadians are split when asked if they have confidence in Justin Trudeau to do the right thing to help the economy.  

Vancouver, BC [January 28, 2022] – Many Canadians appear dissatisfied with the current state of the nation’s finances, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 54% of Canadians rate the economic conditions in Canada today as “bad” or “very bad”, while 41% consider them “very good” or “good.”  

Economic confidence is particularly low in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (26%) and Alberta (33%). At least two-in-five residents of British Columbia (40%), Ontario (43%), Atlantic Canada (also 43%) and Quebec (48%) think the economic conditions in Canada today are “very good” or “good.”  

Only one-in-five Canadians (20%) expect the Canadian economy to improve over the next six months, while 30% foresee a decline and 41% believe it will remain the same.  

Almost three-in-five Canadians (58%) say their own personal finances today are “very good” or “good”, while almost two-in-five (38%) state that they are “bad” or “very bad.”  

Compared to a survey conducted by Research Co. in April 2020, Canadians are not as concerned about possible financial setbacks.  

More than two-in-five Canadians acknowledge worrying “frequently” or “occasionally” about two issues in the past couple of months: the safety of their savings (44%, -8) and the value of their investments (41%, -9).  

Fewer Canadians are concerned about unemployment affecting their household (31%, -15), being able to pay their mortgage or rent (31%, -10) or their employer running into serious financial trouble (26%, -11).  

More than four-in-five Canadians expect the price of a week’s worth of groceries (83%) and gasoline (82%) to go up in the next six months. At least three-in-five Canadians also foresee rising costs for real estate (72%), a new car (71%) and a new television set (62%).  

While 47% of Canadians trust Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to do the right thing to help the economy, 48% express no confidence in his leadership.  

More than a third of Canadians (37%) trust Governor of the Bank of Canada Tiff Macklem to make the right decisions, while only 29% feel the same way about Federal Leader of the Opposition Erin O’Toole.

“Canadians are not particularly thrilled with the current economic conditions and are not expecting a quick fix to address inflation,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However, they are less likely to express grave concerns about meeting existing financial commitments or losing their job than in the early stages of the pandemic.”

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from January 21 to January 23, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Tiny Proportion of British Columbians Can Identify a Senator

In spite of the low level of awareness about the Red Chamber, most residents would like to vote to choose the next senator.

Vancouver, BC [January 24, 2022] – Fewer than one-in-twenty British Columbians are able to name one of the five people that currently represent the province in the Senate of Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, only 4% of British Columbians are able to correctly identify Larry Campbell, Bev Busson, Yonah Martin, Yuen Pau Woo and/or Mobina Jaffer as the province’s current senators.

Most British Columbians are also oblivious of the actual number of seats that the province has in the Red Chamber. Only 3% of respondents to the survey know that the correct number is six.

There is a British Columbia vacancy in the Canadian Senate, following the mandatory retirement of Richard Neufeld in November 2019.

A majority of British Columbians (58%, down six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March 2019) agree with holding a non-binding election, similar to the ones that have taken place in Alberta, to choose a nominee for appointment to the Senate.

Support for a non-binding Senate ballot reaches 61% among men, 65% among British Columbians aged 18-to-34 and 69% among residents of Northern BC.

A third of British Columbians (32%) say they would prefer to reform the Senate to allow Canadians to elect their senators, down four points since March 2019.

Fewer British Columbians are supportive of other ideas, such as abolishing the Senate of Canada altogether (16%, -1), having a selection committee that would appoint non-partisan Senators (13%, -1) or having the sitting prime minister appoint members of the upper house (7%, -1).

The proportion of British Columbians who do not select any of these four options when pondering the Red Chamber increased by seven points to 32%.

“When thinking about the Senate of Canada, British Columbians are more likely to endorse the concepts of reform or abolition, in spite of the complexities either option would entail,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The current status quo of the upper house, where a selection committee ultimately appoints members, is only more popular than giving the prime minister ultimate authority over who becomes a senator.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 21 to December 23, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

British Columbians Ponder Who Can Deliver Affordable Housing

The provincial government has the highest level of trust from residents, while for-profit developers are at the bottom.  

Vancouver, BC [January 11, 2021] – The current provincial administration outranks the federal government when British Columbians are asked who they have confidence in to deal with affordable housing, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 55% of British Columbians say they trust the provincial government under the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) to deliver affordable housing in the province.  

The numbers are significantly lower when residents are asked to consider the actions of a provincial government headed by the BC Liberal Party (36%) or headed by the BC Green Party (33%).  

“As expected, a sizeable majority of BC NDP voters in the 2020 election (73%) express confidence in the current provincial government to manage affordable housing ,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than two-in-five of those who cast ballots for the BC Liberals (47%) and the BC Greens (45%) in 2020 also trust the current provincial administration on this file.”  

Fewer than two-in-five British Columbians (39%) have confidence in the federal government under the Liberal Party to deliver affordable housing. The numbers are significantly higher when the province’s residents assess what things would look like with the federal NDP in charge (51%) and lower for a federal government assembled by the Conservative Party (32%).  

Women (40%) and British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (46%) are more likely to express confidence in the actions of the federal government under the Liberal Party to deliver affordable housing than men (37%), residents aged 35-to-54 (38%) and residents aged 55 and over (35%).  

Almost half of British Columbians (47%) trust their own provincial administration to deliver affordable housing. The rating is slightly higher for not-for-profit developers (49%) and substantially lower for for-profit developers (19%).  

In a December 2021 poll conducted by Research Co. in Metro Vancouver, 31% of respondents identified housing as the most important issue facing their municipality.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 21 to December 23, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Positive Perceptions on China Remain Low Across Canada

Only Iran and North Korea post a lower favourability ranking among the 15 nations included in the semi-annual survey.  

Vancouver, BC [January 7, 2022] – As has been the case for the past year, only one-in-five Canadians hold favourable views on the People’s Republic of China, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 20% of Canadians have a positive opinion of China. The results are similar to the ones reported by Research Co. after nationwide polls conducted in July 2021 (21%) and December 2020 (19%).  

“Just a few weeks before Beijing hosts the Winter Olympics, two thirds of Canadians (68%) say their perception of China is negative,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion rises to 71% in British Columbia and to 77% among Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2021 federal election.”

Half of Canadians (50%, =) hold a positive opinion of the United States, while 41% (+1) express negative views.  

The favourability rating for the United States on this question is highest in Alberta (58%), followed by Quebec (56%), Ontario (51%), Atlantic Canada (44%), British Columbia (43%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (36%).  

Canadians who voted for the Conservatives and the Liberal Party last year are more likely to express positive views on the United States (59% and 55% respectively) than those who cast ballots for New Democratic Party (NDP) candidates (31%).  

Sizeable majorities of Canadians continue to hold favourable perceptions on the five other countries that—along with the United States and Canada—are part of the G7: the United Kingdom (71%, -2), Germany (69%, =), Japan (69%, +1), Italy (69%, -4) and France (68%, -5).  

A majority of Canadians (55%, -2) have a positive opinion of South Korea. The rating dropped markedly for two other nations: Mexico (45%, -4) and India (37%, -4).  

Fewer than three-in-ten Canadians hold favourable views on Venezuela (28%, -1), Russia (24%, -4), Saudi Arabia (23%, =), Iran (16%, -1) and North Korea (14%, -1).  

While just over three-in-ten Canadians aged 18-to-34 (31%) express positive opinions on Russia, the proportion drops to 26% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 16% among those aged 55 and over.  

Methodology:  Results are based on an online study conducted from December 15 to December 17, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Majorities in Alberta and Ontario Would Prefer a Different Premier

Since August, the proportion of Albertans who feel they would be “better off” as a country increased by 10 points to 38%.  

Vancouver, BC [December 28, 2021] – As the year draws to an end, residents of Alberta and Ontario are particularly dissatisfied with their premiers, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 51% of Canadians think their province would be better off with a different head of government in charge.  

Majorities of Albertans (73%, +5 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2021) and Ontarians (57%, +3) suggest that the state of affairs would be more satisfactory under a different premier. The proportion is lower in Quebec (42%, +4) and British Columbia (35%, +1).  

Practically half of Canadians (49%, +2) believe their province would be better off with a different Prime Minister in Ottawa, while 36% disagree and 15% are undecided.  

Criticism of the current prime minister is strongest in Alberta (65%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (56%) and British Columbia (53%), followed by Ontario (49%), Quebec (42%) and Atlantic Canada (38%).  

Just under one-in-five Canadians (18%) believe their province would be better off joining the United States and becoming an American state—a proportion that rises to 25% in Alberta and 24% in Quebec.  

Almost two-in-five Albertans (38%, +10) and three-in-ten Quebecers (30%, +5) believe their province would be better off as its own country.  

“Separatist sentiment in Alberta is currently near the levels observed in December 2019 (40%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Across the province, 16% of residents strongly agree with the idea that they would be better off as an independent nation.”  

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 15 to December 17, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Metro Vancouverites Ponder Guidelines for Municipal Votes

More than half are against “corporate votes”, non-resident electors and allowing residents aged 16 and 17 to cast ballots.  
 
Vancouver, BC [December 23, 2021] – More than three-in-five residents of Metro Vancouver believe it is time to end the regulation that allows people who do not reside in a municipality to vote in local elections if they own property there, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 63% of residents agree with eliminating non-residency property electors and only letting residents of a city vote in municipal elections.  
 
Majorities of Metro Vancouverites disagree with the notion of allowing “corporate voting” by giving businesses the ability to vote in municipal elections (56%) and with letting Canadians aged 16 and 17 cast ballots in municipal elections (51%).  
 
The idea of allowing adult Permanent Residents of Canada to vote in municipal elections is endorsed by more than seven-in-ten Metro Vancouverites (71%), while only 22% disagree and 7% are undecided.  
 
Three-in-ten Metro Vancouverites (31%) identify housing as the most important issue facing their municipality right now, followed by COVID-19 (24%), property taxes (10%), climate change (7%), drug overdoses (6%) and crime (5%).
 
“While concerns about housing are particularly high in Burnaby (45%), this is also the main preoccupation for residents of Vancouver (31%) and Surrey (24%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Drug overdoses are a salient issue in Vancouver (9%) while crime is a significant worry in Surrey (12%).”  
 
The approval rating for Vancouver Mayor Kennedy Stewart stands at 57%, up six points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in January 2020. The numbers are stable for Burnaby Mayor Mike Hurley (51%, =), while Surrey Mayor Doug McCallum has seen his rating drop from 50% at the start of 2020 to 30% in the last month of 2021.  
 
Across Metro Vancouver, 42% of residents believe their current mayor deserves re-election, while 37% disagree and 20% are undecided.  
 
Almost half of residents of Burnaby (48%) and Vancouver (47%) are currently willing to re-elect Hurley and Stewart respectively. In Surrey, only 28% think McCallum deserves a new term in office while 59% disagree.
 
Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from December 17 to December 19, 2021, among 1,200 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Canadians Continue to Back Boycott of Beijing 2022 Winter Games

Two thirds of Canadians (68%) say they refrain from buying products made in China at least some of the time.  

Vancouver, BC [December 9, 2021] – More than half of Canadians think the country’s athletes should avoid taking part in the next edition of the Winter Olympics, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 56% of Canadians think Canada should boycott the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing over China’s human rights record.  

The level of support for a boycott of the 2022 Winter Olympics is exactly the same as it was in a survey conducted by Research Co. in August 2021.  

“The idea of a Canadian boycott of the Beijing Winter Olympics is more attractive in Ontario (60%), British Columbia (59%) and Quebec (56%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are lower in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (51%), Atlantic Canada (50%) and Alberta (49%).”  

Similar proportions of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (61%), the Conservative Party (59%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (58%) in this year’s federal election are in favour of a boycott of the 2022 Winter Olympics.  

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) are worried about the health and safety of Canadian athletes who participate in the Beijing Winter Olympics, and 45% say they will make a conscious effort to refrain from watching the games.  

Almost three-in-four Canadians (74%) believe athletes who want to protest China’s human rights record during the 2022 Winter Olympics should be able to do so, and a slightly smaller proportion (71%) think the International Olympic Committee (IOC) should not punish those who actually speak out.  

Across the country, 52% of Canadians claim to check labels “all the time” or “most of the time” to see where the products they buy for the home or family were manufactured.  

More than three-in-five Canadians say they never refrain from buying products made in Europe (68%), the United States (62%) and Mexico (56%), while just under half follow the same course of action for goods manufactured in Russia (49%) and India (48%).  

Only 32% of Canadians say they never refrain from buying products manufactured in China, with two thirds of residents (68%) saying they avoid purchasing Chinese goods “all the time” (15%), “most of the time” (20%) or “some of the time” (33%).  

Women (70%), British Columbians (71%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (75%) are more likely to avoid acquiring products manufactured in China at least “some of the time.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 4 to December 6, 2021, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Party Platforms Were Most Influential with Canadian Voters

Almost two-in-five voters say the most important factor behind their selection is a party’s ideas and policies.  

Vancouver, BC [October 1, 2021] – Canadians who cast a ballot in the 44th federal election say that the party platforms were particularly important in helping them choose which candidate to support, a new Research Co. “exit poll” has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample of Canadians who voted in this year’s federal election, 59% say that party platforms were “very influential” or “moderately influential” in their decision to support a party.  

Practically three-in-four Canadians who voted for the People’s Party in this month’s federal election (74%) cite the platform as a major influence. Sizeable majorities of Canadians who supported the Conservative Party (67%), the Liberal Party (64%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (also 64%) feel the same way, along with 39% of Green Party supporters and 19% of Bloc Québécois supporters.  

More than two-in-five Canadian voters believe discussions with family (42%) and discussions with friends (also 42%) influenced their vote in the last election, while 35% mention campaign ads on radio and television.  

While interaction with candidates on social media was an influencer for 30% of Canadian voters, the proportion rises to 43% among those aged 18-to-34. A similar scenario ensues on the issue of interactions with other people on social media. One-in-four Canadian voters (26%)—and 44% of those aged 18-to-34—say these exchanges influenced their vote.  

The survey also asked Canadian voters about the effect of seven different endorsements. More than one-in-four (27%) say they were influenced by the endorsement of U.S. President Barack Obama, including 42% of Liberal Party supporters.  

The level of influence was lower for all other endorsements, including those originating from non-governmental organizations (25%), newspapers (24%), trade associations (23%), unions (21%) former U.S. Secretary of State Hilary Clinton (18%, and 27% for Liberal voters) and current U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders (17%, and 25% for NDP voters).  

When Canadians are asked about their main motivation for supporting a party, almost two-in-five (39%) mention its ideas and policies, while one-in-four (26%) say it is the party leader.  

Fewer Canadians are primarily moved by a desire for change (12%), the party’s candidate in the riding (10%), a desire for stability (9%) or disgust with other candidates (7%).  

“More than three-in-ten Canadians who voted for the Liberals and the Bloc (32% and 31% respectively) say the most important factor behind their choice was the party leaders,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among those who cast ballots for the Conservatives (25%), the New Democrats (also 25%), the People’s Party (21%) and the Greens (10%).”  

Canadians who voted for the People’s Party were more likely to say that their main motivation was disgust with other candidates (14%).  

When asked to ponder what this federal election would have looked like with different leaders, just under three-in-ten Canadians (29%) admit they would have voted for the Conservative Party with Peter MacKay as leader or for the Liberal Party with Chrystia Freeland as leader. Fewer Canadian voters (22%) would have supported the Liberals with Mark Carney as leader.  

In the “exit poll”, a majority of Canadians (52%) say they would be “very upset” if the Liberal Party forms the government again in Canada. A slightly lower proportion (48%) would feel the same way if the Conservative Party forms the government.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 18 to September 21, 2021, among 1,900 adults in Canada who voted in the 2021 federal election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.3 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490