2030 Winter Olympic Bid Trending Upward in British Columbia

Most of the province’s residents agree with Vancouver being a host city during the FIFA (Soccer) 2026 Men’s World Cup.

Vancouver, BC [July 5, 2022] – Public support for a new opportunity to host the Winter Olympics has improved in British Columbia, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 54% of British Columbians think Vancouver should launch a bid to host the Winter Olympics in 2030, up 11 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in October 2021.

Support for the 2030 Winter Games bid is highest among British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (61%). The proportions are lower among those aged 35-to-54 (56%) and those aged 55 and over (48%).

On a regional basis, public backing for the 2030 bid is highest in the Fraser Valley (58%), followed by Northern BC (57%), Metro Vancouver (56%), Southern BC (52%) and Vancouver Island (46%).

Vancouver hosted the XXI Olympic Winter Games, from February 12 to February 28, 2010. A Winter Olympics bid in 2030 is being explored by Four Host First Nations—Musqueam, Squamish, Tsleil-Waututh, and Lilwat—and the municipal governments of Vancouver and Whistler.

Almost one-in-four British Columbians (23%) say they are more likely to support the 2030 bid because of the Indigenous partnership, while 44% say it has no effect on their views and 18% are less likely to back the project.

“Practically a third of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (32%) are more inclined to support the 2030 Winter Olympic bid because of the Indigenous partnership,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, just over one-in-four British Columbians aged 55 and over (26%) are less likely to back the bid because of this reason.”

A significant majority of British Columbians (58%, +5) believe it is impossible for Vancouver to host the 2030 Winter Olympics without any public or government funds.

Just under half of British Columbians (48%, +10) think Vancouver should launch a bid to host the Summer Olympics in 2036, a proportion that rises to 58% among residents aged 18-to-34.

The views of British Columbians on the International Olympic Committee (IOC) did not go through significant changes since 2021. Almost half (47%, -1) have positive views of the IOC, while more than a third (33%, -3) hold negative opinions.

Vancouver was selected as one of the 16 host cities for the FIFA (Soccer) 2026 Men’s World Cup. More than half of British Columbians (55%) agree with this decision, including 58% of those aged 35-to-54.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 24 to June 26, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Flag First, Health Care Down as Canadians Assess Sources of Pride

Fewer than half of Canadians say Parliament (45%) and the Monarchy (37%) make them proud.

Vancouver, BC [June 28, 2022] – While Canadians continue to rank the flag as their main source of pride, perceptions on the country’s health care system have dropped dramatically since 2021, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample asks Canadians to say if 12 institutions and features elicit feelings of pride among them.

Just under four-in-five Canadians (78%, +1 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in 2021) say they are proud of the flag.

More than two thirds of Canadians express pride in multiculturalism (69%, -1) and hockey (also 68%, +2).

Majorities of Canadians are proud of five other institutions and features: the Canadian Armed Forces (65%, -2), bilingualism (59%, =), the health care system (58%, -8) , Indigenous culture (also 58%, -4) and the state of democracy in Canada (57%, -5).

Just under half of Canadians express pride in the Canadian economy (49%, =) and the Canadian justice system (also 49%, -3). The ranking is lower for Parliament (45%, -5) and the Monarchy (37%, +3).

Three years ago, 77% of Canadians were proud of the health care system,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In 2022, the proportion has dropped by 19 points to 58%.”

Men are significantly more likely to say that the health care system is a source of pride (66%) than women (51%). On a regional basis, the health care system scores best in Ontario (71%), followed by Alberta (69%), British Columbia (59%), Atlantic Canada (51%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (50%) and Quebec (45%).

While 57% of Canadians are proud of the state of democracy in Canada, there are significant differences across the political spectrum. Fewer than half of Conservative Party voters in the 2021 federal election (48%) say the state of democracy in Canada is source of pride. The rating is higher among Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (55%) or the Liberal Party (79%) last year.

More than half of Ontarians (54%) are proud of Parliament. The rating on this question is lower in Quebec (46%), Atlantic Canada (42%), British Columbia (41%), Alberta (35%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (31%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 18 to June 20, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Than Half of Vancouver Voters Would Abolish Park Board

Almost three-in-five respondents support changing zoning laws to allow up to six strata title units on a standard lot.

Vancouver, BC [June 17, 2022] – Public confidence in the only elected Park Board in Canada has eroded considerably over the past year and a half, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample, 52% of likely voters in the City of Vancouver think the Board of Parks and Recreation should be eliminated, and that public parks and the public recreation system should be placed under the jurisdiction of City Council.

“In November 2020, only 44% of municipal likely voters in Vancouver favoured the elimination of the Board of Parks and Recreation,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This month, the proportion has reached 52%.”

Public support for abolishing Vancouver’s Park Board is highest among likely voters who reside Downtown (63%), followed by those who live in the West Side (52%) and the East Side (45%).

Vancouverites who voted for Kennedy Stewart or Ken Sim in the 2018 mayoral election are significantly more likely to endorse the abolition of the Board of Parks and Recreation (61% and 60% respectively) than those who cast a ballot for Shauna Sylvester  (43%).

Just over half of likely voters in Vancouver (51%, +5) believe it would be worthwhile to explore the idea of amalgamating all of the municipalities in Metro Vancouver, like they did in Toronto or Montreal.

Two thirds of Vancouverites who voted for Stewart in 2018 (67%) support exploring the concept of amalgamation, compared to just under half of those who cast a ballot for Sim (49%).

Almost three-in-five likely voters in Vancouver (58%, +5) are in favour of changing zoning laws to allow property owners to build up to six strata title units on a standard lot, provided the new building is no taller than an average home.

Majorities of Vancouver’s likely voters who currently rent or own their primary residence support a change in zoning laws (65% and 54% respectively).

Seven-in-ten likely voters in the City of Vancouver (71%, -10) are in favour of the plan to extend the Skytrain Millennium Line (currently under construction to Arbutus) to the University of British Columbia (UBC) campus at Point Grey.

Public support for the proposed SkyTrain extension is strongest among likely voters who reside Downtown (75%), followed by those who live in the East Side (72%) and the West Side (67%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 7 to June 9, 2022, among 400 municipal likely voters in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty. 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Fewer Than One-in-Five Canadians Prefer Black Coffee

When asked to select the best way to cook a steak, 27% of Canadians cast their vote for “medium”.

Vancouver, BC [June 14, 2022] –  A plurality of Canadians express a fondness for the middle ground when assessing how they personally enjoy coffee and steak, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample showed Canadians two photographs with various shades of coffee and steak, and asked them to select what they usually consume.

Across the country, one-in-ten residents (10%) say they do not eat steak and about one-in-seven (15%) do not drink coffee.

Just under one-in-five Canadians (17%) selected the #1 option or black coffee, including 21% of men and 20% of those aged 55 and over.

“Only 13% of Atlantic Canadians usually take their coffee without any creamer,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is higher in Quebec (15%), Ontario (16%), Alberta (17%), British Columbia (21%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (22%).”

The proportion of Canadians who selected shades #2, #3 and #4—adding a little bit of milk or creamer to their cup of coffee—stands at 18% across the country.

More than two-in-five Canadians (43%) take their coffee with a larger amount of milk or creamer, choosing shades #5, #6 and #7. This group includes 50% of women in Canada, but only 34% of men.

Shades #8 and #9—where the milk or creamer content is significantly greater—are selected by a combined 8% of Canadians, including 13% of Albertans.

Among the five shades of steak tested in the survey, more than one-in-four Canadians (27%) selected #3 or medium—including 29% of men and 32% of British Columbians.

Equal proportions of Canadians chose shade #4 or medium well (17%) or shade #5 or well done (also 17%). Well done steak is particularly fashionable among Atlantic Canadians (24%) and Quebecers (21%).

Just over one-in-five Canadians (21%) preferred shade #2 or medium rare, while 9% opted for shade #1 or blue.

The rarest of steaks are preferred by 14% of Canadians of Indigenous or First Nations origin.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 22 to May 24, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. 

Find our data tables and photographs here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two Thirds of British Columbians Would Reduce Speed Limits

Support for lowering speeds in residential areas to 30 km/h has increased from 58% in 2019 to 66% this year.

Vancouver, BC [June 10, 2022] – More British Columbians believe it is a good idea to have a lower speed limit on residential streets, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 66% of British Columbians acknowledge that they would “definitely” or “probably” like to see the speed limit reduced to 30 km/h on all residential streets in their municipality, while keeping the speed limit on arterial and collector roads at 50 km/h.

Support for a lower speed limit on British Columbia’s residential areas is higher with women (68%) than with men (63%). While seven-in-ten of the province’s residents aged 18-to-34 would welcome this regulation (70%), the rating is lower among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (65%) and aged 55 and over (62%).

On a regional basis, the notion of a lower residential speed limit is most popular in Southern BC (72%), followed by Metro Vancouver (67%), Northern BC (also 67%), the Fraser Valley (63%) and Vancouver Island (58%).

In 2019, Vancouver City Council unanimously passed a motion to establish a pilot project to reduce the speed limit to 30 km/h on select residential streets in the city. The pilot project is currently underway in the Grandview-Woodland neighbourhood.

“In 2019, public support for a lower speed limit on British Columbia’s residential streets stood at 58%,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion climbed to 61% in 2021 and has increased again this year to 66%.”

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (72%, +6) believe Vancouver’s pilot project is a “very good” or “good” idea—a proportion that rises to 84% among residents of Southern BC.

As was the case last year, almost two-in-five British Columbians (39%, =) say they witness cars circulating above the current speed limit on the street where they live “at least once a day.”

Fewer of the province’s residents are exposed to speeding vehicles on their street “a few times a week” (29%, +2), “a few times a month” (18%, =) or “never” (15%, -1).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from June 3 to June 5, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two-in-Five Canadians Would Take Nickel Out of Circulation

Men (47%) are more likely to support getting rid of the five-cent coin than women (33%).

Vancouver, BC [June 7, 2022] – While practically half of Canadians are willing to keep the nickel, support for abandoning the five-cent coin has increased since 2019, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 40% of Canadians support taking the nickel out of circulation, up four points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2019.

Almost half of Canadians (49%, -6) oppose abolishing the five-cent coin, while 11% (+2) are undecided.

There is a substantial gender gap when Canadians think about the nickel. While 47% of men support its abolition, the proportion drops to 33% among women.

Across Canada, 43% of residents aged 18-to-34 are in favour of taking the five-cent coin out of circulation. The proportion is lower among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (38%) and aged 55 and over (37%).

“More than half of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (58%), British Columbia (52%) and Atlantic Canada (also 52%) support keeping the nickel,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion of five-cent coin fans is lower in Quebec (49%), Ontario (47%) and Alberta (46%).”

More than seven-in-ten Canadians (71%, -4) agree with the federal government’s decision to take the penny out of circulation in February 2013.

Male respondents are more likely to agree with dropping the one-cent coin (77%) than their female counterparts (66%).

The level of agreement with abolishing the penny is highest among Canadians aged 18-to-34 (74%), followed by those aged 55 and over (72%) and those aged 35-to-54 (65%).

More than seven-in-ten residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (75%), Ontario (71%) and Quebec (also 71%) agree with taking Canada’s one-cent coin out of circulation. The numbers are lower in Alberta (69%) and British Columbia (65%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 22 to May 24, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Motorbicycle

Half of British Columbians Are Worried About Data Breaches

More than four-in-five of the province’s residents are comfortable accessing banking information and shopping online.

Vancouver, BC [June 3, 2022] – While a sizeable majority of British Columbians are at ease managing specific tasks online, more than half express concerns about where their data could end up, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 51% of British Columbians say they have worried “frequently” or “occasionally” over the past couple of months about having their personal information stolen over the Internet, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2021.

Similar proportions of British Columbians have worried “frequently” or “occasionally” about computers and technology being used to invade their privacy (51%, -1) and somebody hacking into their own computer or smartphone (46%, -3).

“In British Columbia, women (55%) are particularly concerned about their personal information falling into the wrong hands when they are online,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer men (46%) share the same preoccupation.”

As was the case in 2021, more than four-in-five British Columbians are “very” or “moderately” comfortable shopping (89%, +2) and accessing banking information (87%, =) online. The level of comfort is lower across the province for making charitable donations online (73%, =) or commenting on an online forum that requires an email address (56%, +2).

Some British Columbians continue to encounter setbacks when relying on digital tools. More than three-in-five (63%, +2) have received “phishing” emails—where somebody attempts to acquire personal information by masquerading as a trustworthy entity—and a majority (58%, +4) received an email offering them money for their help and assistance, in what is usually referred to as the “Nigerian scam.”

Fewer than a third of the province’s residents reveal that their computer became infected with a virus while they were browsing the Internet (31%, =) or endured hackers accessing their social media platform (16%, +1) or email address (15%, =).

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians are partaking on five activities online at least a few times per month: visiting websites or blogs (89%, +2), accessing banking information (87%, -1), looking for deals on websites (81%, +2), using an instant messaging service (79%, +2) and looking for directions and/or maps to get to a destination (73%, +4),

Fewer British Columbians are purchasing goods from a website (60%, =), posting on social media (57%, -2), uploading pictures or videos to the Internet (53%, +3) or using the Internet to place telephone calls (39%, -2) at least a few times per month.

More than three-in-five British Columbians (62%, =) have googled themselves to see what has been posted about them online.

Among the province’s residents who typed their names on Google, 61% (+6) state that the information that came up was “accurate”, while 12% (-1) considered it “inaccurate”. More than a quarter of these residents (27%, -5) did not find information about themselves online.

Just over one-in-five British Columbians (22%) report having only one email address, while 41% possess two and 37% have three or more.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 25 to April 27, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Separated Bike Lanes Remain Particularly Popular in Vancouver

About a third of residents believe that some of the existing paths should be removed, but two-in-five endorse the status quo.

Vancouver, BC [May 27, 2022] – Two thirds of residents of the City of Vancouver are satisfied with the existence of dedicated cycling infrastructure, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative municipal sample, 66% of Vancouverites support having separated bike lanes in the city, up two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2021.

“Vancouver’s cycling infrastructure is accepted by sizeable majorities of residents who bike (82%) or take public transit (79%) on weekdays,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Most Vancouverites who drive (59%) are also in favour of the separated bike lanes.”

Just over half of Vancouverites of East Asian descent (54%) support the city’s separated bike lanes. The rating is higher among the city’s residents of South Asian (70%) and European (71%) ancestry.

About a third of Vancouverites (32%, +4) believe there are too many separated bike lanes in the city and some should be removed, while just under one-in-five (19%, -3) say there are not enough separated bike lanes and more should be added.

Two-in-five residents of Vancouver (40%, -1) think the current number of bike lanes is correct—a proportion that rises to 46% among women, 48% among Vancouverites aged 18-to-34 and 43% among residents of the West side.

The Vancouver Park Board approved a temporary bike lane on Park Drive in Stanley Park until the Summer of 2022. More than three-in-five Vancouverites (63%, +4) think this is a “good idea”, while 24% (-5) consider the decision a “bad idea.”

Vancouverites who bike to school or work are extremely supportive of the temporary bike lane in Stanley Park (86%), along with those who rely on public transit to commute (69%).

While 32% of drivers in Vancouver consider the approval of a bike lane on Park Drive as a “bad idea”, more than half (57%) say it is a “good idea.”

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 17 to May 19, 2022, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Four Canadians Say Worst of COVID-19 is Now Behind Us

The satisfaction rating for the way provincial governments have managed the pandemic improved in Alberta and Quebec.

Vancouver, BC [May 24, 2022] – As a significant proportion of Canadians sense the end of the pandemic, positive views on the performance of various levels of government in managing COVID-19 have increased, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 76% of Canadians think the worst of COVID-19 is now “behind us”, up 14 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in April.

Four-in-five residents of Alberta and Ontario (80%) believe that the pandemic is unlikely to worsen, along with 76% of Quebecers, 71% of residents of British Columbia, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and 70% of Atlantic Canadians.

More than three-in-four Canadians (78%, -4) consider COVID-19 as a real threat—including 81% of those aged 55 and over.

A survey released by Research Co. earlier this month showed that 45% of Canadians were “anxious” about the end of COVID-19 restrictions and mandates in their community.

More than three-in-five Canadians (61%, +4) are currently satisfied with the way the federal government has dealt with COVID-19.

Sizeable majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (83%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (71%) in the 2021 Canadian federal election are happy with how Ottawa has managed the pandemic. The proportion is lower among those who voted for the Conservative Party last year (42%).

This month, the satisfaction rating also improved for provincial governments (63%, +6) and municipal administrations (65%, +5).

In the four most populous provinces, the level of satisfaction is highest in Quebec (67%, +8), followed by Ontario (65%, +4), British Columbia (62%, +1) and Alberta (53%, +16).

The satisfaction rating also rose across Canada for the federal chief public health officer (66%, +5) and for provincial health officers or chief medical officers (66%, +6).

“The numbers are remarkably consistent when Canadians rate the way their provincial health officers or chief medical officers are dealing with COVID-19,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Ontario is at the top of the list among the four most populous provinces at 67%, followed by Quebec with 66%, Alberta with 65% and British Columbia with 63%.”

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 14 to May 16, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Hold Mixed Views on End of Pandemic Regulations

COVID-19 infections have hit almost one-in-four Canadian households since the end of restrictions and mandates.

Vancouver, BC [May 20, 2022] – While almost half of Canadians endorse the decision to abandon all regulations related to the COVID-19 pandemic, more than two-in-five believe the call was made too soon, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians believe COVID-19 restrictions and mandates were “definitely” or “probably” lifted at the right time in their community, while 43% think they were lifted too early.

At least half of residents of Ontario (52%) and Alberta (50%) believe restrictions and mandates came to an end at the right time. The proportions are lower in British Columbia (49%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 49%), Quebec (47%) and Atlantic Canada (44%).

Almost one-in-four Canadians (23%) report that either themselves or someone else in their household became infected with COVID-19 after restrictions and mandates were lifted in their community—a proportion that rises to 36% among those aged 18-to-34 and to 27% among Quebecers.

“More than half of Canadians who endured a COVID-19 infection after restrictions and mandates were lifted (52%) feel that this decision was taken too soon,” says Mario Canseco. “Still, 42% of these respondents believe the regulations were halted at the correct time.”

Just over three-in-five Canadians (61%) say they would be satisfied if proof of vaccination was required once again in the future to go to restaurants or public events. Higher proportions of Canadians would be satisfied if two other restrictions and mandates returned: a reduction of capacity at venues (such as cinemas, theatres, concert halls and sports arenas) (64%) and having to wear a mask or face covering when entering an indoor premise (68%).

A majority of Canadians (52%) state that, as long as people are vaccinated, COVID-19 is a minor nuisance. This includes 58% of those who have experienced the virus personally or in their household after the end of restrictions and mandates.

Larger proportions of Canadians agree that it’s only a matter of time before everyone catches COVID-19 (59%) and expect to be vaccinated against the virus at least once again in the next six months (60%).

Compared to a similar Research Co. survey conducted in April, fewer Canadians (45%, -11) say are “anxious” about the end of COVID-19 restrictions and mandates in their community.

This month, there are also marked drops in the proportion of Canadians who, over the course of the next two weeks, intend to continue wearing a mask or face covering when entering an indoor premise (54%, -6) or every time they leave their home (35%, -10).

Two thirds of Canadians (66%, +8) are planning to visit relatives or friends in person in the next fortnight. In addition, more than half of Canadians will have dinner (52%, +6) or lunch (51%, +8) at a sit-down restaurant in the same span.

Canadians are also more likely to be planning a visit to the theatre or cinema (27%, +5), to a live concert (17%, +6) and to a live sporting event (14%, +3) than last month.

Travel plans are also on the rise, with 30% of Canadians (+8) intending to take a trip by car for an overnight stay in the next two weeks, while 16% (+3) are considering a trip by airplane.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 14 to May 16, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Few Canadians Think Marital Infidelity is Morally Acceptable

Across Canada, the moral acceptability of gambling and physician assisted death dropped since 2021.

Vancouver, BC [May 17, 2022] – Only one-in-six Canadians have no moral qualms about the existence of infidelity in a marriage, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample asked Canadians whether they considered 21 different issues as “morally acceptable” or “morally wrong.”

Only 16% of Canadians think married men and/or women having an affair is morally acceptable, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in April 2021.

“Across Canada, more than one-in-five men (22%) think affairs involving married persons are morally acceptable,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 10% of Canadian women share the same view.”

More than two thirds of Canadians think four other issues are morally acceptable: contraception (75%, -1), divorce (73%, -4), sexual relations between an unmarried man and woman (69%, -3)  and having a baby outside of marriage (also 69%, =).

More than half of Canadians believe sexual relations between two people of the same sex (59%, -3), abortion (55%, -2) and medical research using stem cells obtained from human embryos (also 55%, =) are morally acceptable. The proportions are lower for four other issues: pornography (31%, =), prostitution (30%, -3), polygamy (19%, =), cloning humans (12%, =) and paedophilia (4%, -1).

On issues related to animals, more than a third of Canadians (36%, -2) say buying and wearing clothing made of animal fur is morally acceptable, while fewer feel the same way about medical testing on animals (25%, +1) and cloning animals (19%, =).

Two-in-five Canadians (40%, -1) believe the death penalty is morally acceptable. Significantly fewer hold similar views on using illegal drugs (18%, -2) and suicide (also 18%, =).

Just over three-in-five Canadians (61%, -4) consider physician-assisted death as morally acceptable. Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to feel this way (66%) than those aged 35-to-54 (58%) and aged 18-to-34 (57%).

Canadians of European descent are significantly more likely to say that physician-assisted death is morally acceptable (71%) than their counterparts whose origins are East Asian (49%) and South Asian (38%).

Just over half of Canadians (52%, -5) think gambling is morally acceptable.

Quebec is the only province where fewer than half of residents (48%) refer to gambling as morally acceptable. The proportions are higher in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (51%), Alberta and Ontario (each at 53%), Atlantic Canada (54%) and British Columbia (58%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 7 to May 9, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Canadians Are Having Dinner in Front of the Television Set

Practically three-in-five Canadians spend anywhere from 31 to 60 minutes preparing dinner on an average weekday.

Vancouver, BC [May 13, 2022] – Most of Canada’s evening meals occur in a setting that is not the dining room and with electronic entertainment, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, Canadians report that 45% of their dinners at home in the past month took place at the dining room with no television, down six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2019. A majority of dinners (55%, +6) happened at a different part of the home, with the television on.

In Quebec, 50% of dinners at home in the past month occurred away from the dining room and with the television on. The proportion rises to 53% in British Columbia, 54% in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, 56% in Ontario, 58% in Atlantic Canada and 62% in Alberta.

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are having fewer evening meals away from the dining room (51%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (56%) and aged 55 and over (57%).

Three-in-ten Canadians (30%, -6 since a Research Co. survey conducted in June 2020) say they spend less than 30 minutes preparing dinner for themselves and others in their household on an average weekday.

Almost three-in-five Canadians (59%, +3) say making dinner on an average weekday takes anywhere from 31 to 60 minutes, while 11% (+3) require more than one hour to prepare food.

“A third of Ontarians, Quebecers and Albertans (33% each) manage to make dinner in less than half an hour,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (30%), British Columbia (26%) and Atlantic Canada (23%) can consistently manage this feat.”

Across the country, 65% of Canadians (unchanged) say they are “very familiar” or “moderately familiar” with Canada’s Food Guide. Awareness is lowest among Canadians aged 55 and over (56%) and rises among those aged 18-to-34 (70%) and those aged 35-to-54 (71%).

Fewer than three-in-five residents of British Columbia (58%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (59%) are familiar with Canada’s Food Guide. The proportion is higher in Quebec (64%), Alberta (65%), Ontario (68%) and Atlantic Canada (71%).

Just over a third of Canadians (35%, -6) rely on the recommendations of Canada’s Food Guide “all the time” or “most of the time” when choosing what they eat in an average week.

Women are more likely to review the recommendations of Canada’s Food Guide when deciding what to prepare (40%) than men (32%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from May 7 to May 9, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Reluctant to Re-Open Debate on Abortion

More than two-in-five Canadians believe the practice should continue to be legal under any circumstances.

Vancouver, BC [May 9, 2022] – More than half of Canadians believe the country should steer clear of starting a new argument about abortion, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 53% of Canadians think there is no point in re-opening a debate about abortion in Canada right now, down five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September 2020.

Just over one-in-four Canadians (26%, +1) believe a debate about abortion is long overdue in Canada and the discussion should be re-opened, while 21% (+4) are undecided.

Three-in-ten Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2021 federal election (30%) believe the time is right for a new conversation about abortion in Canada. The proportion is lower among those who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP) (26%) and the Liberal Party (24%) in last year’s ballot.

When asked about abortion, 44% of Canadians (-4) think it should be legal under any circumstances, while 37% (+1) believe the practice should be legal only under certain circumstances. Only 10% of Canadians (+2) believe abortion should be illegal in all circumstances.

“A significant gender gap persists in Canada on the issue of abortion,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 49% of women in Canada think the practice should be legal under any circumstances, only 39% of men share the same view.”

On a regional basis, support for legal abortion under any circumstances is highest in Quebec (50%), followed by Saskatchewan and Manitoba (47%), British Columbia (46%), Atlantic Canada (43%), Alberta (40%) and Ontario (39%).

Canadians who voted for the New Democrats in 2021 are more likely to endorse the concept of legal abortion under any circumstances (57%) than those who cast ballots for the Liberals (48%).

More than half of Canadians who supported the Conservatives in last year’s federal ballot (54%) believe abortion should be legal only under certain circumstances. About one third (32%) think the practice should be legal under any circumstances, while 9% say it should be illegal in all circumstances.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 25 to April 27, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Credit and Debit Cards Relied Upon for Most Payments in Canada

Most Canadians say that lack of cash compelled them to make a small purchase with their credit or debit card in the last month.

Vancouver, BC [May 6, 2022] – Canadians are currently using cash for transactions at a higher rate than during the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, but most payments continue to be made through alternative methods, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, Canadians relied on a credit card or a smartphone to finalize 46% of their purchases over the past month, down four points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2020.

One third of purchases from Canadians (33%, -2) were completed with a debit card or e-transfer, while 3% (-9) entailed the use of a cheque. Cash was used for the remaining 18% of transactions (+15).

“Credit cards are the main form of payment for residents of British Columbia (58%) and Quebec (50%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The debit card is the preferred option for residents of Ontario (47%) and Alberta (43%).”

More than three-in-five Canadians (63%) say that, over the course of the past month, there was a time when they did not have any paper money with them and had to make a small purchase (less than $10) with their credit or debit card.

While 50% of Canadians aged 55 and over were caught without paper money in the past month, the proportion rises to 64% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 77% among those aged 18-to-34.

Half of Canadians (50%, -8) expect people to rely on biometrics (such as iris scans, fingerprints or palm recognition) to complete purchases at some point within the next 10 years.

Albertans are more likely to predict the introduction of biometric payments in the next 10 years (60%). Belief in this vision becoming reality is lower in Ontario (52%), Quebec (50%), British Columbia (also 50%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (43%) and Atlantic Canada (37%).

Almost half of Canadians (49%, +14) say they would not like to see people utilizing biometrics to buy things in their lifetimes. Just under two-in-five (39%, -11) would welcome this development, and 12% (-3) are undecided.

Men (43%), Canadians aged 18-to-34 (49%), Albertans (also 49%) and Quebecers (44%) are more likely to wish for the opportunity to make payments through biometrics in the future.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 25 to April 27, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Almost Three-in-Five British Columbia Drivers Ready for Electric Car

More than seven-in-ten of the province’s residents endorse the goal of only selling “zero emission” vehicles by 2040.

Vancouver, BC [May 3, 2022] – The proportion of drivers in British Columbia who are willing to consider the purchase of an electric vehicle has increased since 2020, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 59% of British Columbians who drive their own vehicles claim it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that the next car they buy for themselves or their household will be electric, up six points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2021.

“Significant majorities of drivers in Metro Vancouver (64%) and the Fraser Valley (62%) foresee their next vehicle being electric,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower in Southern BC (54%), Vancouver Island (53%) and Northern BC (36%).”

The Government of British Columbia has passed legislation to ensure that, by the year 2040, all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province will be “zero emission.” More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (73%, +3) endorse this course of action—including 81% of those who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the 2020 provincial election, 76% of those who supported the BC Green Party and 73% of those who cast ballots for the BC Liberals.

More than three-in-four British Columbians aged 18 to 34 (78%) endorse the provincial government’s “zero emission” mandate, along with 75% of those aged 35-to-54 and 69% of those aged 55 and over.

More than half of British Columbians (53%, +2) believe the goal established by the provincial government on the issue of “zero emission” vehicles is “achievable”, while 39% (+3) think it is “not achievable.”

When British Columbians who drive their own cars are asked about issues that would make them less likely to purchase an electric vehicle, 59% say the vehicles are too expensive when compared to non-electric options—a proportion that rises to 66% among those aged 55 and over and to 70% among residents of Vancouver Island.

A majority of British Columbians who drive their own cars (54%) say they fear becoming stranded in an electric vehicle if they cannot find a charging station, and half (50%) are worried about not having enough places to charge the vehicle in the areas where they usually drive.

More than two-in-five British Columbians who drive their own cars (44%) are concerned about not having a place to charge an electric vehicle where they currently live, while 13% cite the “feel” of the vehicle compared with a non-electric option.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 25 to April 27, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Agree with Nationwide “Conversion Therapy” Ban

Strong majorities of residents of all regions are in favour of the legislation that came into effect in January 2022.

Vancouver, BC [April 29, 2022] – The recently enacted prohibition of the practice of “conversion therapy” is endorsed by more than three-in-five Canadians, a new Research Co. poll has found.

Proponents of “conversion therapy” believe that individuals who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, gender diverse, queer, and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2+) can be “converted” into heterosexuals through psychological or spiritual intervention.

Legislation that came into effect in January 2022 makes it illegal to promote, advertise, or profit from providing “conversion therapy”, or to subject a person, consenting or not, to “conversion therapy” in Canada.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 62% of Canadians agree with “conversion therapy” being illegal in Canada, while 21% disagree and 17% are undecided.

Support for the nationwide ban on “conversion therapy” is highest in Atlantic Canada (66%), followed by British Columbia (64%), Ontario (63%), Alberta (62%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (61%) and Quebec (57%).

“At least seven-in-ten Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (71%) and the Liberal Party (70%) in the last federal election are in favour of the new guidelines,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “They are joined by a majority of those who supported the Conservative Party in 2021 (57%).”

Most Canadians (57%, +2 since a similar Research Co poll conducted in November 2020) continue to believe that individuals who identify themselves as LGBTQ2+ cannot be “converted” into heterosexuals through psychological or spiritual intervention. This includes 69% of Atlantic Canadians, 63% of Canadians aged 55 and over and 60% of women.

Compared to 2020, there is little fluctuation when Canadians are asked about the legal recognition of same-sex couples in the country.

Two thirds of Canadians (66%, -1) believe same-sex couples should continue to be allowed to legally marry. Significantly fewer side with the notion of same-sex couples being allowed to form civil unions and not marry (12%, =) or not granting any kind of legal recognition to same-sex couples (10%, =).

More than two-in-five Canadians (42%, +3) think people are born as LGBTQ2+. However, 28% (=) believe people choose to be LGBTQ2+, while 31% (-2) are not sure.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 16 to April 18, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Young Canadians Are Vaping More Now Than in 2020

While most Canadians agree with the federal regulations that have been in place since 2018, support is not as strong this year.

Vancouver, BC [April 22, 2022] – The proportion of Canadians who have used an electronic cigarette or e-cigarette has increased in the past two years, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 17% of Canadians say they have vaped in the past 12 months, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September 2020.

Vaping remains more popular among Canadians aged 18-to-34 (26%) than among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (18%) and aged 55 and over (7%).

On a regional basis, British Columbia is at the top of the list when it comes to vaping (21%), followed by Atlantic Canada (18%), Quebec (also 18%), Ontario (16%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (15%) and Alberta (12%).

Current regulations related to vaping were implemented in May 2018, after Bill S-5—an overhaul of the Tobacco Act—was approved by the House of Commons and the Senate.

Across the country, more than four-in-five Canadians (82%, -4) agree with prohibiting the sale of vaping products to minors.

Almost two thirds of Canadians are also in favour of two other current measures: restricting any reference to e-cigarettes as healthier than standard tobacco products (65%, -12) and restricting the use of testimonials and “lifestyle” advertising for vaping products (64%, -11).

A majority of Canadians (58%, -11) agree with banning certain flavours of vaping products, such as cannabis and “confectionery.”

“The rise in vaping across Canada is accompanied by a drop in support for some of the measures introduced by the federal government in 2018,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There are double-digit drops in the level of agreement with advertising and flavouring guidelines.”

More than four-in-five Canadians (82%, -4) think vaping products that contain nicotine should display a warning, similar to the one used for tobacco products, while just over seven-in-ten (71%, -8) would ban the use of e-cigarettes in public places where smoking is currently prohibited.

Half of Canadians (50%, -6) would not consider dating a person who vapes—including 52% of men, 59% of Canadians aged 55 and over and 55% of Ontarians.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 16 to April 18, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Call for Public Inquiry into COVID-19 Response

The proportion of Canadians who are “anxious” about the end of pandemic restrictions and mandates increased to 56%.

Vancouver, BC [April 22, 2022] – A majority of Canadians believe a thorough review of the performance of various levels of government during the COVID-19 pandemic is warranted, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample, 66% of Canadians support holding a public inquiry into the way the COVID-19 pandemic was managed by the federal government, while 23% are opposed and 12% are undecided.

The Government of the United Kingdom has announced a public inquiry into the COVID-19 pandemic. The terms of reference intend to cover preparedness, the public health response, the response in the health care sector and the economic response. 

Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2021 federal election are more likely to endorse the call for a public inquiry into Ottawa’s pandemic management (77%) than those who voted for the Conservative Party (67%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (66%).

More than three-in-five Canadians believe that public inquiries into the way COVID-19 was handled by their provincial governments (64%) and their municipal governments (61%) are in order.

“More than two thirds of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (70%) and Ontario (68%) are in favour of holding a public inquiry into how their provincial governments managed the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support is slightly lower in Quebec (64%), British Columbia (61%), Alberta (also 61%) and Atlantic Canada (59%).”

This month, 82% of residents (+1 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March 2022) believe COVID-19 is a real threat. In addition, 62% of Canadians (-10) believe that the worst of COVID-19 is “behind us”.

Satisfaction with the way the federal government is handling the pandemic fell by four points to 57%. The rating is exactly the same for provincial administrations across Canada (57%, +1) and slightly higher for municipal governments (60% =).

Among the four most populous provinces, satisfaction is highest in British Columbia (61%, -2) and Ontario (also 61%, +4), followed by Quebec (59%, -4) and Alberta (37%, =).

There is little movement on the satisfaction of Canadians with the performance of the federal chief public health officer (61%, -2) and their provincial health officer or chief medical officer (60%, -1).

Most Canadians (56%) acknowledge feeling “very anxious” or “moderately anxious” about the end of COVID-19 restrictions and mandates in their community, up four points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in March 2022.

Three-in-five Canadians (60%, -5) plan to continue wearing a mask or face covering when entering an indoor premise in the next fortnight, while 45% (=) will do so every time they leave their home.

The proportion of Canadians who intend to visit relatives or friends in person over the next two weeks remains at 58%. Just over two-in-five Canadians are planning to have dinner (44%, -1) or lunch (43%, +4) at a sit-down restaurant in the next fortnight.

Fewer than one-in-four Canadians are planning to attend the theatre or cinema (22%, +1), a live sporting event as a spectator (11%, =) or a live concert as a spectator (also 11%, +2). 

While 22% of Canadians are planning to travel by car for an overnight stay in the next two weeks, only 13% are currently willing to travel by airplane.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 16 to April 18, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Fewer British Columbians Are Noticing Distracted Drivers on Roads

Almost two thirds of the province’s residents support seizing the electronic devices of repeat offenders.

Vancouver, BC [April 19, 2022] – While the proportion of British Columbians who are detecting distracted drivers has dropped since 2020, most of the province’s residents think it is time for tougher penalties to deal with this issue, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 46% of British Columbians say they witnessed a driver talking on a hand-held cell phone or texting while driving over the past four weeks, down nine points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2020.

Men (50%) and British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (52%) are more likely to say that they crossed paths with a distracted driver than women (43%) and British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (47%) and aged 55 and over (42%).

Drivers caught emailing, texting, or using an electronic device while driving in British Columbia face a fine of $368 and four penalty points (equivalent to $252) in their insurance penalty point premium. This means a total of $620 for a first-time infraction.

A majority of British Columbians (56%, +4) say the current fine for distracted driving in the province is “about right”, while 24% (-6) deem it “too low” and 15% (+1) consider it “too high.”

While one third of residents of Vancouver Island (33%) believe the current penalty for distracted driving is “too low”, the proportion is lower in Northern BC (29%), the Fraser Valley (22%), Southern BC (21%) and Metro Vancouver (also 21%).

More than half of British Columbians are in favour of three different penalties for drivers caught emailing, texting, or using an electronic device in the province, although the level of support for each one is lower in 2022 than in 2020.

Across the province, 52% of British Columbians (-2) support suspending drivers who break the law for a year, while 41% (+4) are opposed to this course of action.

“The notion of suspending distracted drivers for 12 months is contentious on a regional basis,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 54% of residents of Metro Vancouver, Southern BC and Vancouver Island like the idea, the proportion drops to 44% in Northern BC and to 42% in the Fraser Valley.”

More than half of the province’s residents (55%, -4) are in favour of doubling the current first-time fine to $1,240, while almost two thirds (64%, -6) support seizing the electronic devices of repeat offenders.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 1 to April 5, 2022, among 650 adults in British Columbia who are employed full time or part time. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Question Their Public Speaking Capabilities

A majority (51%) feel anxious when they have to make a phone call to a person they do not know.

Vancouver, BC [April 15, 2022] – Many Canadians are not particularly confident about their ability to address an audience publicly, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 44% of Canadians say they would have no problem giving a speech in front of other people. More than half (52%) disagree with this assessment.

Across the country, 51% of Canadians say they feel anxious when they have to make a phone call to a person they do not know—a proportion that rises to 57% among women and 61% among Canadians aged 18-to-34.

Canadians are divided when pondering text messages and emails, with 46% finding this form of communication impersonal and 47% disagreeing with this point of view.

“A majority of Canadians aged 55 and over (55%) brand electronic communications as impersonal,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (46%) and aged 18-to-34 (36%).”

The survey asked Canadians about their preferred mode of communication for various tasks. More than four-in-five Canadians (82%) say they would end a relationship with someone in person. Only 7% of Canadians would break up by sending a text message, including 11% of those aged 18-to-34.

Almost three-in-four Canadians (73%) say they would prefer to quit a job in person, but 15% would do so by sending an email, including 18% of women and 24% of Canadians aged 18-to-34.

Canadians are evenly divided on the best way to order food delivery to their home, with identical proportions choosing to make a phone call (39%) or use an app (also 39%).

While a majority of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (53%) would rely on an app to manage food delivery, the proportion drops slightly to 47% among those aged 35-to-54 and falls to 20% among those aged 55 and over.

Canadians who live in Alberta (50%) and Ontario (49%) are more likely to prefer to use an app to order food delivery than their counterparts in British Columbia (44%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (43%), Quebec (26%) and Atlantic Canada (18%).

More than a third of Canadians (37%) say they would make a phone call if they had to ask a question to their bank, while a smaller proportion (32%) would visit in person. Significantly fewer Canadians prefer an email (15%), an app (11%) or a text message (5%) for this particular task.

If Canadians had to ask a question to their municipality or City Hall, almost two-in-five (39%) would send an email, while one third (33%) would place a phone call and one-in-five (20%) would schedule a meeting in person.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from April 1 to April 3, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca