Positive Views on TMX Pipeline Rise in BC, Drop Slightly in Alberta

A third of British Columbians (33%) believe the project should be stopped, down eight points since October 2021.

Vancouver, BC [August 5, 2022] – Favourable perceptions on the expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline have increased in British Columbia and remain high in Alberta, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative provincial samples, 51% of British Columbians agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the project, up six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in October 2021.

Practically seven-in-ten Albertans (69%) also agree with the re-approval of the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion, down five points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November 2020.

In British Columbia, residents of Southern BC (66%), Northern BC (61%) and the Fraser Valley (58%) are more likely to hold positive views on the pipeline project. The rating is lower in Metro Vancouver (50%) and Vancouver Island (41%).

In Alberta, sizeable majorities of residents of Edmonton (72%) and Calgary (66%) are in favour of the pipeline expansion, along with 70% of those who live other areas of the province.

“The proportion of British Columbians who want the provincial government to do anything necessary to ensure that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion does not happen dropped from 41% in October 2021 to 33% in July 2022,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In Alberta, 25% of residents (+3) share the same point of view.”

More than half of British Columbians (51%, -4) and three-in-five Albertans (61%, +2) say they are disappointed with the way the federal government has managed the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion.

Significant majorities of Albertans (78%, -1) and British Columbians (71%, +6) believe the Trans Mountain Pipeline will create hundreds of jobs for residents of each province.

Two-in-five British Columbians (40%, -7) think the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of the province’s residents. Just under three-in-ten Albertans (28%, +11) share this point of view.

Fewer than half of residents of the two provinces expect gas prices to be lower now that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion has been re-approved: 40% in Alberta (+6) and 37% in British Columbia (+1).

In November 2016, the federal government rejected a proposal—known as the Enbridge Northern Gateway—to build a new pipeline from Alberta to British Columbia’s north coast, to export oil on tankers to Asian markets.

Just under half of British Columbians (46%, +5) believe it is time to reconsider the Enbridge Northern Gateway proposal, while just over a quarter (27%, -7) disagree.

Support for taking a second look at the Enbridge Northern Gateway is highest in Northern BC (60%), followed by Southern BC (51%), Metro Vancouver (45%), the Fraser Valley (43%) and Vancouver Island (38%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from July 29 to July 31, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia and 800 adults in Alberta. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in each province. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.5 percentage points for each province, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables for British Columbia here, our data tables for Alberta here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 Photo Credit: Codex

Two-in-Five Canadians Expect National Economy to Decline

Positive perceptions of Justin Trudeau as an economic manager have fallen to 41% across the country. 

Vancouver, BC [August 28, 2022] – A majority of Canadians perceive the nation’s finances in a negative light, and there is a significant increase in the proportion of the country’s residents who foresee a worsening situation, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 57% of Canadians consider the economic conditions in Canada right now as “bad” or “very bad”, up three points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2022.

Only two-in-five Canadians (40%, -1) describe the country’s economic conditions as “very good” or “good” today.

Positive views on the national economy reach 55% in Quebec (+7). The rating is significantly lower across all other regions of Canada, including British Columbia (37%, -3), Atlantic Canada (36%, -7) Ontario (34%, -9), Alberta (32%, -1) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (30%, +4).

Just 13% of Canadians (-7) believe the Canadian economy will improve over the next six months, while 40% (+10) predict a decline and 40% (-1) foresee conditions staying as they are.

While 57% of Canadians (-1) define their own personal finances today as “very good” or “good”, just over two-in-five (41%, +3) describe them as “bad” or “very bad.”

Only 41% of Canadians (-6) express confidence in Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to do the right thing to help the economy, while a majority (52%, +4) distrust him.

“Two thirds of Albertans (68%) have misgivings about Trudeau as an economic manager,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The negative rating is lower in British Columbia (55%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (53%), Atlantic Canada (51%), Ontario (48%) and Quebec (46%).”

More than a third of Canadians (37%, =) trust Governor of the Bank of Canada Tiff Macklem to make the right decisions to help the nation’s finances. The rating is lower (26%) for federal Leader of the Opposition Candice Bergen.

There are some significant changes in the perceptions of Canadians on inflation. More than four-in-five (81%, -2) continue to expect higher prices for a week’s worth of groceries over the next six months, and majorities also foresee paying more for a new car (68%, -3) and a new television set (57%, -5).

The needle moved on two items, with 61% of Canadians (-21) expecting to pay more for gasoline in the next six months and only 44% (-28) thinking real estate will be more expensive.

Half of Canadians have worried “frequently” or “occasionally” about the safety of their savings (50%, +6) and the value of their investments (50%, +9) over the past couple of months.

Fewer Canadians are preoccupied about unemployment affecting their household (34%, +3), being able to pay their mortgage or rent (34%, +3) or their employer running into serious financial trouble (24%, -2).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from July 11 to July 13, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Few British Columbians Ponder Calorie Counts When Dining Out

More than three-in-four believe it should be mandatory to display calories on any menu that lists or depicts standard food items.

Vancouver, BC [July 26, 2022] – Residents of British Columbia pay more attention to the nutritional value of foods when they are at the supermarket than when dining out or ordering in, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, more than a third of British Columbians (37%) say they “frequently” check labels to review nutritional content when buying groceries for themselves or others in their household.

Significantly fewer British Columbians “frequently” pay attention to menus to review nutritional content when dining out (13%) or when ordering food delivery (11%).

While almost three-in-ten British Columbians (29%) “frequently” check labels at the grocery store to review the total calories of a product, the proportion drops drastically when residents dine out (14%) or order in (11%).

A similar scenario ensues when respondents are asked about checking for two other items in the food they consume. About three-in-ten British Columbians check labels at the grocery store for sodium (32%) and fat (29%). Fewer follow the same course of action when they go to a restaurant (Sodium 14%, Fat 13%) or when they browse menus or apps for food delivery (Sodium 10%, Fat 11%).

In the Province of Ontario, it is mandatory to display calories on any menu that lists or depicts standard food items offered for sale by a regulated food service premises. More than three-in-four British Columbians (76%, -5 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2018) are in favour of adopting this regulation.

In 2012, the Province of British Columbia implemented the Informed Dining initiative, a program designed to allow residents to have nutrition information available when eating at participating food service establishments. The voluntary program was abandoned in 2020.

“British Columbians appear to be affected by the lack of standards when it comes to nutritional information in restaurants,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Customers do not have the same information to make a decision that they currently have at the grocery store.”

The proportion of British Columbians who use an activity tracker to monitor certain fitness-related metrics—such as distance walked, amount of exercise and/or calorie consumption—increased from 41% in November 2018 to 45% this month.

Practically half of Metro Vancouverites (49%) rely on an activity tracker. The proportions are lower in Southern BC (46%), Northern BC (42%), Vancouver Island (36%) and the Fraser Valley (35%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from July 4 to July 6, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Generation X Moves Toward Music Streaming Services in Canada

Compared to last year, fewer Canadians aged 35-to-54 are listening to music on the radio.

Vancouver, BC [July 22, 2022] – The proportion of Canadians who relied on a radio to listen to music on a weekly basis has dropped since last year, as more members of Generation X embrace streaming platforms, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 60% of Canadians heard music on a regular radio over the past week, down six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2021.

Just over two-in-five Canadians (41%, +1) say they listened to music on a streaming service over the past seven days, while fewer than one-in-four (23%, -7) accessed music files stored in a computer or a phone.

Over the past week, fewer Canadians heard music on an LP record, cassette or CD (13%, -2) or on satellite radio (12%, =).

“The data shows a marked generational divide when it comes to how Canadians are listening to music,” says Mario Canseco. President of Research Co. “While Canadians aged 18-to-34 were quicker to adopt streaming platforms, their counterparts aged 35-to-54 are now clearly moving in the same direction.”

Practically three-in-five Canadians aged 18-to-34 (59%) are listening to music on a streaming service, while less than half (45%, down 17 points since February 2019) are using a radio.

Almost half of Canadians aged 35-to-54 (48%, +3 since 2021) are listening to music on a streaming platform, while 62% (-8) rely on the radio.

Two thirds of Canadians aged 55 and over (67%, -3) hear music on the radio, while 27% (-1) listen on a streaming platform.

Almost one-in-four Canadians (24%, +4) paid to access a music streaming service in the last month, including 40% of those aged 18-to-34 and 26% of those aged 35-to-54.

In the last month, significantly fewer Canadians paid for and downloaded a song online (11%, =) or purchased a compact disc or LP record (7%, -3).

Canadians remain divided when asked to ponder if, in this day and age, music creators are being fairly compensated for their work. While 40% think they are (=), 40% (-1) claim that they are not.

While only 30% (-2) of Canadians aged 55 and over believe music creators are being fairly compensated right now, the proportion rises to 45% (+3) among those aged 35-to-54 and to 55% (+1) among those aged 18-to-34.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from July 11 to July 13, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Enthusiastic and Selective About Activism

Three-in-ten British Columbians would protest a low-income housing project located within three blocks of their home.

Vancouver, BC [July 19, 2022] – A significant proportion of British Columbians are engaged in campaigns to bring about political or social change, but their willingness to protest plans to establish specific facilities in their neighbourhood is not substantial, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 30% of British Columbians say they have used social media to protest or support an issue, while 25% have donated money to an organization that supports or opposes an issue.

About one-in-seven British Columbians have attended a public consultation meeting or process (15%) or a protest (14%), while fewer acknowledge joining a political party or campaign (7%), participating in a political campaign (6%) or taking legal action against a development or project (5%)

“Two thirds of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (67%) have been involved in some form of activism,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (48%) and aged 55 and over (41%).”

The survey also asked British Columbians about which actions they would take under hypothetical circumstances related to their municipality and their neighbourhood.

More than half of the province’s residents would take no action if there were plans to install a military base (57%), a casino (62%), a recycling plant (64%) or wind turbines (67%) within the boundaries of their municipality.

British Columbians are more likely to consider passive protest—such as sending letters to politicians or complaining on social media—to register concerns about a natural gas pipeline (19%), an incinerator for waste treatment (21%), a prison (22%), an oil pipeline, a landfill site, an oil refinery or a nuclear power plant (23% each) or a coal terminal (26%).

Active protest, which includes donating to opponents and attending town halls, would be the recourse of 24% of British Columbians to deal with a coal terminal and of 29% to deal with a nuclear power plant.

When asked about the possibility of specific facilities seeking a permit to operate three blocks away from their home, majorities of British Columbians would take no action on a cell phone tower (54%), a low-income housing project (58%), a marijuana store (60%), a recycling depot (63%), a retail or mall development (65%), an entertainment complex (69%), a pub or bar (also 69%) or a hospital (75%).

At least one-in-five British Columbians would passively protest if a composting site (20%), a homeless shelter (22%) or a sewage plant (27%) attempted to operate within three blocks of their home. Similar proportions of residents would actively protest against a composting site and a homeless shelter (20% each) and a sewage plant (25%).

Three-in-ten British Columbians (30%) are willing to passively (16%) or actively (14%) protest a low-income housing project seeking a permit to set-up within three blocks of their home, while 58% would take no action.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from July 4 to July 6, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

One-in-Four Canadian WhatsApp Users Face Scams, Fake News

The vast majority of messages received on the app (84%) are personal, while fewer than one-in-five (16%) are work-related.

Vancouver, BC [July 15, 2022] – Just over two-in-five Canadians who rely on WhatsApp have never encountered one of four different setbacks while using the instant messaging application, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 45% of Canadians say they use WhatsApp, including 68% of those aged 18-to-34 and 55% of Ontarians.

More than three-in-four Canadian WhatsApp users (76%) say they rely on the application to send text messages “every day” or “a few days a week.”

More than half of WhatsApp users in Canada (55%) share pictures through the app “every day” or “a few days a week”, a proportion that rises to 74% among those aged 18 to 34.

Fewer Canadian WhatsApp users make audio phone calls (46%), share news articles (44%) or make video phone calls (42%) “every day” or “a few days a week” through the application.

Over the course of an average week, 84% of all WhatsApp messages received by Canadians are personal in nature (from friends and family), while the remaining 16% are work-related (dealing with co-workers, tasks or clients).

Only 41% of Canadian WhatsApp users say they have not encountered any one of four problems when using the app.

Almost two-in-five Canadian WhatsApp users (38%) acknowledge that they had to block a person on the app, including 52% of Atlantic Canadians.

More than a quarter of Canadian WhatsApp users (27%) say they were added to a group without their consent, a proportion that rises to 41% in Quebec.

One-in-four Canadian WhatsApp users received “fake news” or misinformation on the app (24%) or were targeted by a scam (23%).

“About a third of Canadian WhatsApp users aged 18-to-34 (32%) are successful at pinpointing misinformation,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are decidedly lower among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (24%) and aged 55 and over (16%).”

WhatsApp users in British Columbia are more likely to have been targeted by a scam while using the application (26%) than those in Alberta and Quebec (24% each), Ontario (23%), Atlantic Canada (22%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (17%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 25 to June 27, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Ambiguous About Province-Wide Police Force

Seven-in-ten residents (70%) support increasing the use of closed circuit television (CCTV) in their community.

Vancouver, BC [July 12, 2022] – Residents of British Columbia are split when assessing if a province-wide police force that would replace the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) should be created, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 39% of British Columbians agree with this idea, while 38% disagree and 23% are undecided.

Earlier this year, the all-party Special Committee on Reforming the Police Act in the Legislative Assembly issued a report which recommended the establishment of a BC-wide police force that would replace the RCMP.

At least two-in-five residents of Northern BC (45%), the Fraser Valley (43%), Vancouver Island (also 43%) and Metro Vancouver (40%) are in favour of instituting a BC-wide police force. Support is decidedly lower in Southern BC (26%).

The concept of “defunding the police” calls for divesting funds from police departments and reallocating them to non-policing forms of public safety and community support. Almost half of British Columbians (49%) agree with this idea, while 38% disagree and 14% are not sure.

Support for “defunding the police” is highest among BC Green Party voters in the last provincial election (66%). The level of agreement is lower among British Columbians who cast ballots for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (53%) or the BC Liberals (50%) in 2020.

Seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%) agree with increasing the use of closed circuit television (CCTV) cameras in their community as a means of surveillance to help deter and solve crimes.

Compared to a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2021, there are no changes in the perceptions of British Columbians on two issues: almost half (48%) continue to fear becoming victims of crime in their community “a great deal” or “a fair amount” and 63% would feel “very safe” or “moderately safe” walking alone in their own neighbourhood after dark.

This month, fear of crime is highest in Northern BC (52%, +3), followed by Metro Vancouver (51%, -3), Southern BC (48%, +16),  the Fraser Valley (45%, +4) and Vancouver Island (40%, -1).

Fewer than one-in-five British Columbians (18%, -2) say they have been victims of a crime involving the police (such as an assault or a car break-in) in their community over the past four years.

Just over half of British Columbians (51%, +7) believe that the level of criminal activity in their community has increased in the past four years—a proportion that jumps to 62% in Southern BC.

British Columbians continue to support the authorization of two bans in their municipality: one on military-style assault weapons (82%, -2) and another one on handguns (75%, -4).

More than half of British Columbians (51%, +3) think addiction and mental health issues are to blame “a great deal” for the current situation regarding crime in their community.

Fewer residents of the province blame other factors, such as gangs and the illegal drug trade (37%, -1), poverty and inequality (32%, +1), an inadequate court system (32%, +2), lack of values and improper education for youth (27%, =), a bad economy and unemployment (24%, +4), insufficient policing and a lack of resources to combat crime (also 22%, +2) and immigrants and minorities (8%, -1).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from July 4 to July 6, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Ten Canadians Say Justin Trudeau is Worst Recent PM

Pierre Trudeau (19%) and Stephen Harper (17%) are ahead when Canadians are asked who the best recent head of government is.

Vancouver, BC [July 8, 2022] – The perceptions of Canadians on the tenure of Justin Trudeau have worsened over the past year, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 29% of Canadians think Justin Trudeau has been Canada’s worst prime minister since 1968, up seven points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in July 2021.

“Animosity towards Justin Trudeau is decidedly strong in one Canadian province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Almost half of Albertans (49%) consider him the worst recent prime minister.”

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians (17%) think Stephen Harper has been the worst prime minister since 1968. The numbers are lower for Pierre Trudeau (6%, =), Kim Campbell (also 6%, +1), Brian Mulroney (5%, -2), Jean Chrétien (also 5%, +2), Joe Clark (3%, -1), Paul Martin (2%, =) and John Turner (also 2%, =).

When asked who Canada’s best recent head of government has been, 19% of Canadians (-1) select Pierre Trudeau, while 17% (+1) pick Harper. Justin Trudeau is third with 12% (-1), followed by Chrétien (9%, +2) and Mulroney (8%, -1).

Pierre Trudeau leads Harper as the best recent prime minister among Canadians aged 55 and over (27% to 21%). There is a virtual tie among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (Harper 18%, Pierre Trudeau 17%), while Justin Trudeau leads among Canadians aged 18-to-34 (19%).

British Columbians are split when assessing the best recent head of government (Pierre Trudeau 19%, Harper 17%). Pierre Trudeau tops the list in Quebec (23%), Ontario (22%) and Atlantic Canada (also 22%), while Harper is ahead in Alberta (35%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (28%).

The survey also asked questions about 10 different politicians who served as leaders of the Official Opposition in Ottawa over the past five decades.

Just under one-in-four Canadians think the last two leaders of the Conservative Party—Andrew Scheer and Erin O’Toole—would have made good prime ministers (23% each).

The rating on this question is lower for former Conservative Party leader Rona Ambrose (22%, -2), former Canadian Alliance leader Stockwell Day (20%, =) and two former Liberal Party leaders: Stéphane Dion (18%, -2) and Michael Ignatieff (also 18%, -1).

Three-in-ten Canadians (30%, -1) think former Progressive Conservative leader Robert Stanfield would have made a good head of government. The results are similar for former New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Tom Mulcair (29%, -1) and former Reform Party leader Preston Manning (28%, =).

A majority of Canadians (52%, +2) believe former NDP leader Jack Layton would have made a good prime minister—a proportion that rises to 58% in Quebec and 62% among Canadians aged 55 and over.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 25 to June 27, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Bobak Ha’Eri

2030 Winter Olympic Bid Trending Upward in British Columbia

Most of the province’s residents agree with Vancouver being a host city during the FIFA (Soccer) 2026 Men’s World Cup.

Vancouver, BC [July 5, 2022] – Public support for a new opportunity to host the Winter Olympics has improved in British Columbia, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 54% of British Columbians think Vancouver should launch a bid to host the Winter Olympics in 2030, up 11 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in October 2021.

Support for the 2030 Winter Games bid is highest among British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (61%). The proportions are lower among those aged 35-to-54 (56%) and those aged 55 and over (48%).

On a regional basis, public backing for the 2030 bid is highest in the Fraser Valley (58%), followed by Northern BC (57%), Metro Vancouver (56%), Southern BC (52%) and Vancouver Island (46%).

Vancouver hosted the XXI Olympic Winter Games, from February 12 to February 28, 2010. A Winter Olympics bid in 2030 is being explored by Four Host First Nations—Musqueam, Squamish, Tsleil-Waututh, and Lilwat—and the municipal governments of Vancouver and Whistler.

Almost one-in-four British Columbians (23%) say they are more likely to support the 2030 bid because of the Indigenous partnership, while 44% say it has no effect on their views and 18% are less likely to back the project.

“Practically a third of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (32%) are more inclined to support the 2030 Winter Olympic bid because of the Indigenous partnership,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, just over one-in-four British Columbians aged 55 and over (26%) are less likely to back the bid because of this reason.”

A significant majority of British Columbians (58%, +5) believe it is impossible for Vancouver to host the 2030 Winter Olympics without any public or government funds.

Just under half of British Columbians (48%, +10) think Vancouver should launch a bid to host the Summer Olympics in 2036, a proportion that rises to 58% among residents aged 18-to-34.

The views of British Columbians on the International Olympic Committee (IOC) did not go through significant changes since 2021. Almost half (47%, -1) have positive views of the IOC, while more than a third (33%, -3) hold negative opinions.

Vancouver was selected as one of the 16 host cities for the FIFA (Soccer) 2026 Men’s World Cup. More than half of British Columbians (55%) agree with this decision, including 58% of those aged 35-to-54.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 24 to June 26, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Separation from Canada Enthralls Some Albertans and Quebecers

Half of Canadians (51%) believe their province would be better off with a different Prime Minister in Ottawa.

Vancouver, BC [July 1, 2022] – A third of residents of Alberta and Quebec hold positive feelings towards the notion of sovereignty, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 33% of Albertans (-5 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in December 2021) and 32% of Quebecers (+2) say their respective provinces would be better off as independent countries.

Support for outright sovereignty is lower among residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (28%, +10), Ontario (25%, +2), Atlantic Canada (21%, +7) and British Columbia (19%, +3).

“Expressed support for separation has diminished in Alberta over the past six months, but remains the highest in Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In Quebec, with a provincial election looming, support for sovereignty has risen slightly.”

Across the country, 17% of Canadians (-1) think their province would be better off joining the United States and becoming an American state.

In Alberta, the proportion of residents who express a preference for joining the United States has dropped markedly, from 25% in December 2021 to 14% in June 2022.

A majority of Canadians (51%, +2) think their province would be better off with a different Prime Minister in charge.

Residents of Alberta are more likely to believe that their province would benefit from having a different head of government in Ottawa (64%, -1). The proportions are lower in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (60%, +4), British Columbia (53%, =), Atlantic Canada (52%, +14), Ontario (48%, -1) and Quebec (45%, +3).

Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to believe that their province would be better off under a different Prime Minister (52%) than their counterparts aged 18-to-34 (50%) and aged 35-to-54 (49%).

More than half of Canadians (51%, =) say their province would be better off with a different premier in charge.

Almost two thirds of Albertans (65%, -8) would prefer to have a different person in charge of the provincial government right now. The rating is significantly lower in Quebec (48%, =), Ontario (43%, -14) and British Columbia (41%, +6).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 18 to June 20, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Flag First, Health Care Down as Canadians Assess Sources of Pride

Fewer than half of Canadians say Parliament (45%) and the Monarchy (37%) make them proud.

Vancouver, BC [June 28, 2022] – While Canadians continue to rank the flag as their main source of pride, perceptions on the country’s health care system have dropped dramatically since 2021, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample asks Canadians to say if 12 institutions and features elicit feelings of pride among them.

Just under four-in-five Canadians (78%, +1 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in 2021) say they are proud of the flag.

More than two thirds of Canadians express pride in multiculturalism (69%, -1) and hockey (also 68%, +2).

Majorities of Canadians are proud of five other institutions and features: the Canadian Armed Forces (65%, -2), bilingualism (59%, =), the health care system (58%, -8) , Indigenous culture (also 58%, -4) and the state of democracy in Canada (57%, -5).

Just under half of Canadians express pride in the Canadian economy (49%, =) and the Canadian justice system (also 49%, -3). The ranking is lower for Parliament (45%, -5) and the Monarchy (37%, +3).

Three years ago, 77% of Canadians were proud of the health care system,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In 2022, the proportion has dropped by 19 points to 58%.”

Men are significantly more likely to say that the health care system is a source of pride (66%) than women (51%). On a regional basis, the health care system scores best in Ontario (71%), followed by Alberta (69%), British Columbia (59%), Atlantic Canada (51%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (50%) and Quebec (45%).

While 57% of Canadians are proud of the state of democracy in Canada, there are significant differences across the political spectrum. Fewer than half of Conservative Party voters in the 2021 federal election (48%) say the state of democracy in Canada is source of pride. The rating is higher among Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (55%) or the Liberal Party (79%) last year.

More than half of Ontarians (54%) are proud of Parliament. The rating on this question is lower in Quebec (46%), Atlantic Canada (42%), British Columbia (41%), Alberta (35%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (31%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 18 to June 20, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Would Appoint Anti-Corruption Commissioner

Most respondents believe the Cullen Commission enabled the public to learn more about how to curb money laundering.

Vancouver, BC [June 24, 2022] – Public satisfaction with the provincial government’s decision to establish the Commission of Inquiry into Money Laundering in British Columbia has increased since last year, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 62% of British Columbians think the government made the right call in instituting the Cullen Commission, up five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in October 2021.

“British Columbians of all political stripes believe it was prudent to set up the Commission of Inquiry into Money Laundering,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This is the view of 73% of BC New Democratic Party (NDP) voters, 70% of BC Liberal voters and 65% of BC Green Party voters.”

Three-in-five British Columbians (60%, +7) think we have learned more about why money laundering became a problem in British Columbia due to the Cullen Commission—a proportion that rises to 68% among those aged 55 and over.

More than half of British Columbians (54%, +5) believe we have learned more about what to do in the future to curb money laundering in the province—including 60% of men and 59% of residents of Northern BC.

When asked who they think deserves “all of the blame” or “most of the blame” for the current situation related to money laundering in the province, 41% of British Columbians (+2) mention the previous government headed by the BC Liberals.

One third of British Columbians (33%, -3) say the British Columbia Lottery Corporation (BCLC) deserves “all of the blame” or “most of the blame” for the situation. The numbers are lower for the current federal government headed by the Liberal Party (27%, +7), the current provincial government headed by the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (20%, +3) and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) (18%, +1).

The provincial government announced its intention to establish the Commission of Inquiry into Money Laundering in British Columbia in May 2019. The Cullen Commission’s hearings ended in September 2021. The final report was released earlier this month.

The survey also asked British Columbians if they regarded two statements as true or untrue. For almost seven-in-ten respondents (69%), the notion that executives at the BCLC allowed suspicious cash transactions to continue in their casinos because these transactions resulted in higher revenue and pay bonuses is “definitely” or “probably” true.

Two thirds of British Columbians (66%) believe it is true that former minister of public safety and solicitor general Rich Coleman knowingly ignored warnings about suspected drug-money laundering in casinos.

The Province of Quebec has established the Office of Anti-Corruption Commissioner “to ensure the coordination of actions to prevent and fight corruption in the public sector, including in contractual matters.”

More than three-in-four British Columbians (78%, +7) would like to see the province instituting an office similar to the one that is currently in place in Quebec.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 3 to June 5, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Almost Three-in-Five Vancouver Voters Want a Ward System

Majorities also support establishing tougher guidelines for residents who want to become candidates for public office.

Vancouver, BC [June 21, 2022] – More voters in the City of Vancouver are in favour of changing the way they elect their councillors, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample, 58% of likely voters in the City of Vancouver (+6 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2020) would move to a “ward system” (where councillors can be elected in specific constituencies) and abandon the currently used “at-large system” (where voters select 10 councillors).

Support for the implementation of a “ward system” in Vancouver is high among likely voters who reside in the East Side (57%), the West Side (58%) and Downtown (60%).

Majorities of voters who cast ballots for Kennedy Stewart (66%), Ken Sim (63%) or Shauna Sylvester (56%) in the 2018 Vancouver mayoral election are in favour of a “ward system.”

In order to run for office in the City of Vancouver, candidates are currently required to present the signatures of 25 nominators. More than three-in-five likely voters (62%, +2) believe this number should be raised to 100 signatures in future elections.

“Voters of all ages believe it is time to raise the bar for aspiring municipal politicians in Vancouver,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of likely voters aged 18-to-34 (60%), aged 35-to-54 (62%) and aged 55 and over (65%) believe candidates must secure at least 100 signatures if they want their name to appear on the ballot.”

In addition, candidates who wish to run for office in the City of Vancouver are currently required to pay a $100 deposit, which is refunded after the election. More than half of likely voters (54%, -1) think this number should be raised to $500 in future elections.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 7 to June 9, 2022, among 400 municipal likely voters in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty. 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Than Half of Vancouver Voters Would Abolish Park Board

Almost three-in-five respondents support changing zoning laws to allow up to six strata title units on a standard lot.

Vancouver, BC [June 17, 2022] – Public confidence in the only elected Park Board in Canada has eroded considerably over the past year and a half, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample, 52% of likely voters in the City of Vancouver think the Board of Parks and Recreation should be eliminated, and that public parks and the public recreation system should be placed under the jurisdiction of City Council.

“In November 2020, only 44% of municipal likely voters in Vancouver favoured the elimination of the Board of Parks and Recreation,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This month, the proportion has reached 52%.”

Public support for abolishing Vancouver’s Park Board is highest among likely voters who reside Downtown (63%), followed by those who live in the West Side (52%) and the East Side (45%).

Vancouverites who voted for Kennedy Stewart or Ken Sim in the 2018 mayoral election are significantly more likely to endorse the abolition of the Board of Parks and Recreation (61% and 60% respectively) than those who cast a ballot for Shauna Sylvester  (43%).

Just over half of likely voters in Vancouver (51%, +5) believe it would be worthwhile to explore the idea of amalgamating all of the municipalities in Metro Vancouver, like they did in Toronto or Montreal.

Two thirds of Vancouverites who voted for Stewart in 2018 (67%) support exploring the concept of amalgamation, compared to just under half of those who cast a ballot for Sim (49%).

Almost three-in-five likely voters in Vancouver (58%, +5) are in favour of changing zoning laws to allow property owners to build up to six strata title units on a standard lot, provided the new building is no taller than an average home.

Majorities of Vancouver’s likely voters who currently rent or own their primary residence support a change in zoning laws (65% and 54% respectively).

Seven-in-ten likely voters in the City of Vancouver (71%, -10) are in favour of the plan to extend the Skytrain Millennium Line (currently under construction to Arbutus) to the University of British Columbia (UBC) campus at Point Grey.

Public support for the proposed SkyTrain extension is strongest among likely voters who reside Downtown (75%), followed by those who live in the East Side (72%) and the West Side (67%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 7 to June 9, 2022, among 400 municipal likely voters in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty. 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Fewer Than One-in-Five Canadians Prefer Black Coffee

When asked to select the best way to cook a steak, 27% of Canadians cast their vote for “medium”.

Vancouver, BC [June 14, 2022] –  A plurality of Canadians express a fondness for the middle ground when assessing how they personally enjoy coffee and steak, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample showed Canadians two photographs with various shades of coffee and steak, and asked them to select what they usually consume.

Across the country, one-in-ten residents (10%) say they do not eat steak and about one-in-seven (15%) do not drink coffee.

Just under one-in-five Canadians (17%) selected the #1 option or black coffee, including 21% of men and 20% of those aged 55 and over.

“Only 13% of Atlantic Canadians usually take their coffee without any creamer,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is higher in Quebec (15%), Ontario (16%), Alberta (17%), British Columbia (21%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (22%).”

The proportion of Canadians who selected shades #2, #3 and #4—adding a little bit of milk or creamer to their cup of coffee—stands at 18% across the country.

More than two-in-five Canadians (43%) take their coffee with a larger amount of milk or creamer, choosing shades #5, #6 and #7. This group includes 50% of women in Canada, but only 34% of men.

Shades #8 and #9—where the milk or creamer content is significantly greater—are selected by a combined 8% of Canadians, including 13% of Albertans.

Among the five shades of steak tested in the survey, more than one-in-four Canadians (27%) selected #3 or medium—including 29% of men and 32% of British Columbians.

Equal proportions of Canadians chose shade #4 or medium well (17%) or shade #5 or well done (also 17%). Well done steak is particularly fashionable among Atlantic Canadians (24%) and Quebecers (21%).

Just over one-in-five Canadians (21%) preferred shade #2 or medium rare, while 9% opted for shade #1 or blue.

The rarest of steaks are preferred by 14% of Canadians of Indigenous or First Nations origin.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 22 to May 24, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. 

Find our data tables and photographs here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two Thirds of British Columbians Would Reduce Speed Limits

Support for lowering speeds in residential areas to 30 km/h has increased from 58% in 2019 to 66% this year.

Vancouver, BC [June 10, 2022] – More British Columbians believe it is a good idea to have a lower speed limit on residential streets, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 66% of British Columbians acknowledge that they would “definitely” or “probably” like to see the speed limit reduced to 30 km/h on all residential streets in their municipality, while keeping the speed limit on arterial and collector roads at 50 km/h.

Support for a lower speed limit on British Columbia’s residential areas is higher with women (68%) than with men (63%). While seven-in-ten of the province’s residents aged 18-to-34 would welcome this regulation (70%), the rating is lower among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (65%) and aged 55 and over (62%).

On a regional basis, the notion of a lower residential speed limit is most popular in Southern BC (72%), followed by Metro Vancouver (67%), Northern BC (also 67%), the Fraser Valley (63%) and Vancouver Island (58%).

In 2019, Vancouver City Council unanimously passed a motion to establish a pilot project to reduce the speed limit to 30 km/h on select residential streets in the city. The pilot project is currently underway in the Grandview-Woodland neighbourhood.

“In 2019, public support for a lower speed limit on British Columbia’s residential streets stood at 58%,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion climbed to 61% in 2021 and has increased again this year to 66%.”

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (72%, +6) believe Vancouver’s pilot project is a “very good” or “good” idea—a proportion that rises to 84% among residents of Southern BC.

As was the case last year, almost two-in-five British Columbians (39%, =) say they witness cars circulating above the current speed limit on the street where they live “at least once a day.”

Fewer of the province’s residents are exposed to speeding vehicles on their street “a few times a week” (29%, +2), “a few times a month” (18%, =) or “never” (15%, -1).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 3 to June 5, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

How Ontario Voted: A Provincial “Exit Poll”.

While most voters pointed out that it was “time for change”, the two main opposition leaders never gained on the “Best Premier” question.

Vancouver, BC [June 8, 2022] – The Progressive Conservative Party will form a majority government once again in Ontario, after all the votes from the 2022 provincial election have been tallied. An “exit poll” conducted by Research Co. provides an opportunity to look at why the sentiment for change that was expressed by most voters never materialized.

In our final poll of the campaign, Premier and Ontario Progressive Conservative Party leader Doug Ford had a significant advantage over his main rivals on the “Best Premier” question. While 37% of Ontarians favoured Ford for the province’s top job, the rating was decidedly lower for Official Opposition and Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Andrea Horwath (21%) and Ontario Liberal Party leader Steven Del Duca (19%).

The election’s outcome does not suggest an extraordinary rekindling of voters with Ford and the Progressive Conservatives, but rather a failure from the two opposition parties to entice voters. In 2018, right before Ford’s victory and the end of the tenure of Kathleen Wynne and the Liberals, more than three-in-four voters in Ontario (77%) thought a new premier was needed.

In our survey of Ontarians who cast a ballot in the 2022 provincial election, 64% of respondents told us that it was “time for a change of government” in the province. The desire to make Ford a one-term premier encompassed enormous proportions of Ontarians who voted for the NDP (95%) and the Liberals (88%) this year.

Still, when Ontario voters were asked to point out their main motivation for supporting a particular party in 2022, more than two-in-five (44%) mentioned ideas and policies. This indicator is more powerful for New Democrats (48%) and Liberals (47%) than for Progressive Conservatives (40%).

On the other hand, one-in-four Ontario voters (25%) say their ballot was cast primarily on account of the party’s leader. This time, the two opposition parties lag. While 31% of Progressive Conservatives thought of the leader more than anything, the numbers drop to 21% among those who supported either the New Democrats or the Liberals.

Across Ontario, only 9% of voters said they were thinking of a desire for change when casting their ballot. This indicator usually rises in provincewide elections when incumbents are unpopular. Even among New Democrats and Liberals, the number of voters who actively yearned for a new government was small (14% and 12% respectively).

One of the biggest hindrances that centre-left supporters may point to is the electoral system. In spite of endless discussions about “strategic voting”—with some pointing to predictions in an attempt to lure voters to one party or another—only 45% of Ontarians said they cast their ballot strategically: voting for the candidate in their riding who had the best chance of defeating a party they dislike, even if the candidate they voted for was not their first preference. As expected, “strategic voting” was significantly more favoured by voters aged 18-to-34 (62%) than among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (47%) and aged 55 and over (33%).

But even if “strategic voting” failed to deliver change, many Ontarians would be happy with proportional representation in provincial elections. Across the province, 58% of voters like this idea. There is no generation gap on this question, with similar proportions of voters aged 18-to-34 (58%), aged 35-to-54 (59%) and aged 55 and over (57%) welcoming a new system. As expected, those who cast ballots for the New Democrats (70%) and Liberals (64%) are more enthused about the prospect of electoral reform than those who voted for the Progressive Conservatives (53%).

Ontario voters are not entirely convinced on enacting a merger of the two centre-left parties. Just under two-in-five Ontario voters (39%) would welcome this idea, but this number includes majorities of those who cast ballots for the Liberals (58%) and the New Democrats (57%). Progressive Conservative voters, who envisioned their party coasting to a win, are significantly more skeptical: only 23% would like to see a united “Liberal Democrat” party in 2026.

Even with a majority mandate, and with severe tasks ahead for the opposition, there is a sense of dismay from voters. Practically four-in-five (79%) say they would like to see better people serving as leaders of Ontario’s main political parties. On this question, significant majorities of supporters of the New Democrats (87%), Liberals (83%) and Progressive Conservatives (72%) think these political organizations owe them better options, individually and collectively.

Find our data tables here. 

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on June 1 and June 2, 2022, among 500 Ontario adults who voted in the 2022 provincial election. The margin of error — which measures sample variability — is +/- 4.4 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Two-in-Five Canadians Would Take Nickel Out of Circulation

Men (47%) are more likely to support getting rid of the five-cent coin than women (33%).

Vancouver, BC [June 7, 2022] – While practically half of Canadians are willing to keep the nickel, support for abandoning the five-cent coin has increased since 2019, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 40% of Canadians support taking the nickel out of circulation, up four points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2019.

Almost half of Canadians (49%, -6) oppose abolishing the five-cent coin, while 11% (+2) are undecided.

There is a substantial gender gap when Canadians think about the nickel. While 47% of men support its abolition, the proportion drops to 33% among women.

Across Canada, 43% of residents aged 18-to-34 are in favour of taking the five-cent coin out of circulation. The proportion is lower among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (38%) and aged 55 and over (37%).

“More than half of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (58%), British Columbia (52%) and Atlantic Canada (also 52%) support keeping the nickel,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion of five-cent coin fans is lower in Quebec (49%), Ontario (47%) and Alberta (46%).”

More than seven-in-ten Canadians (71%, -4) agree with the federal government’s decision to take the penny out of circulation in February 2013.

Male respondents are more likely to agree with dropping the one-cent coin (77%) than their female counterparts (66%).

The level of agreement with abolishing the penny is highest among Canadians aged 18-to-34 (74%), followed by those aged 55 and over (72%) and those aged 35-to-54 (65%).

More than seven-in-ten residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (75%), Ontario (71%) and Quebec (also 71%) agree with taking Canada’s one-cent coin out of circulation. The numbers are lower in Alberta (69%) and British Columbia (65%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 22 to May 24, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Motorbicycle

Half of British Columbians Are Worried About Data Breaches

More than four-in-five of the province’s residents are comfortable accessing banking information and shopping online.

Vancouver, BC [June 3, 2022] – While a sizeable majority of British Columbians are at ease managing specific tasks online, more than half express concerns about where their data could end up, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 51% of British Columbians say they have worried “frequently” or “occasionally” over the past couple of months about having their personal information stolen over the Internet, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2021.

Similar proportions of British Columbians have worried “frequently” or “occasionally” about computers and technology being used to invade their privacy (51%, -1) and somebody hacking into their own computer or smartphone (46%, -3).

“In British Columbia, women (55%) are particularly concerned about their personal information falling into the wrong hands when they are online,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer men (46%) share the same preoccupation.”

As was the case in 2021, more than four-in-five British Columbians are “very” or “moderately” comfortable shopping (89%, +2) and accessing banking information (87%, =) online. The level of comfort is lower across the province for making charitable donations online (73%, =) or commenting on an online forum that requires an email address (56%, +2).

Some British Columbians continue to encounter setbacks when relying on digital tools. More than three-in-five (63%, +2) have received “phishing” emails—where somebody attempts to acquire personal information by masquerading as a trustworthy entity—and a majority (58%, +4) received an email offering them money for their help and assistance, in what is usually referred to as the “Nigerian scam.”

Fewer than a third of the province’s residents reveal that their computer became infected with a virus while they were browsing the Internet (31%, =) or endured hackers accessing their social media platform (16%, +1) or email address (15%, =).

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians are partaking on five activities online at least a few times per month: visiting websites or blogs (89%, +2), accessing banking information (87%, -1), looking for deals on websites (81%, +2), using an instant messaging service (79%, +2) and looking for directions and/or maps to get to a destination (73%, +4),

Fewer British Columbians are purchasing goods from a website (60%, =), posting on social media (57%, -2), uploading pictures or videos to the Internet (53%, +3) or using the Internet to place telephone calls (39%, -2) at least a few times per month.

More than three-in-five British Columbians (62%, =) have googled themselves to see what has been posted about them online.

Among the province’s residents who typed their names on Google, 61% (+6) state that the information that came up was “accurate”, while 12% (-1) considered it “inaccurate”. More than a quarter of these residents (27%, -5) did not find information about themselves online.

Just over one-in-five British Columbians (22%) report having only one email address, while 41% possess two and 37% have three or more.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 25 to April 27, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Double-Digit Advantage for Ontario’s Progressive Conservatives

Half of Ontarians (50%) approve of the performance of Doug Ford as Premier and PC leader, while 46% disapprove.

Vancouver, BC [June 1, 2022] – Public support for the governing Progressive Conservative Party has increased as the provincial election in Ontario draws near, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Ontarian adults, 39% of decided voters say they will cast a ballot for the Ontario PC candidate in their riding tomorrow or have already done so, up five points since the previous Research Co. poll completed in mid-May.

The Ontario Liberal Party remains in second place with 26% (-3), followed by the Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) with 23% (=), the Ontario Green Party with 6% (-1), the New Blue Party of Ontario with 3% (=) and the Ontario Party with 1% (=).

Since mid-May, the Progressive Conservatives have improved their standing in Ontario among both male decided voters (42%, +5) and female decided voters (37%, +7).

More than two-in-five decided voters aged 35-to-54 (42%) and aged 55 and over (also 42%) intend to back an Ontario PC candidate. The race is closer among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (PC 31%, Liberal 28%, NDP 26%).

“The Progressive Conservatives are keeping 81% of their 2018 voters, while the New Democrats are only maintaining 71% of them,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The Ontario Liberals are only attracting 52% of Ontarians who voted for the federal Liberal Party in last year’s Canadian federal election, as one-in-four of these voters (25%) are planning to vote for Ontario PC candidates tomorrow.”

Half of Ontarians (50%, +4) approve of the way Premier and Ontario Progressive Conservative Party leader Doug Ford has handled his duties.

The rating is lower for Official Opposition and Ontario NDP leader Andrea Horwath (46%, -1) Ontario Liberal Party leader Steven Del Duca (42%, =), Ontario Green Party leader Mike Schreiner (40%, +9), New Blue Party of Ontario leader Jim Karahalios (16%, +3) and Ontario Party leader Derek Sloan (16%, +4).

On the momentum question, Schreiner does particularly well, with 18% of Ontarians (+9 since mid-May) saying their opinion of the Ontario Green Party leader has improved since the electoral campaign started. The needle did not move for Del Duca (20%, =) and smaller gains are seen for Horwath (19%, +2), Ford (also 19%, +3), Karahalios (6%, +2) and Sloan (5%, +2).

More than a third of Ontarians (37%, +4) believe Ford would make the best premier of the province among the six main party leaders. Horwath is a distant second with 21% (-2), followed by Del Duca (19%, -1), Schreiner (7%, +4), Karahalios (2%, =) and Sloan (also 2%, =).

There is little movement on the issue landscape, where the top ranking belongs to housing, poverty and homelessness (26%, =), followed by health care (23%, -2) and the economy and jobs (22%, +2).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on May 31 and June 1, 2022, among 700 Ontario adults, including 659 decided voters in the 2022 provincial election. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points for the entire sample and +/- 3.8 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Josh Evnin