Six Months Later, British Columbians Content with Legal Marijuana

Across the province, 6% of adults say they tried cannabis for the first time after it was legalized.

Vancouver, BC [April 16, 2019] – Most British Columbians appear satisfied with both the legalization of marijuana and the framework to acquire cannabis in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 63% of British Columbians agree with marijuana being legal in Canada, while 29% disagree.

Agreement with the legalization of cannabis in Canada is highest among British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (70%), as well as residents of Northern BC (72%) and Vancouver Island (also 72%).

More than two-in-five British Columbians (43%) acknowledge having consumed marijuana in Canada before it was legal, while 51% reveal they have never used cannabis in the country. 

Just over one-in-twenty British Columbians (6%) say they used marijuana in Canada only after it became legal last year, including 10% of those aged 18-to-34.

When asked to review the decisions that the provincial government has taken to enable the legal sale of marijuana in British Columbia, practically four-in-five residents agree with two measures: establishing 19 years as the legal age to purchase, sell or consume marijuana in the province (79%) and restricting marijuana smoking to areas where tobacco smoking is allowed (also 79%).

In addition, two thirds of residents (67%) agree with authorizing adults to grow up to four cannabis plants per household, as long as the plants are not visible from public spaces off the property, and home cultivation is banned in homes used as day-cares.

A majority of respondents to the survey (57%) agree with establishing the Liquor Distribution Branch (LDB) as the wholesale distributor of non-medical marijuana in British Columbia, while 31% disagree.

In October 2018, a Research Co. survey found that British Columbians were split on having a marijuana shop a block away from their home.

More than three-in-four British Columbians disagree with legalizing ecstasy (78%), powder cocaine (79%), heroin (also 79%), crack cocaine (83%), methamphetamine or “crystal meth” (83%) and fentanyl (84%).

“There is little appetite from British Columbians to extend marijuana’s legal framework to other substances,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Few residents want to allow other drugs to be readily available for any adult who wants to access them.”

In some countries, including the United States, a company can administer “drug tests” to employees, even if they do not operate machinery (such as pilots, truck drivers or crane operators). 

Three-in-five British Columbians (60%) think companies in British Columbia should be able to administer “drug tests” to any employee now that marijuana is legal—a proportion that rises to 68% among residents aged 55 and over.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 4 to April 7, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Government’s Housing Taxes Remain Popular in British Columbia

Four-in-five residents endorse the increase in the foreign buyers tax, and more than two thirds agree with the “speculation tax.”.

Vancouver, BC [March 19, 2019] – Most British Columbians endorse the provincial government’s housing-related fiscal policies, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 68% of residents agree with the implementation of a “speculation tax” in specific urban areas targeting foreign and domestic homeowners who pay little or no income tax in BC, and those who own second properties that aren’t long-term rentals.

In a survey conducted by Research Co. in June 2018, 62% of British Columbians called the “speculation tax” a “very good” or “good” idea.

“While some government policies tend to cause extraordinary differences between residents according to political allegiance, the ‘speculation tax’ is different,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Those who agree with the ‘speculation tax’ include 82% of British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the 2017 provincial election, 70% of those who voted for the Green Party and 55% of those who voted for the BC Liberals.”

Four-in-five British Columbians (80%) agree with the provincial government’s decision to increase the foreign buyers tax from 15% to 20%, and three-in-four (75%) agree with the decision to expand the foreign buyers tax to areas located outside of Metro Vancouver.

More than three-in-five British Columbians also agree with increasing the property transfer tax from 3% to 5% for homes valued at more than $3 million (64%) and introducing a tax of 0.2% on the value of homes between $3 million and $4 million, and a tax rate of 0.4% on the portion of a home’s value that exceeds $4 million (66%).

Across the province, 39% of residents think the actions of the provincial government will be “effective” in making housing more affordable in British Columbia, while almost half (47%) believe they will be “ineffective.”

Residents who voted for the BC NDP in the last provincial election (56%) are more likely to expect the hosing measures to be effective, while those who cast a ballot for the BC Liberals (64%) or the BC Greens (48%) are more likely to deem them as ”ineffective.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 8 to March 10, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Say Reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples is Possible

But almost half think the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls has been a failure so far.

Vancouver, BC [March 14, 2019] – A majority of Canadians are hopeful about renewing the country’s relationship with Indigenous peoples, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Canadians think a renewed nation-to-nation relationship with First Nations peoples can be achieved in the country.

“Perceptions about attaining a true reconciliation vary widely according to age,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 63% of Canadians aged 18-to-34 think the nation-to-nation goal is achievable, the proportion of believers drops to 54% among those aged 35-to-54 and 44% among those aged 55 and over.”

The Government of Canada launched the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in September 2016. 

Across the country, 47% of Canadians say they have followed stories related to the inquiry “very closely” or “moderately closely”, including 59% in British Columbia, 52% in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and 51% in Quebec.

Almost half of Canadians (46%) consider the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls to be “a failure” so far, while 27% believe it has been “a success.”

Residents of Alberta (51%), Manitoba and Saskatchewan (49%) and British Columbia (48%) are more likely to brand the inquiry as “a failure” so far.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 21 to February 24, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Archkris 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Four-in-Five Canadians Support Resource Development Projects

The majority of Canadians (61%) say they are tired of nothing getting built in the country.

Vancouver, BC [March 12, 2019] – A significant proportion of Canadians and British Columbians are in favour of resource development projects, a new Research Co. poll conducted on behalf of LNG Canada—a liquefied natural gas project currently under construction in Kitimat, B.C.—has found.

In the online survey of representative samples, 79% of Canadians and 71% of British Columbians express support for resource development projects. In addition, 61% of respondents across the country and 51% of those located in the westernmost province agree they are “tired of nothing getting built” in Canada and British Columbia—a proportion that rises to 67% in northern B.C.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) believe the “national economy will suffer if we can’t build resource projects.” In British Columbia, 63% feel this way about the possible effect on the provincial economy, including 74% of those in northern B.C.

More than half of Canadians (54%) believe the country’s reputation “is harmed by protests against resource development projects.” In British Columbia, 52% express the same sentiment about the effect of protests against resource development projects, and fewer than a quarter (23%) think it’s possible to have unanimous support for resource development projects. 

“When asked what would make them more likely to support resource development projects, a majority of British Columbians (57%) want assurances that the impact on the environment is limited,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Other important considerations are guaranteeing that Canadians will get the first opportunity to work on the project (53%) and providing training and apprenticeship opportunities for young Canadians (46%).”

Seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%) foresee a positive economic impact from LNG Canada’s liquefied natural gas export project in Kitimat, B.C., which is scheduled to deliver its first LNG cargo before mid-next decade. Broken down by region, over half of Vancouver Island residents (56%), two thirds of Metro Vancouverites (67%) and 86% of those in northern B.C. anticipate a positive economic impact from the project.

“LNG Canada has received significant support from First Nations at the facility and along the shipping route, as well as from northern communities overall,” says Susannah Pierce, LNG Canada’s Director, External Relations. “We are committed to these supporters. A project like ours is vital to the creation of training, employment and contracting opportunities, and we’re pleased to see that British Columbians and Canadians recognize the importance of resource projects as drivers of the Canadian economy.”

The poll also revealed that at least three-in-five Canadians have a positive opinion of four energy sources: wind (80%), hydropower (76%), natural gas (69%) and geothermal (61%). Canadians are divided on oil, with 43% having positive views and 46% having a negative opinion. The lowest ranked energy source for Canadians is coal, with 24% of residents expressing a positive view. 

Three-in-five Canadians (60%) believe Canada has a responsibility to “export natural gas to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) in other countries.” LNG exported from LNG Canada’s facility can displace the use of coal for power generation, reducing global GHGs by 60 to 90 mtpa, which is the equivalent of all GHGs produced in British Columbia annually.

In the online survey of representative samples, 79% of Canadians and 71% of British Columbians express support for resource development projects. In addition, 61% of respondents across the country and 51% of those located in the westernmost province agree they are “tired of nothing getting built” in Canada and British Columbia—a proportion that rises to 67% in Northern B.C.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) believe the “national economy will suffer if we can’t build resource projects.” In British Columbia, 63% feel this way about the possible effect in the provincial economy, including 74% of those in northern B.C.

More than half of Canadians (54%) believe the country’s reputation “is harmed by protests against resource development projects”. In British Columbia, 52% express the same sentiment about the effect of protests against resource development projects, and fewer than a quarter (23%) think it’s possible to have unanimous support for resource development projects. 

“When asked what would make them more likely to support resource development projects, a majority of British Columbians (57%) want assurances that the impact in the environment is limited,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Other important considerations are guaranteeing that Canadians will get the first opportunity to work on the project (53%) and providing training and apprenticeship opportunities for young Canadians (46%).”

Seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%) foresee a positive economic impact from LNG Canada’s liquefied natural gas export project in Kitimat, B.C., which is scheduled to deliver first LNG cargo mid-next decade. Broken down by region, over half of Vancouver Island residents (56%), two thirds of Metro Vancouverites (67%) and 86% of those in northern B.C. anticipate a positive economic impact from the project.

“LNG Canada has received significant support from First Nations at the facility and along the shipping route, as well as from northern communities overall,” says Susannah Pierce, LNG Canada’s Director, External Relations. “We are committed to these supporters. A project like ours is vital to the creation of training, employment and contracting opportunities, and we’re pleased to see that British Columbians and Canadians recognize the importance of resource projects as drivers of the Canadian economy.”

The poll also revealed that at least three-in-five Canadians have a positive opinion of four energy sources: wind (80%), hydropower (76%), natural gas (69%) and geothermal (61%). Canadians are divided on oil, with 43% having positive views and 46% having a negative opinion. The lowest ranked energy source for Canadians is coal, with 24% of residents expressing a positive view. 

Three-in-five Canadians (60%) believe Canada has a responsibility to “export natural gas to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) in other countries.” LNG exported from LNG Canada’s facility can displace the use of coal for power generation, reducing global GHGs by 60 to 90 mtpa, which is the equivalent of all GHGs produced in British Columbia annually.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 21 to February 24, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada; and an online study conducted from February 16 to February 18, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada and British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for the sample of Canadians and +/- 3.5 percentage points for the sample of British Columbians, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full Canada data set here, our full British Columbia data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

LNG Canada Media Relations
[c] 604.761.5529
[e] media@lngcanada.ca

Canadians Express Lukewarm Support for Multiculturalism

Two-in-five Canadians think that racism has become a more significant problem in Canada over the past two years.

Vancouver, BC [February 8, 2019] – Many Canadians are tepid supporters of the concept of multiculturalism and a sizeable proportion is expressing concerns about racism, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 62% of Canadians think multiculturalism has been “very good” or “good” for Canada, while 33% believe the policy has been “bad” or “very bad”.

 “Strong endorsement for multiculturalism stands at roughly the same level as strong rejection (13% and 14% respectively),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Most Canadians feel the policy has been positive, but few of them are willing to say it has been overwhelmingly beneficial.”

Across the country, 41% of Canadians believe racism has become a more significant problem over the past two years. 

Residents of Manitoba and Saskatchewan are the most likely to believe racism is on the rise (55%), while only 37% of Quebecers concur with this assessment.

When asked to select between two different policies, almost half of Canadians (49%) say that Canada should be a “melting pot” and want immigrants to assimilate and blend into Canadian society. 

A smaller proportion of respondents (42%) think that Canada should be a “mosaic” and say cultural differences within Canadian society are valuable and should be preserved.

Men (53%), Quebecers (also 53%), respondents aged 55 and over (61%) and Conservative Party voters in the 2015 federal election (62%) are more likely to express a preference for the “melting pot”.

Conversely, Canadians aged 18-to-34 (60%), British Columbians (52%) and those who voted for the Liberal Party (59%) or the New Democratic Party (NDP) (56%) in the last federal ballot endorse the concept of the “mosaic.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 14 to January 17, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Drfunko

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca