Metro Vancouverites Consider Working Conditions for Ride-Hailers

Sizeable majorities of residents would also limit the number of cars on the road and call for more wheelchair accessible vehicles.

Vancouver, BC [October 2, 2019] – As Metro Vancouver prepares to welcome ride-hailing companies, many residents appear concerned over the working conditions of drivers, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, three-in-four residents (75%) think British Columbia should require ride-hailing drivers and taxi drivers to be paid a minimum wage, as well as benefits such as overtime and vacation pay.

“Men (78%) and Metro Vancouverites aged 35-to-54 (76%) are more likely to call for ride-hailing policies similar to what the State of California is currently pondering,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents who voted for any of the three major parties in the last provincial election are in agreement on this matter as well.”

Seven-in-ten Metro Vancouverites (71%) think ride-hailing companies should devote 17% of their fleet to wheelchair accessible vehicles. Support for this measure is highest among women (72%) and residents aged 55 and over (80%).

Almost two thirds of Metro Vancouverites (64%) think the provincial government should limit the number of ride-hailing cars on the road—including 68% of men and 72% of residents of the City of Vancouver.

Across Metro Vancouver, 42% of residents believe ride-hailing companies should be allowed to operate in British Columbia, if they compete on an equal footing with taxis.

A smaller proportion (39%) believe ride-hailing companies should be allowed to operate in British Columbia without reservations, while only 6% of Metro Vancouverites would ban ride-hailing in the province.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 20 to September 23, 2019, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.7 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Liberals and Conservatives Gain in Canadian Federal Campaign

Justin Trudeau holds a nine-point advantage over Andrew Scheer in the “Best Prime Minister” question.

Vancouver, BC [September 28, 2019] – The two main federal parties in Canada increased their level of voter support over the past couple of months, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 36% of decided voters (+2 since a Research Co. survey conducted in July) would cast a ballot for the Liberal candidate in their riding in next month’s federal election.

The Conservative Party remains in second place with 33% (+2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 15% (-2), the Green Party with 9% (-1), the Bloc Québécois with 5% (+1) and the People’s Party with 2% (-1).

The two main parties hold the same level of support among male decided voters (36% for each), while the Liberals have a six-point lead over the Conservatives among women (36% to 30%).

Voters aged 18-to-34 currently prefer the Liberals (35%, with the Conservatives at 22% and the NDP at 20%). The Liberals are barely ahead among voters aged 35-to-54 (36% to 34%), while the Tories hold the same edge among voters aged 55 and over (38% to 36%).

“The Conservatives are keeping more than four-in-five decided voters (84%) who supported the party in 2015,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The retention rate is not as respectable at this point for the NDP (71%) and the Liberals (68%).”

The approval rating for Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau remains at 41%, with more than half of Canadians (54%, +4) disapproving of his performance.

NDP leader Jagmeet Singh improved his standing by seven points and is now at 42%. The approval rating is higher for Green Party leader Elizabeth May (44%, +2) and lower for Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Andrew Scheer (38%, +2). Maxime Bernier of the People’s Party dropped to 17% (-4).

Trudeau posted the lowest momentum score at -34, with 46% of Canadians saying their opinion of the incumbent prime minister has worsened since the start of the campaign. Bernier (-24) and Scheer (-17) also had negative numbers. Singh is the only leader with a positive momentum score (+3), while May is even.

On the “Best Prime Minister” question, Trudeau is first with 33%, followed by Scheer with 24%, Singh with 13% and May with 9%.

The environment is now the top issue facing Canada at 22% (+6), followed by the economy and jobs (21%, +2), health care (18%, -1) and housing, homelessness and poverty (17%, +4).

Health care is identified as the top issue in Atlantic Canada (33%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (23%), while the environment is top among Quebecers (33%). Housing, homelessness and poverty is the most important matter for British Columbians (24%), while the economy and jobs is first in Alberta (38%) and Ontario (23%).

Trudeau is the preferred leader to handle foreign affairs (32%)  health care (28%), and housing, homelessness and poverty (25%). May is clearly ahead on the environment (28%, with Trudeau at 21%)

The Liberal and Conservative leaders are tied or virtually even on four issues: crime and public safety (Scheer 26%, Trudeau 25%), economy and jobs (Trudeau 28%, Scheer 27%), energy and pipelines (Trudeau 25%, Scheer 25%) and accountability and leadership (Scheer 25%, Trudeau 24%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 24 to September 26, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most British Columbians Bought a Lottery Ticket in the Past Year

Two thirds want the government to do more to deal with the negative effects of gambling.

Vancouver, BC [September 20, 2019] – A majority of British Columbians bought a lottery ticket in the past year, with a sizeable proportion of players anticipating a “big win” in the process, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, almost three-in-five residents (58%) say they bought a lottery ticket in the past year.

Lottery ticket buyers in British Columbia are divided in their expectations on the game itself. While 41% do not anticipate they will win anything, 38% say they expect to get “a small prize” and 21% foresee winning “a big prize”.

“The youngest lottery ticket buyers in British Columbia have bigger dreams than their older counterparts,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 24% of those aged 18-to-34 do not believe they will win a prize, the proportion rises to 40% among those aged 35-to-54 and 50% among those aged 55 and over.”

British Columbians found other ways to gamble in the past year. Almost half (48%) bought a Scratch & Win ticket, more than a third (36%) attended a casino, and about one-in-five (19%) visited the PlayNow.com website.

Fewer residents of the province played poker (or other card games) online (12%), placed bets on a sporting event with a friend or relative (10%), through SportAction (9%) or on a horse race (5%) in the past 12 months.

Sport bets with friends or relatives are more popular among British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (15%) than among those aged 55 and over (5%).

When asked directly about casinos, three-in-five British Columbians (61%) believe these venues bring tourism dollars and create jobs. Conversely, 27% feel casinos increase gambling addiction and lead to more crime and traffic.

Almost nine-in-ten British Columbians (88%) think people will continue to find ways to gamble even if it was made illegal, and two thirds (67%) believe the government should do more to deal with the negative effects of gambling.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 14, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: GoToVan

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Back Opt-Out System for Organ and Tissue Donation

Support for change is highest in British Columbia, Alberta and Quebec.

Vancouver, BC [August 21, 2019] – A majority of Canadians would welcome a modification in the way the registries of organ and tissue donors are compiled across the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than three-in-five Canadians (63%) think their province should “definitely” or “probably” implement an “Active Donor Registration” system for organ and tissue donation after death.

Some jurisdictions around the world have established “Active Donor Registration” systems for organ and tissue donation. Under these systems, every person over the age of 18 is considered an organ and tissue donor after death unless they specifically opt-out of a registry.

Across the country, 25% of Canadians are opposed to their province implementing an opt-out system for organ and tissue donation and 13% are undecided.

Earlier this year, Nova Scotia’s House of Assembly unanimously passed the “Human Organ and Tissue Act”. The law makes every single person who has resided in the province for at least a year a potential organ and tissue donor after death. Nova Scotians who do not wish to be donors are able to opt-out of the system.

 “Support for enacting an opt-out system for organ and tissue donation reaches 66% in British Columbia, Alberta and Quebec,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “A majority of residents of Manitoba and Saskatchewan (63%), Atlantic Canada (59%) and Ontario (57%) would also welcome the change.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 12 to August 14, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views on Crime in British Columbia Vary by Generation

In the past four years, one-in-five residents of the province have reported a crime to the police.

Vancouver, BC [August 16, 2019] – The perceptions of British Columbians on crime and public safety go through sizeable fluctuations according to age, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, two-in-five of the province’s residents (40%) say they fear becoming a victim of a crime in their community “a great deal” or “a fair amount.”

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (48%) are significantly more likely to fear becoming victims of crime than those aged 35-to-54 (40%) and those aged 55 and over (33%).

On a regional basis, the area where most British Columbians fear becoming victims of a crime is Metro Vancouver (43%), followed by Southern BC (40%), the Fraser Valley (39%), Northern BC (37%) and Vancouver Island (30%).

“There is a deep generational divide when it comes to perceptions of public safety in British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Millennials are more likely to fear becoming victims and Baby Boomers are more likely to say that crime is on the rise in their community.”

While two thirds of British Columbians (68%) acknowledge that they would feel “very safe” or “moderately safe” walking alone in their own neighbourhood after dark, 31% say they would feel  “moderately unsafe” or “very unsafe.”

Women (41%) and British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (39%) are more likely to report that they would feel “unsafe” walking alone in their own neighbourhood after dark.

Almost two-in-five British Columbians (41%, +3 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2018) think the level of criminal activity in their community has increased in the past four years.

Most residents of Southern BC (56%) and the Fraser Valley (54%) believe crime has increased in their communities, compared to 41% for Northern BC, 38% for Vancouver Island and 37% for Metro Vancouver.

Across the province, one-in-five British Columbians (20%) say they have been the victims of a crime over the past few years where the police was called in (such as an assault or a car break-in) in their community—including 26% of those aged 18-to-34.

When asked how much specific factors are to blame “a great deal” for the current situation regarding crime and public safety in their community, more than two-in-five British Columbians (45%) point to “addiction and mental health issues” while one third (32%) select “gangs and the illegal drug trade.”

Fewer residents of the province blame an “inadequate court system” (24%), “poverty and inequality” (23%), “lack of values and the improper education of youth” (17%), “bad economy and unemployment” (14%), “insufficient policing and lack of resources to combat crime” (13%) and “immigrants and minorities” (9%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 7 to August 10, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca