Canadians Move Away from Conscience Rights in Health Care

Compared to 2020, more Canadians believe practitioners should not be able to refuse services on account of moral beliefs.

Vancouver, BC [November 18, 2022] – Disapproval with the notion of provinces taking legislative action to entrench conscience rights for health care workers has grown in Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Canadians would oppose a bill that sought to allow health care professionals the ability to have a moral or faith-based objection to providing services, up three points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in February 2020.

“Opposition to the concept of conscience rights in health care delivery is strongest among Canadians aged 55 and over (56%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (50%) and aged 18-to-34 (48%).”

In 2019, Alberta considered the implementation of Bill 207 which was later abandoned. The proposed legislation sought to enable the province’s health care practitioners to abstain from providing services to an individual if they considered that their conscientious beliefs would be infringed upon.

Just over half of Canadians (51%, +9) disagree with health care professionals having the ability to object to providing services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to physician-assisted death.

Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (59%) and the Liberal Party (56%) in the 2021 federal election are more likely to disagree with conscience rights in physician-assisted death than those who backed the Conservative Party (40%).

A majority of Canadians (56%, +7) are against health care professionals being able to object to providing services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to abortion.

Opposition to conscience rights on abortion is highest in Quebec (63%), followed by Atlantic Canada (60%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (55%), British Columbia (54%), Alberta (also 54%) and Ontario (50%).

More than three-in-five Canadians (63%, +5) reject the notion of health care practitioners refusing to serve lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, gender diverse, queer and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2+) people because of a moral or faith-based objection—a proportion that rises to 69% among both Canadians aged 55 and over and Atlantic Canadians.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 12 to November 14, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Rising Cost of Food Impacting the Habits of British Columbians

More than three-in-five of the province’s residents have reduced their visits to restaurants since September.

Vancouver, BC [November 15, 2022] – Residents of British Columbia are starting to take action to deal with increasing food prices, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 64% of British Columbians say they have cut back on dining out on the weekend over the past two months, and a slightly smaller proportion (61%) have cut back on buying or going out to lunch on a weekday.

More than half of British Columbians have also cut back on treats (59%) and visits to coffee shops (56%), while more than two-in-five (44%) have switched packaged food brands to lower priced alternatives.

“Only 14% of British Columbians have not made any adjustments to their food budget over the past two months,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This includes 19% of male residents and 10% of female residents.”

More than four-in-five British Columbians (82%) say the price of groceries has increased since September, and practically seven-in-ten say lunch at a restaurant (69%) and dinner at a restaurant (71%) are more expensive now than they were two months ago.

Almost half of British Columbians (49%) also think the price of food delivery has increased—a proportion that rises to 60% among those aged 18-to-34.

More than three-in-five British Columbians (61%) say their diet has been healthy over the past two months, while just over a third (34%) describe it as unhealthy.

Women (39%), residents of Vancouver Island (40%) and British Columbians in the lowest income bracket (43%) are more likely to report that their diet has not been healthy since September.

More than three-in-five British Columbians who have not followed a healthy diet recently (61%) say an inability to afford healthier foods has negatively impacted their nourishment, while just over half (51%) blame the stress and pressures of daily life getting in the way of good eating habits.

Fewer British Columbians who claim their diet is unhealthy say they find it difficult to make lifestyle changes (38%), lack the time for food preparation at home (33%) or lack the time to buy groceries (16%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 6 to November 8, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Oblivious to Acts Proposed by Western Premiers

Half of residents (50%) agree with what Saskatchewan is trying to accomplish, while 39% feel the same way about Alberta’s actions.

Vancouver, BC [November 11, 2022] – Few Canadians are actively following stories related to the recent pronouncements issued by the premiers of Alberta and Saskatchewan, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 37% of Canadians say they are paying close attention to the Alberta Sovereignty Act.

Just over three-in-ten Canadians (31%) are following stories related to the Saskatchewan First Act “very closely” or “moderately closely”

The Alberta Sovereignty Act proposed by Premier Danielle Smith seeks to allow the province to refuse to follow specific federal laws if they are deemed not to be in Alberta’s best interests.

The Saskatchewan First Act proposed by Premier Scott Moe seeks to confirm Saskatchewan’s autonomy and exclusive jurisdiction over its natural resources.

“Half of Conservative Party voters in the last Canadian federal election (50%) are keeping an eye on news related to the Alberta Sovereignty Act,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower among Canadians who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (36%) or the Liberal Party (35%) in 2021.”

Just over half of Canadians (51%) are concerned about the Alberta Sovereignty Act, while 45% feel the same way about the Saskatchewan First Act.

Half of Canadians (50%) think the Government of Saskatchewan is right to confirm its autonomy and exclusive jurisdiction over its natural resources, while 27% disagree with this notion and 22% are undecided.

On a regional basis, residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (60%) and Alberta (57%) agree with the principle of the Saskatchewan First Act, along with 48% of those who live in Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia.

Only 34% of Canadians think the Government of Alberta is right to refuse to follow specific federal laws if they are deemed not to be in Alberta’s best interests, while 42% disagree with this assessment and 21% are not sure.

Just over half of Albertans (52%) agree with the ideals behind the Alberta Sovereignty Act. The numbers are lower in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (43%), British Columbia and Ontario (38% each), Atlantic Canada (34%) and Quebec (33 %).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from November 4 to November 6, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

A Third of British Columbians Willing to Change Province’s Name

Residents aged 18-to-34 are particularly supportive of a move to acknowledge the province’s Indigenous heritage.

Vancouver, BC [November 8, 2022] – While most British Columbians disagree with the notion of changing the province’s name, young adults believe this would be the correct course of action, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 53% of British Columbians disagree with changing the name of the province to acknowledge its Indigenous heritage, down seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2021.

A third of British Columbians (32%, +6) would like to go forward with a name change—a proportion that rises to 50% among those aged 18-to-34.

“More than a third of Vancouver Island residents (37%) would welcome changing British Columbia’s name,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support is lower in Northern BC (32%), Metro Vancouver (31%), the Fraser Valley (30%) and Southern BC (26%).”

Just over three-in-five British Columbians (62%, -5) are not bothered by any component of the province’s name. About one-in-five are upset about the absence of an acknowledgement to Indigenous peoples (20%, +2) and the “British” part (19%, +4). Only 8% (=) are bothered by the presence of the word “Columbia”.

The numbers did not move much when British Columbians were asked if the provincial flag should be amended to remove the Union Jack. Just over three-in-ten (31%, +1) agree with this plan, while 46% (-3) disagree with it.

Only 24% of British Columbians aged 55 and over would consent to having a provincial flag that does not feature the Union Jack. Support is higher among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (30%) and aged 18-to-34 (43%).

In 2010, the Queen Charlotte Islands were renamed as Haida Gwaii. Most British Columbians (58%, +2) believe this was the right decision, while 20% (=) disagree and 23% (-1) are undecided.

More than seven-in-ten residents of Vancouver Island (71%) believe changing the name of the Queen Charlotte Islands was the correct course of action, along with majorities of residents of Southern BC (58%), the Fraser Valley (57%), Metro Vancouver (55%) and Northern BC (also 55%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 29 to October 31, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Florida and Ohio Are Red States in U.S. Midterm Election

Democratic incumbents in Illinois and New York head to Election Day with significant leads. 

Vancouver, BC [November 7, 2022] – The U.S. Senate contests in the states of Georgia, Nevada and Pennsylvania are remarkably close on the eve of the midterm election in the United States, according to a series of new polls conducted by Research Co. in ten American states.

The surveys of Americans who have already participated in the democratic process or plan to do so tomorrow also show Republican candidates dominating the Senate and Governor’s races in Florida and Ohio, and their Democratic counterparts with healthy leads in California, Illinois and New York

Arizona

In 2020, Democrat Mark Kelly defeated Republican Martha McSally in a U.S. Senate special election with 51,2% of the vote. In this month’s contest, Kelly holds a four-point lead over GOP challenger Blake Masters (51% to 47%), with Libertarian Marc Victor at 2%.

In the Grand Canyon State’s gubernatorial election, Republican Kari Lake has a two-point edge over Democrat Katie Hobbs (51% to 49%).

California

Voters in California will take part in two U.S. Senate elections: a special contest to fill a seat until January 2023 and a regular contest to choose a Senator for a six-year term. In each election, Democrat Alex Padilla holds a sizeable advantage over Republican Mark Meuser (63% to 37%).

Incumbent Gavin Newsom of the Democratic Party has a 20-point lead over Republican challenger Brian Dahle in the gubernatorial election (60% to 40%).

Practically seven-in-ten decided voters in the Golden State (69%) say they will vote “Yes” on Proposition 1 which seeks to amend the California Constitution to expressly include an individual’s fundamental right to reproductive freedom.

Florida

In the Sunshine State, incumbent U.S. Senator Marco Rubio of the Republican Party has a double-digit advantage over Democratic challenger Val Demmings (54% to 44%).

Incumbent Governor Ron DeSantis is also heavily favoured to win a new term in office in his contest against former governor Charlie Crist (56% to 42%).

Georgia

The U.S. Senate election in the Peach State may have to be decided in a run-off, with Libertarian candidate Chase Oliver garnering the support of 1% of decided voters. Challenger Herschel Walker of the Republican Party and incumbent U.S. Senator Raphael Warnock of the Democratic Party are tied with 49% each.

In the gubernatorial election, incumbent Republican Brian Kemp has a seven-point lead over Democratic challenger Stacey Abrams (53% to 46%).

Illinois

Democrat Tammy Duckworth appears headed to a new six-year term in the U.S. Senate, with a sizeable advantage over Republican challenger Kathy Salvi (58% to 40%).

In the Prairie State’s gubernatorial race, incumbent Democrat J. B. Pritzker is 20 points ahead of Republican rival Darren Bailey (59% to 39%).

Nevada

Democratic U.S. Senator Catherine Cortez Masto, first elected in 2016, is trailing GOP challenger Adam Laxalt by a single point (48% to 49%).

In the Silver State’s gubernatorial election, incumbent Democrat Steve Sisolak is also slightly behind Republican contender Joe Lombardo (47% to 49%).

New York

Voters in the Empire State give incumbent U.S. Senator Chuck Schumer of the Democratic Party a substantial lead over GOP challenger Joe Pinion (59% to 39%).

In the gubernatorial election, former Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul of the Democratic Party has a double-digit lead over Republican candidate Lee Zeldin (55% to 45%).

Ohio

In the Buckeye State’s election to the U.S. Senate, J.D. Vance holds an eight-point advantage over Democrat Tim Ryan (54% to 46%).

Incumbent Republican Governor Mike DeWine has a larger lead over Democratic challenger Nan Whaley (61% to 39%).

Pennsylvania

In the race to replace retiring U.S. Senator Pat Toomey, Democratic candidate John Fetterman is barely ahead of Republican contender Mehmet Oz (49% to 48%).

The contest for the governor’s office in the Keystone State is not as tight. Democrat Josh Shapiro has a 12-point lead over Republican Doug Mastriano (55% to 43%).

Wisconsin

Incumbent Republican U.S. Senator Ron Johnson, first elected in 2010, has a six-point lead over Democratic rival Mandela Barnes in the Badger State (53% to 47%).

In the race for governor, incumbent Tony Evers of the Democratic Party and challenger Tim Michels of the Republican Party are tied with the support of 50% of decided voters each.

Methodology:
Results are based on online surveys conducted from November 4 to November 6, 2022, among representative samples of 450 likely voters in ten American states: Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Nevada, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age and gender in each state. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.6 percentage points for each state, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Concerns About Birth Tourism Drop Slightly in Canada

More than seven-in-ten Canadians still want the federal government to investigate the full extent of the practice.

Vancouver, BC [November 4, 2022] – Canadians are currently not paying as much attention to the issue of “birth tourism” as they did in 2020, but a sizeable majority believe the practice should still be scrutinized, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 28% of Canadians say they have followed media stories related to the issue of “birth tourism” in the past year “very closely” or “moderately closely”, down 13 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2020.

British Columbians and Quebecers are significantly more likely to be paying attention to news related to “birth tourism” (36% and 34% respectively) than their counterparts in other Canadian provinces.

“Birth tourism” is the practice of traveling to a specific country for the purpose of giving birth there and securing citizenship for the child in a country that has birthright citizenship. Canada allows expectant mothers who are foreign nationals to gain automatic citizenship for their children born in Canada.

Over the past few years, there have been reports of unregulated “for profit” businesses that have facilitated the practice of “birth tourism” in Canada. More than half of Canadians agree that “birth tourism” can displace Canadians from hospitals (54%, -2) and can degrade the value of Canadian citizenship (53%, -6).

More than three-in-five Canadians (64%, -7) believe “birth tourism” can be unfairly used to gain access to Canada’s education, health care and social programs—a point of view shared by 76% of British Columbians.

More than seven-in-ten Canadians (73%, -5) believe the federal government should establish a committee to investigate the full extent of “birth tourism” in Canada.

“A federal inquiry into the full scope of birth tourism would not represent a political liability for the federal government,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (82%), the Conservative Party (77%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (72%) in the last federal election are on board.”

Almost half of Canadians (48%, -6) think the country should ponder establishing new guidelines for birthright citizenship, while more than a third (37%, +3) would prefer to keep existing regulations.

Support for developing a new framework to birthright citizenship in Canada is highest in Ontario (50%), followed by Manitoba and Saskatchewan (49%), Quebec (48%) and Alberta, British Columbia and Atlantic Canada (each at 47%).

More than three-in-five Canadians (62%, -5) agree with the notion that birthright citizenship may have made sense at one point, but now people have taken advantage of existing rules.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 24 to October 26, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Conservatives Have Four-Point Lead Over Liberals in Canada

Canadians are evenly split when assessing the accomplishments of the Liberals and the NDP following their March 2022 agreement.

Vancouver, BC [October 31, 2022] – The opposition Conservative Party is ahead in Canada’s federal political scene, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 35% of decided voters would cast a ballot for the Conservative candidate in their constituency.

The governing Liberal Party is in second place with 31%, followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 19%, the Bloc Québécois with 8%, the Green Party with 4% and the People’s Party with 2%.

The Conservatives hold sizeable leads in their traditional strongholds of Alberta (51%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (47%) and are also first in Ontario (41%) and British Columbia (37%). The Liberals are leading in Quebec (38%, with the Bloc at 32%) and Atlantic Canada (38%).

“Among Canadian decided voters aged 55 and over, the Conservatives have a double-digit lead over the Liberals (41% to 30%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The race is much closer among younger voters.”

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%) approve of the performance of Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau while just over half (51%) disapprove.

The approval rating is higher this month for NDP leader Jagmeet Singh (46%, -5 since the last Research Co. survey conducted before the 2021 federal election).

More than a third of Canadians (37%) approve of the way Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Pierre Poilievre has handled his duties, while 44% disagree and 19% are undecided.

The numbers are lower for Green interim leader Amita Kuttner (22%), Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (20%, and 38% in Quebec) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (18%).

Practically three-in-ten Canadians (29%, +7 since September 2021) identify the economy and jobs as the most important issue facing Canada, followed by housing, homelessness and poverty (21%, +6), health care (also 21%, -6), the environment (7%, -3), accountability and leadership (5%, -1), immigration (4%, +1) and crime and public safety (also 4%, +1).

The economy and jobs is regarded as the most pressing federal concern for residents of Alberta (38%), Quebec (33%), Ontario (30%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 30%).

Health care is the prevalent issue for Atlantic Canadians (35%), while housing, homelessness and poverty is the most important matter in British Columbia (33%).

When asked which one of the six main party leaders would make the best prime minister of Canada, Trudeau holds a six-point advantage over Poilievre (30% to 24%), followed by Singh (17%), Blanchet (4%), Bernier (2%) and Kuttner (1%).

Residents of two provinces are almost evenly divided on whether Trudeau or Poilievre would be the best head of government for Canada right now. In Ontario, Poilievre is a point ahead of Trudeau (30% to 29%). In British Columbia, the current prime minister edges the opposition leader by the same margin (27% to 26%).

More than two-in-five Canadians (43%) say they are comfortable with Trudeau being charge of Canada’s economy, a proportion that rises to 45% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 52% in Quebec.

Just under two-in-five Canadians (39%) say they would be comfortable with Poilievre being charge of Canada’s economy, including 48% of Albertans and 43% of Ontarians.

There is no clear consensus on what the March 2022 supply and confidence agreement between the Liberals and the NDP has meant to Canada so far. Across the country, 44% are satisfied with the accomplishments of this deal, while the same proportion (44%) are dissatisfied.

Liberal voters in the 2021 federal election are significantly more likely to hold positive views on the March 2022 supply and confidence agreement (80%) than those who voted for the New Democrats (51%) or the Conservatives (13%).

The country is also divided on whether a federal election should be called in the next six months now that the Conservatives have a full time leader (Agree 44%, Disagree 41%).

Canadians who voted for the Conservatives in the last federal election are more convinced about the need to hold a fresh ballot now (73%) than their counterparts who supported the NDP (44%) or the Liberals (30%) in 2021.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 24 to October 26, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Support for Celebrating Halloween on Saturday Rises in Canada

Negative perceptions about specific types of costumes for adults and children also increased since 2019.

Vancouver, BC [October 28, 2022] – A plurality of Canadians believe it is time to observe Halloween on the last Saturday of October, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 44% of Canadians agree with this idea, while 39% disagree and 17% are undecided.

Compared to a Research Co. poll conducted in 2019, support for moving Halloween to the last Saturday of October—instead of having it every year on the same day (October 31)— is up by four points, while opposition is down by the same margin.

Residents of Ontario (48%) and Atlantic Canada (47%) are more likely to back the notion of celebrating Halloween on a Saturday every year. The proportions are lower in British Columbia (44%), Alberta (43%), Quebec (42%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (33%).

In 2022, Canadians are more likely to find fault with specific Halloween costumes for children. More than half of Canadians think that three types of costumes for kids are inappropriate: those that represent an ethnic stereotype (60%, +3), those that change the colour of the child’s skin (57%, +6) and those where a child carries toy or replica weapons (51%, +4).

At least two-in-five Canadians also believe two other types of costumes for kids are inappropriate: those that refer to a culture that is not the child’s own (43%, +5) and those that represent a social stereotype, such as a jailbird or vagabond (40%, +7).

The views are similar when Canadians are asked to ponder the suitability of certain Halloween costumes for adults. Three-in-five deem it inappropriate for an adult to wear Halloween costumes that depict ethnic stereotypes (60%, +1) or that change the colour of the adult’s skin (also 60%, +7).

Half of Canadians also find fault with adult Halloween costumes that feature toy or replica weapons (50%, +1) or that refer to a culture that is not the adult’s own, (also 50%, +6%). Two-in-five (41%, +5) also think adult costumes that represent a social stereotype are inappropriate.

“Canadians of all backgrounds appear dissatisfied with the existence of Halloween children’s costumes that feature ethnic stereotypes,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This includes Canadians whose ancestries are Indigenous (68%), South Asian (65%), East Asian (63%) and European (52%).”

A final question gauged views on some of the food and beverages that have become staples of the season. Two thirds of Canadians (66%) say they like pumpkin pie, and almost three-in-five (58%) enjoy pumpkin spice flavoured cakes.

Two other offerings are decidedly more contentious. Almost half of Canadians (47%) dislike pumpkin spice flavoured beverages, while 44% enjoy them.

A majority of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (53%) like pumpkin spice flavoured beverages. The numbers are lower among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (46%) and aged 55 and over (34%).

The nationwide results are similar for candy corn: 42% of Canadians enjoy this confectionery, while 48% do not.

There is a sizeable gender gap on candy corn, with 45% of Canadian men saying they like it, compared to 37% of Canadian women.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 22 to October 24, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Mixed Messages on Organ Donation After Death in Canada

While sizeable majorities of Canadians agree with the practice, significantly fewer have explicitly outlined their wishes.

Vancouver, BC [October 25, 2022] – While a vast majority of Canadians say they want to donate their human organs and tissue after death, few are actually registered to do so, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 84% of Canadians support the donation of human organs and tissue after death.

Canadians aged 55 and over are the most supportive of the practice (92%), followed by their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (84%) and aged 18-to-34 (78%).

Two thirds of Canadians (68%) say they would want their organs and tissue to be donated after their death, while 21% disagree and 11% are undecided.

On a regional basis, residents of Atlantic Canada are more likely to say that they would like to donate their organs and tissue after death (79%), followed by those who live in British Columbia and Alberta (each at 71%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (69%), Quebec (66%) and Ontario (64%).

Across the country, only 43% of Canadians say they have registered to be an organ and tissue donor after their death, an “explicit consent” usually expressed in a health card or driver’s licence.

“On the issue of organ and tissue donation after death, the thoughts and actions of Canadians differ greatly,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While two thirds want to go through with donations, fewer than half have actually registered to do so.”

Some jurisdictions around the world have established “Active Donor Registration” systems for organ and tissue donation. Under these systems, every person over the age of 18 is considered an organ and tissue donor after death unless they specifically opt-out of a registry.

In January 2021, Nova Scotia’s “Human Organ and Tissue Act” came into effect. The law makes every single person who has resided in the province for at least a year a potential organ and tissue donor after death. Nova Scotians who do not wish to be donors are able to opt-out of the system.

Almost two thirds of Canadians (65%, down five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2020) want their provincial government to “definitely” or “probably” implement an “Active Donor Registration” system for organ and tissue donation after death.

Support for the implementation of an “Active Donor Registration” system is highest among Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) in the 2021 federal election (74%), but also encompasses majorities of those who cast ballots for the Liberal Party (68%) and the Conservative Party (67%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from October 1 to October 3, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Concerns About Opioid Crisis Stagnant in Canada, Rise in U.S.

Just over a third of Canadians and Americans are satisfied with the way Justin Trudeau and Joe Biden are managing this issue.

Vancouver, BC [October 21, 2022] – Residents of Canada and the United States voice a high level of support for specific strategies to deal with the opioid crisis, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 45% of Canadians and 60% of Americans describe the current situation related to the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in their community as “a major problem”.

Grave concerns about the opioid crisis remain stagnant in Canada compared to a Research Co. poll conducted in October 2021, but have risen by seven points in the United States since September 2020.

Respondents to this survey were asked to consider six ideas related to opioids. More than four-in-five Canadians and Americans endorse two of them: launching more education and awareness campaigns about drug use (CAN 84%, USA 88%) and creating more spaces for drug rehabilitation (CAN 82%, USA 84%).

The concept of “safe supply” programs, where alternatives to opioids can be prescribed by health professionals, is supported by 74% of Canadians and 80% of Americans. In addition, three-in-four residents of each country (CAN 75%, USA 75%) believe it is time to reduce the prescription of opioids by medical professionals.

Two other proposals are more contentious. Majorities of Canadians and Americans (CAN 63%, USA 56%) agree with setting up more “harm reduction” strategies, such as legal supervised injection sites.

The notion of decriminalizing all drugs for personal use is endorsed by 40% of Canadians and 35% of Americans.

“Nationwide support for the decriminalization of all drugs for personal use increased in Canada from 33% in 2021 to 40% this year,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the United States, it dropped from 47% in 2020 to 35% in 2022.”

Canadians and Americans have similar opinions on the work of elected politicians to deal with the opioid crisis. More than a third consider the performance of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the Canadian federal government (36%) and President Joe Biden and the American federal government (34%) as satisfactory.

While 34% of Canadians think their own Member of Parliament is doing a “good job” managing the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in your community, only 23% of Americans feel the same way about the U.S. Congress.

The ratings are equivalent for Canadians premiers and provincial governments (36%) and American governors and state governments (also 36%).

Local governments fare slightly better, with 39% of Americans endorsing the work of their mayor and local government on the opioid crisis and 38% of Canadians feeling the same way about their mayor and council.

Methodology: Results are based on online studies conducted from October 15 to October 17, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Ponder Future Effect of BC NDP Leadership Race

Women are more likely to support the BC New Democrats if David Eby replaces John Horgan as leader.

Vancouver, BC [October 18, 2022] – The governing BC New Democratic Party (NDP) remains ahead of the opposition BC Liberals in British Columbia’s political scene, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 44% of decided voters would support the BC NDP candidate in their constituency if a provincial ballot were held today, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in February.

The BC Liberals are in second place with 35% (-3), followed by the BC Green Party with 15% (+2) and the BC Conservative Party with 4% (+2).

More than half of British Columbians (57%, -12) approve of the way Premier and BC NDP leader John Horgan has handled his duties. The numbers are lower for both BC Liberals leader Kevin Falcon (36%, -2) and BC Greens leader Sonia Furstenau (35%, -1).

The survey also asked about the two prospective candidates seeking to replace Horgan at the helm of the BC NDP. Just over two-in-five British Columbians (42%) approve of David Eby, while three-in-ten (30%) feel the same way about Anjali Appadurai.

Across British Columbia, a third of residents (33%) say it makes no difference to them who becomes the next leader of the BC NDP, while one-in-five (25%) are undecided. Eby is ahead of Appadurai among all residents of the province (30% to 12%) and among those who voted for the BC New Democrats in the 2020 provincial election (42% to 11%).

Respondents to this poll were asked about four different scenarios that could materialize upon the conclusion of the BC NDP leadership race.

In a match-up with Eby as leader, 43% of decided voters would support the BC NDP and 34% would back the BC Liberals. The race becomes much closer if Appadurai supplants Horgan: 38% for the BC NDP and 36% for the BC Liberals.

“The BC NDP would have an easier time connecting with female voters with David Eby as leader,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support for the governing party among women stands at 51% with him and at 44% under Appadurai.”

The results are also different if either of the losing contenders in the BC NDP leadership race decided to create their own political parties.

With Eby as leader, the BC NDP would keep the upper hand over the BC Liberals (40% to 34%), with lower support for the BC Greens (15%), the BC Conservatives (6%) and a new political party led by Appadurai (3%).

An Appadurai-led BC NDP would be four points behind the BC Liberals (31% to 35%). The BC Greens would be third with 16%, followed by a new provincial party led by Eby (10%) and the BC Conservatives (6%).

When asked about the most important issue facing the province, almost two-in-five British Columbians (38%, +5) select housing, homelessness and poverty—a proportion that jumps to 43% among women and to 47% among those aged 18-to-34.

Health care is second on the list of concerns with 28% (+5), rising to 44% among British Columbians aged 55 and over. The economy and jobs is third on the list with 11% (-5), followed by crime and public safety (8%, +4) and the environment (6%, -4).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 9 to October 11, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

How Quebec Voted: A Provincial “Exit Poll”.

Supporters of the governing CAQ say leader François Legault was their primary motivator for casting a ballot.

Vancouver, BC [October 17, 2022] – By the mid-way point of the campaign, it became clear that the provincial election in Quebec would become a race for second place, both in terms of voting percentages and seats.

The governing Coalition Avenir Québec (CAQ) ultimately garnered 41% of all cast ballots, in tune with the final survey published by Research Co. Premier François Legault, who held the upper hand on approval and on the “Best Premier” question, now leads a caucus of 90 members in the National Assembly—a 14-seat improvement from his first election victory in 2018.

When it comes to the main motivators of support, our “Exit Poll” shows that the Quebec electorate was equally invested in the party’s leader (35%) and the party’s ideas and policies (34%). Significantly fewer voters were primarily concerned about a desire for stability (15%), a desire for change (9%), the party’s candidate in the riding (8%) or disgust with other contending candidates (6%).

For the governing CAQ, building the campaign around the personality of the current head of government paid off handsomely. The party’s leader was the main motivator for 43% of CAQ voters. A look at what we found in Ontario earlier this year shows the command that Legault has on his party’s base. Ontario Premier Doug Ford, who also earned a majority mandate, was seen as the primary motivator for 31% of Progressive Conservative voters, 12 points below what we see in Quebec.

The level of rapport with leaders is significantly lower among the other four parties. More than a third of Parti Québécois (PQ) voters (36%) were motivated by leader Paul St-Pierre Plamondon. The proportions on this indicator drop to 27% for Dominique Anglade among Liberal Party of Quebec voters, 26% for Éric Duhaime among Conservative Party of Quebec voters, and just 20% for co-spokesperson Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois among Québec solidaire voters.

In Quebec, few voters looked at the candidate in their riding as a key factor in their decision, with numbers ranging from a high of 13% for Liberal and PQ voters to a low of 6% among those who cast ballots for CAQ candidates. Desire for change, an item that is always crucial for opposition parties, stands at 9% as a main motivator across the province, rising to 20% among Québec solidaire voters.

Québec solidaire is also unique when we measure how many Quebecers chose who to support based primarily on a party’s ideas and policies, with a total score of 48%. All other parties have lower scores (Liberals 39%, Conservatives 38%, PQ 36% and CAQ 28%).

On the “strategic vote” question, Quebecers are evenly split. Almost half (49%) admit to having voted for the candidate in their riding who had the best chance of defeating a party they disliked, even if the candidate they voted for was not their first preference. Supporters of the Liberals (61%) and the Conservatives (53%) were more likely to behave this way.

Age is a key aspect behind the allure of “strategic voting”. In Quebec, 62% of voters aged 18-to-34 say they voted strategically, compared to 47% among those aged 35-to-54 and 37% among those aged 55 and over. These results are very similar to what we found when we asked this question in Ontario. In Eastern Canada, the younger the voter, the more likely he or she is to look at outside information before casting a ballot. Those aged 55 and over are significantly more likely to simply go with their first choice.

Finally, we asked voters in Quebec a question about their nationality. Just over half (52%) say they consider themselves “Quebecers first, Canadians second.” This is a significantly higher level of provincial identification than what we found in August when we asked representative samples of Albertans (28%) and British Columbians (22%).

When these results are analyzed by party support, majorities of those who cast ballots for the Liberals (82%) and the Conservatives (59%) identify as Canadian. In contrast, supporters of Québec solidaire (52%), the CAQ (60%) and the PQ (86%) are more likely to say they are Quebecers first.

Find our data tables here. 

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on October 3 and October 4, 2022, among 500 Quebec adults who voted in the 2022 provincial election. The margin of error — which measures sample variability — is +/- 4.4 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Deadlock As Voters in Vancouver Prepare for Municipal Election

Housing (43%, up eight points) remains the most important issue for likely voters in the city, followed by crime (14%, up five points).

Vancouver, BC [October 14, 2022] – The outcome of the mayoral election in Vancouver is uncertain, with the two main contenders tied and about one-in-seven likely voters still undecided about who they will support tomorrow, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative sample of likely voters in Vancouver finds both incumbent Kennedy Stewart of Forward Together and challenger Ken Sim of A Better City (ABC) garnering the support of 33% of decided voters. The numbers represent a two-point drop for Stewart and a three-point gain for Sim since a Research Co. survey conducted in early September.

Colleen Hardwick of TEAM for a Livable Vancouver remains in third place with 16% (-1), followed by Mark Marissen of Progress Vancouver with 8% (-5) and Fred Harding of the Non-Partisan Association (NPA) also with 8% (+4). Two per cent of decided voters say they will cast a ballot for one of the other ten mayoral candidates.

Among male decided voters, Stewart has a three-point edge over Sim (37% to 34%). The race is closer among female voters, with Sim one point ahead of Stewart (31% to 30%), and Hardwick at 21%.

Stewart is the top choice for voters on both the East side of Vancouver (37%) and Downtown (35%), while Sim holds the upper hand on the West side (35%).

Among likely voters who own their primary residence, Sim has a five-point lead over Stewart (38% to 33%), while Stewart is ahead of Sim among likely voters who rent their primary residence (33% to 25%).

“On the eve of the election, 14% of likely voters in Vancouver are still undecided about which mayoral candidate to back,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion of undecided voters is higher among women (17%), likely voters aged 35-to-54 (17%), residents of the West Side (16%) and renters (18%).”

More than two-in-five likely voters in Vancouver (43%, +8) identify housing is the most important issue facing the city—a proportion that rises to 47% among women and to 49% among likely voters aged 55 and over.

Crime is second on the list of pressing concerns for likely voters in Vancouver at 14% (+5), followed by property taxes (10%, +1), poverty (8%, -1) and drug overdoses (8%, -6).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted on October 13 and October 14, 2022, among a representative sample of 400 municipal likely voters in the City of Vancouver, including 344 decided voters in the 2022 mayoral election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points for the entire sample and +/- 5.3 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Endorse Pardons for Simple Possession of Marijuana

Two thirds of Canadians agree with cannabis being legal in Canada, as reliance on licensed retailers increases.

Vancouver, BC [October 12, 2022] – More than three-in-five Canadians are in favour of a plan to pardon people convicted of simple possession of marijuana, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 64% of Canadians agree with the federal government providing expungement orders to people convicted of possession of cannabis for personal use with no intent to traffic.

In Canada, an expungement order compels police forces, federal departments or agencies to destroy or remove any judicial record of a conviction.

“The issue of pardons for simple possession of marijuana is not particularly divisive politically,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Sizeable majorities of Canadians who voted for the New Democrats (78%), the Liberals (70%) and the Conservatives (63%) in 2021 believe it is the right course of action.”

Two thirds of Canadians (66%, +2 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in April 2021) agree with cannabis being legal in Canada.

There are some significant differences among Canadians of different ethnic backgrounds when it comes to marijuana. Majorities of Canadians of Indigenous (80%), European (68%) and South Asian (57%) heritage agree with cannabis being legal in the country, compared to just 41% of those of East Asian descent.

While half of Canadians (50%) have never tried marijuana, about two-in-five (39%) used cannabis before it became legal in October 2018.

Just over one-in-ten Canadians (11%) consumed it only after legalization—a proportion that rises to 16% among those aged 18-to-34.

Almost half of Canadians who have used marijuana after legalization (48%) say they acquired “all” of their product at a licensed retailer, up 10 points since 2021.

There is also a reduction in the proportion of marijuana consumers who have not bought any cannabis from a licensed retailer, from 20% in April 2021 to 15% this month.

Few Canadians think it is time to make other substances legal in Canada, including ecstasy (10%, -4), powder cocaine (10%, -6), heroin (10%, -5), fentanyl (8%,-6), crack cocaine (8%, -5) and methamphetamine or “crystal meth” (8% -5).

Three-in-five Canadians (60%, -1) believe companies should be able to administer “drug tests” to any employee now that marijuana is legal in Canada, even if they do not operate machinery (such as pilots, truck drivers or crane operators).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from October 1 to October 3, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Some British Columbians Keep Options Open to Work from Home

Only 11% of British Columbians who worked from home during the COVID-19 pandemic have returned to the office full time.

Vancouver, BC [October 7, 2002] – Employed British Columbians are still figuring out the new qualms of office life, and more than a third are not particularly thrilled with their current arrangements to work from home, a new Research Co. poll has found

In the online survey of a representative sample, more than three-in-five home workers in British Columbia (63%) say they are happy with their current arrangements to perform their duties away from the office. Similar proportions claim to be working from home more often (19%) or less often (18%) than they would like to.

Just over one-in-ten British Columbians who worked from home during the COVID-19 pandemic (11%) have returned to the office full time. About a third (32%) are working from home once or twice a week, while 25% are there three to four times a week and 31%  work from home five days a week.

“There is a significant generational divide when it comes to the home office in British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 19% of home workers aged 18-to-34 are not commuting at all, the proportion rises to 35% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 47% among those aged 55 and over.”

More than half of British Columbians who worked from home during the pandemic (53%) say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to seek a different job if their current company does not allow them to work from home as often as they want. Just under one-in-ten (8%) have already left a position because of this reason.

Two thirds of home workers in British Columbia (66%, +2 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2022) say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to explore the possibility of switching to a different job that can be performed from home in their own metropolitan area.

Smaller proportions of home workers in British Columbia would consider switching to a different job that can be performed from home for a company headquartered in the province (59%, +2) or in a different Canadian province (45%, =).

Compared to January 2022, we see fewer employed British Columbians reporting an increase in virtual staff meetings (28%, -17) and virtual business development (21%, -24) at their workplace.

Conversely, employed British Columbians say that they have seen more in person staff meetings (27%, +13) and more in-person business development (21%, +6) than three months ago.

The change is not as pronounced on business travel, with 15% of employed British Columbians (+5) noticing more trips and 31% (-8) saying they are less common than three months ago. In addition, there is a slight reduction in the amount of virtual communications between offices (27%, -19).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 28 to September 30, 2022, among 700 adults who work in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Support Wide Use of Territory Acknowledgements

Almost three-in-five of the country’s residents think the practice is a positive step towards reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.

Vancouver, BC [October 4, 2022] – While fewer than half of Canadians have been at an event that featured a territory acknowledgement, most believe that the practice should become more common across the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 39% of Canadians say they have attended a ceremony, lecture or public event that featured a territory acknowledgement.

Residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (49%), Alberta (46%) and British Columbia (44%) are more likely to have listened to a territory acknowledgement than their counterparts in Atlantic Canada (36%), Quebec (also 36%) and Ontario (35%).

Territory acknowledgements are usually worded this way: “I want to acknowledge that we are on the traditional territory of [nation names].”

More than half of Canadians (54%) think territory acknowledgements should be adopted widely before ceremonies, lectures and public events held in Canada, while 26% disagree and 19% are undecided.

“Support for the wide adoption of territory acknowledgements is highest among Canadians aged 18-to-34 (62%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer Canadians aged 35-to-54 (57%) and aged 55 and over (45%) share the same point of view.”

More than three-in-five Canadians who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (62%) and the Liberal Party (64%) in the 2021 federal election are in favour of the wide adoption of territory acknowledgements in Canada. Fewer than half of Conservative Party voters (44%) welcome this idea.

Just over half of Canadians (53%) consider territory acknowledgements as a sincere and important practice, and practically three-in-five (59%) think they are a positive step towards reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.

For 57% of Canadians, territory acknowledgements amount to a lip-service gesture, while just under two thirds (63%) believe they do little to address the problems facing Indigenous peoples.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 25 to September 27, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

CAQ Headed for Second Majority Mandate in Quebec

Vancouver, BC [October 2, 2022] – The governing Coalition Avenir Québec (CAQ) heads to tomorrow’s provincial election as the overwhelming favourite, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of likely voters in Quebec, 41% of decided voters will cast a ballot for the CAQ candidate in their constituency, up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in mid-September.

The Liberal Party of Quebec and the Conservative Party of Quebec are tied for second place with 16% each (-1 and -2 respectively), followed by Québec solidaire with 14% (=) and the Parti Québécois (PQ) with 12% (+2).

More than three-in-five decided voters aged 55 and over (64%) say they will support the CAQ, along with 39% of those aged 35-to-54. Québec solidaire is the top choice for decided voters aged 18-to-34 (30%).

A majority of likely voters in Quebec (55%, -2) approve of François Legault’s performance as Premier and CAQ leader—a proportion that rises to 68% among those aged 55 and over.

Since mid-September, the approval rating improved for Québec solidaire co-spokesperson Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois (42%, +5), PQ leader Paul St-Pierre Plamondon (40%, +4) and Official Opposition and Liberal leader Dominique Anglade (39%, +6). The numbers are lower for Conservative leader Éric Duhaime (29%, -2).

On the “Best Premier” question, Legault maintains a sizeable lead (40%, -3), followed by Nadeau-Dubois (12%, +2), Duhaime (also 12%, -1), Anglade (10%, -1), and  Plamondon (8%, +2).

“More than seven-in-ten CAQ voters from the 2018 election (73%) think Legault would make the best premier out of the five main party leaders in Quebec ,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In stark contrast, only 30% of Liberal voters from the previous provincial ballot feel the same way about Anglade.”

The most important issue for likely voters in Quebec is health care (40%, -5), followed by the economy and jobs (17%, +1) and housing, homelessness and poverty (12%, unchanged).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from September 30 to October 2, 2022, among 708 likely voters in Quebec, including 637 decided voters in the 2022 provincial election. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points for the sample of likely voters and +/- 3.9 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Positive Views on State of Health Care Drop in British Columbia

Half of the province’s residents say a shortage of doctors and nurses is the biggest problem facing the system right now.

Vancouver, BC [September 30, 2020] – Just over three-in-ten British Columbians believe the province’s health care system requires a major overhaul, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 31% of British Columbians believe health care in the province has so much wrong with it that we need to completely rebuild it, up 20 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November 2020.

Only 13% of British Columbians (-9) think health care in the province works well, and only minor changes are needed to make it work better, while half (50%, -14) say there are some good things in health care in British Columbia, but some changes are required.

“Negative perceptions about the current state of the health care system in British Columbia increase with age,“ says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 22% of residents aged 18-to-34 call for a complete rebuild, the proportion rises to 30% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 40% among those aged 55 and over.”

Half of British Columbians (50%, +26) consider a shortage of doctors and nurses as the biggest problem facing the health care system right now. Long waiting times is a distant second on the list of concerns with 18% (-9), followed by bureaucracy and poor management (10%, =) and inadequate resources and facilities (7%, -6).

Two-in-five British Columbians (40%, =) say they would be willing to pay out of their own pocket to have quicker access to medical services that currently have long waiting times—a proportion that rises to 49% among those aged 18-to-34.

In addition, a third of British Columbians (33%, +6) would consider travelling to another country to have quicker access to medical services that currently have long waiting times.

In September 2020, a B.C. Supreme Court justice ruled that access to private health care is not a constitutional right, even if wait times for care under the public system are too long.

More than a third of British Columbians (37%, -9) agree with the decision taken by the B.C. Supreme Court justice, while 49% (+18) disagree and 14% (-9) are undecided.

British Columbians who voted for the BC Liberals and the BC Green Party in the 2020 provincial election are more likely to disagree with the justice’s decision (52% and 51% respectively) than those who supported the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (43%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 23 to September 25, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Appetite for Political Correctness Rises in Canada, Sinks in U.S.

One-in-five Americans (20%) claim to never act “politically correct”, compared to just 11% of Canadians.

Vancouver, BC [September 28, 2022] – Residents of Canada and the United States hold differing views on the concept of “political correctness”, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 55% of Canadians and 45% of Americans support the use of “political correctness” in their respective countries.

The term “political correctness” has been used to describe language and/or behaviour that seeks to minimize possible offenses to racial, cultural and gender identity groups, among others.

Since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2020, support for “political correctness” has increased by five points in Canada and fallen by eight points in the United States.

“Canadians who voted for the Conservatives in 2021 (41%) and Americans who identify as Independent (35%) or Republican (29%) are less likely to endorse political correctness,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are higher among (66%) in the United States (66%) and among Canadians who voted for the Liberals (64%) or the New Democrats (67%) in 2021.”

There is little change when Canadians are asked about their own behaviour, with just over a third (34%, +2) claiming to always act “politically correct” because it’s the right thing to do. Two-in-five (40%, =) sometimes act “politically correct” because it’s the safe thing to do, while only 11% (=) do not act “politically correct” because it’s the wrong thing to do.

In the United States, the proportion of Americans who claim to never act “politically correct” increased to 20% (+5), while those who sometimes act “politically correct” rose to 41% (+4). About one-in-four Americans (24%, -12) say they always act “politically correct” because it’s the right thing to do.

As was the case in 2020, more than half of Canadians and Americans think three groups in society should act in a “politically correct” manner “always” or “most of the time”: teachers (75% in Canada and 64% in the U.S.), politicians (72% in Canada and 60% in the U.S.) and journalists (67% in Canada and 55% in the U.S.).

Significantly fewer Canadians (41%) and Americans (28%) believe comedians should act in a “politically correct” way “always” or “most of the time”.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%, +5) and just under three-in-five Americans (59%, -3) are in favour of adding a disclaimer to explain that programs or movies are presented “as originally created” and “may contain outdated cultural depictions.”

Opposition grew in the United States toward the notion of printing new editions of books that remove words that may be deemed offensive to a specific race or ethnicity (65%, +6). More than half of Canadians (55%, -6) feel the same way (55%, -6).

A similar scenario ensues when residents of the two countries are asked about re-dubbing movies to remove words that may be deemed offensive to a specific race or ethnicity. Just under two thirds of Americans are opposed (64%, +7), along with a majority of Canadians (56%, -6).

Methodology: Results are based on online surveys conducted from September 16 to September 18, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Vast Majority of Surrey Voters Endorse New Fire Hall

More than nine-in-ten eligible voters in Surrey want to increase number of fire trucks that operate in the municipality. 

Vancouver, BC [September 27, 2022] – Sizeable majorities of eligible voters in the City of Surrey call for decisive action to properly prepare for emergencies, a new Research Co. poll conducted on behalf of the Surrey Fire Fighters’ Association has found.

In the telephone survey of a representative sample of eligible voters in Surrey, almost nine-in-ten respondents (89%) support establishing another fire hall in the city, specifically tailored with the appropriate equipment and firefighters for managing emergencies and fires in high rise buildings.

“The Surrey Fire Service needs immediate attention with a growth plan for additional resources,” says Saverio Lattanzio, President of the Surrey Fire Fighters’ Association. “Fire fighters on the front line are stretched thin, suffering from burnout and in dire need of staffing. Properly resourced fire protection must be maintained to ensure public and fire fighter safety.”

More than four-in-five eligible voters in Surrey (87%) support increasing Surrey Fire Fighters’ staffing levels to reach the average ratio currently seen in cities such as Vancouver, Burnaby, Toronto, Calgary and Ottawa.

“As the municipal campaign continues, eligible voters in Surrey have a clear idea of what they would like to see in order to protect lives and property,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Voters across the entire city believe it is time to hire more fire fighters and make additional investments in equipment.”

Almost seven-in-ten eligible voters in Surrey (69%) would prefer for the ratio of firefighters to citizens to increase as the city grows.

Just under four-in-five eligible voters in Surrey (79%) think it is “very important” that the next Mayor supports Surrey Fire Fighters by making the workplace safer and ensuring proper response to emergencies in Surrey.

Methodology:

Results are based on a telephone survey conducted from September 12 to September 16, 2022, among 402 eligible voters in the City of Surrey. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for region in the City of Surrey. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Saverio Lattanzio, President, Surrey Fire Fighters’ Association

778.322.6363 [e] sav@iaff1271.org

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca