Half of Canadians Expect to Remain a Monarchy in Twenty Years

Queen Elizabeth holds the highest favourability rating in the Royal Family, while Prince Charles remains below the 50% threshold.

Vancouver, BC [March 11, 2020] – While indifference towards the monarchy has increased in Canada, most Canadians believe the country will maintain the current system of government for the next two decades, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Canadians believe Canada will “definitely” or “probably” be a monarchy twenty years from now, while 27% expect to have an elected head of state by then.

Almost seven-in-ten Canadians (69%, down two points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2019) have a favourable opinion of Queen Elizabeth II. The rating is slightly lower for Prince Harry (64%, -6) and Prince William (63%, -8).

More than half of Canadians hold favourable views of Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge (64%, -4), and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex (56%, -4).

The rating is lower for Prince Philip (48%, -6), Prince Charles (44%, +1) and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall (32%, unchanged).

Across the country, 32% of Canadians (down one point since 2019) would prefer for Canada to have an elected head of state, while 27% (down four points) would rather keep the monarchy. The proportion of Canadians who say they do not care either way increased by eight points to 28%.

“The level of support for the continuation of the monarchy in Canada is lowest among women (23%) and among those who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) in last year’s federal election (20%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “On a regional basis, more than two-in-five Quebecers (41%) would like to have an elected head of state.”

More than a third of Canadians (35, -6%) would prefer to see Prince William as monarch after Queen Elizabeth II dies or abdicates, while 25% (+5) would rather have Prince Charles ascend the throne.

Men are evenly divided when assessing the next monarch (29% for Prince Charles and 29% for Prince William). Women prefer Prince William over Prince Charles by a 2-to-1 margin (41% to 21%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 22 to February 25, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

Photo Credit: Michal Klajban

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Death Penalty Splits Views in Canada and the United States

More Canadians than Americans select life imprisonment without parole as their preferred punishment for murder.

Vancouver, BC [March 3. 2020] – More than half of Canadians and Americans are supportive of capital punishment, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 51% of Canadians are in favour of reinstating the death penalty for murder in their country, and 59% of Americans support the possibility of prosecutors relying on capital punishment for murder cases.

Support for reinstating the death penalty in Canada is highest among Canadians aged 55 and over (56%) and people who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election (68%).

In the United States, the groups that voice the highest support for prosecutors relying on the death penalty are people who voted for Republican Party nominee Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election (76%) and those who reside in the West (69%).

Supporters of the death penalty in the two North American countries believe that, if a convicted murdered has taken a life, the death penalty fits the crime (60% in Canada and 68% in the United States).

“A sizeable majority of Canadians who are in favour of the return of the death penalty (57%) believe it would save taxpayers money and the costs associated with having murderers in prison,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the United States, only 43% of supporters of capital punishment feel the same way.”

Opponents of the death penalty in both North American countries are primarily concerned with the possibility of executing a person who was wrongfully convicted (73% in Canada and 65% in the United States).

When asked about their personal point of view about the death penalty, Canadians are more likely to believe that it is “never appropriate” (27%) than Americans (18%).

Conversely, Americans are slightly more likely to say that capital punishment is “always appropriate” (16%) than Canadians (13%).

Almost half of Canadians (47%) select life imprisonment without the possibility of parole over the death penalty (34%) as their preferred punishment in cases of murder.

In the United States, respondents are evenly split when pondering the two approaches (42% for the death penalty and 42% for life imprisonment without parole).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 7 to February 9, 2020, among 1,000 Canadian adults, and an online study conducted from February 6 to February 8, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each study, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full Canadian dataset here, our full American dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Conscience Rights on Physician-Assisted Death Split Canadians

About two-in-five Canadians would allow health care professionals to object to providing abortion services.

Vancouver, BC [February 26, 2020] – While practically half of Canadians are not in favour of legislative action that would entrench conscience rights for health care workers, the country is evenly divided when assessing cases of physician-assisted death, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 44% of Canadians agree that health care professionals should have the ability to object to providing services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to physician-assisted death. A similar proportion of Canadians (42%) disagree with this stipulation.

Alberta—where public debate over Bill 207 intensified late last year—has the lowest proportion of residents who would agree to entrench conscience rights in cases of physician-assisted death (38%).

The level of support for a caveat for health care professionals on physician-assisted suicide cases is highest in British Columbia (48%), followed by Quebec (47%), Atlantic Canada (46%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (46%) and Ontario (41%).

When asked about conscience rights on two other instances, Canadians are not as divided. Practically half (49%) disagree with health care professionals objecting to provide services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to abortion, while 39% agree.

A majority of Canadians (58%) disagree with health care professionals objecting to provide services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to serving lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, gender diverse, queer and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2+) people, while 31% agree.

“Canadians who profess a religion are more likely to extend the ability for health care professionals to have moral or faith-based objections in cases of physician-assisted suicide (52%), abortion (46%) and serving LGBT people (37%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The level of support is considerably lower among Canadians who have no religious affiliation (28%, 24% and 18% respectively).”

Across the country, 49% of Canadians say that they would oppose a bill that sought to allow health care professionals the ability to have a moral or faith-based objection to providing services, while 39% would support this provincial legislation.

Opposition to this type of bill is highest in Alberta (59%), followed by Atlantic Canada (53%), British Columbia (51%), Ontario (49%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (45%) and Quebec (42%).  

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 14 to February 17, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Snowstorm Made British Columbians Drive Less, Work From Home

Three in ten residents say their municipality is “getting better” when it comes to dealing with snow.

Vancouver, BC [February 19, 2019] – The snowstorm that affected most of British Columbia last month had an effect on the daily lives of residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two-in-five British Columbians (39%) say they chose not to drive their own vehicle on account of the snowstorm.

“A majority of residents of the Fraser Valley (51%) avoided getting behind the wheel with snow on the roads,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Vancouver Island was a close second on this question at 49%.”

In addition, three-in-ten British Columbians (31%) acknowledge that they, or somebody in their household, worked from home on account of the snowstorm.

Practically half of British Columbians report having witnessed two negative behaviours, with 49% saying that they saw neighbours who did not shovel snow on their sidewalk and 48% witnessing a vehicle with snow on the top circulating in their municipality.

Across the province, two thirds of British Columbians (68%) say they are satisfied with how their municipality dealt with the timeliness of alerts, such as school closures, and 61% feel the same way about snow clearing on roads.

The satisfaction rating is lower for snow clearing on sidewalks (54%) and responsiveness to requests on social media (51%, with 30% undecided).

Three-in-ten British Columbians (29%) say that, compared to five years ago, their municipality is “getting better” when it comes to dealing with snow. Half of the province’s residents (49%) see no change, and 16% believe the situation has “worsened” over the past five years.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are significantly more likely to believe that their municipality is now better equipped to deal with snow (40%) than their older counterparts (22% among those aged 35-to-54 and those aged 55 and over).

A majority of residents of Northern BC (57%) believe their municipality is handling snow better than it did in 2015. The numbers are lower in all other regions of the province, including Vancouver Island (30%), Metro Vancouver (29%), Southern BC (20%) and the Fraser Valley (18%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 21 to January 24, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two-in-Five Americans Say Economy is Better Now Than in 2016

Significantly fewer Americans see improvements in the areas of health care, education, ethics, environment and national unity.

Vancouver, BC [February 10, 2020] – Americans have mixed feelings about the effect of the administration headed by President Donald Trump on specific issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 41% of Americans think the domestic economy is better now than it was four years ago.

More than a third of Americans (35%) believe defense is better now than in 2016, while about one-in-four feel the same way about America’s role in global affairs (27%), taxation (26%) and America’s reputation in the world (24%).

The rating is lower for public safety (20%), health care (18%), education (17%), ethics and accountability (14%) and national unity (also 14%).

“As expected, there are some major political differences when Americans assess the current state of affairs,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 74% of Republicans believe the American economy is better now than four years ago, only 39% of Independents and 16% of Democrats concur.”

Respondents who usually watch Fox News are significantly more likely to say that America’s reputation in the world is better now than in 2016 (44%) than those who watch their local network (16%), MSNBC or CNBC (also 16%) and CNN (15%).

Among eight contenders in the 2020 presidential race, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders currently has the largest potential pool of voters, with 47% of Americans saying they would “definitely” or “probably” cast a ballot for him this year’s election. 

While almost two thirds of Americans aged 18-to-34 (64%) say they would consider voting for Sanders, he has the highest level of rejection among voters aged 55 and over (59%) of all candidates tested.

Just over two-in-five Americans would consider voting for former Vice President Joe Biden (43%), incumbent President Donald Trump (42%) and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg (also 42%) in November.

The voter pool is smaller at this stage for Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren (37%), former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg (35%), businessman Tom Steyer (25%) and Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar (23%).

More than three-in-five Americans who voted for Democratic Party nominee Hillary Clinton in 2016 are currently willing to support Sanders (73%), Biden (also 73%), Bloomberg (69%), Warren (65%) and Buttigieg (61%) in this year’s presidential election.

More than half of African Americans say they would consider casting a ballot for Sanders (75%), Biden (72%), Bloomberg (61%) and Warren (57%). Among Hispanic and Latino voters, the voter pool is larger for Sanders (59%), Biden (45%) and Bloomberg (42%).

Almost half of White voters (47%) are considering a vote to re-elect Trump. Only three other contenders can currently count on the potential support of more than a third of White voters: Sanders (41%), Biden (38%) and Bloomberg (37%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on February 5, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our datasets here and here and download the press release here.

Photo Credit: chensiyuan 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Americans Split on Pelosi’s Ripping of State of the Union Address

Just over a third of Americans think Donald Trump has accomplished much since he became President.

Vancouver, BC [February 6, 2020] – Americans are divided when assessing’s the decision of House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi to rip her copy of the State of the Union address in half after President Donald Trump finished his delivery, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 47% of Americans think the actions of the Speaker were “unjustified”, while 42% consider them “justified.”

“More than three-in-four Democrats (77%) stand by the Speaker, while a comparable proportion of Republicans (76%) suggest that she was out of line,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Independents are more likely to believe that Pelosi’s actions were unjustified (48%) than justified (36%).”

About two thirds of Americans were exposed to the latest State of the Union address, with 33% observing it in its entirety, 23% seeing parts of it and 11% only watching reports in the media.

Respondents who were familiar with the State of the Union were asked to select four feelings to describe the speech. The top emotions selected were pride (26%), enthusiasm (23%), trust (21%) and disgust (21%).

Sizeable proportions of Republicans said the speech elicited pride (53%), enthusiasm (47%) and trust (46%). Conversely, the most mentioned emotions by Democrats were disgust (33%) anger (27%) and shame (26%).

More than a third of Americans (35%, including 71% of Republicans) believe that Donald Trump has accomplished much since he became President. More than two-in-five (44%, including 67% of Democrats) think Trump has accomplished little since taking office.

The approval rating for President Trump stands at 45%, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2019. Half of Americans (51%, -7) currently disapprove of his performance.

Two-in-five Americans (41%) believe Trump deserves re-election as president, while 55% disagree—including 84% of Democrats and 59% of Independents.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on February 5, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Ingfbruno

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Remain Opposed to Huawei in 5G Networks

Two thirds of respondents think Canada should not work to establish closer ties with China.

Vancouver, BC [January 31, 2019] – A sizeable majority of Canadians continue to believe that a telecommunications company from the People’s Republic of China should be excluded from the 5G spectrum, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The federal government is currently reviewing the guidelines for the development of 5G (or “Fifth Generation”) mobile networks, which are expected to provide Canadians with larger data capacity and faster connections. 

In the online survey of a representative national sample, two thirds of Canadians (66%) think the federal government should not allow Huawei to participate in Canada’s 5G mobile networks.

The level of rejection for Huawei’s presence in the 5G spectrum is similar to what was observed by Research Co. in July 2019 (68%), and remains higher than what was first reported in February 2019 (57%).

Canadians aged 55 and over (72%) and British Columbians (81%) are the groups that are voicing the highest opposition to Huawei’s participation in the 5G spectrum.

A series of extradition hearings for Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou were held in the BC Supreme Court earlier this month. Meng was arrested in December 2018 and faces charges in the United States, including bank fraud and obstruction of justice. 

Two thirds of Canadians (67%, -5 since July 2019) agree with the way Canadian authorities have acted in this case.

“More than four-in-five Liberal Party voters in last year’s election (83%) endorse the performance of the federal government on the Meng case,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Smaller majorities of federal New Democratic Party (NDP) voters (68%) and Conservative Party voters (53%) concur.”

Following Meng’s arrest, China’s detained two Canadians—Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor—on espionage allegations, and banned exports of Canadian canola, pork and beef.

When asked if Canada should work to establish closer ties with China, one-in-five Canadians (19%, +1 since July 2019) believe that it should, while a majority (67%, -1) think it should not.

In a Research Co. survey conducted in December 2019, 27% of Canadians expressed a positive opinion of China, while 61% had negative views. 

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 23  to January 26, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

BC’s Three Biggest Cities Get Satisfactory Grades on Most Issues

Vancouver posts the highest score on dealing with transportation, while Burnaby is ahead on handling crime.

Vancouver, BC [January 29, 2020] – More than two thirds of residents of Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby are pleased with the way their municipal governments have handled three specific issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative samples in the three cities, 79% of residents say their municipal administration has done a “very good” or “good” job in providing sanitation services.

In addition, 70% of residents are satisfied with how parks and recreation facilities are being managed, and 69% think their municipal government is enhancing their overall quality of life.

More than three-in-five residents of Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby are also content with what their municipal governments are doing to protect the environment (66%), promote tourism (65%), foster artistic and cultural activities (also 65%) and manage development and growth (63%).

At least half of residents are satisfied with the way Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby are dealing with transportation (57%), dealing with crime (54%), making City Hall work in a transparent and unbiased fashion (52%), handling the city’s finances (52%) and engaging with regular people (50%).

“There are some subtle differences between the three cities when it comes to public safety,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 60% of Burnaby residents endorse the performance of their administration, the proportion falls to 54% in Vancouver and 52% in Surrey.”

The lowest ranked issue across all three cities is dealing with homelessness and poverty (44%). Satisfaction with this file rises to 52% in Surrey, but is lower in Vancouver (42%) and Burnaby (39%).

The assessment of City of Vancouver residents on many services has increased markedly since a Research Co. survey conducted in October 2018, particularly on managing development and growth (from 24% to 62%), dealing with crime (from 44% to 54%) and protecting the environment (from 55% to 64%).

A similar situation is observed in Surrey, where the current administration has a higher ranking than the previous one on issues such as promoting tourism (from 39% to 64%), dealing with transportation (from 24% to 57%) and enhancing quality of life (from 36% to 68%).

The approval rating for the three mayors is very similar: 52% for Vancouver’s Kennedy Stewart, 51% for Burnaby’s Mike Hurley and 50% for Surrey’s Doug McCallum.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 2 to January 6, 2020, among 1,200 adults in Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age and gender in each municipality. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 2.8 percentage points for each municipality, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Have Favourable View of UK, Split on USA

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians have a positive opinion of Saudi Arabia, Iran and North Korea.

Vancouver, BC [January 10, 2020] – More than four-in-five Canadians hold a favourable opinion of the United Kingdom, but just under half feel the same way about the United States, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 83% of Canadians have a positive view of the United Kingdom.

At least seven-in-ten Canadians hold positive opinions on four other nations: Germany (73%), Italy (72%), Japan (also 72%) and France (70%). More than half of Canadians (52%) have a positive view of South Korea.

Canadians are split when assessing the United States, with 47% saying they have a positive opinion of the country and 48% stating they have a negative one.

Canadian men are more likely to have a positive opinion of the United States than Canadian women (50% to 42%). Canadians aged 18-to-34 are also more likely to hold favourable views on the United States (53%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (43%) and 55 and over (45%). 

“A majority of Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in last year’s federal election (64%) have a positive opinion of the United States,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are decidedly lower among Canadians who voted for the Liberals (42%) or the New Democrats (31%) last year.”

Just under half of Canadians (46%) have a positive view of Mexico, while more than a third (36%) have a positive opinion of India and three-in-ten (30%) have a favourable view of Venezuela.

Just over one-in-four Canadians have a positive opinion of China (27%) and Russia (26%), while more than three-in-five (61%) have a negative view of each country.

In the specific case of China, the proportion of positive opinions varies greatly around the country: 29% in Atlantic Canada, Ontario and Quebec, 28% in Alberta, 22% in British Columbia and 17% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians have a positive view of Saudi Arabia (17%), Iran (14%) and North Korea (11%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 18 to December 20, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Than Seven-in-Ten British Columbians Endorse Housing Taxes

Almost half of residents think these actions will be effective in making housing more affordable in the province.

Vancouver, BC [January 3, 2020] – The “speculation tax” introduced by the Government of British Columbia is still backed by a sizeable proportion of the province’s residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 76% of British Columbians agree with the implementation of the “speculation tax” in specific urban areas targeting foreign and domestic homeowners who pay little or no income tax in BC, and those who own second properties that aren’t long-term rentals.

The survey outlines an eight-point increase in agreement with the “speculation tax” since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March 2019.

“Agreement with this particular tax is strong among voters of all three major political parties in the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “It encompasses 86% for those who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in 2017, as well as 75% of those who cast ballots for candidates from the BC Liberals and the BC Green Party.”

More than three-in-four British Columbians agree with two other policies: Increasing the foreign buyers tax from 15% to 20% (77%, -3) and expanding the foreign buyers tax to areas located outside of Metro Vanncouver (also 77%, +2).

Agreement is also strong with two other measures: increasing the property transfer tax from 3% to 5% for homes valued at more than $3 million. The 5% portion only applies to the value greater than $3 million (72%, +8) and introducing a tax of 0.2% on the value of homes between $3 million and $4 million, and a tax rate of 0.4% on the portion of a home’s value that exceeds $4 million (also 72%, +6).

Across the province, 49% of residents think the actions of the provincial government will be “effective”, in making housing more affordable in British Columbia, while 39% consider they will be ”ineffective.”

There is a pronounced regional divide on this question. While majorities of residents of Northern BC (56%) and Metro Vancouver (52%) think the provincial government’s actions will help make housing more affordable, the proportion is lower in the Fraser Valley (45%), Vancouver Island (44%) and Southern BC (40%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 12 to December 16, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Unhappy with Their Mobile Phone Plan Prices

Most residents are skeptical about the promises of lower wireless costs issued by the federal and provincial governments.

Vancouver, BC [December 25, 2019] – Most residents of British Columbia are dissatisfied with how much they are paying for wireless communications, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, seven-in-ten mobile phone users (70%) describe the cost of their plan as “very expensive” or “moderately expensive.”

Mobile phone users aged 35-to-54 (77%) and those who reside in the Fraser Valley (74%) are more likely to believe that they currently pay too much for wireless services.

A monthly plan for a mobile phone in Canada with two gigabytes of data costs about $75. More than three-in-five British Columbians (62%) say a similar plan would be less expensive in the United States. 

More than a third of residents also think the cost of a similar phone plan would be lower in Italy (39%) and Australia (37%). 

“Most British Columbians know that wireless costs are lower in the United States than in Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But the current cost of a monthly plan for a mobile phone with two gigabytes of data in Australia and Italy is significantly lower, at $21 and $25 a month respectively.”

Two levels of government have promised action on this issue. The federal Liberal Party pledged to reduce the cost of wireless bills for Canadians by 25 per cent over the next four years. 

The Government of British Columbia recently appointed MLA Bob D’Eith to work with the federal government to explore more affordable and transparent mobile phone options.

Across British Columbia, only 31% of residents believe that the federal government will actually deliver on its promise of lower phone bills for Canadians.

A slightly higher proportion (35%) think the provincial government’s push for more affordable and transparent mobile phone options will ultimately be successful.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 12 to December 16, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views of Pipeline Expansion in British Columbia Remain Stable

Two thirds believe the project will create hundreds of jobs, but fewer than two-in-five expect lower gas prices.

Vancouver, BC [December 18, 2019] – After six months that included a federal election, the perceptions of British Columbians on pipeline expansion did not go through a severe fluctuation, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 56% of British Columbians agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion, while 35% disagree and 10% are undecided.

“There has been practically no change in the way British Columbians feel about this project,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Our survey from June also showed 56% of British Columbians agreeing with the re-approval of the project.”

More than seven-in-ten residents of Southern BC (74%) and Northern BC (71%) are in favour of the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion. Support for the course of action authorized by the federal government is lower in the Fraser Valley (59%), Metro Vancouver (51%) and Vancouver Island (49%).

There is a sizeable gender gap on this question. While two thirds of men (66%) agree with the pipeline expansion, only 46% of women concur.

Two thirds of British Columbians (68%, -5 since May) expect the Trans Mountain Pipeline to create hundreds of jobs for British Columbians—an argument that resonates especially well with 81% of those who voted for the BC Liberals in the 2017 provincial election.

Three-in-five British Columbians (59%, unchanged) say they are disappointed with the way the federal government has handled the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion. 

More than two-in-five British Columbians (45%, -1) believe the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of British Columbians. Voters who cast ballots for the BC Green Party (64%) and the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (59%) in 2017 are more likely to have this point of view.

Across the province, 40% of British Columbians (-1) believe the provincial government should do anything necessary to ensure that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion does not happen—including 45% of women, 51% of residents aged 18-to-34, and 63% of BC Green Party voters in 2017.

The notion of gas prices being lower in British Columbia now that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion has been re-approved is convincing for just over a third of British Columbians (37%, -2).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 4 to December 7, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Seven-in-Ten Vancouverites Happy with Separated Bike Lanes

Men and residents aged 55 and over are more likely to believe that the city currently has too many separated bike lanes.

Vancouver, BC [December 13, 2019] – More than two thirds of City of Vancouver residents appear satisfied with bike infrastructure, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative municipal sample, practically seven-in-ten Vancouverites (69%) support having separated bike lanes in the city, while 25% are opposed and 5% are undecided.

“It is not surprising to see 90% of Vancouverites who commute to school or work on a bike express support for this type of infrastructure,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “We also see that majorities of Vancouverites who commute by taking public transit (79%) and driving (69%) are also in favour of having separated bike lanes.”

Across the city, 40% of residents believe Vancouver currently has the right number of separated bike lanes. In addition, 30% of Vancouverites think there are too many separated bike lanes and some should be removed, and 21% feel there are not enough separated bike lanes and more should be added.

About a third of Vancouverites aged 55 and over (33%) and aged 35-to-54 (32%) believe that the city has too many separated bike lanes at this stage. The proportion is significantly lower among residents aged 18-to-34 (24%).

Men are also more likely to believe that some separated bike lanes should be removed than women (36% and 24% respectively).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 12 to November 15, 2019, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Gas Prices Stirring New Behaviours in British Columbia Drivers

Just under one-in-five drivers in the province have gone to the United States with the sole purpose of purchasing cheaper fuel.

Vancouver, BC [December 11, 2019] – A significant proportion of drivers in British Columbia are taking steps to deal with the cost of fuel in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, half of drivers in British Columbia (51%) say they have purchased gas for their vehicle in their community even if the tank was not near empty because prices were suddenly lower.

Drivers in Vancouver Island (56%) are more likely to have purchased gas after they noticed a drop in prices.

Two-in-five drivers in the province (39%) say they have purchased less gas for their vehicle in their community—or did not fill up the entire tank—because prices were suddenly higher.

Almost half of drivers in the Fraser Valley (47%) have chosen not to completely fill up because of inflated gas prices.

Just under one-in-five drivers in British Columbia (18%) say they have driven to the United States with the sole purpose of purchasing cheaper gas for their vehicle.

“Two-in-five drivers who reside in the Fraser Valley (40%) say they have visited the United States only to get gas in the past year” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “They have been joined by one-in-five (21%) drivers in Metro Vancouver.”

The Government of British Columbia recently introduced legislation to compel oil and gas companies to disclose supply and pricing data. More than four-in-five British Columbians (85%) support this legislation, including 90% of residents aged 55 and over.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 27 to November 29, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Happy Without Penny, Not Ready to Abandon Nickel

More than half of residents disagree with taking the five-cent coin out of circulation in Canada.

Vancouver, BC [December 6, 2019] – After almost seven years of life without the penny, most Canadians appear satisfied with the decree to abolish the one-cent coin, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-four Canadians (75%) agree with the federal government’s decision to take the penny out of circulation in February 2013.

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to welcome the decision to abolish the penny (81%) than those aged 35-to-54 (74%) and those aged 55 and over (72%).

“On a regional basis, one-in-five residents of Atlantic Canada (21%), British Columbia (20%) and Ontario (also 20%) seem more nostalgic about the penny,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (18%), Alberta (15%) and Quebec (14%).”

The notion of taking the nickel out of circulation is definitely not as popular. Across the country, more than a third of Canadians (36%) agree with abandoning the five-cent coin, while more than half (55%) disagree.

Once again, the views on this issue vary by age. Canadians aged 18-to-34 are slightly more likely to suggest that the nickel should be abandoned (41%) than those aged 35-to-54 (39%) and those aged 55 and over (29%).

The regions with the highest level of rejection for the idea of not having a five-cent coin in Canada are Saskatchewan and Manitoba (63%), Atlantic Canada (59%), Ontario (58%) and British Columbia (55%). The proportion is lower in Alberta (50%) and Quebec (47%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 25 to November 27, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca