Most Canadians Say Horses Are Not Food, Reject Exports to Asia

Only 16% knew that Canadian horses have been exported for slaughter and human consumption in Japan and South Korea.

Vancouver, BC [February 18, 2021] – The export of Canadian horses for slaughter and human consumption abroad is rejected by a large majority of Canadians, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, two thirds of Canadians (67%) oppose this practice, while 22% support it and 12% are undecided.

Opposition to the export of Canadian horses for slaughter and human consumption abroad is highest among women (76%). Significant majorities of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (65%), aged 35-to-54 (66%) and aged 55 and over (68%) also hold unfavourable views.

On a regional basis, Alberta posts the highest level of aversion to this practice (74%), followed by Atlantic Canada (73%), Ontario (70%), British Columbia (66%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 66%) and Quebec (62%).

Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election are slightly more likely to oppose the export of Canadian horses for slaughter and human consumption abroad (69%) than those who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (66%) and the Liberal Party (63%)

Since 2013, more than 30,000 Canadian horses have been exported for slaughter and human consumption in Japan and South Korea. 

More than four-in-five Canadians (84%) were unaware of this fact before taking the survey—a proportion that rises to 86% among women, 88% among Canadians aged 35-to-54 and 88% among Atlantic Canadians.

When asked a separate question about food sources, only 27% of Canadians consider it appropriate for humans to consume horses, while 65% deem this as inappropriate and 8% are undecided.

In stark contrast, at least three-in-four Canadians think chickens (88%), pigs (79%), turkeys (75%) and cattle (also 75%) are suitable food sources for humans.

Majorities of Canadians also think that the consumption of six other animals is appropriate: ducks (71%), sheep (69%), fish (68%), goats (64%), rabbits (58%) and geese (also 58%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from February 11 to February 13, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

One-in-Four Albertans Support Becoming an Independent Nation

The idea of independence is more appealing to the province’s residents if Saskatchewan and British Columbia join in.

Vancouver, BC [February 16, 2021] – Support for the formation of a country independent of Canada grows in both Alberta and Saskatchewan if British Columbia is included in the territory, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative sample of Canadians in the three western provinces gauged support for sovereignty under various scenarios.

The idea of an independent country that would encompass British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan is appealing to 29% of both Albertans and Saskatchewanians, but only to 12% of British Columbians.

Almost half of Albertans who voted for the United Conservative Party (UCP) in the 2019 provincial election (47%), more than a third of men in Saskatchewan (35%) and almost three-in-ten residents of Northern BC (28%) voice support for an independent country encompassing the three western provinces.

In this survey, one-in-four Albertans (25%) are in favour of their province becoming a country independent from Canada. This level of support is consistent with what was observed in similar questions asked by Research Co. in December 2018 (25%) but lower than the numbers registered in July 2019 (30%).

Fewer than one-in-six residents of Saskatchewan (16%) and British Columbia (12%) are in favour of their respective provinces becoming sovereign on their own.

When asked about the possibility of an independent nation encompassing Alberta and Saskatchewan, one-in-four Albertans (26%) and one-in-five Saskatchewanians (21%) are in favour.

Only 13% of British Columbians agree with the prospect of forming a sovereign nation with Alberta. While 18% of Albertans support their province joining the United States, only 7% of British Columbians concur.

Residents of the three provinces were also asked about their perceptions of specific levels of government. At least three-in-five Saskatchewanians (62%) and British Columbians (60%) consider their own provincial government as “very responsive” or moderately responsive” to their needs and the needs of other residents. In Alberta, only 43% of respondents feel the same way.

“In Alberta, the criticism towards the provincial government is not coming exclusively from supporters of opposition parties,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Half of those who voted for the UCP in 2019 (50%) believe that the current administration is responsive, but two-in-five (41%) do not.”

The responsiveness of local governments was rated positively by majorities of residents in each of the three provinces (64% in Saskatchewan, 60% in British Columbia and 58% in Alberta). 

While more than two-in-five British Columbians (45%) believe the federal government is responsive to their needs, the proportion drops to 32% in Alberta and 26% in Saskatchewan.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from February 7 to February 9, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia, 600 adults in Alberta and 600 adults in Saskatchewan. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in each province. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for British Columbia and +/- 4.0 percentage points for Alberta and Saskatchewan, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables for British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Divided Over Vaccine Rollout and Expectations

Fewer than one-in-four respondents believe the vaccines developed in Russia, China and India are safe for them.

Vancouver, BC [February 4, 2021] – Canadians are split on the notion that every resident of the country who wants to have a vaccine against COVID-19 will be able to get one in the timeline specified by the federal government, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In December 2020, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) stated that it expected to have enough COVID-19 vaccine doses to inoculate every willing Canadian by the end of September 2021.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 45% of Canadians believe this goal will be attained, while 46% think it will not be attained.

“More than half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (53%) expect everyone in the country to be vaccinated in the next eight months,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer Canadians aged 35-to-54 (46%) and aged 55 and over (37%) have the same optimism.”

About three-in-four Canadians (74%) say they would take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available to them, while 18% would not and 8% are undecided. These proportions are consistent with what Research Co. has found in surveys conducted in September 2020November 2020 and January 2021.

Canadians are divided in their assessment of various aspects of the COVID-19 vaccine rollout. While 46% say they are satisfied with the procurement of vaccine doses from the federal government, 43% are not.

Canadians who supported the Conservative Party in the 2019 election are particularly critical of the federal government, with 65% saying they are dissatisfied with the procurement of vaccine doses—compared to 44% for those who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) and 30% for those who voted for the Liberal Party.

More than half of Canadians (51%) are satisfied with the vaccination plans and phases outlined by their province. 

While majorities of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (57%), British Columbia (56%), Atlantic Canada (54%) and Quebec (53%) are satisfied with this aspect of the vaccine rollout, the proportion is lower in Ontario (45%) and Alberta (42%).

Across the country, 41% of Canadians say they are satisfied with the pace of vaccination efforts in their province, 49% are dissatisfied. 

The level of satisfaction with the pace of vaccination efforts is highest in Quebec (46%), followed by British Columbia (45%), Atlantic Canada (42%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (40%), Alberta (37%) and Ontario (34%).

Health authorities around the world have allowed the emergency use of nine vaccines against COVID-19. When this survey was conducted, Canada had only allowed two vaccines: the Pfizer–BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine and the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. 

More than two thirds of Canadians consider the Moderna (69%) and Pfizer (67%) vaccines as “safe” for them personally. These two vaccines are considered “not safe” by 12% and 15% of Canadians respectively.

Almost half of Canadians (48%) feel the Oxford-Astra Zeneca COVID-19 vaccine is “safe” for them personally, while 16% consider it “not safe” and 35% are not sure.

Fewer than one-in-four Canadians deem six other vaccines as “safe” for them: the KeeGam-COVID-Vac (Sputnik V) from Russia (20%), the EpiVacCorona from Russia (also 20%), the BBV152 (Varat Biotech) from India (also 20%), the CoronaVac (Sinovac) from China (18%), the Ad5-nCoV (Cansino Biologics) from China (17%) and the BBIBP-CorV (Sinopharm) from China (15%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from January 30 to February 1, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Want Data Access and Decorum in Legislature

More than three-in-five of the province’s residents believe it is time to eliminate heckling during Question Period.

Vancouver, BC [January 29, 2021] – Many residents of British Columbia are on board with some changes recently suggested by the outgoing Speaker of the Legislative Assembly, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In December, Darryl Plecas—who served as speaker from  September 2017 to December 2020—issued a report outlining several recommendations for the future of the Legislative Assembly.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, four-in-five British Columbians (80%) are in favour of providing public access, wherever possible, to the data and information being used to make decisions in accessible and manageable ways.

In addition, seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%) agree with establishing a non-partisan “fact-checker” of statements made by MLAs in the Chamber, and more than three-in-five (63%) want to develop strategies for civic organizations to engage with the Legislative Assembly.

There is also wide support for specific measures aimed at fostering respectful behaviour inside the legislature. More than half of British Columbians (57%) support establishing an all-party parliamentary committee to examine parliamentary decorum, including heckling. This includes majorities of British Columbians who voted for the BC Green Party (57%), the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (62%) and the BC Liberals (66%) in last year’s provincial election.

There is no definite consensus on what type of behaviour British Columbians would like to banish from Question Period in the legislature. While only 41% of British Columbians would eliminate clapping, there is majority support for abandoning two other practices: the banging of desks (55%) and heckling (63%).

The idea of lowering the voting age for provincial elections to 16 years is supported by 28% of British Columbians, while 64% are opposed. 

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be in favour of lowering the voting age (38%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (31%) and aged 55 and over (17%).

“There is very little opposition from British Columbians to the proposals that seek to address information transparency and public participation in the legislature,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The most contentious idea is the one related to lowering the voting age.”

In a two-country survey conducted by Research Co. in November 2020, 62% of Canadians and 58% of Americans rejected the notion of allowing people aged 16 and 17 to vote in federal elections.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from January 16 to January 18, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Would Ban Non-Essential Travel During Pandemic

Practically three-in-four of the country’s residents say they will “definitely” or “probably” take a COVID-19 vaccine.

Vancouver, BC [January 25, 2021] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians believe it would be wise to impose travel restrictions inside and across provinces during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 80% of Canadians agree with prohibiting non-essential travel from one province to another. 

In addition, 72% of Canadians are in favour of prohibiting non-essential travel inside their own province—a proportion that rises to 78% among those aged 55 and over and 81% among those who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election.

During the holiday season, some elected politicians travelled outside of their home province in contravention of a federal public health guidance to avoid all non-essential travel.

Three-in-five Canadians (61%) think this is a very serious offence and want elected politicians who travelled during the holiday season to resign from their legislatures or face a recall vote.

Nine-in-ten Canadians (90%) are in favour of placing all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period and a similarly high proportion (88%) would keep the border with the United States closed to non-essential travel.

While 51% of Canadians agree with allowing K-12 students to go back to in-class learning in their province, 39% disagree with this course of action.

Almost three-in-four Canadians (74%, +1 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in November) say they will “definitely” or “probably” take a vaccine against COVID-19, while 16% (+2) would not and 9% (-4) are not sure.

Almost nine-in-ten Canadians (88%) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside. Slightly fewer respondents (81%) say they wear a mask every time they leave their home.

Across the country, 58% of Canadians (-5) are satisfied with the way the federal government has managed the COVID-19 pandemic. Similar proportions of residents are content with the performance of their provincial governments (58%, -6) and their municipal governments (60%, -2).

Satisfaction with the way provincial administrations have handled the pandemic is highest in British Columbia (72%, +2), followed by Quebec (65%, -3), Ontario (53%, -15) and Alberta (34%, -12).

When it comes to personal behaviours to prevent infection, about three-in-ten Canadians (29%) say they clean the groceries they buy and 21% do not order food from restaurants at all.

This month saw increases in the proportion of Canadians who say they are overeating or eating more than usual at home (30%, +9), drinking alcohol more often (18%, +6) and losing their temper more often (17%, +2).

In addition, 18% of Canadians (+5) are having baths or showers less often than before the pandemic and one-in-ten (10%, +3) are brushing their teeth less often.

Half of Canadians (50%, -14) believe the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic is “definitely” or “probably” ahead of us, while 33% (+11) think the worst is “definitely” or “probably” behind us.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from January 18 to January 20, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Support Pandemic Ban on In-Person Worship

Only 12% of the province’s residents think the current fine of $2,300 for those who break the rules is “too high.”

Vancouver, BC [January 22, 2021] – The provincial government’s decision to forbid in-person worship services across British Columbia on account of the COVID-19 pandemic is endorsed by a sizeable majority of residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 81% of British Columbians agree with the prohibition, while 13% disagree and 6% are not sure.

In November 2020, the provincial health officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry, banned all in-person faith-related gatherings in an effort to curb the spread of COVID-19.

Churches, temples, mosques, synagogues and gurdwaras can only hold services for special occasions—such as baptisms, weddings and funerals—and with 10 people or fewer in attendance.

Support for the decision to forbid in-person worship services is slightly higher among women (84%) than men (77%). Majorities of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (81%), aged 35-to-54 (75%) and aged 55 and over (85%) also agree with the government’s course of action.

“Four-in-five British Columbians who describe themselves as Christian (81%) believe the government made the right decision in banning in-person worship during the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support for the regulation is also high among residents who are atheist (87%), agnostic (75%) or who profess no religion (79%).” 

Some churches in British Columbia have been issued $2,300 tickets for holding in-person worship services in contravention of provincial orders. 

Two-in-five British Columbians (40%) believe the fine is “about right”, while a similar proportion (39%) deem it “too low.” Only 12% of the province’s residents feel the fine is “too high.”

While one-in-four residents of Northern BC (25%) believe the current monetary penalty is “too high”, the proportion drops 16% in the Fraser Valley and Southern BC, 11% in Metro Vancouver and 6% in Vancouver Island.

British Columbians of European descent are more likely to think that the $2,300 fine for holding in-person worship services is “too low” (43%) than those who described their ancestry as East Asian (37%), South Asian (30%) or First Nations, Métis or Inuit (26%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from January 16 to January 18, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Four Canadians Back Medical Assistance in Dying Rules

Almost three-in-five respondents personally think the practice should be permitted, but only under specific circumstances.

Vancouver, BC [January 15, 2021] – The regulations that allow people in Canada to seek medical assistance in dying under specific conditions are endorsed by a large majority of the country’s residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 76% of Canadians support the practice under the current guidelines specified by the federal government:

  • Being eligible for health services funded by the federal government, or a province or territory (or during the applicable minimum period of residence or waiting period for eligibility).
  • Being at least 18 years old and mentally competent.
  • Having a grievous and irremediable medical condition.
  • Making a voluntary request for medical assistance in dying that is not the result of outside pressure or influence.
  • Giving informed consent to receive medical assistance in dying.

Support for the regulations to seek medical assistance in dying is high across all groups, but the measure is particularly accepted among Canadians aged 55 and over (82%).

At least four-in-five residents of Alberta (84%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (80%) are in favour of the current guidelines to seek medical assistance in dying, along with 79% of British Columbians, 77% of Quebecers, 74% of Ontarians and 74% of Atlantic Canadians.

When asked about their personal feelings on this issue, almost three-in-five Canadians (58%) believe medical assistance in dying should be allowed, but only under specific circumstances. 

Only one-in-five Canadians (20%) would always allow the practice regardless of who requests it, while one-in-ten (11%) would never permit it.

“Majorities of Canadians who voted for each of the three major parties in the last federal election are personally in favour of permitting medical assistance in dying under specific circumstances,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This includes 64% of those who voted for the Liberal Party and 58% of those who voted for either the Conservative Party or the New Democratic Party (NDP).”

Just over two-in-five Canadians (43%) say they are satisfied with the regulations that are currently in place in Canada to deal with the issue of medical assistance in dying, while 26% are dissatisfied and 31% are undecided.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from January 9 to January 11, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Western Canadians Support Banning Single-Use Plastics

Majorities of residents of the four Canadian provinces say they are relying on reusable bags when shopping for groceries.

Vancouver, BC [January 12, 2021] – The federal government’s plan to curb the use of single-use plastics in Canada is supported by most residents of the four western provinces, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative provincial samples, 82% of British Columbians, 78% of Manitobans, 71% of Albertans and 69% of Saskatchewanians support the proposal.

The federal plan calls for as ban on grocery checkout bags, straws, stir sticks, six-pack rings, plastic cutlery and food takeout containers made from hard-to-recycle plastics.

Support for the ban on single-use plastics is highest among British Columbians who voted for the BC Green Party in the 2020 provincial election (91%), as well as those who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) in the most recent provincial democratic processes held in Saskatchewan (90%) and Alberta (86%).

In British Columbia, more than three-in-four respondents to this survey (77%) say they rely on their own re-usable bag when shopping for groceries—a proportion that rises to 80% among those aged 35-to-54.

Majorities of residents of Alberta (69%), Saskatchewan (64%) and Manitoba (60%) are also using their own bags when they shop for groceries, instead of bags provided by the stores.

More than half of British Columbians (54%) say they go out of their way to recycle—such as holding on to bottles and cans until they can be placed into a proper recycling bin—“all of the time”. The proportion for this particular behaviour is slightly lower in Saskatchewan (50%), Manitoba (48%) and Alberta (46%).

One-in-four British Columbians (26%) say they limit hot water usage in their home—taking shorter showers or running the washing machine or dishwasher with full loads only—“all of the time”, compared to 19% in both Alberta and Saskatchewan and 17% in Manitoba.

Other behaviours are not as widely embraced across Western Canada. While 13% of British Columbians and 11% of Albertans say they unplug electrical devices in their home—such as TVs, computers and cell phone chargers—when they are not in use “all of the time”, only 5% of Saskatchewanians and 4% of Manitobans follow the same course of action.

Fewer than one-in-ten residents of each province say they buy biodegradable products or eat organic or home-grown foods “all of the time.”

“Western Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to be keeping an eye on hot water usage in their homes,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, those aged 18-to-34 have been quicker to adopt biodegradable products.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from January 4 to January 6, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia, 600 adults In Alberta, 600 adults in Saskatchewan and 600 adults in Manitoba. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in each province. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for British Columbia and +/- 4.0 percentage points for Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views on Safety in British Columbia Unchanged Since 2019

Four-in-five residents support enacting municipal bans on handguns and military-style assault weapons.

Vancouver, BC [January 5, 2021] – The perceptions of British Columbians on the possibility of being affected by criminal activity have not gone through a significant fluctuation over the past year and a half, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two thirds of British Columbians (68%) say they would feel “very safe” or “moderately safe” walking alone in their own neighbourhood after dark—unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2019.

More than seven-in-ten residents of the Fraser Valley (72%) and Metro Vancouver (71%) say they would feel safe walking alone in their own neighbourhood after dark, compared to 67% in Southern BC and 56% in both Vancouver Island and Northern BC.

Just over two-in-five British Columbians (41%, +1 since August 2019) say they fear becoming victims of a crime in their community “a great deal” or “a fair amount”, while almost three-in-five (58%) do not.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to fear becoming victims of crime (53%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (46%) and aged 55 and over (33%).

When asked about the current situation regarding crime in their community, more than a third of British Columbians blame addiction and mental health issues (45%) and gangs and the illegal drug trade (38%).

Smaller proportions of the province’s residents point the finger at poverty and inequality (26%), an inadequate court system (26%), lack of values and the improper education for youth (24%),  a bad economy and unemployment (19%), insufficient policing and a lack of resources to combat crime (16%) and immigrants and minorities (9%).

In April, 27% of British Columbians suggested that insufficient policing was one of the factors to blame for criminal activity in their community,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In December, only 16% feel the same way.” 

Four-in-five British Columbians (80%, +1 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in September 2018) support enacting a ban on handguns within the limits of their municipality, while a slightly higher proportion (83%, -3) would prohibit military-style assault weapons.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 14 to December 16, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Endorse Tougher Penalties for Distracted Driving

Seven-in-ten residents of the province agree with seizing the electronic devices of repeat offenders.

Vancouver, BC [December 25, 2020] – A large proportion of residents of British Columbia report seeing distracted drivers on the road, and sizeable majorities are supportive of implementing new measures to curb the illegal practice, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, more than half of British Columbians (55%) say they witnessed a driver talking on a hand-held cell phone or texting while driving over the past month.

Residents of Southern BC (64%) and Vancouver Island (also 64%) are more likely to have recently seen a driver texting or chatting on a cell phone, compared to 61% in both Northern BC and the Fraser Valley and 49% in Metro Vancouver.

Drivers caught emailing, texting, or using an electronic device while driving in British Columbia face a fine of $368 and four penalty points (equivalent to $252) in their insurance penalty point premium. This means a total of $620 for a first-time infraction. 

Just over half of British Columbians (52%) believe the current fine for distracted driving is “about right”, while 30% consider it “too low” and 14% deem it “too high.”

Only 18% of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 believe the current fine for distracted driving in British Columbia is “too low”, compared to 29% among those aged 35-to-54 and 38% among those aged 55 and over.

When asked about other possible penalties for drivers caught emailing, texting, or using an electronic device in British Columbia, more than half of residents (54%) agree with suspending the driver for one year.

Support is higher for two other penalties: doubling the current fine to $1,240 (59%) and seizing the electronic devices of repeat offenders (70%).

“British Columbians who voted for each of the province’s major parties in the last election are in favour of tougher legislation to curtail distracted driving,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 50% of BC Liberal voters endorse doubling the current fine, the proportion rises to 57% among those who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) and 66% among those who cast ballots for BC Green Party candidates.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 14 to December 16, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Perceptions on the Benefits of Immigration Improve in Canada

While 54% of Canadians say immigration is having a positive effect in the country, only 43% of Americans hold the same view.

Vancouver, BC [December 22, 2020] – Canadians have developed a more positive opinion about immigration over the past two years, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 54% of Canadians think immigration is having a mostly positive effect in the country, up eight points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2019.

In the United States, 43% of Americans acknowledge that immigration is having a mostly positive effect, while 36% say it is mostly negative.

Just over two-in-five Canadians (43%, +8) think the number of legal immigrants who are allowed to relocate in their country should remain the same. One third of Canadians (32, -6) believe the level of legal immigration should be reduced, while 17% (-3) want it increased.

“Majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (51%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (51%) in last year’s federal election want legal immigration levels to stay as they are,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, a majority of Conservative voters (53%) call for a decrease.”

In the United States, the number of Americans who would maintain the current levels of legal immigration is akin to Canada’s (42%), while similar proportions favour either an increase (24%) or a reduction (25%).

Three-in-four Canadians (75%, +20) think the hard work and talent of immigrants makes Canada better—including 81% of residents of British Columbia and 87% of those who voted for the federal Liberals last year.

Almost two thirds of Canadians (65%, +15) believe immigrants should only be allowed in Canada if they adopt Canadian values—including 76% of those who voted for the Conservative Party last year.

While 46% of Americans think illegal immigrants are employed in jobs that American workers do not want, 40% believe they take jobs away from American workers—a proportion that rises to 62% among Republicans.

Practically half of Americans (49%) think illegal immigrants who are currently working in the United States should be allowed to stay in the country and eventually apply for citizenship. About one-in-five  Americans (19%) would continue to allow these workers on a temporary basis and without a path to citizenship, while just under one-in-four (23%) would opt for deportation. 

Democrats are significantly more likely to support the notion of illegal immigrants eventually becoming citizens (64%) than Independents (51%) and Republicans (34%).

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted from December 3 to December 5, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Liberals Stay Ahead in Canada as Trudeau’s Rating Improves

Health care (28%, +3) is regarded as the most important issue facing the country, followed by the economy and jobs (27%, -2).

Vancouver, BC [December 17, 2020] – The governing Liberal Party maintains the upper hand in Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 37% of decided voters would support the Liberal candidate in their riding if a federal election were held today, down one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September.

The Conservative Party is second with 31% (-1), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (+3), the Bloc Québécois with 7% (-1), the Green Party with 3% (=) and the People’s Party with 1% (=).

The Liberals are nine points ahead of the Conservatives among female decided voters (38% to 29%) and hold a three-point edge among male decided voters (36% to 33%).

The Conservatives are the most popular federal party in Alberta (51%) and in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (48%). The Liberals are ahead in Atlantic Canada (44%), Quebec (45%, with the Bloc at 35%) and Ontario (37%). In British Columbia, the New Democrats and the Conservatives are essentially tied (34% and 33% respectively), with the Liberals at 29%.

Health care is regarded as the most important issue facing the country by 28% of Canadians (+3), followed by the economy and jobs (27%, -2), COVID-19 (15%), housing, homelessness and poverty (9%, -3) and the environment (6%, -1).

“Concerns about health care are more prevalent among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (30%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (29%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Those aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be preoccupied with the economy and jobs (36%).”

The approval rating for Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is 55%, up five points since September, while 40% of Canadians disapprove of his performance (-5).

Trudeau’s rating is highest in Atlantic Canada (60%), followed by Ontario (59%), British Columbia (58%), Quebec (55%), Manitoba and Saskatchewan (42%) and Alberta (37%).

Just over one third of Canadians (35%, +2) approve of the way Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole has handled his duties, while 38% (+4) disapprove—including 45% of Quebecers.

Almost half of Canadians (46%, +2) approve of the performance of Jagmeet Singh as leader of the NDP. The numbers are lower for Green Party leader Annamie Paul (25%) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (17%, +3).

Trudeau remains ahead of all other leaders when Canadians are asked who would make the best prime minister of the country (39%, +1), followed by O’Toole (22%, -1), Singh (13%, =), Bernier (3%, +1), Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (2%, -1) and Paul (2%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 12 to December 14, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Many Canadians Willing to Avoid Office Life When Pandemic Ends

Four-in-five “provisional home workers” (80%)  say that working from home has been easier than they originally thought.

Vancouver, BC [December 11, 2020] – A vast majority of Canadians who are currently working from home instead of at their regular workplace say they would like to continue to explore this possibility after the COVID-19 pandemic has disappeared, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 80% of Canadian “provisional home workers” say they hope to be able to work from home more often after the COVID-19 outbreak has passed, up 15 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in April.

Almost nine-in-ten Canadian “provisional home workers” (89%, +9) feel their company trusts they are carrying on with their duties from home, and 78% (+9) think their company is perfectly equipped for them to do their work from home.

Four-in-five “provisional home workers” (80%, +18) acknowledge that working from home has been easier than they originally thought—including 87% of those aged 55 and over and 83% of Quebecers.

“Back in April, the notion of working from home was definitely intimidating for some Canadians,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Eight months later, most say they have all they need in order to fulfil their duties away from the office and acknowledge that the experience has been positive.”

Almost half of “provisional home workers” (46%, =) say they are having a difficult time working due to distractions at home.

There is a sizeable generational gap when it comes to focusing on the tasks at hand while at home. While only 25% of those aged 55 and over claim to have a tough time with distractions, the proportion rises to 45% among those aged 35-to-54 and 54% among those aged 18-to-34.

Two thirds of “provisional home workers” in Canada (68%, +1) say they miss interacting with other people at their regular office, including 73% of men, 73% of those aged 18-to-34 and 86% of British Columbians.

Almost half of “provisional home workers” (47%, +3) say they miss commuting to their regular office or workplace. Those aged 18-to-34 are more likely to yearn for their daily commute (54%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (43%) and aged 55 and over (44%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 2 to December 6, 2020, among 803 Canadian adults who are currently working from home instead of at their regular office. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

A Third of Americans Want to See Trump Run Again in 2024

Three-in-five (61%) believe the investigations into the outgoing president’s taxes should continue.

Vancouver, BC [December 9, 2020] – More than half of Americans would not welcome a new presidential bid by Donald Trump four years from now, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 34% of Americans say they would like to see Trump run again for president in 2024, while 58% disagree and 8% are undecided.

The possibility of a new Trump campaign is attractive for 66% of Republicans, 24% of Independents and 10% of Democrats.

Americans who watch Fox News are significantly more likely to endorse a Trump candidacy in 2024 (55%) than those who watch a local network (26%), CNN (also 26%) or MSNBC / CNBC (13%).

Only 15% of African Americans would like to see Trump become a presidential candidate again in the next election, compared to 32% of Latino / Hispanic Americans and 37% of White Americans. 

Three-in-five Americans (61%) believe the investigations into Trump’s taxes should continue—a proportion that includes 84% of Democrats, 63% of Independents and 34% of Republicans.

Democratic nominee Joe Biden won the 2020 United States Presidential election, with more than 51% of all cast ballots and 308 votes in the Electoral College.

More than two-in-five Americans (45%) believe president-elect Biden should commit to serving only one term in office, while 38% disagree with this course of action.

Americans aged 18-to-34 are more likely to wish for Biden’s commitment to be a one-term president (52%) than those aged 35-to-54 (44%) and those aged 55 and over (42%).

Two thirds of Americans (68%) are satisfied with the way their local governments have dealt with the COVID-19 outbreak, down one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in October

A majority of Americans (64%, -1) are satisfied with the performance of state governments, while only 44% (-1) are content with the way the federal government has managed the pandemic.

The approval rating for Trump stands at 42% this month, down four points since a Research Co. survey conducted in early November. More than half of Americans (54%, +2) disapprove of the way the president is handling his duties.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 3 to December 5, 2020, among 1,200 American adults.  The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here.

Photo Credit: Samson Katt

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Age and Gender Shape Views on Health Care in British Columbia

Almost half of the province’s residents agree with the recent court ruling on private delivery, while three-in-ten disagree.

Vancouver, BC [December 8, 2020] – The views of British Columbians on how best to manage the province’s health care system vary greatly by age and gender, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 27% of British Columbians identify long waiting times as the biggest problem facing the health care system right now, down 11 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2019.

A shortage of doctors and nurses is second on the list of concerns with 24% (+4), followed by inadequate resources and facilities (13%, -2), and bureaucracy and poor management (10%, =).

Fewer British Columbians believe the most important health care problems right now are the absence of a focus on preventive care (9%, +6), a lack of a wider range of services for patients (6%, =), vague legal rights of patients (3%, -1) and insufficient standards of hygiene (1%, unchanged).

Long waiting times is identified as the most important problem by women (30%), British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (34%) and British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (29%). Conversely, a shortage of doctors and nurses is the most prevalent concern for men (26%) and British Columbians aged 55 and over (33%).

In Metro Vancouver, one third of residents (33%) cite long waiting times as the biggest health care problem. A shortage of doctors and nurses is the top concern for respondents in Southern BC (25%), Vancouver Island (32%), the Fraser Valley (41%) and Northern BC (55%).

Almost two thirds of British Columbians (64%, +6) think there are some good things in health care in the province, but some changes are required.

Just over one-in-five British Columbians (22%, -4) believe the health care system in the province works well and only minor changes are needed to make it work better, while 11% (-1) think health care has so much wrong with it that we need to completely rebuild it.

“There are some significant gender differences when British Columbians assess the health care system,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 28% of men think only minor changes are needed, only 16% of women share the same point of view.”

The proportion of British Columbians who say they would be willing to pay out of their own pocket to have quicker access to medical services that currently have long waiting times fell from 45% in August 2019 to 40% this year.

In addition, only 27% of British Columbians are willing to travel to another country to have quicker access to medical services that currently have long waiting times, down 10 points since last year.

In September, a B.C. Supreme Court justice ruled that access to private health care is not a constitutional right, even if wait times for care under the public system are too long. Almost half of British Columbians (46%) agree with this decision, while 31% disagree and 23% are undecided.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 25 to November 27, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians and Americans Would Ban “Conversion Therapy”

Two thirds of Canadians and almost three-in-five Americans are in favour of same-sex couples being allowed to legally marry.

Vancouver, BC [December 4, 2020] – Most residents of Canada and the United States are in favour of abolishing the practice of “conversion therapy”, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 56% of Canadians and Americans think “conversion therapy” should be banned in their respective countries.

Proponents of “conversion therapy” believe that individuals who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, gender diverse, queer, and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2+) can be “converted” into heterosexuals through psychological or spiritual intervention.

More than half of Canadians (55%) and more than two-in-five Americans (45%) think “conversion therapy” is impossible—a proportion that rises to 58% among Canadian women and 51% among American women.

Two thirds of Canadians (67%) think same-sex couples should continue to be allowed to legally marry, up three points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in July 2019

Conversely, 12% of Canadians think same-sex couples should only be allowed to form civil unions and not marry, and 10% would not offer any kind of legal recognition to same-sex couples.

Support for the continued legality of same-sex marriage in Canada is highest among women (70%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (71%). 

Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) and the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election are more likely to support same-sex marriage (78% and 69% respectively) than those who cast ballots for the Conservative Party (56%).

Almost three-in-five Americans (57%) believe same-sex couples should continue to be allowed to legally marry, while 17% prefer the concept of civil unions and 16% would grant no legal recognition to same-sex partnerships.

In the United States, women (59%) and Americans aged 18-to-34 (62%) are more likely to endorse same-sex marriage. Majorities of those who identify as Democrats (68%) and Independents (58%) are also in favour of  same-sex marriage, compared to just 44% of Republicans.

The proportion of Americans who would not grant any legal recognition to same-sex partnerships climbs to 26% among Americans who supported Republican candidate Donald Trump in the 2020 United States presidential election, compared to 9% among those who voted for Democratic nominee Joe Biden.

In Canada, almost two-in-five respondents (39%) think people are born as LGBTQ2+, a view shared by 35% of Americans. However, 28% of Canadians and 34% of Americans think people choose to be LGBTQ2+.

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted from November 14 to November 16, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Endorse Travel Restrictions During COVID-19 Pandemic

More than four-in-five Canadians say they wear a mask every time they go out, up 12 points since September.

Vancouver, BC [December 1, 2020] – Almost two thirds of Canadians hold negative views on what the COVID-19 pandemic has in store, and three-in-four believe it is time to restrict travel inside their province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 64% of Canadians say the worst of the pandemic is “definitely” or “probably” ahead of us. This represents an 18-point increase since September, and the second highest level recorded on this question (68% in a poll conducted in April 2020). 

Public support for two regulations established by the federal government remains extremely high, with 92% of Canadians agreeing with the decision to keep the border with the United States closed to non-essential travel and 90% in favour of placing all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period.

Sizeable majorities of Canadians also endorse two other measures: prohibiting non-essential travel from one province to another (82%) and prohibiting non-essential travel inside their province (75%).

Nine-in-ten Canadians (90%) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside, while 50% are in favour of allowing K-12 students to go back go in-class learning in their province.

Across the country, 63% of Canadians are satisfied with the performance of the federal government in handling the COVID-19 pandemic, down one point since September. More than three-in-five respondents also provide a positive assessment of their provincial administrations (64%) and their municipal governments (62%).

“In the four most populous provinces, the highest level of satisfaction with the way COVID-19 has been managed is observed in British Columbia (70%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are slightly lower in Quebec and Ontario (each at 68%), while Alberta fell to an all-time low (46%).”

More than seven-in-ten Canadians (73%, +1) say they will “definitely” or “probably” take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available, while 14% would not and 13% are not sure.

More than four-in-five Canadians (82%) say they are wearing a mask every time they go out, up from 70% in September. Just under a third (31%) are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection, and one-in-five (20%) are not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection.

Just over one-in-five Canadians (21%) say they are overeating more than usual at home, while 15% are losing their temper more often and 12% are drinking alcohol more often.

About one-in-seven Canadians (13%) are having a bath or shower less often than before the pandemic and 7% acknowledge that they are brushing their teeth less often than before.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from November 22 to November 24, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians and Americans Would Allow Legal Immigrants to Vote

Support for allowing people aged 16 and 17 to cast ballots in federal elections is decidedly lower.

Vancouver, BC [November 27, 2020] – Sizeable majorities of adults in Canada and the United States are willing to allow permanent residents to participate in democratic processes that are currently accessible only to citizens, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 72% of Canadians agree with allowing permanent residents to vote in federal elections, while 20% disagree.

In the United States, 64% of respondents would allow permanent residents—sometimes referred to as “Green Card Holders”—to cast ballots in federal elections, while 27% are opposed to this idea.

“Support for extending federal voting rights to permanent residents of Canada encompasses majorities of voters who supported the Liberal Party (78%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (71%) and the Conservative Party (66%) in the last federal election,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the United States, the idea is attractive to 76% of Democrats, 62% of Republicans and 51% of Independents.”

More than three-in-five Canadians (62%) are opposed to allowing people aged 16 and 17 to vote in federal elections, while 29% agree with this idea.

Extending voting rights to people aged 16 and 17 is rejected by large proportions of Canadians aged 55 and over (72%). Albertans (78%) and Conservative Party voters in 2019 (also 78%).

In the United States, more than half of respondents (58%) disagree with allowing people aged 16 and 17 to cast ballots in federal elections, while 33% are in favour of this idea.

American residents aged 55 and over (77%) and Independents (74%) are more likely to believe that voting rights should not be extended to those aged 16 and 17.

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted from November 14 to November 16, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Western Canadians Perceive Increase in Criminal Activity

Fewer than a third of residents of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba have reported crimes to the police.

Vancouver, BC [November 24, 2020] – More than two-in-five residents of four Canadian provinces believe that unlawful activity is on the rise in their communities, even if significantly fewer have actually been victims of crime, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative provincial samples, 54% of Manitobans say the level of criminal activity has increased in their community over the past three years.

Almost half of Albertans (48%) also feel that criminal activity in their communities has risen in the past three years. The numbers are slightly lower in British Columbia (42%) and Saskatchewan (41%).

The proportion of residents of the four western provinces who feel crime has decreased is in single digits (7% in Manitoba, 6% in Alberta and British Columbia, and 5% in Saskatchewan).

When respondents are asked if they have been victims of a crime that was reported to the police (such as an assault or a car break-in) in their community, only 20% of British Columbians answered affirmatively. The proportion is higher in Alberta (24%), Saskatchewan (27%) and Manitoba (31%).

“There is a clear divide between perceptions of crime and the reality that communities across Western Canada are reporting,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Respondents are significantly more likely to believe that unlawful activity has increased than to have personally experienced crime.”

In British Columbia, three-in-ten residents of Northern BC (31%) and one-in-five residents of Metro Vancouver (21%) say that they have been victims of a crime that was reported to the police over the past three years. 

In Alberta, residents of Edmonton are more likely to have experienced crime (26%) than those in Calgary (22%) or in the rest of the province (23%). 

A similar situation is observed in Saskatchewan, where more residents of Saskatoon (28%) say they have been victims of crime than those who live in Regina (24%) or in the rest of the province (18%).

In Manitoba, the proportion criminal activity reported to the police stands at 29% in Winnipeg and at 33% in the remaining areas of the province.

The groups that are more likely to believe that criminal activity is on the rise in their communities are British Columbians aged 55 and over (45%), Albertans aged 55 and over (56%), women in Saskatchewan (45%) and Manitobans aged 35-to-54 (58%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 14 to November 16, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia, 600 adults In Alberta, 600 adults in Saskatchewan and 600 adults in Manitoba. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in each province. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for British Columbia and+/- 4.0 percentage points for Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Vancouverites Support Zoning Law Changes, SkyTrain to UBC

More than half of likely voters would abandon the “at-large system” and move to a “ward system” to elect councillors.

Vancouver, BC [November 20, 2020] – More than half of likely voters in the City of Vancouver are in favour of a proposal to modify zoning laws, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of likely voters in the City of Vancouver, 53% of respondents support changing zoning laws to allow property owners to build up to six strata title units on a standard lot, provided the new building is no taller than an average home.

Support for this modification is highest among women (55%) and likely voters aged 35-to-54 (53%), those who voted for independent candidate Kennedy Stewart in the 2018 mayoral election (56%) and those who voted for Non-Partisan Association (NPA) candidate Ken Sim (also 56%).

Four-in-five likely voters in the City of Vancouver (81%) support extending the Skytrain Millennium Line (currently under construction to Arbutus) to the University of British Columbia (UBC) campus at Point Grey. This includes sizeable majorities of respondents in the West Side (78%), East Side (81%) and Downtown (86%).

When asked about specific issues related to municipal elections in the City of Vancouver, 52% of likely voters think the “at-large system” (where voters select 10 councillors) should be abandoned and replaced by a “ward system” (where councillors can be elected in specific constituencies).

“Majorities of likely voters aged 18-to-34 (60%) and aged 35-to-54 (55%) favour a ward system to elect councillors in the City of Vancouver,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support drops to 39% among likely voters aged 55 and over.”

Three-in-five likely voters (60%) would like to see candidates running for office in the City of Vancouver presenting the signatures of 100 nominators, instead of the current threshold of 25. In addition, 55% of likely voters think anyone who wants to run for public office in municipal elections should pay a $500 deposit to register, instead of the current one of $100.

Just under half of likely voters (46%) think it would be worthwhile to explore the idea of amalgamating all of the municipalities in Metro Vancouver, like they did in Toronto or Montreal. The notion of reviewing the possibility of amalgamation is more popular among men (49%) and likely voters aged 18-to-34 (48%).

Likely voters are divided on the idea of eliminating the Board of Parks and Recreation and placing public parks and the public recreation system under the jurisdiction of City Council. Across the city, 44% of likely voters agree with this idea, while 48% disagree.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 9 to November 12, 2020, among 400 municipal likely voters in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: James Wheeler

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca