British Columbians Want Data Access and Decorum in Legislature

More than three-in-five of the province’s residents believe it is time to eliminate heckling during Question Period.

Vancouver, BC [January 29, 2021] – Many residents of British Columbia are on board with some changes recently suggested by the outgoing Speaker of the Legislative Assembly, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In December, Darryl Plecas—who served as speaker from  September 2017 to December 2020—issued a report outlining several recommendations for the future of the Legislative Assembly.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, four-in-five British Columbians (80%) are in favour of providing public access, wherever possible, to the data and information being used to make decisions in accessible and manageable ways.

In addition, seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%) agree with establishing a non-partisan “fact-checker” of statements made by MLAs in the Chamber, and more than three-in-five (63%) want to develop strategies for civic organizations to engage with the Legislative Assembly.

There is also wide support for specific measures aimed at fostering respectful behaviour inside the legislature. More than half of British Columbians (57%) support establishing an all-party parliamentary committee to examine parliamentary decorum, including heckling. This includes majorities of British Columbians who voted for the BC Green Party (57%), the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (62%) and the BC Liberals (66%) in last year’s provincial election.

There is no definite consensus on what type of behaviour British Columbians would like to banish from Question Period in the legislature. While only 41% of British Columbians would eliminate clapping, there is majority support for abandoning two other practices: the banging of desks (55%) and heckling (63%).

The idea of lowering the voting age for provincial elections to 16 years is supported by 28% of British Columbians, while 64% are opposed. 

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be in favour of lowering the voting age (38%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (31%) and aged 55 and over (17%).

“There is very little opposition from British Columbians to the proposals that seek to address information transparency and public participation in the legislature,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The most contentious idea is the one related to lowering the voting age.”

In a two-country survey conducted by Research Co. in November 2020, 62% of Canadians and 58% of Americans rejected the notion of allowing people aged 16 and 17 to vote in federal elections.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from January 16 to January 18, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Would Ban Non-Essential Travel During Pandemic

Practically three-in-four of the country’s residents say they will “definitely” or “probably” take a COVID-19 vaccine.

Vancouver, BC [January 25, 2021] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians believe it would be wise to impose travel restrictions inside and across provinces during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 80% of Canadians agree with prohibiting non-essential travel from one province to another. 

In addition, 72% of Canadians are in favour of prohibiting non-essential travel inside their own province—a proportion that rises to 78% among those aged 55 and over and 81% among those who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election.

During the holiday season, some elected politicians travelled outside of their home province in contravention of a federal public health guidance to avoid all non-essential travel.

Three-in-five Canadians (61%) think this is a very serious offence and want elected politicians who travelled during the holiday season to resign from their legislatures or face a recall vote.

Nine-in-ten Canadians (90%) are in favour of placing all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period and a similarly high proportion (88%) would keep the border with the United States closed to non-essential travel.

While 51% of Canadians agree with allowing K-12 students to go back to in-class learning in their province, 39% disagree with this course of action.

Almost three-in-four Canadians (74%, +1 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November) say they will “definitely” or “probably” take a vaccine against COVID-19, while 16% (+2) would not and 9% (-4) are not sure.

Almost nine-in-ten Canadians (88%) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside. Slightly fewer respondents (81%) say they wear a mask every time they leave their home.

Across the country, 58% of Canadians (-5) are satisfied with the way the federal government has managed the COVID-19 pandemic. Similar proportions of residents are content with the performance of their provincial governments (58%, -6) and their municipal governments (60%, -2).

Satisfaction with the way provincial administrations have handled the pandemic is highest in British Columbia (72%, +2), followed by Quebec (65%, -3), Ontario (53%, -15) and Alberta (34%, -12).

When it comes to personal behaviours to prevent infection, about three-in-ten Canadians (29%) say they clean the groceries they buy and 21% do not order food from restaurants at all.

This month saw increases in the proportion of Canadians who say they are overeating or eating more than usual at home (30%, +9), drinking alcohol more often (18%, +6) and losing their temper more often (17%, +2).

In addition, 18% of Canadians (+5) are having baths or showers less often than before the pandemic and one-in-ten (10%, +3) are brushing their teeth less often.

Half of Canadians (50%, -14) believe the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic is “definitely” or “probably” ahead of us, while 33% (+11) think the worst is “definitely” or “probably” behind us.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from January 18 to January 20, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Positive Perceptions on China Plummet to New Low in Canada

Two-in-five Canadians hold favourable views on the United States, up 10 points since July 2020.

Vancouver, BC [January 8, 2021] – Just under one-in-five Canadians currently have a favourable view of the People’s Republic of China, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, only 19% of Canadians hold a positive opinion of China, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in July 2020. Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%, +3) hold negative views on this particular country.

One-in-four Atlantic Canadians (25%) have a favourable opinion of China. The rating is lower in Quebec (23%), British Columbia (20%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (19%), Ontario (16%) and Alberta (13%).

“Canadians aged 55 and over are the least likely to currently have a positive view of China (16%)”, says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are slightly higher among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (19%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (25%).”

At least three-in-five Canadians currently have favourable views on seven different nations: the United Kingdom (78%, +5), Italy (75%, +6), Germany (72%, +5), Japan (71%, +1), France (71%, +1), South Korea (60%, -1) and Mexico (51%, -3).

Just over two-in-five Canadians hold a positive opinion of India (44%, +7) and the United States (42%, +10).

Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election are more likely to have a favourable view of India (54%) than those who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP) (44%) or the Conservative Party (35%).

In Canada, positive views on the United States are highest among men (47%), Albertans (54%) and those who voted for the Conservatives in the last federal ballot (61%).

Significantly fewer women (36%), Quebecers (37%) and British Columbians (36%) hold a favourable opinion on the United States, along with Canadians who voted for the Liberals (38%) or the New Democrats in 2019 (24%) 

Fewer than a third of Canadians have a positive view of five other countries: Venezuela (31%, -2), Russia (26%, =), Saudi Arabia (23%, +3), Iran (15%, -2) and North Korea (12%, -1).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 12 to December 14, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views on Safety in British Columbia Unchanged Since 2019

Four-in-five residents support enacting municipal bans on handguns and military-style assault weapons.

Vancouver, BC [January 5, 2021] – The perceptions of British Columbians on the possibility of being affected by criminal activity have not gone through a significant fluctuation over the past year and a half, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two thirds of British Columbians (68%) say they would feel “very safe” or “moderately safe” walking alone in their own neighbourhood after dark—unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2019.

More than seven-in-ten residents of the Fraser Valley (72%) and Metro Vancouver (71%) say they would feel safe walking alone in their own neighbourhood after dark, compared to 67% in Southern BC and 56% in both Vancouver Island and Northern BC.

Just over two-in-five British Columbians (41%, +1 since August 2019) say they fear becoming victims of a crime in their community “a great deal” or “a fair amount”, while almost three-in-five (58%) do not.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to fear becoming victims of crime (53%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (46%) and aged 55 and over (33%).

When asked about the current situation regarding crime in their community, more than a third of British Columbians blame addiction and mental health issues (45%) and gangs and the illegal drug trade (38%).

Smaller proportions of the province’s residents point the finger at poverty and inequality (26%), an inadequate court system (26%), lack of values and the improper education for youth (24%),  a bad economy and unemployment (19%), insufficient policing and a lack of resources to combat crime (16%) and immigrants and minorities (9%).

In April, 27% of British Columbians suggested that insufficient policing was one of the factors to blame for criminal activity in their community,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In December, only 16% feel the same way.” 

Four-in-five British Columbians (80%, +1 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in September 2018) support enacting a ban on handguns within the limits of their municipality, while a slightly higher proportion (83%, -3) would prohibit military-style assault weapons.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 14 to December 16, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Liberals Stay Ahead in Canada as Trudeau’s Rating Improves

Health care (28%, +3) is regarded as the most important issue facing the country, followed by the economy and jobs (27%, -2).

Vancouver, BC [December 17, 2020] – The governing Liberal Party maintains the upper hand in Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 37% of decided voters would support the Liberal candidate in their riding if a federal election were held today, down one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September.

The Conservative Party is second with 31% (-1), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (+3), the Bloc Québécois with 7% (-1), the Green Party with 3% (=) and the People’s Party with 1% (=).

The Liberals are nine points ahead of the Conservatives among female decided voters (38% to 29%) and hold a three-point edge among male decided voters (36% to 33%).

The Conservatives are the most popular federal party in Alberta (51%) and in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (48%). The Liberals are ahead in Atlantic Canada (44%), Quebec (45%, with the Bloc at 35%) and Ontario (37%). In British Columbia, the New Democrats and the Conservatives are essentially tied (34% and 33% respectively), with the Liberals at 29%.

Health care is regarded as the most important issue facing the country by 28% of Canadians (+3), followed by the economy and jobs (27%, -2), COVID-19 (15%), housing, homelessness and poverty (9%, -3) and the environment (6%, -1).

“Concerns about health care are more prevalent among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (30%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (29%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Those aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be preoccupied with the economy and jobs (36%).”

The approval rating for Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is 55%, up five points since September, while 40% of Canadians disapprove of his performance (-5).

Trudeau’s rating is highest in Atlantic Canada (60%), followed by Ontario (59%), British Columbia (58%), Quebec (55%), Manitoba and Saskatchewan (42%) and Alberta (37%).

Just over one third of Canadians (35%, +2) approve of the way Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole has handled his duties, while 38% (+4) disapprove—including 45% of Quebecers.

Almost half of Canadians (46%, +2) approve of the performance of Jagmeet Singh as leader of the NDP. The numbers are lower for Green Party leader Annamie Paul (25%) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (17%, +3).

Trudeau remains ahead of all other leaders when Canadians are asked who would make the best prime minister of the country (39%, +1), followed by O’Toole (22%, -1), Singh (13%, =), Bernier (3%, +1), Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (2%, -1) and Paul (2%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 12 to December 14, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

A Third of Americans Want to See Trump Run Again in 2024

Three-in-five (61%) believe the investigations into the outgoing president’s taxes should continue.

Vancouver, BC [December 9, 2020] – More than half of Americans would not welcome a new presidential bid by Donald Trump four years from now, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 34% of Americans say they would like to see Trump run again for president in 2024, while 58% disagree and 8% are undecided.

The possibility of a new Trump campaign is attractive for 66% of Republicans, 24% of Independents and 10% of Democrats.

Americans who watch Fox News are significantly more likely to endorse a Trump candidacy in 2024 (55%) than those who watch a local network (26%), CNN (also 26%) or MSNBC / CNBC (13%).

Only 15% of African Americans would like to see Trump become a presidential candidate again in the next election, compared to 32% of Latino / Hispanic Americans and 37% of White Americans. 

Three-in-five Americans (61%) believe the investigations into Trump’s taxes should continue—a proportion that includes 84% of Democrats, 63% of Independents and 34% of Republicans.

Democratic nominee Joe Biden won the 2020 United States Presidential election, with more than 51% of all cast ballots and 308 votes in the Electoral College.

More than two-in-five Americans (45%) believe president-elect Biden should commit to serving only one term in office, while 38% disagree with this course of action.

Americans aged 18-to-34 are more likely to wish for Biden’s commitment to be a one-term president (52%) than those aged 35-to-54 (44%) and those aged 55 and over (42%).

Two thirds of Americans (68%) are satisfied with the way their local governments have dealt with the COVID-19 outbreak, down one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in October

A majority of Americans (64%, -1) are satisfied with the performance of state governments, while only 44% (-1) are content with the way the federal government has managed the pandemic.

The approval rating for Trump stands at 42% this month, down four points since a Research Co. survey conducted in early November. More than half of Americans (54%, +2) disapprove of the way the president is handling his duties.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 3 to December 5, 2020, among 1,200 American adults.  The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here.

Photo Credit: Samson Katt

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Opposition NDP Edges Ahead of Governing UCP in Alberta

Almost two thirds of the province’s residents (65%) oppose the introduction of a provincial sales tax (PST).

Vancouver, BC [December 7, 2020] – The New Democratic party (NDP) holds the upper hand in Alberta’s political scene, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 43% of decided voters would cast a ballot for the opposition NDP if a provincial election were held today, while 40% would support the governing United Conservative Party (UCP).

The Alberta Party is third with 9%, followed by the Green Party (2%), the Liberal party (also 2%) and the Wildrose Independence Party (also 2%).

The NDP holds a 10-point lead over the UCP among female decided voters (46% to 36%), while the governing party is ahead among male voters (43% to 41%).

The UCP is the top choice for decided voters aged 55 and over (48% to 38%) while the NDP leads among those aged 18-to-34 (45% to 36%) and those aged 35-to-54 (42% to 39%).

The NDP has a sizeable lead in Edmonton (55% to 30%), while the UCP is slightly ahead in Calgary (44% to 42%) and holds a substantial advantage in the rest of the province (49% to 32%).

“The United Conservative Party is holding on to 74% of its voters from the 2019 election,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Some former UCP voters are currently looking at supporting the New Democrats (11%), the Alberta Party (7%) and the Wildrose Independence Party (5%).”

Across the province, just over two-in-five Albertans (42%) approve of the way Premier and UCP leader Jason Kenney is handling his duties while half (50%) disapprove. Residents are split when assessing the performance of official opposition and NDP leader Rachel Notley (Approve 45%, Disapprove 46%). 

The approval ratings are significantly lower for Green Party leader Jordan Wilkie (16%), interim Wildrose Independence Party leader Paul Hinman (also 16%) and Alberta Party interim leader Jacquie Fenske (15%).

The economy and jobs is identified as the most important issue facing the province by 43% of Albertans, followed by health care (27%), government accountability (7%), COVID-19 (6%) and energy and pipelines (4%).

When asked about the possible introduction of a provincial sales tax (PST) given Alberta’s fiscal challenges, almost two thirds of residents (65%) voiced opposition to the idea, while 28% supported it.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 2 to December 4, 2020, among 600 adults in Alberta. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Alberta. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.0 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Endorse Travel Restrictions During COVID-19 Pandemic

More than four-in-five Canadians say they wear a mask every time they go out, up 12 points since September.

Vancouver, BC [December 1, 2020] – Almost two thirds of Canadians hold negative views on what the COVID-19 pandemic has in store, and three-in-four believe it is time to restrict travel inside their province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 64% of Canadians say the worst of the pandemic is “definitely” or “probably” ahead of us. This represents an 18-point increase since September, and the second highest level recorded on this question (68% in a poll conducted in April 2020). 

Public support for two regulations established by the federal government remains extremely high, with 92% of Canadians agreeing with the decision to keep the border with the United States closed to non-essential travel and 90% in favour of placing all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period.

Sizeable majorities of Canadians also endorse two other measures: prohibiting non-essential travel from one province to another (82%) and prohibiting non-essential travel inside their province (75%).

Nine-in-ten Canadians (90%) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside, while 50% are in favour of allowing K-12 students to go back go in-class learning in their province.

Across the country, 63% of Canadians are satisfied with the performance of the federal government in handling the COVID-19 pandemic, down one point since September. More than three-in-five respondents also provide a positive assessment of their provincial administrations (64%) and their municipal governments (62%).

“In the four most populous provinces, the highest level of satisfaction with the way COVID-19 has been managed is observed in British Columbia (70%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are slightly lower in Quebec and Ontario (each at 68%), while Alberta fell to an all-time low (46%).”

More than seven-in-ten Canadians (73%, +1) say they will “definitely” or “probably” take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available, while 14% would not and 13% are not sure.

More than four-in-five Canadians (82%) say they are wearing a mask every time they go out, up from 70% in September. Just under a third (31%) are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection, and one-in-five (20%) are not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection.

Just over one-in-five Canadians (21%) say they are overeating more than usual at home, while 15% are losing their temper more often and 12% are drinking alcohol more often.

About one-in-seven Canadians (13%) are having a bath or shower less often than before the pandemic and 7% acknowledge that they are brushing their teeth less often than before.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from November 22 to November 24, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Vancouverites Support Zoning Law Changes, SkyTrain to UBC

More than half of likely voters would abandon the “at-large system” and move to a “ward system” to elect councillors.

Vancouver, BC [November 20, 2020] – More than half of likely voters in the City of Vancouver are in favour of a proposal to modify zoning laws, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of likely voters in the City of Vancouver, 53% of respondents support changing zoning laws to allow property owners to build up to six strata title units on a standard lot, provided the new building is no taller than an average home.

Support for this modification is highest among women (55%) and likely voters aged 35-to-54 (53%), those who voted for independent candidate Kennedy Stewart in the 2018 mayoral election (56%) and those who voted for Non-Partisan Association (NPA) candidate Ken Sim (also 56%).

Four-in-five likely voters in the City of Vancouver (81%) support extending the Skytrain Millennium Line (currently under construction to Arbutus) to the University of British Columbia (UBC) campus at Point Grey. This includes sizeable majorities of respondents in the West Side (78%), East Side (81%) and Downtown (86%).

When asked about specific issues related to municipal elections in the City of Vancouver, 52% of likely voters think the “at-large system” (where voters select 10 councillors) should be abandoned and replaced by a “ward system” (where councillors can be elected in specific constituencies).

“Majorities of likely voters aged 18-to-34 (60%) and aged 35-to-54 (55%) favour a ward system to elect councillors in the City of Vancouver,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support drops to 39% among likely voters aged 55 and over.”

Three-in-five likely voters (60%) would like to see candidates running for office in the City of Vancouver presenting the signatures of 100 nominators, instead of the current threshold of 25. In addition, 55% of likely voters think anyone who wants to run for public office in municipal elections should pay a $500 deposit to register, instead of the current one of $100.

Just under half of likely voters (46%) think it would be worthwhile to explore the idea of amalgamating all of the municipalities in Metro Vancouver, like they did in Toronto or Montreal. The notion of reviewing the possibility of amalgamation is more popular among men (49%) and likely voters aged 18-to-34 (48%).

Likely voters are divided on the idea of eliminating the Board of Parks and Recreation and placing public parks and the public recreation system under the jurisdiction of City Council. Across the city, 44% of likely voters agree with this idea, while 48% disagree.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 9 to November 12, 2020, among 400 municipal likely voters in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: James Wheeler

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Pandemic Affects Casinos, But Not Lotteries in British Columbia

There is no change in the proportion of residents who bought a lottery ticket over the past 12 months.

Vancouver, BC [November 13, 2020] – While most British Columbians continue to buy lottery tickets in the province, the number of casino visitors has greatly decreased on account of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, almost three-in-five residents (58%, unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted last year) purchased a lottery ticket over the past 12 months.

British Columbians aged 55 and over are more likely to have bought a lottery ticket (76%) than those aged 35-to-54 (58%) and those aged 18-to-34 (35%). 

Just over half of lottery ticket buyers in the province (51%) say they do not expect to win any prize, up 10 points since 2019. Just over three-in-ten (31%, -7) foresee winning a small prize, while 18% (-3) believe they will win a big prize,

Since March, all casinos in British Columbia have been closed following a directive issued by the Attorney General. Only 20% of British Columbians say they have attended a casino over the past 12 months, down from 36% who reported the same behavior in 2019.

More than half of British Columbians (56%, -5) believe casinos bring tourism dollars and create jobs in the province, while 31% (+4) think these venues increase gambling addiction and lead to more crime and traffic.

“All of the casino visits reported by British Columbians took place in the final two months of 2019 and the first two and a half months of 2020,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In spite of the evident effect of the pandemic on casino visits, the only type of gambling that has seen a slight increase in users is the PlayNow.com website.”

Across the province, 22% of residents say they have visited PlayNow.com, up three points since 2019. British Columbians aged 35-to-54 are more likely to be doing this (25%) than those aged 55 and over (22%) and those aged 18-to-34 (19%).

More than two-in-five British Columbians (45%, -3) bought a Scratch & Win ticket over the past 12 months—a proportion that rises to 54% on Vancouver Island and 52% in Northern BC.

As was the case last year, fewer British Columbians relied on for other forms of gambling: playing poker (or other card games) online (9%, -3), placing bets on a sporting event with a friend or relative (8%, -2), through SportsAction (7%, -2) or on a horse race (4%, -1).

Across the province, seven-in-ten British Columbians (71%, +4) think it is the right of the individual to gamble, regardless of the consequences.

In addition, 86% of residents (-2) believe people will continue to find ways to gamble even if it was made illegal, and 64% (-3) want the government to do more to deal with the negative effects of gambling.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 29 to October 31, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half in BC, Three-in-Four in Alberta Agree with Pipeline Expansion

Majorities of Albertans and British Columbians are disappointed with the way the federal government has handled this issue.

Vancouver, BC [November 10, 2020] – Just over half of British Columbians and practically three-in-four Albertans want to carry on with the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative provincial samples, 52% of British Columbians and 74% of Albertans agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the project.

“There is a higher level of support for the pipeline’s expansion from residents aged 55 and over in both British Columbia (60%) and Alberta (83%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Agreement with the federal government’s decision is lower among those aged 18-to-34 In each province (44% in BC, 68% in Alberta).”

In British Columbia, agreement with the pipeline expansion has dropped by four points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in December 2019

Opposition to the project fell by six points in British Columbia (from 35% to 29%) , while the proportion of undecided respondents increased from 10% last year to 18% now.

More than half of residents of each Canadian province (59% in Alberta and 54% in British Columbia) are disappointed with the way the federal government has handled the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion. These groups include 66% of Green Party voters in British Columbia and 70% of United Conservative Party voters in Alberta.

While two-in-five British Columbians (40%) want the provincial government to do anything necessary to ensure that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion does not happen, the proportion of Albertans who feel the same way about the actions of their own provincial administration stands at 22%.

Only 17% of Albertans believe the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of the province’s residents. The proportion is significantly higher in British Columbia (44%).

Two thirds of British Columbians (68%) and four-in-five Albertans (79%) believe the Trans Mountain Pipeline will create hundreds of jobs for residents of each province.

More than a third of Albertans (34%) and British Columbians (38%) believe gas prices will be lower now that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion has been re-approved.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 29 to October 31, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia, and an online study conducted from November 2 to November 4, 2020, among 700 adults in Alberta. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia and Alberta. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for British Columbia and +/- 3.4 percentage points for Alberta, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables for British Columbia here, our data tables for Alberta here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Biden Will Capture Popular Vote Win in U.S. Presidential Election

Almost three-in-five decided female voters in the United States would support, or have voted for, the Democratic nominee.

Vancouver, BC [November 2, 2020] – Democratic Party nominee Joe Biden stands to win a majority of the votes cast in the United States presidential election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of likely voters, 53% of decided voters would vote for Biden tomorrow or have already done so—unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in mid-October.

Republican incumbent Donald Trump is a distant second with 44%. Support is lower for both Jo Jorgensen of the Libertarian Party (1%) and Howie Hawkins of the Green Party (also 1%).

While Trump is barely ahead among male decided voters (48% to 47%), Biden holds a 20-point advantage among female decided voters (59% to 39%). 

Biden holds large leads among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (53% to 42%) and decided voters aged 55 and over (54% to 44%). The race is closer among decided voters aged 35-to-54 (Biden 50%, Trump 47%). 

“More than half of decided voters who identify as Independent (54%) will support Biden in the presidential election,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Trump is 13 points behind (41%) among this group.”

Sizeable majorities of decided voters in the Northeast (59%) and the West (59%) are voting for Biden. The Democratic nominee holds a three-point edge in the Midwest (50% to 47%), while Trump leads by the same margin in the South (50% to 47%).

The race remains tight among White decided voters (50% for Biden, 48% for Trump), while Biden is still ahead among African Americans (88%) and Hispanic / Latino decided voters (61%).

Only 29% of decided voters who watch Fox News will support Biden in the election. The Democratic nominee fares better among decided voters who get their news from CNN (70%) and MSNBC/CNBC (88%).

The primary motivation for decided voters in the United States (43%) continues to be the candidate’s ideas and policies, followed by a desire for stability (17%), the candidate’s political party (14%), disgust with other candidates (also 14%) and a desire for change (13%).

The approval rating for Donald Trump on the eve of the election stands at 46%, up three points since mid-October. More than half of Americans (52%, -2) disapprove of his performance as president.

The groups that provide the highest marks to Trump are men (51%), Americans aged 35-to-54 (49%), residents of the South (52%) and Fox News watchers (72%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 31 to November 2, 2020, among 1,100 American adults, including 1,025 likely voters in the United States and 974 decided voters in the 2020 presidential election. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.9 percentage points for American adults, +/- 3.0 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 3.1 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin Set to Flip in U.S. Election

Ohio remains too close to call, while there is little danger for the Democrats in Illinois, Minnesota, New Jersey and New York.

Vancouver, BC [November 2, 2020] – Democratic nominee Joe Biden holds the upper hand over Republican incumbent Donald Trump in the crucial states of Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin as American voters prepare to cast ballots in the United States presidential election, according to a series of new polls conducted by Research Co. in eight states.

The surveys of Americans who have already participated in the democratic process or plan to do so tomorrow also outline a tight race in Ohio, and give Biden the lead in Illinois, New Jersey, Minnesota and New York. 

Four Democrats who are seeking to retain their seats in the U.S. Senate are also ahead of their Republican rivals.

Illinois

No Republican nominee has carried the Prairie State since George H. W. Bush in 1988. In the 2016 presidential election, Hillary Clinton defeated Trump in Illinois with 55% of the vote. 

Biden holds a 19-point advantage over Trump among decided voters in Illinois (59% to 40%). Decided voters aged 18-to-34 prefer Biden over Trump by a 2-to-1 margin (66% to 32%).

In the election to the U.S. Senate, incumbent Democrat Dick Durbin holds a significant lead over GOP challenger Mark Curran (60% to 35%).

Michigan

Trump ended a streak of six consecutive presidential elections where the Great Lakes State was won by Democrats, defeating Hillary Clinton by 10,704 votes in 2016 (47.5% to 47.3%)

Biden heads to Election Day with an eight-point advantage over the Republican incumbent in Michigan (53% to 45%). Independent decided voters in Michigan are more likely to support Biden (49%) than Trump (44%).

Incumbent U.S. Senator Gary Peters is ahead of Republican candidate John James by six points (52% to 46%).

Minnesota

The last Republican nominee to carry the North Star State was Richard Nixon in 1972. Clinton defeated Trump by 44,593 votes to secure Minnesota for the Democrats in 2016 (46.4% to 44.9%).

Biden is ahead of Trump by nine points (54% to 45%). The Democratic nominee holds a higher level of support among female decided voters (61%) than among their male counterparts (47%).

Democratic U.S. Senator Tina Smith—who won a Special Election in 2018—stands to earn a full six-year term, with a 13-point advantage over Republican candidate Jason Lewis (55% to 42%).

New Jersey

No Republican nominee has emerged victorious in the Garden State since George H. W. Bush in 1988. Four years ago, Clinton carried New Jersey with 55% of the vote.

Biden currently leads Trump by 19 points (59% to 40%) and can count on the support of 54% of decided voters who identify as Independent.

In the race for the U.S. Senate seat, incumbent Democrat Cory Booker is ahead of Republican rival Rik Mehta by 26 points (62% to 36%).

New York

In the last 10 presidential elections, only Ronald Reagan has been able to carry the Empire State for the Republican Party in 1980 and 1984. In 2016, Clinton won New York with 59% of the vote.

Biden is ahead of Trump by a sizeable margin (64% to 34%). Practically three-in-four female voters in New York (73%) will cast a ballot for Biden or have already done so.

Ohio

The Buckeye State has given its electoral votes to the winner of every presidential election held in the United States since 1964. In 2016, Trump defeated Clinton by eight points (51% to 43%)

Biden and Trump are tied among decided voters in Ohio (49% and 49%). There is a higher level of undecided voters among women (6%) than among men (2%).

Pennsylvania

In 2016, Trump became the first Republican nominee to win the Keystone State since George H. W. Bush in 1988, defeating Clinton by 44,292 votes (48.2% to 47.5%).

Biden holds a six-point edge over Trump in Pennsylvania (52% to 46%). More than half of men (54%) and decided voters aged 35-to-54 (52%) intend to support the Republican nominee or have already cast a ballot for him.

Wisconsin

In 2016, Trump became the first Republican nominee to win the Badger State since Ronald Reagan in 1984, defeating Clinton by 22,748 votes 47.2% to 46.5%).

Biden is ahead of Trump by nine points in Wisconsin (54% to 45%). Support for the Democratic nominee is strongest among women (58%) and voters aged 18-to-34 (also 58%).

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted on October 31 and November 1, 2020, among representative samples of 450 likely voters in eight American states: Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age and gender in each state. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.6 percentage points for each state.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbia Voters Satisfied with NDP and Green Campaigns

A majority of voters in the province say they would have been “very upset” if the BC Liberals had formed the government again.

Vancouver, BC [October 30, 2020] – A majority of British Columbians who cast ballots in this year’s provincial election commend the campaigns of two contending political parties, a new Research Co. “exit poll” has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbian voters, 59% describe the campaign of the governing BC New Democratic Party (NDP) as “positive”, while 28% brand it as “negative”.

Just over half of voters (53%) believe the campaign of the BC Green Party was “positive”, while 25% deem it “negative.”

The results are different for the BC Liberals. While two-in-five voters (41%) think the BC Liberal campaign was “positive”, 46% describe it as “negative.”

More than half of British Columbian voters (55%) say they would have been “very upset” if the BC Liberals had formed the government again. Majorities of voters in Vancouver Island (65%), the Fraser Valley (59%) and Metro Vancouver (55%) feel this way, along with 45% of voters in Southern BC and 38% of those in Northern BC.

About two-in-five British Columbian voters (39%) say they would have supported the BC Liberals in the most recent election if Dianne Watts had been their leader—a proportion that rises to 42% among women, 44% among voters aged 18-to-34 and 43% in both Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley.

Across British Columbia, 38% of voters think the BC NDP and the BC Green Party should consider a formal merger into a single provincial political party. This idea is more popular among those aged 18-to-34 (48%) and those who voted for the BC NDP this year (46%) but is only supported by 30% of BC Green voters and 19% of those who reside in Vancouver Island.

The notion of a merger between the BC Liberals and the BC Conservative Party is supported by 34% of voters—but climbs to 62% among those who cast a ballot for BC Liberal candidates this month.

A comparison of voting behaviour shows that 42% of BC NDP voters in 2020 cast a ballot for the federal NDP in the 2019 federal contest. 

“Liberal Party voters at the federal level were almost evenly split between the BC Liberals (31%) and the BC NDP (25%) at the provincial level,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, three-in-five Conservative Party voters in the last federal election (60%) were BC Liberal voters in 2020.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 22 to October 25, 2020, among 832 adult British Columbians who voted in the 2020 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by James Wheeler

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Saskatchewan Party Keeps Sizeable Edge in Provincial Election

More than three-in-five likely voters in the province approve of the way Premier Scott Moe has handled his duties

Vancouver, BC [October 25, 2020] – The Saskatchewan Party remains ahead of all challengers in the Prairie Province’s election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 56% of decided voters would cast a ballot for the Saskatchewan Party candidate in their constituency or have already done so in Advance Voting or through the mail, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted earlier this month.

The New Democratic Party (NDP) is in second place with 38%, up two points since the start of the campaign. There was no movement for the other contending parties, with the Green Party at 2%, the Progressive Conservative Party also at 2%, the Liberal Party at 1% and the Buffalo Party also at 1%.

On a regional basis, the New Democrats have a four-point edge over the Saskatchewan Party in Regina among decided voters (50% to 46%). The Saskatchewan Party leads in Saskatoon (53% to 42%) and in the rest of the province (68% to 23%).

About one-in-five decided voters who will be casting their ballot tomorrow in Saskatchewan (18%) say they may change their mind about which party or candidate to support, while 82% are certain of their choice.

At the end of the campaign, almost half of decided voters in Saskatchewan (47%) acknowledge that their main motivation is a party’s ideas and policies. The party’s leader is a distant second with 24%, followed by a desire for change (10%), the party’s candidate in the riding (9%), a desire for stability (7%) and disgust with other contending candidates (3%).

More than three-in-five likely voters (61%, -4) approve of the performance of Premier and Saskatchewan Party leader Scott Moe, while one third (33%, +5) disapprove. 

The rating for Official Opposition and NDP leader Ryan Meili improved by three points to 48%. The numbers are significantly lower for Green leader Naomi Hunter (22%), Progressive Conservative leader Ken Grey (17%), Liberal leader Robert Rudachyk (16%) and Buffalo leader Wade Sira (15%).

The leaders of Saskatchewan’s two main parties reach the end of the campaign with a negative momentum score: -9 for Moe (17% say their opinion of the incumbent premier has improved, while 26% say it has worsened) and -4 for Meilli (23% say their opinion of the opposition leader has improved, while 27% say it has worsened).

On the “Best Premier” question, Moe remains in first place with 51% (+2), followed by Meilli with 29% (+8). The other party leaders are in single digits.

As was the case at the start of the campaign, more than a third of likely voters (35%, =) say the economy and jobs is the most important issue facing Saskatchewan, followed by heath care (31%, +3), crime and public safety (7%, +2), housing, poverty and homelessness (also 7%, +2) and COVID-19 (also 7%, +2).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 23 to October 25, 2020, among 500 likely voters in Saskatchewan, including 456 decided voters in the 2020 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Saskatchewan. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.4 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 4.6 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

New Democrats Headed for Outright Victory in British Columbia

Almost half of likely voters in the province pick John Horgan as the best person to head the provincial government.

Vancouver, BC [October 23, 2020] – The BC New Democratic Party (NDP) stands to make significant gains in British Columbia’s provincial election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 50% of decided voters in British Columbia would cast a ballot for the BC NDP candidate in their constituency or have already done so in Advance Voting or through the mail. This represents a two-point increase for the New Democrats since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in early October.

The BC Liberals remain in second place with 35%, followed by the BC Green Party with 13% and the BC Conservative Party with 2%.  

The New Democrats maintain a nine-point lead over the BC Liberals among decided male voters (48% to 39%) and have a 21-point advantage among decided female voters (52% to 31%).

The BC NDP is also ahead of the main opposition party among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (54% to 29%), decided voters aged 35-to-54 (49% to 36%) and decided voters aged 55 and over (47% to 40%).

Only 11% of decided voters who will be casting their ballot tomorrow say they may change their mind about which party or candidate to support, while 89% are certain of their choice.

Almost half of decided voters in British Columbia (47%) say a party’s ideas and policies is the main motivator for their choice in this provincial election. This includes 66% of BC Green voters and 51% of BC NDP voters, but just 37% of those who will support the BC Liberals.

Other factors cited by decided voters are the party’s leader (22%), the party’s candidate in the riding (11%), a desire for stability (9%), a desire for change (7%) and disgust with other contending candidates (4%).

On the eve of the election, more than three-in-five likely voters (62%, -3) approve of the way Premier and BC NDP leader John Horgan is handling his duties, while 33% disapprove.

There was no change in the approval rating for BC Liberals leader Andrew Wilkinson since early October (40%), while BC Greens leader Sonia Furstenau improved markedly to 46% (+13).

Furstenau posts a momentum score of +13 (27% of likely voters say their opinion of her has improved since the start of the campaign, while 14% say it has worsened). The numbers are also in positive territory for Horgan (+2), while Wilkinson’s score is -21 (with 36% of likely voters reporting a worsening opinion of the BC Liberals leader).

When asked who would make the best premier of the province, Horgan remains on top with the endorsement of almost half of likely voters (48%, +1), followed by Wilkinson with 24% (-3) and Furstenau with 12% (+6).

While 81% of likely voters who supported the BC NDP in the 2017 ballot feel Horgan is the best person to act as British Columbia’s head of government, only 53% of BC Liberal voters in the last election feel the same way about Wilkinson.

The issue landscape did not shift dramatically in the final week of the campaign. One-in-four likely voters (25%, =) say the economy and jobs is their main preoccupation right now, followed by housing, poverty and homelessness (23%, -2) and health care (also 23%, =). 

Fewer likely voters mentioned COVID-19 (13%, +5), the environment (7%, =), crime and public safety (4%, =), education (2%, +1), accountability (1%, -2), and energy (also 1%, +1) as the top issue facing the province.

As has been the case throughout the past five weeks, likely voters aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be concerned about housing, homelessness and poverty (33%), while those aged 35-to-54 gravitate towards the economy and jobs (29%) and those aged 55 and over select health care (28%).

At least two-in-five likely voters pick Horgan over Wilkinson as the best party leader to handle health care (49% to 22%), the economy and jobs (43% to 31%), education (42% to 22%), housing, poverty and homelessness (40% to 22%) and accountability (40% to 25%), 

On the issue of handling the COVID-19 pandemic, likely voters in British Columbia choose Horgan over Wilkinson by a 3-to-1 margin (53% to 17%). The incumbent premier is also ahead of the opposition leader on two other matters: crime and public safety (38% to 30%) and energy (32% to 25%). 

Furstenau extended her lead as the best leader to manage the environment (44%, +11), with Horgan at 24% and Wilkinson at 14%.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on October 22 and October 23, 2020, among 750 likely voters in British Columbia, including 705 decided voters in the 2020 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.6 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 3.7 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by Adi kavazovic

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Steady National Lead for Biden as United States Election Nears

The main influences for American likely voters are party platforms, discussions with family and discussions with friends.

Vancouver, BC [October 21, 2020] – Joe Biden stands to capture a majority of the national vote in this year’s presidential election in the United States, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of likely voters, 53% of decided voters would cast a ballot for the Democratic Party nominee or have already done so, while 45% would support Republican Party incumbent Donald Trump.

Support for both Jo Jorgensen of the Libertarian Party and Howie Hawkins of the Green Party remains at 1%.

The popular vote forecast is practically unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September.

Biden holds 19-point leads over Trump among female decided voters (57% to 38%) and decided voters aged 18-to-34 (58% to 37%). The race is closer among male decided voters (50% to 48%), decided voters aged 35-to-54 (51% to 46%) and decided voters aged 55 and over (52% to 47%).

White decide voters are evenly split among the two main candidates(48% for Biden, 48% for Trump), while the level of support for the Democratic nominee is higher with Hispanic / Latino decided voters (58%) and African American decided voters (92%).

Across the country, 11% of decided voters who supported Trump in the 2016 presidential election are voting for Biden this year. Only 3% of decided voters who backed Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in 2016 are casting a ballot for Trump in 2020.

Almost two-in-five likely voters in the United States (39%) say their primary motivation when selecting who to back in the presidential election is the candidate’s ideas and policies, followed by the candidate’s political party (20%), a desire for stability (15%), disgust with other candidates (14%) and a desire for change (13%).

More than half of likely voters believe Biden is the best candidate to handle five issues: the environment (54%), race relations (53%), health care (52%), education (51%) and COVID-19 (also 51%).

The former Vice President holds the upper hand over the current President on nine other topics: government accountability (Biden 49%, Trump 34%), foreign policy (Biden 48%, Trump 38%), immigration (Biden 48%, Trump 38%), job creation (Biden 47%, Trump 41%), crime (Biden 46%, Trump 37%), the economy (Biden 45%, Trump 42%), managing the deficit (Biden 44%, Trump 35%), energy and oil (Biden 44%, Trump 39%) and national defense (Biden 44%, Trump 42%). 

Almost two thirds of likely voters in the United States (64%) say party platforms are “very influential” or “moderately influential” in their decision to support candidates in this year’s election, while 51% mention discussions with family and 48% mention cite discussions with friends.

Fewer American likely voters are swayed by endorsements from non-governmental organizations (44%), campaign ads on radio and television (43%), endorsements from unions (40%), endorsements from trade associations (39%), interaction with candidates on social media (also 39%), interaction with other people on social media (38%) and endorsements from newspapers (also 38%).

“More than half of Republican likely voters (54%) say campaign ads on radio and television are influential in their decision to support candidates,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among Democrats (45%) and Independents (28%).”

Sizeable majorities of American likely voters express confidence in the people responsible for conducting elections in their state being able to oversee the entire process (83%), enforce social distancing at polling stations (82%) and ensure that there is no fraudulent activity with mailed ballots (78%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 16 to October 18, 2020, among 1,035 likely voters in the United States and 973 decided voters in the 2020 presidential election. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.0 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 3.1 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Americans Divided on What’s Next in COVID-19 Pandemic

Satisfaction with how various levels of government have handled the situation has increased since September.

Vancouver, BC [October 19, 2020] – Adults in the United States are split in their assessment of the future during the COVD-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 44% of Americans believe the worst of the pandemic has been left “behind”, while 43% think it is still “ahead.”

“Most Americans aged 55 and over (56%) believe the worst of COVID-19 lies ahead,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among those aged 18-to-34 (32%) and those aged 35-to-54 (33%).”

Practically seven-in-ten Americans (69%) are satisfied with the way their local government has dealt with the COVID-19 outbreak, up 13 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September

The level of satisfaction also improved for state governments (65%, +9) and for the federal government (45%, +6). 

Americans who voted for Republican Party nominee Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election are more likely to be satisfied with the way the federal government has handled the pandemic (78%) than those who cast a ballot for Democratic Party contender Hillary Clinton (22%).

The approval rating for President Trump stands at 43% this month (-1), with 54% of Americans (-1) saying they disapprove of his performance.

There is a significant gender gap when it comes to public perceptions of the president. While 52% of men approve of the way Trump has handled his duties, only 36% of women concur.

In addition, while 48% of White Americans are satisfied with Trump’s performance, the rating drops to 28% among Hispanic / Latino Americans and 13% among African Americans.

Nine-in-ten Americans (90%, unchanged since September) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside, while only 8% disagree (+1) and 2% (-1) are undecided.

Three-in-five Americans (61%, -5) say they would take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available, while 26% (+4) would not follow this course of action.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 16 to October 18, 2020, among 1,100 American adults.  The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.0 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most British Columbians Would Welcome Online Voting Option

More than three-in-five likely voters think Elections BC should consider this possibility before the next provincial ballot.

Vancouver, BC [October 12, 2020] – A sizeable proportion of likely voters in British Columbia would like to explore the option of participating in the democratic process through the internet, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 63% of likely voters in British Columbia think Elections BC—the non-partisan office of the legislature responsible for conducting provincial and local elections—should “definitely” or “probably” consider allowing voters to cast their ballots online in the next provincial election.

The possibility of online voting is backed by majorities of likely voters who supported the BC Green Party (54%), the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (60%) and the BC Liberals (70%) in the 2017 election.

Across the province, 43% of likely voters say they intend to vote in this year’s election by mail, up 14 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in late September. In addition, 25% (-3) will cast a ballot in person on Election Day and 23% (-4) plan to do so during Advance Voting.

Practically one-in-five mail voters (19%) have already sent their ballot back to Elections BC. More than a third (35%) have requested a ballot but have not received it, 18% possess a ballot but have not voted yet, and 28% intend to request one.

More than nine-in-ten likely voters in British Columbia (93%, +3) express confidence in Elections BC being able to oversee the entire voting process this year. Confidence increased on Elections BC’s ability to ensure that there is no fraudulent activity with mailed ballots (87%, +5) and to enforce social distancing at polling stations (86%, +12).

When likely voters are asked what influences their choice in this election, more than two thirds (69%) mention party platforms. Slightly lower proportions of likely voters say discussions with family (52%) and friends (46%) are also persuasive.

Fewer than a third of likely voters in the province are swayed by interactions with candidates on social media (30%), endorsements from non-governmental organizations (also 30%), campaign ads on radio and television (29%), interactions with other people on social media (27%), or endorsements from unions (26%), trade associations (25%) and newspapers (23%).

This week’s televised debate will feature the leaders of the BC New Democratic Party (NDP), the BC Liberals and the BC Green Party. Fewer than half of likely voters believe other parties should be included in this debate.

While 41% of likely voters want to hear from the BC Conservative Party during the televised debate, fewer would extend an invitation to the BC Libertarian Party (35%), the Rural BC Party (22%), BC Vision (19%), the Christian Heritage Party (also 19%), the Communist Party (16%) and Wexit BC (also 16%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 5 to October 7, 2020, among 750 likely voters in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.6 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by James Wheeler

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Saskatchewan Party Ahead of NDP in Provincial Election

Practically half of likely voters in the province say Scott Moe is their preferred leader to serve as head of government.

Vancouver, BC [October 11, 2020] – The Saskatchewan Party holds a sizeable advantage in the electoral campaign currently underway in the Prairie Province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 58% of decided voters in Saskatchewan would cast a ballot for the candidate of the governing party in their constituency.

The New Democratic Party (NDP) is in second place with 36%, followed by the Green Party with 2%, the Progressive Conservative Party also with 2%, the Liberal Party with 1% and the Buffalo Party also with 1%.

The race is currently tight in Regina, where the Saskatchewan Party and the NDP are virtually tied among decided voters (49% and 47% respectively). The governing party is ahead in Saskatoon (54% to 41%) and in the rest of the province (65% to 25%).

Practically four-in-five decided voters in Saskatchewan (79%) say they are certain of their current choice, while 21% say they may change their mind before Election Day on Oct. 26.

The primary motivation for decided voters in Saskatchewan is a party’s ideas and policies (38%), followed by the party’s leader (32%), the candidate in the riding (10%), a desire for stability (also 10%), a desire for change (7%) and disgust with other contending candidates (3%).

“Decided voters who plan to support the Saskatchewan Party are more likely to say that their main motivation is the leader (41%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, those who plan to cast a ballot for the NDP are more likely to cite ideas and policies (42%).”

Almost two thirds of the province’s likely voters (65%) are satisfied with the way Premier and Saskatchewan Party leader Scott Moe has handled his duties, while 28% are not and 7% are undecided.

Likely voters are divided in their assessment of Official Opposition and NDP leader Ryan Meili (Approve 45%, Disapprove 44%). The rating is lower for Progressive Conservative leader Ken Grey (35%), Green leader Naomi Hunter (32%), Liberal leader Robert Rudachyk (31%) and Buffalo leader Wade Sira (25%).

On the “Best Premier” question, Moe holds a commanding lead over Meili (49% to 21%). The other four party leaders are in single digits.

More than a third of likely voters in Saskatchewan (35%) believe the economy and jobs is the most important issue facing the province, followed by heath care (28%), the environment (8%) and crime and public safety (5%).

Moe holds the upper hand over Meili as the best leader to handle eight issues: energy (46% to 19%), the economy and jobs (45% to 24%), crime and public safety (42% to 19%), accountability (41% to 22%), the environment (40% to 19%), health care (39% to 30%), education (39% to 24%) and housing, poverty and homelessness (38% to 23%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 8 to October 10, 2020, among 500 likely voters in Saskatchewan, including 447 decided voters in the 2020 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Saskatchewan. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.4 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 4.6 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by Tintaggon.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca