Four-in-Five Canadians Support Resource Development Projects

The majority of Canadians (61%) say they are tired of nothing getting built in the country.

Vancouver, BC [March 12, 2019] – A significant proportion of Canadians and British Columbians are in favour of resource development projects, a new Research Co. poll conducted on behalf of LNG Canada—a liquefied natural gas project currently under construction in Kitimat, B.C.—has found.

In the online survey of representative samples, 79% of Canadians and 71% of British Columbians express support for resource development projects. In addition, 61% of respondents across the country and 51% of those located in the westernmost province agree they are “tired of nothing getting built” in Canada and British Columbia—a proportion that rises to 67% in northern B.C.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) believe the “national economy will suffer if we can’t build resource projects.” In British Columbia, 63% feel this way about the possible effect on the provincial economy, including 74% of those in northern B.C.

More than half of Canadians (54%) believe the country’s reputation “is harmed by protests against resource development projects.” In British Columbia, 52% express the same sentiment about the effect of protests against resource development projects, and fewer than a quarter (23%) think it’s possible to have unanimous support for resource development projects. 

“When asked what would make them more likely to support resource development projects, a majority of British Columbians (57%) want assurances that the impact on the environment is limited,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Other important considerations are guaranteeing that Canadians will get the first opportunity to work on the project (53%) and providing training and apprenticeship opportunities for young Canadians (46%).”

Seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%) foresee a positive economic impact from LNG Canada’s liquefied natural gas export project in Kitimat, B.C., which is scheduled to deliver its first LNG cargo before mid-next decade. Broken down by region, over half of Vancouver Island residents (56%), two thirds of Metro Vancouverites (67%) and 86% of those in northern B.C. anticipate a positive economic impact from the project.

“LNG Canada has received significant support from First Nations at the facility and along the shipping route, as well as from northern communities overall,” says Susannah Pierce, LNG Canada’s Director, External Relations. “We are committed to these supporters. A project like ours is vital to the creation of training, employment and contracting opportunities, and we’re pleased to see that British Columbians and Canadians recognize the importance of resource projects as drivers of the Canadian economy.”

The poll also revealed that at least three-in-five Canadians have a positive opinion of four energy sources: wind (80%), hydropower (76%), natural gas (69%) and geothermal (61%). Canadians are divided on oil, with 43% having positive views and 46% having a negative opinion. The lowest ranked energy source for Canadians is coal, with 24% of residents expressing a positive view. 

Three-in-five Canadians (60%) believe Canada has a responsibility to “export natural gas to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) in other countries.” LNG exported from LNG Canada’s facility can displace the use of coal for power generation, reducing global GHGs by 60 to 90 mtpa, which is the equivalent of all GHGs produced in British Columbia annually.

In the online survey of representative samples, 79% of Canadians and 71% of British Columbians express support for resource development projects. In addition, 61% of respondents across the country and 51% of those located in the westernmost province agree they are “tired of nothing getting built” in Canada and British Columbia—a proportion that rises to 67% in Northern B.C.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) believe the “national economy will suffer if we can’t build resource projects.” In British Columbia, 63% feel this way about the possible effect in the provincial economy, including 74% of those in northern B.C.

More than half of Canadians (54%) believe the country’s reputation “is harmed by protests against resource development projects”. In British Columbia, 52% express the same sentiment about the effect of protests against resource development projects, and fewer than a quarter (23%) think it’s possible to have unanimous support for resource development projects. 

“When asked what would make them more likely to support resource development projects, a majority of British Columbians (57%) want assurances that the impact in the environment is limited,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Other important considerations are guaranteeing that Canadians will get the first opportunity to work on the project (53%) and providing training and apprenticeship opportunities for young Canadians (46%).”

Seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%) foresee a positive economic impact from LNG Canada’s liquefied natural gas export project in Kitimat, B.C., which is scheduled to deliver first LNG cargo mid-next decade. Broken down by region, over half of Vancouver Island residents (56%), two thirds of Metro Vancouverites (67%) and 86% of those in northern B.C. anticipate a positive economic impact from the project.

“LNG Canada has received significant support from First Nations at the facility and along the shipping route, as well as from northern communities overall,” says Susannah Pierce, LNG Canada’s Director, External Relations. “We are committed to these supporters. A project like ours is vital to the creation of training, employment and contracting opportunities, and we’re pleased to see that British Columbians and Canadians recognize the importance of resource projects as drivers of the Canadian economy.”

The poll also revealed that at least three-in-five Canadians have a positive opinion of four energy sources: wind (80%), hydropower (76%), natural gas (69%) and geothermal (61%). Canadians are divided on oil, with 43% having positive views and 46% having a negative opinion. The lowest ranked energy source for Canadians is coal, with 24% of residents expressing a positive view. 

Three-in-five Canadians (60%) believe Canada has a responsibility to “export natural gas to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) in other countries.” LNG exported from LNG Canada’s facility can displace the use of coal for power generation, reducing global GHGs by 60 to 90 mtpa, which is the equivalent of all GHGs produced in British Columbia annually.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 21 to February 24, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada; and an online study conducted from February 16 to February 18, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada and British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for the sample of Canadians and +/- 3.5 percentage points for the sample of British Columbians, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full Canada data set here, our full British Columbia data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

LNG Canada Media Relations
[c] 604.761.5529
[e] media@lngcanada.ca

Almost One-in-Five Canadians Say Global Warming is a Theory

Half of Canadians say the federal government is paying “the right amount” of attention to the environment. 

Vancouver, BC [January 4, 2019] – A large majority of Canadians believe in human-made climate change, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-five Canadians (60%) think global warming (or climate change) is a fact and is mostly caused by emissions from vehicles and industrial facilities.

An additional 15% of Canadians think global warming is a fact and is mostly caused by natural changes.

Almost one-in-five respondents (18%) refer to global warming as a theory that has not yet been proven—a proportion that includes 22% of Canadians aged 55 and over and 36% of those who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2015 federal election.

Across the country, two thirds of Canadians (66%) say it is more important to them to protect the environment, even at the risk of hampering economic growth.

A significantly smaller proportion of respondents (22%) say they would prefer to foster economic growth, even at the risk of damaging the environment.

“Political allegiance plays a big role in the struggle between environmental stewardship and economic development,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While more than three-in-five Canadians who voted for the Liberals or the New Democrats in 2015 believe environmental protection is paramount, the proportion falls to 47% among Conservative voters.”

Half of Canadians (50%) think the current federal government is paying the right amount of attention to the environment, including 59% of Liberal voters.

Conversely, 31% of Canadians believe Ottawa is not paying enough attention to the environment, including 40% of New Democrat voters in 2015.

About one-in-six Canadians (14%) think the federal government is paying too much attention to the environment, including 43% of Conservative voters.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 17 to December 20, 2018, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two-in-Five Canadians Say Their Home Heating Use Has Increased

Three-in-ten Canadians in a relationship say they change the temperature at home without telling their partner. 

Vancouver, BC [December 6, 2018] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians are relying more heavily on home heating this year, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, two-in-five Canadians (41%) say their energy and heating use at home has increased over the past few weeks—a proportion that reaches 46% in Atlantic Canada, and 43% in both Ontario and British Columbia.

Across the country, 9% of Canadians say they typically set their home heating at 18C or lower. Most residents select 19C or 20C (38%) and 21C or 22C (40%), while 6% set the thermostat at 23C or higher.

Respondents to this survey who are married or living with a significant other were asked who is in charge of setting the temperature at home. Two-in-five (40%) say they are solely responsible, while 18% say their spouse or partner takes care of this task, and 30% affirm that the decision is taken by both equally.

Women are more likely to say that the home thermostat is a joint responsibility (34%, compared to 25% for men), while men are more likely to say they are solely responsible for home heating settings at home (43%, compared to 38% for women).

Three-in-ten Canadians in a relationship (30%) admit that they change the temperature at home without telling their spouse or significant other “all of the time” (8%) or “most of the time” (22%), while just 19% say they have “never” done this.

“Women (35%) are more likely to acknowledge that they adjust the thermostat without telling their spouse or partner than men (25%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “On a regional basis, Quebecers are more likely to say they would never change the settings without consulting first (35%), while British Columbians (8%) are the least likely to do so.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 26 to November 29, 2018, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

High Support for Transportation Projects in Metro Vancouver

Almost nine-in-ten residents are in favour of taking SkyTrain to the UBC Point Grey campus.

Vancouver, BC [October 18, 2018] – Two pending transportation projects are backed by a sizeable proportion of Metro Vancouver residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, two thirds (68%) say they agree with the construction of the proposed Surrey–Newton–Guildford Light Rail Transit (LRT) project in Surrey.

In the City of Surrey, 62% of residents are in favour of the proposed LRT project, while 34% are not.

Four-in-five Metro Vancouver residents (82%) agree with the extension of the SkyTrain Millennium Line underneath Broadway to Arbutus in Vancouver—including 81% of those who live in the City of Vancouver.

In addition, 87% of Metro Vancouverites support extending the Millennium Line beyond Arbutus to the University of British Columbia (UBC) campus at Point Grey.

“Most residents of Metro Vancouver are keen to see these transportation projects through,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support is similarly high among those who drive, take public transit or bike to school or work.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 4 to October 7, 2018, among 635 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: PoYang

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Welcome Automated Speed Enforcement

The use of red light cameras to capture speeding vehicles is endorsed by seven-in-ten residents. 

Vancouver, BC [August 13, 2018] – Most British Columbians support the use of technology to enforce speed limits in the province’s roads, a new Research Co. survey has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, seven-in-ten residents (70%) approve of the use of speed-on-green cameras, or red light cameras that also capture vehicles that are speeding through intersections.

Automated speed enforcement works by using cameras or sensors to pick up a vehicle speeding. A ticket is then issued to the owner of the vehicle. Driver’s license points are not issued as the driver of the vehicle cannot be identified.

The provincial government announced last fall that red light cameras located at 140 intersections would record 24 hours a day. In the fall, the provincial government is expected to announce the number and locations of cameras that would be used to identify speeding vehicles.

In addition to the speed-on-green cameras, most British Columbians also endorsed three other types of automated speed enforcement.

Across the province, 71% of residents approve of using fixed speed cameras, or cameras that stay in one location and measure speed as a vehicle passes. These cameras can be placed in school zones or on other roads.

In addition, almost two thirds of British Columbians (65%) approve of using mobile speed cameras, which can be moved from place to place and measure speed as a vehicle passes.

A majority of residents (55%) also approved of point-to-point enforcement, which uses cameras at two or more distant points on a road. The average speed of vehicles that pass between points is calculated and tickets are issued to vehicles whose average speed over the distance was excessive.

“There is high support for all four types of automated speed enforcement across the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Point-to-point enforcement is the most contentious of all four, with more than a third of residents disapproving of its use.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 2 to August 5, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca