Lead for New Democratic Party Increases in British Columbia

John Horgan is ahead of Andrew Wilkinson as the best leader to handle the five most important issues for voters in the province.

Vancouver, BC [October 8, 2020] – The BC New Democratic Party (NDP) has extended its advantage in British Columbia’s provincial electoral campaign, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 48% of decided voters in British Columbia would cast a ballot for the BC NDP candidate in their constituency, up four points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in late September.

The BC Liberals remain in second place with 36% (-1), followed by the BC Green Party with 13% (=) and the BC Conservative Party with 2% (-3). 

The BC NDP holds a nine-point edge over the BC Liberals among decided male voters (47% to 38%) and a 16-point lead among decided female voters (49% to 33%).

The New Democrats are also ahead of the BC Liberals among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (45% to 31%), decided voters aged 35-to-54 (46% to 33) and decided voters aged 55 and over (44% to 34%).

Just under one-in-four decided voters (23%) say they may change their mind and support another party’s candidate in the election scheduled for Oct. 24. Supporters of the BC Liberals and the BC NDP are less likely to consider a switch (15% and 20% respectively) than those who plan to vote for the BC Greens (29%).

When asked about the main factor that motivates their selection, 43% of decided voters cite the party’s ideas and policies, while 21% focus mostly on the party’s leader and 14% concentrate on the party’s candidate in the riding. Fewer decided voters in British Columbia are swayed by a desire for stability (11%), a desire for change (10%) or disgust with other contending candidates (4%).

The approval rating for Premier and BC NDP leader John Horgan stands at 65% (-1). The numbers are lower for BC Liberals leader Andrew Wilkinson (40%, +1) and BC Greens leader Sonia Furstenau (33%, -4).

Horgan’s campaign momentum is balanced, with 24% of likely voters in British Columbia saying their opinion of him has improved and 24% stating that it has worsened. In contrast, Wilkinson has a negative momentum score (Improved 16%, Worsened 26%) as does Furstenau (Improved 12%, Worsened 16%).

On the preferred premier question, almost half of likely voters in British Columbia (47%, +3) select Horgan, with Wilkinson at 27% (=) and Furstenau at 6% (-1).

As was the case last month, likely voters in British Columbia are primarily preoccupied with housing, poverty and homelessness (25%, +1), the economy and jobs (also 25%, +4) and health care (23%, -3). Other issues mentioned by likely voters are COVID-19 (8%, -3), the environment (7%, =), crime and public safety (4%, -4), accountability (3%, =), education (1%, =) and energy (1%, +1).

When asked which leader is better suited to handle specific issues, Horgan holds sizeable leads over Wilkinson on COVID-19 (52% to 20%), health care (48% to 24%), education (42% to 23%), the economy and jobs (42% to 30%), housing, poverty and homelessness (40% to 23%), accountability (37% to 28%), crime and public safety (37% to 30%) and energy (34% to 27%).

On the environment, Furstenau is in first place (33%), followed by Horgan with 29% and Wilkinson with 18%.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 5 to October 7, 2020, among 750 likely voters in British Columbia, including 698 decided voters in the 2020 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.6 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 3.7 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by James Wheeler

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Race Relations Have Worsened for a Majority of Americans

The country is deeply divided on whether to rename U.S. Army installations christened after Confederate historical figures.

Vancouver, BC [September 30, 2020] – Adults in the United States hold ominous views on the issue of race relations, as considerable proportions of residents of specific ethnic background say they have experienced racism in the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 58% of Americans say race relations in the United States have worsened over the past two years, while only 30% believe they have improved.

Practically three-in-four respondents of Native American descent (73%) think race relations have worsened over the past two years—a view shared by 59% of White Americans, 58% of Asian and Pacific Islanders, 58% of African Americans and 46% of Hispanic and Latino Americans.

About three-in-five Americans say they have personally experienced behaviour that they would consider racist in the United States on social media (60%) and during day-to-day interactions with others (59%). 

Smaller proportions of Americans have endured racism at work (49%), at school (47%), during interactions with police or law enforcement officers (44%) and during interactions with the health care system (39%).

“Almost two thirds of Americans of African and Hispanic or Latino descent (64% each) say they have experienced racist behaviour when dealing with police and law enforcement in the United States,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower for Native Americans (51%), Asian and Pacific Islanders (42%) and White Americans (38%).”

More than half of Americans say they have witnessed racist behaviour on social media (68%), during day-to-day interactions with others (65%), at work (56%), at school (55%) and during interactions with police or law enforcement officers (also 55%). 

More than two-in-five Americans (46%) say they have witnessed racist behaviour during interactions with the health care system.

A majority of Americans (56%) have a positive opinion of the Black Lives Matter movement, while 35% hold negative views. 

Perceptions on Black Lives Matter vary greatly according to ethnicity, from a high of 71% among African Americans to a low of 40% among Native Americans.

Half of Americans (50%) hold positive views on the #MeToo and #TimesUp movement, while 30% have a negative opinion.

Positive perceptions of #MeToo and #TimesUp are higher with Americans aged 18-to-34 and aged 35-to-54 (56% each) than among those aged 55 and over (40%).

Respondents to this survey were also asked about four recent decisions and proposals. 

More than half of Americans agree with NASCAR’s decision to ban the Confederate Flag from events (56%) while 33% disagree.

On a regional basis, agreement with NASCAR’s choice is highest in the West (64%), followed by the Midwest (58%), the South (54%) and the Northeast (52%).

The nationwide results are similar for the State of Mississippi’s decision to change its flag to a new one that will not feature the Confederate battle emblem. A majority of Americans (56%) agree with this decree, while one third (33%) disagree.

On this particular decision, support is also highest from Americans who reside in the West (64%), followed by the Midwest (57%), the South (55%) and the Northeast (50%).

Two other proposals are decidedly more contentious. While 46% of respondents agree with the removal of monuments and sculptures that feature Americans who owned slaves, 46% disagree and 8% are undecided.

Support for the removal of these monuments and sculptures stands at 63% among Democrats and 74% among African Americans, but drops to 42% among Independents, 30% among Republicans and 40% among White Americans.

The results are similar for the notion of renaming U.S. Army installations named after Confederate historical figures. Across the country, 45% of Americans agree with this proposal, while 44% disagree.

Support for changing the names of these installations is higher among Democrats (65%) and African Americans (61%) and lower among Republicans (28%) and White Americans (39%).

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted on August 3 and August 4, 2020, and from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among 2,400 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.0 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Photo: Life Matters

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Many Likely Voters in British Columbia Plan to Vote by Mail in 2020

Nine-in-ten likely voters in the province have confidence in Elections BC to oversee the entire voting process this year.

Vancouver, BC [September 28, 2020] – British Columbia could see a substantial number of mail-in ballots in this year’s provincial election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, three-in-ten likely voters in British Columbia (29%) say they intend to cast their ballot by mail this year, up from 2% who recall voting this way in 2017.

While 58% of respondents to this survey remember voting in person on Election Day in the last provincial election, only 28% say they are currently planning to cast their ballot in the same fashion on October 24.

The proportion of likely voters who intent to cast their ballot during the Advance Voting period is also lower in 2020. In 2017, 36% of respondents say they took advantage of this option. This year, only 27% intend to vote this way.

In addition, 16% of likely voters in British Columbia are currently not sure about the way in which they will cast their ballot in 2020.

“The concept of postal voting is particularly attractive for likely voters in Vancouver Island (32%) and the Fraser Valley (also 32%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “A similar proportion of those who reside in Metro Vancouver (29%) would also currently prefer to vote by mail,”

Likely voters aged 55 and over are slightly less likely to cast their ballot on Election Day (25%) than those aged 18-to-34 (31%) and those aged 35-to-54 (30%).

Conversely, voting by mail is a more popular option for likely voters aged 35-to-54 (33%) and aged 55 and over (31%) than for those aged 18-to-34 (21%).

Across the province, 90% of likely voters are “very confident” or “moderately confident” that Elections BC —the non-partisan office of the British Columbia legislature responsible for conducting provincial and local elections—will be able to oversee the entire voting process in this year’s provincial ballot.

Sizeable proportions of likely voters also express confidence in Elections BC to ensure that there is no fraudulent activity with mailed ballots (82%) and to enforce social distancing at polling stations (74%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 21 to September 23, 2020, among 750 likely voters in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.6 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by James Wheeler

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

BC NDP Ahead of Rivals as Campaign Starts in British Columbia

John Horgan has a 17-point lead over Andrew Wilkinson when voters are asked who would make the Best Premier.

Vancouver, BC [September 24, 2020] – As British Columbia prepares for a unique electoral campaign in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic, the governing New Democratic Party (NDP) is in first place, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 44% of decided voters in British Columbia would support the BC NDP candidate in their constituency in the election scheduled for October 24. The BC NDP has gained three points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May.

The BC Liberals are in second place with 37% (+4), followed by the BC Green Party with 13% (-3) and the BC Conservative Party with 4% (-5). 

The BC NDP holds a 12-point lead among decided female voters (47% to 35%). The race is significantly closer among decided male voters (41% for the BC NDP and 39% for the BC Liberals).

The BC Liberals are six-points ahead of the BC NDP in Southern BC (43% to 37%). 

The BC Green Party has its best numbers among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (22%, with the BC NDP at 38%) and in Vancouver Island (22%, with the BC NDP at 50%).

Two thirds of British Columbians (67%, -6) approve of the way Premier and BC NDP leader John Horgan is handling his duties, while one-in-four (25%, +7) disapprove.

Since May, the approval rating for BC Liberals leader Andrew Wilkinson dropped by nine points to 39%. Recently selected BC Green Party leader Sonia Furstenau holds similar numbers (37%), while the rating is significantly lower for BC Conservative Party leader Trevor Bolin (23%, -12).

When likely voters are asked who would make the Best Premier of British Columbia, more than two-in-five (44%) select Horgan, while 27% choose Wilkinson. Furstenau and Bolin are in single digits (7% and 2% respectively) and 21% are undecided.

More than one-in-four likely voters (26%, -2) think health care is the most important issue facing the province. Housing, poverty and homelessness is a close second at 24% (+7), followed by the economy and jobs (21%, =), COVID-19 (11%, -10), crime and public safety (8%, +6) and the environment (7%, +3).

“At the start of the provincial campaign, the most pressing concerns of voters in British Columbia vary greatly depending on age,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Housing, poverty and homelessness is especially important for those aged 18-to-34 (29%), while the economy and jobs is top of mind for those aged 35-to-54 (26%) and health care is paramount for those aged 55 and over (29%).”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 21 to September 23, 2020, among 750 likely voters in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.6 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by James Wheeler

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Americans Reject Lifting Term Limits for Presidents

Likely voters in the United States are more supportive of reforms that would reduce the tenures of Members of Congress.

Vancouver, BC [September 23, 2020] – The notion of allowing the President of the United States to serve more than two terms in office is not attractive to a large proportion of American likely voters, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of likely voters, only 6% of respondents are willing to lift term litis to allow American presidents to serve as many four-year terms as they want.

While one-in-four likely voters (26%) would prefer to limit the head of state to a single four-year term, almost two thirds (65%) would keep the current regulations that allow presidents to serve for two four-year terms,

“Support for completely abolishing term limits at the White House has dropped from 12% in a survey conducted in May 2013, four months after Barack Obama was sworn in for his final term, to 6% this year,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “A majority of likely voters in all regions believe the current guidelines should remain in place.”

Just over a third of likely voters (35%) would limit U.S. Senators to one six-year term, while a similar proportion (34%) would prefer to limit members of the upper house to two six-year terms.

While 9% of likely voters would endorse an 18-year tenure for U.S. Senators (three six-year terms), 16% would keep the current regulations that allow members of the upper house to serve as many terms as they want.

Half of likely voters in the United States (50%) are willing to limit members of the House of Representatives to six-year tenures (three two-year terms), while about one-in-five (21%) would prefer to allow members of the lower house to serve for up to 12 years.

Just under one-in-five likely voters (18%) would continue to allow members of the House of Representatives to serve as many terms as they want.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among 1,200 American adults.  The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Liberals Hold a Six-Point Lead Over Conservatives in Canada

The economy and jobs (30%) and health care (25%) are identified as the most important issues facing the country.

Vancouver, BC [September 17, 2020] – The governing Liberal Party is ahead of all other contenders in Canada’s federal political scene, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 38% of decided voters would support the Liberal candidate in their constituency if an election were held today, down one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May.

The Conservative Party is second with 32% (+2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 17% (=), the Bloc Québécois with 8% (+3), the Green Party with 3% (-4) and the People’s Party with 1% (=).

“Among decided voters, the Liberals are the most popular party in Atlantic Canada (45%) and Ontario (43%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The Conservatives lead in Alberta (58%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (45%).”

In Quebec, the Liberals are five points ahead of the Bloc (39% to 34%). In British Columbia, the three main federal parties are locked in a close race (Conservatives 34%, Liberals 31%, New Democrats 29%).

Three-in-ten Canadians (30%) say the economy and jobs is the most important issue facing the country right now, followed by health care (25%), housing, homelessness and poverty (12%), the environment (7%), and accountability and leadership (6%).

Residents of Alberta are particularly preoccupied with the economy and jobs (52%, the highest proportion across all regions), while Atlantic Canadians are more worried about health care (44%).

Housing, homelessness and poverty is a bigger concern in British Columbia and Ontario (each at 19%) than in other Canadian provinces, while Quebec has the highest proportion of residents who think the environment is the most important issue right now (16%).

Across the country, 51% of Canadians approve of the performance of Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau, while 45% disapprove. The incumbent prime minister has his best numbers with Canadians aged 18-to-34 (59%), Ontarians (58%) and Quebecers (52%). 

The approval rating for opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole stands at 33%, with 34% of Canadians disapproving and 33% being undecided. O’Toole’s rating is highest in Alberta (50%) and lowest in Quebec (26%).

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%) approve of the way NDP leader Jagmeet Singh has handled his duties, while the rating is significantly lower for Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (20%, and 42% in Quebec), interim Green Party leader Jo-Ann Roberts (21%) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (14%).

Almost two-in-five Canadians (38%) think Trudeau would make the best Prime Minister of Canada. O’Toole is second on the list with 23%, followed by Singh with 13%. Blanchet, Bernier and Roberts are in single digits.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 13, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Thomas J. Whitmore is Most Popular Fictional President in U.S.

Three-in-five likely voters would vote for the character played by Bill Pullman in the movie “Independence Day”.

Vancouver, BC [September 16, 2020] – Three fictional presidents could count on the support of more than half of voters in the United States if they were actually running for office, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample asked American likely voters whether they would cast a ballot for seven different fictional presidents that have appeared in movies and television series.

Three-in-five respondents (61%) say they would “definitely” or “probably” vote for Thomas J. Whitmore (as played by Bill Pullman in the movie “Independence Day”) if he was actually running for office.

“Support for Whitmore is extraordinary across the political spectrum,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In this survey, 64% of Democrats, 60% of Independents and 56% of Republicans would vote for Whitmore.”

Two other presidents could count on the support of half of likely voters in an election: Andrew Shepherd (as played by Michael Douglas in the movie “The American President”) (56%) and Jed Bartlett (as played by Martin Sheen in the TV series “The West Wing”) (52%).

Shepherd and Bartlett—who are both portrayed as representing the Democratic Party—are particularly popular with American likely voters who identify as Democrats (62% for each fictional president). 

The proportion of would-be voters across the United States is slightly lower for David Palmer (as played by Dennis Haysbert in the TV series “24”) (48%), Dave Kovic (as played by Kevin Kline in the movie “Dave”) (44%) and Selina Meyer (as played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus in the TV Series “Veep”) (40%).

Francis Underwood (as played by Kevin Spacey in the TV series “House of Cards”) could count on the support of a third of likely voters in the United States (34%).

Palmer and Kovic are particularly popular with women (54% and 52% respectively). In addition, while 48% of female likely voters would cast a ballot for Meyer, only 34% of men would join them. 

Underwood has his best numbers among likely voters aged 18-to-34 (51%) but drops slightly to 44% among those aged 35-to-54. Only 13% of American likely voters aged 55 and over would consider casting a ballot for Underwood in a presidential election.

The most popular fictional presidents for White likely voters in the United States are Whitmore (59%) and Shepherd (55%). The top two is identical among likely voters of Hispanic and Latino descent (Whitmore 70%, Shepherd 63%), while African American voters choose Whitmore (61%) and Palmer (57%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among 1,200 American adults.  The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Biden Keeps National Lead Over Trump in United States Race

The Democratic nominee is regarded as the best person to handle health care, the environment and race relations.

Vancouver, BC [September 9, 2020] – Democratic Party presidential nominee Joe Biden remains ahead of Republican Party incumbent Donald Trump in the United States presidential race, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of likely voters, 53% of decided voters (unchanged since a Research Co. poll conducted in August) will vote for Biden in the election, while 44% (+2) would cast a ballot for Trump.

Support remains low at the national level for Libertarian Party nominee Jo Jorgensen (1%), Green Party nominee Howie Hawkins (also 1%) and other candidates (also 1%).

Among decided voters, Trump gets his best numbers with men (55%) and Americans aged 35-to-54 (54%). Biden leads with women (63%), Americans aged 18-to-34 (57%) and Americans aged 55 and over (61%).

Among White decided voters, Trump is ahead of Biden (51% to 47%). Majorities of decided voters of African American descent (83%) and Hispanic and Latino origin (70%) would support the Democratic nominee.

“Just 7% of likely voters in the United States have not chosen a candidate to support on Election Day,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 4% of decided voters say they may change their mind and support another candidate in the election.”

When asked about their motivation for supporting each of the two major party nominees, almost half of Trump voters (46%) say the most important factor is the candidate’s ideas and policies, followed by his party (30%). 

More than a third of Biden voters (36%) say the candidate’s ideas and policies are paramount, followed by disgust with other candidates (18%) and a desire for change (also 18%).

When likely voters are asked which one of the two main candidates is better suited to handle specific issues, Biden remains well ahead on nine issues: health care (52%), the environment (51%), race relations (also 51%), education (50%), COVID-19 (48%), government accountability (47%), foreign policy (46%), managing the deficit (44%) and energy and oil (43%).

In August, the two contenders, were practically tied on five issues. This month, the Democratic nominee has gained points on three: immigration (Biden 46%, Trump 39%), crime (Biden 44%, Trump 35%) and national defense (Biden 44%, Trump 41%). The numbers are tighter on job creation (Biden 44%, Trump 41%) and the economy (Biden 45%, Trump 42%).

By a 2-to-1 margin, Americans continue to reject the notion of postponing the U.S. presidential election to a later date because of the COVID-19 pandemic. While 29% of likely voters support this course of action, 65% disagree with it.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among 1,114 likely voters in the United States and 1,036 decided voters in the 2020 presidential election. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.9 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 3.0 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: AgnosticPreachersKid 

For more information on this poll, please contact:Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Almost Half of Canadians Expect COVID-19 Pandemic to Worsen

Public support for requiring all customers to wear a mask or face covering when they are indoors reaches 85% across the country.

Vancouver, BC [September 8, 2020] – Canadians hold a gloomier view of the COVID-19 pandemic than they did two months ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 46% of Canadians think the worst of the COVID-19 outbreak is “definitely” or “probably” ahead of us, up 11 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in June. The proportion of Canadians who think the worst of COVID-19 is “behind us” dropped from 49% in June to 37% in September.

On a regional basis, British Columbians are more likely to believe that the worst of the pandemic lies ahead (61%) than residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (50%), Alberta (45%), Quebec (44%), Ontario (40%) and Atlantic Canada (42%).

Nine-in-ten Canadians (90%) agree with two regulations that have been in place for weeks: keeping the border with the United States closed to non-essential travel, and placing all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period.

Public support is also extremely high (85%) for requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside. When Research Co. posed this same question to Americans this month, 90% were in favour of this guideline.

A majority of Canadians (51%) agree with allowing K-12 students to go back to in-class learning in their province, while two-in-five (42%) disagree.

Satisfaction with the way provincial governments have handled the COVID-19 pandemic fell by six points since late June to 69%. The rating remained at 83% in British Columbia, but fell in Ontario (68%, -8), Quebec (67%, -2) and Alberta (57%, -5).

Just under two thirds of Canadians (64%, -6) are satisfied with the way the federal government has managed COVID-19. The rating is the same (64%, -6) for municipal governments.

There has been an extraordinary increase in the proportion of Canadians who say they are wearing a mask every time they go out. This month, 70% of Canadians say they are behaving this way, up from 48% in late June and just 14% in May.

“Women are more likely to be wearing a mask every time they go out (75%) than men (65%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Canadians aged 18-to-34 are also more observant of this practice (74%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (70%) and those aged 55 and over (66%).”

More than seven-in-ten Ontarians (81%), Quebecers (73%) and Albertans (71%) say they are always wearing masks outside. The proportion is lower for residents of Atlantic Canada (65%), British Columbia (56%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (53%).

A third of Canadians (33%, -7) say they clean the groceries they buy to prevent infection, and 22% (-1) are not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection.

Almost one-in-four Canadians (23%, -6) say they are overeating or eating more than usual at home. The figures are stable on Canadians drinking more at home (17%, -1) and losing their temper more often (15%, -1).

Across the country, three-in-four Canadians (74%, -1) say they are willing to take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from August 30 to September 1, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Americans Chide Federal Government’s Response to Pandemic

Men in the United States are more likely to believe that the worst is “behind us” than women.

Vancouver, BC [September 7, 2020] – More than half of Americans are disappointed with the federal administration’s response to COVID-19, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 39% of Americans say they are satisfied with how the federal government has dealt with the outbreak, up two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August.

A majority of Americans (56%, +3) say they are dissatisfied with the way the federal administration has handled the pandemic, including 64% of Democrats.

The assessment is different for two other levels of administration. More than half of Americans say they are satisfied with the way their local governments (56%, -5) and their state governments (also 56%, unchanged) have dealt with the outbreak.

Across the United States, nine-in-ten Americans (90%, +8) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside.

Two thirds of Americans (66%, +1) say they will “definitely” or “probably” take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available, while just over one-in-five (22%, -3) “probably” or “definitely” will not.

More than half of Americans (55%, +1) disapprove of Donald Trump’s performance as president—including 83% of Democrats, 81% of African Americans, 64% of women, 63% of Americans aged 55 and over.

Two months prior to Election Day, the approval rating for Trump stands at 42%. Satisfaction with how Trump is handling his duties is highest among Republicans (86%), Fox News watchers (65%) Americans aged 35-to-54 (53%), men (52%) and White Americans (48%).

Almost half of Americans (47%, +10 since August) think the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic is behind, while 40% (+11) believe it still lies ahead.

“There is an enormous gender gap in the perceptions of Americans on the future of the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 58% of men in the United States believe the situation will improve, only 37% of women share the same point of view.”

White Americans are also more likely to believe that the worst of COVID-19 has passed (51%) than Americans of Hispanic and Latino origin (35%) and African Americans (23%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among 1,200 American adults.  The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Split When Assessing the Military Mission in Afghanistan

More than a third of Canadians think three successive federal governments provided little information about the war.

Vancouver, BC [September 1, 2020] – Canadians are divided in their analysis of the country’s participation in the military operation in Afghanistan, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 43% of Canadians think the country made a mistake in sending military forces to Afghanistan, while 39% believe it did the right thing.

Canada participated in the military effort in Afghanistan from October 2001 to March 2014. More than 40,000 members of the Canadian Armed Forces were mobilized during the deployment, which led to the deaths of 158 Canadian soldiers and seven Canadian civilians.

More than two-in-five Canadian men (42%) believe Canada took the right course of action in committing troops to the military effort in Afghanistan, but only 37% of women share the same point of view.

On a regional basis, more than half of residents of Alberta (55%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (51%) think Canada did the right thing in sending troops to Afghanistan. Fewer Atlantic Canadians (43%), Ontarians (35%), British Columbians (also 35%) and Quebecers (34%) concur.

Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election are more likely to believe that Canada made the right decision in joining the military effort in Afghanistan (47%) than those who voted for the Liberal Party (40%) or the New Democratic Party (NDP) (also 40%).

While 42% of Canadians feel they have a clear idea of what the war in Afghanistan was about, a slightly larger proportion (46%) do not.

“The perceptions of Canadians on the rationale for war in Afghanistan vary with age,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to say they do not have a clear idea of what the conflict was about (51%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (44%) and aged 18-to-34 (45%).”

More than a third of Canadians think the federal government provided too little information about the war in Afghanistan during the tenures of Jean Chrétien (38%), Paul Martin (41%) and Stephen Harper (46%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 21 to August 23, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Sour on Donald Trump, Lukewarm on Joe Biden

Respondents are divided on whether Canadian politicians should “speak their mind” as the American campaign continues.

Vancouver, BC [August 14, 2020] – Few Canadians believe the tenure of United States President Donald Trump has been beneficial to Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 73% of Canadians think that Trump’s term at the White House has been “bad” or “very bad” for Canada, while just 17% deem it “very good” or “good.”

Two thirds of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (67%) regard Trump’s presidency as “bad” for Canada, along with 74% of those aged 35-to-54 and 80% of those aged 55 and over.

Four-in-five Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) and the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election (80% and 79% respectively) believe that Trump’s tenure has been detrimental to Canada.

While 28% of Conservative Party voters in 2019 think Trump’s presidency has been good for Canada, 63% hold the opposite view.

“The animosity from Canadians towards Donald Trump has risen dramatically over the past two years,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In June 2019, only 15% of Canadians felt Trump had been very bad for Canada. In January 2020, the proportion increased to 29%. This month, it reached 47%.”

When asked to consider Democratic Party candidate Joe Biden as President of the United States, just over two-in-five Canadians (44%) say he would be “very good” or “good” for Canada, while 23% consider him “bad” or “very bad.”

One third of Canadians (33%) are undecided when pondering Biden—a proportion that rises to 41% among women, 39% among Canadians aged 35-to-54 and 51% among Albertans.

A Biden presidency is regarded favourably by 57% of Liberal Party voters and 51% of NDP voters. Significantly fewer Conservative voters (29%) hold the same view.

Canadians are split when asked whether elected officials should become involved in the U.S. election. While 46% would prefer for Canadian politicians to stay neutral and avoid public statements during the American campaign, 43% think they should speak their mind if they are concerned about the American presidential election.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 7 to August 9, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

One-in-Four Canadians Did Not Visit a Dentist in the Past Year

More than three-in-four respondents support the creation of a national dental care plan proposed by the federal NDP.

Vancouver, BC [August 11, 2020] – Just over two-in-five Canadians went to the dentist twice in the past year, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 26% of Canadians say they have not visited the dentist over the past 12 months. About a third (32%) went to the dentist only once, while 42% visited two or more times.

Men (28%), Canadians aged 35-to-54 (27%), residents of Manitoba and Saskatchewan (33%) and those in the lowest income bracket (35%) are more likely to have skipped a visit to the dentist in the last year.

When it comes to specific dental health behaviour, more than seven-in-ten Canadians (72%) say they brush their teeth twice a day or more. The proportion is highest among Canadians aged 18-to-34 (78%).

Significantly fewer Canadians rely on mouthwash or rinse (26%), dental floss (25%) or a tongue cleaner (18%) at least twice a day.

More than half of Canadians (54%) say they keep a toothbrush with them on an average day that does not entail travel.

Residents of Quebec are the most likely to have a toothbrush handy when they are away from home (61%), followed by Ontarians (57%), Atlantic Canadians (56%), British Columbians (53%) and Albertans (51%). The proportion is lower among residents of Manitoba and Saskatchewan (39%).

About two-in-five Canadians have chewing gum (39%) and dental floss (38%) with them when they are away from home, while fewer carry mints (31%) or a mouthwash or rinse (29%).

“While almost half of Canadian women have chewing gum handy when they are away from home (46%), significantly fewer men behave the same way (31%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Women are also more likely to carry mints than men (36% to 26%).”

The federal New Democratic Party (NDP) has proposed the creation of a national dental care plan, which would provide complete, federally funded dental coverage to uninsured Canadians with a household income lower than $70,000 a year.

More than three-in-four Canadians (77%) are in favour of this proposal, including majorities of those who voted for the NDP (91%), the Liberal Party (83%) and the Conservative Party (66%) in the last federal election.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from August 1 to August 3, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Americans Pick Four Presidents for “New Mount Rushmore”

Kennedy, Roosevelt, Reagan and Obama are the top vote-getters, with Eisenhower in fifth place.

Vancouver, BC [August 10, 2020] – When Americans are asked which presidents they would include in a new monument similar to Mount Rushmore, three Democrats and a Republican make the cut, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample asked Americans to select four different presidents out of a list that included the 41 current and former heads of state that are not featured at Mount Rushmore.

Mount Rushmore, located in South Dakota, has depictions of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt.

More than half of respondents to this survey (56%) used one of their four votes for John F. Kennedy, while two-in-five (41%) included Franklin D. Roosevelt on their list. Three-in-ten Americans voted for Ronald Reagan (30%) and Barack Obama (also 30%).

Six other presidents reached double digits: Dwight Eisenhower (21%), Ulysses Grant (16%), John Adams (14%), Harry Truman (13%) and Donald Trump (11%).

Among Americans who identify as Democrats, the biggest vote-getters are Kennedy (62%), Obama (53%) and Roosevelt (47%), followed by Eisenhower (18%), Adams (14%), Reagan (13%), Truman (12%), Grant (11%), Jimmy Carter (10%) and Bill Clinton (also 10%).

More than two-in-five Americans who identify as Republicans gave a vote to Kennedy (47%) and Reagan (42%), followed by Roosevelt (32%) and Eisenhower (25%).

Current president Donald Trump is in fifth place among GOP voters with 23%, followed by Grant (20%), Adams (15%), Truman (14%), Andrew Jackson (11%), George W. Bush (11%) and George H. W. Bush (10%).

A majority of Americans who identify as Independents chose Kennedy (57%), followed by Roosevelt (45%), Reagan (39%) Obama (26%), Eisenhower (21%), Grant (16%), Truman (15%), Adams (13%) and Jackson (12%).

Every American president on the list received at least one of the four votes from respondents. Americans aged 55 and over were more likely to vote for Reagan (40%) than those aged 35-to-54 (25%) and those aged 18-to-34 (16%).

Support for Obama was higher among Americans aged 35-to-54 (33%) and aged 18-to-34 (32%) than among those aged 55 and over (27%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on August 3 and August 4, 2020, among 1,200 American adults.  The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our datasets here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Most Americans Reject Delaying the 2020 Presidential Election

Among decided voters, Democratic candidate Joe Biden keeps a sizeable advantage over incumbent Donald Trump. 

Vancouver, BC [August 7, 2020] – Most likely voters in the United States reject the notion of delaying the presidential election that is scheduled for November, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of likely voters, two thirds of respondents (68%) think the election should not be postponed to a later date because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Majorities of likely voters who identify as Democrats (75%), Independents (67%) and Republicans (59%) believe this year’s presidential ballot should go on as planned.

More than half of decided voters (53%) would support prospective Democratic nominee Joe Biden in the November election, while 42% would vote for Republican incumbent Donald Trump.

Support is decidedly lower for Libertarian nominee Jo Jorgensen (2%), Green nominee Howie Hawkins (1%) and other candidates (also 1%).

These results are largely unchanged at the national level since the July Research Co. survey that also placed Biden ahead by double-digits among decided voters.

The bulk of support for Biden comes from women (59%), decided voters aged 18-to-34 (54%) and African Americans (71%). The race is closer among men, where Biden is slightly ahead of Trump (47% to 45%). Among White voters, Trump is practically tied with Biden (48% to 47%).

More than nine-in-ten decided voters (92%) say they are certain that they will vote for their chosen candidate in the election. This includes 94% of those who intend to support Trump and 91% of those who plan to vote for Biden.

There are some sizeable differences when supporters of the two main contenders are asked about the factors for their choice.

About a third of decided voters who support Trump (34%) say their main motivator is the candidate’s ideas and policies, while fewer point to disgust with other candidates (23%) and Trump’s political party (22%).

Biden voters are primarily motivated by disgust with other candidates (30%), and to a lesser extent by the candidate’s ideas and policies (23%) and his political party (21%).

When asked which one of the two main candidates is better suited to handle specific issues, Biden holds the upper hand on the environment (50%), health care (49%), race relations (48%), education (47%), COVID-19 (46%), government accountability (45%), foreign policy (43%), energy and oil (41%) and managing the deficit (40%)

The two contenders are tied or virtually even on five issues: crime (Trump 39%, Biden 39%), the economy (Trump 43%, Biden 41%), job creation (Trump 42%, Biden 41%), immigration (Biden 42%, Trump 40%) and national defense (Trump 41%, Biden 41%).

“In our June survey, Trump was ahead of Biden on job creation, the economy and national defense,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Now the numbers on these issues have tightened considerably, while Biden has also gained ground on energy and oil.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on August 3 and August 4, 2020, among 1,018 likely voters in the United States and 946 decided voters in the 2020 presidential election. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 3.2 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our datasets here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Most Americans Think Worst of COVID-19 Pandemic Lies Ahead

Sizeable majorities of Americans of all political stripes agree with requiring all customers to wear masks at indoor premises.

Vancouver, BC [August 5, 2020] – Americans remain worried about the COVID-19 pandemic, and fewer are satisfied with the way federal authorities have handled the situation, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Americans believe “the worst is ahead” when it comes to the COVID-19 pandemic. This represents an 11-point increase since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June.

Americans aged 55 and over are more likely to expect the COVID-19 situation to worsen (58%) than those aged 35-to-54 (48%) and those aged 18-to-34 (47%).

“In June, 47% of Americans thought they had left the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic behind,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This month, only 37% feel the same way.”

Across the United States, just over a third of Americans (37%) are satisfied with how the federal government has dealt with the COVID-19 outbreak, down nine points since June. Dissatisfaction has risen from 48% to 53%.

The level of satisfaction in how the COVID-19 pandemic has been handled continues to be higher when Americans rate their state governments (56%, -6) and their local governments (61%, -3).

More than four-in-five Americans (82%) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside. Support for this measure is high among Democrats (90%), Independents (83%) and Republicans (73%).

About two thirds of Americans (65%, -4) say they would take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available, while 25% (+5) say they would not.

Three-in-ten Republicans (31%) say they are not willing to get inoculated against COVID-19, along with 27% of Independents and 18% of Democrats.

The approval rating for U.S. President Donald Trump stands at 43% this month, up three points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in July. Satisfaction with Trump’s performance is highest among men (47%), Americans aged 35-to-54 (also 47%), White Americans (46%), Fox News watchers (66%) and Republicans (83%)

A majority of Americans (54%, -2) disapprove of how Trump is handling his duties, including 59% of women, 57% of Americans aged 55 and over, 62% of African Americans and 83% of Democrats.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on August 3 and August 4, 2020, among 1,200 American adults.  The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our datasets here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Fewer Canadians Hold a Positive View of the United States

Only one-in-five Canadians (21%) have a favourable opinion of China, down six points since January.

Vancouver, BC [July 28, 2020] – The perceptions of Canadians on the United States have become more negative during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 32% of Canadians have a positive opinion of the United States, down 15 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted In December 2019.

More than three-in-five Canadians (62%, +14) currently have a negative opinion of the United States—including 75% of women, 64% of Canadians aged 55 and over and 71% of British Columbians.

“When we compare the results of this survey with what Research Co. found late last year, the most drastic fluctuation is seen with the United States,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “At the end of 2019, almost half of Canadians held positive views about the neighbouring nation, but now the proportion has fallen to only one third—slightly higher than Russia and on par with Venezuela.”

At least two thirds of Canadians hold favourable views on five countries that are part of the Group of Seven (G7): the United Kingdom (73%, -10), Japan (70%, -2), Italy (69%, -3), France (69%, -1) and Germany (67%, -6).

Majorities of respondents also have a positive opinion of South Korea (61%, +9) and Mexico (54%, +8). The rating is lower for India (37%, +1) and Venezuela (33%, +3).

Only 26% of Canadians (unchanged) have a positive view of Russia, while 57% hold negative views. Russia has a higher unfavourability rating from Canadians aged 55 and over (63%) and men (61%).

Perceptions of China have also dropped, from 27% in December 2019 to 21% this month. In a separate survey conducted in May 2020, Research Co. found that three-in-four Canadians opposed the participation of Chinese telecommunications company Huawei in Canada’s 5G spectrum.

Across Canada, 67% of respondents have a negative view of China, including 75% of Canadians aged 55 and over, 75% of Atlantic Canadians and 74% of those who voted for the Conservative Party or the New Democratic Party (NDP) in the last federal election.

The lowest ranked nations are Saudi Arabia (20%, +3), Iran (16%, +2) and North Korea (13%, +2).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from July 6 to July 8, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Photo Credit: AlWhiteash429

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Pierre Trudeau Leads as Canadians Rank Recent Prime Ministers

Stephen Harper (16%) and Justin Trudeau (15%) are next, followed by Jean Chrétien (11%) and Brian Mulroney (8%).

Vancouver, BC [July 24, 2020] – About one-in-four Canadians believe Pierre Trudeau has been the best head of government of the past five decades, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 23% of Canadians select Pierre Trudeau as the best prime minister since 1968—a proportion that climbs to 27% among Atlantic Canadians, and 26% among both Ontarians and Quebecers.

Stephen Harper is next on the list with 16%, followed by Justin Trudeau with 15%, Jean Chrétien with 11% and Brian Mulroney with 8%.

Justin Trudeau has his best numbers with Canadians aged 18-to-34 (26%), but drops to 14% among those aged 35-to-54 and 5% among those aged 55 and over.

When asked who the worst prime minister since 1968 has been, 23% of Canadians pick Harper, followed by Justin Trudeau with 18% and Pierre Trudeau with 7%.

“The regional disparities are evident on the worst prime minister question,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Three-in-ten Atlantic Canadians (31%) select Harper, while 25% of Albertans choose Justin Trudeau.”

Canadians were also asked about nine different politicians who served as leaders of the Official Opposition in Ottawa over the past five decades.

Three-in-ten Canadians (30%) believe Robert Stanfield—who led the Progressive Conservatives from 1967 to 1976 and faced off against Pierre Trudeau in three federal elections—would have made a good prime minister, while 11% think he would have been bad.

Canadians are more nuanced when asked to assess former Reform Party leader Preston Manning (Good 26%, Bad 27%) and interim Conservative Party leader Rona Ambrose (Good 27%, Bad 25%).

Respondents are more likely to hold negative feelings about three politicians: Canadian Alliance leader in the 2000 election Stockwell Day (Good 22%, Bad 33%), Liberal leader in the 2008 election Stéphane Dion (Good 22%, Bad 33%) and Liberal leader in the 2011 election Michael Ignatieff (Good 20%, Bad 30%). The review is better for former New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Tom Mulcair (Good 32%, Bad 26%).

The best rated politician on this list of former opposition leaders is the NDP’s Jack Layton. A majority of Canadians (54%) think Layton would have made a good prime minister, and only 14% feel he would have been bad.

While one-in-four Canadians (26%) think outgoing Conservative leader Andrew Scheer would have made a good head of government, almost half (48%) disagree with this point of view.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from July 6 to July 8, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Photo Credit: Alasdair McLellan

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Biden Has Double-Digit Lead in American Presidential Race

Support for the prospective Democratic nominee has grown among women and voters aged 18-to-34.

Vancouver, BC [July 8, 2020] – Public backing for prospective Democratic Party presidential nominee Joe Biden increased this month in the United States, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 53% of American decided voters (+2 since a similar survey conducted in June) say they would vote for Biden in this year’s presidential election, while 43% (-3) would cast a ballot for Republican incumbent Donald Trump.

Biden holds a large advantage among female decided voters (57% to 41%), while the race is closer among male decided voters (49% for Biden, 47% for Trump).

The results of this survey are very different for the incumbent president from what the race looked like in July 2012. At the time, Democrat Barack Obama and Republican Mitt Romney were tied at 47% in the popular vote, with Obama leading by 12-points among women and Romney holding the sae advantage among men.

This month, Trump is virtually tied with Biden among decided voters aged 55 and over (50% to 49%), while the prospective Democratic nominee is ahead among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (61% to 33%) and decided voters aged 35-to-54 (53% to 41%).

Just over half of White Americans (51%) say they would vote for Trump in this year’s election. The Republican incumbent has a significantly lower level of support among Hispanic and Latino Americans (28%) and African Americans (9%).

Trump’s approval rating stands at 40% this month, and at 46% among White Americans.

Respondents to this survey were also provided with a list of 18 words to describe Biden and asked to select up to six of them.

About three-in-ten Americans chose the words “intelligent” (32%), “compassionate” (also 32%), “down to earth” (30%), “out of touch” (28%), “weak” (also 28%) and “open” (27%).

In a similar survey conducted in July 2012, Democratic incumbent Barack Obama was regarded as “intelligent” by 50% of Americans, and as “open” by 21%.

The top words used by Independent voters to describe Biden are “weak” (34%) and “out of touch” (33%). In July 2012, only 22% of Independents described both Obama as “weak”, but 32% regarded him as “out of touch.” 

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on July 1 and July 2, 2020, among 1,200 American adults, including 1,049 likely voters and 965 decided voters in the 2020 presidential election. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points for the entire sample, +/- 3.0 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 3.1 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Four Canadians Would Take a COVID-19 Vaccine

Satisfaction with how provincial governments have handled the pandemic increased to 75% across the country.

Vancouver, BC [July 7, 2020] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians would welcome the idea of inoculation against COVID-19, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-four Canadians (75%) would take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available, up two points since a similar survey conducted in April.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) say they are satisfied with the way the federal government has handled the COVID-19 outbreak, up one point since May. The same proportion (70%) are satisfied with the performance of their municipal administrations during the pandemic.

Satisfaction with the way provincial governments have managed COVID-19 increased by 11 points to 75% across Canada. The rating improved in the four most populous provinces: British Columbia, (83%, +14), Ontario (76%, +23), Quebec (69%, +3) and Alberta (62%, +6).

The proportion of Canadians who say they wear a mask every time they go out has increased dramatically, from 14% in May to 48% in late June.

“There is a big gender gap when it comes to wearing protective masks outside the home,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While more than half of women in Canada (57%) are not leaving their home without a mask, only 39% of men are partaking in the same behaviour.”

Two-in-five Canadians (40%, -7) are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection, and about one-in-four (23%, -17) say they are not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection.

The proportion of Canadians who acknowledge eating more than usual at home remained at 29%, while 18% (+5) are drinking more at home and 16% (-2) are losing their temper more often.

Across the country, only 37% of Canadians expect to be able to attend or host a large social gathering before December, while fewer believe they will be able to shake the hand of a person who is not at their home (33%), attend a live sporting event (26%) or travel abroad (21%).

Half of Canadians (49%, +25 since May) believe the worst of the COVID-19 outbreak is “behind us”—a proportion that rises to 57% in Quebec.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 26 to June 28, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca