Canadians Support Strict Regulations for Smoking and Vaping

More than half of Canadians say they would not consider dating a person who used electronic cigarettes.

Vancouver, BC [October 27, 2020] – Many Canadians are in favour of existing federal legislation that seeks to make electronic cigarettes less appealing to the country’s youth, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 86% of Canadians agree with prohibiting the sale of vaping products to minors.

The federal government passed Bill S-5, which is an overhaul of the Tobacco Act. Other components of this legislation are supported by large majorities of Canadians.

More than seven-in-ten Canadians agree with the federal government’s decision to restrict any reference to e-cigarettes as healthier than standard tobacco products (77%, +4 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in October 2019) and to restrict the use of testimonials and “lifestyle” advertising for vaping products (75%).

Almost four-in-five Canadians (79%, +6) believe there should be a ban on the use of e-cigarettes in public places where smoking is currently prohibited, and a larger proportion (86%, +1) want vaping products that contain nicotine to display a warning, similar to the one used for tobacco products.

More than two thirds of Canadians (69%) agree with banning certain flavours of vaping products, such as cannabis and “confectionery.”

Across the country, one-in-ten Canadians (10%, -1) say they vaped in the past year, a proportion that rises to 19% among those aged 18-to-34 and 14% in British Columbia. 

“A majority of Canadians (56%, -4) say they would not consider dating a person who used electronic cigarettes,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This group includes 57% of women and 62% of Ontarians.”

Almost three-in-four Canadians (73%, +4 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in January 2019) agree with giving Health Canada the power to implement plain and standardized tobacco packaging. 

More than four-in-five Canadians continue to endorse two regulations related to tobacco consumption that have been in place for years: banning smoking in indoor public spaces, public transit facilities and workplaces (including restaurants, bars and casinos) (87%, -2%) and banning smoking in private vehicles occupied by children (85%, +9).

Almost seven-in-ten of Canadians (69, -3%) support banning smoking (tobacco and marijuana) in multi-family buildings, while 20% (-5) are opposed to this course of action.

Support for a regulation that would ban smoking in multi-family dwellings is highest in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (85%), followed by Ontario (72%), British Columbia (68%), Atlantic Canada (67%), Alberta (62%) and Quebec (60%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 18 to September 20, 2020, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Saskatchewan Party Keeps Sizeable Edge in Provincial Election

More than three-in-five likely voters in the province approve of the way Premier Scott Moe has handled his duties

Vancouver, BC [October 25, 2020] – The Saskatchewan Party remains ahead of all challengers in the Prairie Province’s election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 56% of decided voters would cast a ballot for the Saskatchewan Party candidate in their constituency or have already done so in Advance Voting or through the mail, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted earlier this month.

The New Democratic Party (NDP) is in second place with 38%, up two points since the start of the campaign. There was no movement for the other contending parties, with the Green Party at 2%, the Progressive Conservative Party also at 2%, the Liberal Party at 1% and the Buffalo Party also at 1%.

On a regional basis, the New Democrats have a four-point edge over the Saskatchewan Party in Regina among decided voters (50% to 46%). The Saskatchewan Party leads in Saskatoon (53% to 42%) and in the rest of the province (68% to 23%).

About one-in-five decided voters who will be casting their ballot tomorrow in Saskatchewan (18%) say they may change their mind about which party or candidate to support, while 82% are certain of their choice.

At the end of the campaign, almost half of decided voters in Saskatchewan (47%) acknowledge that their main motivation is a party’s ideas and policies. The party’s leader is a distant second with 24%, followed by a desire for change (10%), the party’s candidate in the riding (9%), a desire for stability (7%) and disgust with other contending candidates (3%).

More than three-in-five likely voters (61%, -4) approve of the performance of Premier and Saskatchewan Party leader Scott Moe, while one third (33%, +5) disapprove. 

The rating for Official Opposition and NDP leader Ryan Meili improved by three points to 48%. The numbers are significantly lower for Green leader Naomi Hunter (22%), Progressive Conservative leader Ken Grey (17%), Liberal leader Robert Rudachyk (16%) and Buffalo leader Wade Sira (15%).

The leaders of Saskatchewan’s two main parties reach the end of the campaign with a negative momentum score: -9 for Moe (17% say their opinion of the incumbent premier has improved, while 26% say it has worsened) and -4 for Meilli (23% say their opinion of the opposition leader has improved, while 27% say it has worsened).

On the “Best Premier” question, Moe remains in first place with 51% (+2), followed by Meilli with 29% (+8). The other party leaders are in single digits.

As was the case at the start of the campaign, more than a third of likely voters (35%, =) say the economy and jobs is the most important issue facing Saskatchewan, followed by heath care (31%, +3), crime and public safety (7%, +2), housing, poverty and homelessness (also 7%, +2) and COVID-19 (also 7%, +2).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 23 to October 25, 2020, among 500 likely voters in Saskatchewan, including 456 decided voters in the 2020 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Saskatchewan. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.4 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 4.6 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Appetite for Electric Vehicles Higher in the U.S. Than Canada

Price and the fear of becoming stranded are the major deterrents for motorists pondering a switch to a “carbon free” ride.

Vancouver, BC [October 22, 2020] – Vehicle owners in the United States are more likely to predict that their next car will be electric than their Canadian counterparts, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples of non-electric vehicle owners, 51% of American respondents and 42% of Canadian respondents say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that the next vehicle they acquire for themselves or their household will be electric.

“There is a significant gender gap on both North American countries when it comes to embracing the concept of electric vehicles,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Male non-electric vehicle owners are more likely to foresee an electric car in their future (48% in Canada and 68% in the United States) than their female counterparts (37% in Canada and 30% in the United States).”

In Canada, non-electric vehicle owners aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be considering a switch (61%) than those aged 35-to-54 (44%) and those aged 55 and over (37%).

In the United States, non-electric vehicle owners aged 35-to-54 are more likely to foresee a change in the future (78%) than those aged 18-to-34 (69%) and those aged 55 and over (21%).

When asked about specific issues that may make the purchase of an electric vehicle less likely, about three-in-five respondents in Canada (61%) say that the price is too expensive compared to non-electric options.

A majority of non-electric vehicle owners in Canada are fearful of becoming stranded if they cannot find a charging station (55%) and are worried about not having enough places to charge the vehicle in the areas where they usually drive (also 55%).

Fewer Canadian non-electric vehicle owners cited not having a place to charge the vehicle where they currently live (47%) and the “feel” of the vehicle compared to a non-electric one (14%).

In the United States, more than half of non-electric vehicle owners mentioned the fear of becoming stranded (53%) and price (51%) as the biggest hindrances to making a future purchase. 

More than two-in-five American respondents (45%) are concerned about a shortage of places to charge the vehicle where they usually drive, 37% lack a charging spot where they currently live, and 27% worried about the “feel” of an electric vehicle. 

The idea of the “feel” of the vehicle being a deal-breaker in the purchase of an electric car was more prevalent among non-electric vehicle owners who identify with the Republican Party in the United States (35%) and those who reside in the Canadian province of Alberta (23%).

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among representative samples of 797 adult non-electric vehicle owners in Canada and 804 adult non-electric vehicle owners in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for each country, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables for Canada here, our data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Than Half of Canadians Have Endured Workplace Abuse

One-in-four Canadians who endured harassment say the experience compelled them to switch jobs or leave a company.

Vancouver, BC [October 20, 2020] – A majority of Canadians have endured abuse at the workplace during their careers, including overwork, name calling and intimidation, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than half of Canadians (53%) acknowledge having experienced at least one of five different negative actions during the course of their working lives.

One-in-four Canadians (25%) faced actions that amount to overwork, such as being placed under undue pressure or given impossible deadlines.

Similar proportions of Canadians have experienced actions that threatened their personal standing, such as innuendo, sarcasm and jokes (22%) and actions that threatened their professional status, such as belittling opinions in a public setting or public professional humiliation (also 22%).

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians faced actions that are meant to destabilize, such as allocation of meaningless tasks and being set up for failure (18%) and actions that amount to isolation, such as withholding necessary information, ignoring or excluding (16%).

“Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to have had their professional status threatened in the workplace (28%) than their older counterparts,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, Canadians aged 35-to-54 are more likely to have experienced overwork (29%) and threats to their personal standing (26%).”

A third of Canadians who experienced any one of the five types of negative actions at work (33%) discussed the situation with family and/or friends, while one-in-four (25%) decided to leave the company or switch jobs. 

Fewer Canadians who endured negative actions at work chose to report the behaviour to the appropriate department or person (19%), took time off work or went on an extended leave (12%) or sought professional help to deal with health problems, such as low moods or depression (10%).

More than four-in-five Canadians (82%) think it is necessary for Canada to enact legislation that would provide protection to all workers from repeated abusive mistreatment at the workplace.

Just under one-in-four Canadians have experienced verbal abuse from a superior or boss at work (23%) or verbal abuse from a teacher at school (21%). 

While only 11% of Canadians have experienced verbal abuse from a sports coach, the proportion climbs to 19% among those aged 18-to-34.

Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to report enduring physical abuse from a teacher at school (12%, compared to the Canada-wide average of 8%). 

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 18 to September 20, 2020, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Americans Divided on What’s Next in COVID-19 Pandemic

Satisfaction with how various levels of government have handled the situation has increased since September.

Vancouver, BC [October 19, 2020] – Adults in the United States are split in their assessment of the future during the COVD-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 44% of Americans believe the worst of the pandemic has been left “behind”, while 43% think it is still “ahead.”

“Most Americans aged 55 and over (56%) believe the worst of COVID-19 lies ahead,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among those aged 18-to-34 (32%) and those aged 35-to-54 (33%).”

Practically seven-in-ten Americans (69%) are satisfied with the way their local government has dealt with the COVID-19 outbreak, up 13 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September

The level of satisfaction also improved for state governments (65%, +9) and for the federal government (45%, +6). 

Americans who voted for Republican Party nominee Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election are more likely to be satisfied with the way the federal government has handled the pandemic (78%) than those who cast a ballot for Democratic Party contender Hillary Clinton (22%).

The approval rating for President Trump stands at 43% this month (-1), with 54% of Americans (-1) saying they disapprove of his performance.

There is a significant gender gap when it comes to public perceptions of the president. While 52% of men approve of the way Trump has handled his duties, only 36% of women concur.

In addition, while 48% of White Americans are satisfied with Trump’s performance, the rating drops to 28% among Hispanic / Latino Americans and 13% among African Americans.

Nine-in-ten Americans (90%, unchanged since September) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside, while only 8% disagree (+1) and 2% (-1) are undecided.

Three-in-five Americans (61%, -5) say they would take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available, while 26% (+4) would not follow this course of action.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 16 to October 18, 2020, among 1,100 American adults.  The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.0 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Report Fewer Blunders from Drivers Than Last Year

The proportion of Canadians who say drivers are “worse” than five years ago dropped from 47% in 2019 to 39% this year.

Vancouver, BC [October 16, 2020] – Canadians are expressing a higher level of satisfaction with drivers, and there is a decline on the incidence of specific negative behaviours on the country’s roads, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 39% of Canadians think drivers in their city or town are “worse” than five years ago, down eight points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2019.

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%, +4) say the quality of drivers has not changed, while 7% (=) believe they are “better” than five years ago.

“Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to have a pessimistic view of drivers, with 50% believing they are worse now,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer Canadians aged 35-to-54 (43%) and aged 18-to-34 (20%) share this point of view.”

The survey, which tracks the incidence of six specific behaviours, shows significant drops in some categories. 

More than half of Canadians (54%, -7 since 2019) saw a driver not signaling before a turn in the past month, and more than two-in-five (44%, -3) witnessed a car taking up two or more spots in a parking lot.

More than a third of Canadians (36%, -8) saw a driver not stopping at an intersection over the past month. Fewer respondents witnessed “lane tracking” or vehicles turning right or left from an incorrect lane (33%, -1) or experienced a “close call” on the road, such as slamming the breaks or having to steer violently to avoid a collision (26%, -9).

On a regional basis, British Columbia had the largest proportion of respondents who observed drivers not signaling before a turn (61%) or failing to stop at intersections (48%) in the past month. 

The proportion of respondents who saw vehicles taking up two or more spots in a parking lot was highest in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (53%) and Alberta (50%).

As was the case last year, 56% of Canadians believe that there are specific groups or people in their city or town who are worse drivers than others. 

More than two-in-five respondents who blamed a specific group for bad driving (43%) mentioned “young”, while 25% wrote “elderly.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 18 to September 20, 2020, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians and Americans Want Holistic Approach on Opioids

Information, rehabilitation, appropriate prescriptions and “safe supply” are supported by large majorities of residents.

Vancouver, BC [October 6, 2020] – Residents of Canada and the United States are supportive of several measures to curb the opioid crisis, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, two-in-five Canadians (39%) and more than half of Americans (53%) describe the current situation related to the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in their community as “a major problem.”

When asked about specific ideas to address the opioid crisis, more than four-in-ten respondents in the two countries (84% in Canada and 86% in the United States) agree with launching more education and awareness campaigns about drug use.

Support is also particularly high for creating more spaces for drug rehabilitation (78% in Canada and 81% in Canada), reducing the prescription of opioids by medical professionals (73% in Canada and 76% in the United States), and establishing “safe supply” programs where alternatives to opioids can be prescribed by health professionals (70% in Canada and 78% in the United States).

Three-in-five respondents (59% in Canada and 60% in the United States) agree with setting up more “harm reduction” strategies, such as legal supervised injection sites.

The notion of decriminalizing all drugs for personal use is more contentious. In Canada, 53% of respondents disagree with this idea, while 34% are in favour of it and 14% are not sure.

In the United States, 47% of respondents agree with decriminalizing all drugs for personal use, while 43% disagree and 10% are undecided.

Across North America, the decriminalization of all drugs for personal use is more popular with men (36% in Canada and 61% in the United States) and respondents aged 35-to-54 (37% in Canada and 69% in the United States).

“Only 25% of Conservative Party voters in Canada are willing to decriminalize all drugs for personal use, compared to 38% of those who supported the Liberal Party in the last federal election,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the United States, 55% of Republican Party supporters are in favour of decriminalization, along with 47% of Democrats.”

In Canada, just over a third of respondents (35%) say Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the federal government have done a “very good” or “good” job to come up with solutions to deal with the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs, while 39% deem it “bad” or “very bad” and 26% are not sure.

The rating on this issue is higher for premiers and provincial governments (43%), mayors and councils (40%), provincial legislators (39%) and the local Member of Parliament (38%).

In the United States, governors and state administrations have the highest satisfaction rating in dealing with the opioid crisis (58%), along with mayors and local governments (also 58%). The numbers are lower for President Donald Trump and the federal government (46%) and Congress (44%).

Methodology:

Results are based on online studies conducted from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States

Find our Canadian tables here, our American tables here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Race Relations Have Worsened for a Majority of Americans

The country is deeply divided on whether to rename U.S. Army installations christened after Confederate historical figures.

Vancouver, BC [September 30, 2020] – Adults in the United States hold ominous views on the issue of race relations, as considerable proportions of residents of specific ethnic background say they have experienced racism in the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 58% of Americans say race relations in the United States have worsened over the past two years, while only 30% believe they have improved.

Practically three-in-four respondents of Native American descent (73%) think race relations have worsened over the past two years—a view shared by 59% of White Americans, 58% of Asian and Pacific Islanders, 58% of African Americans and 46% of Hispanic and Latino Americans.

About three-in-five Americans say they have personally experienced behaviour that they would consider racist in the United States on social media (60%) and during day-to-day interactions with others (59%). 

Smaller proportions of Americans have endured racism at work (49%), at school (47%), during interactions with police or law enforcement officers (44%) and during interactions with the health care system (39%).

“Almost two thirds of Americans of African and Hispanic or Latino descent (64% each) say they have experienced racist behaviour when dealing with police and law enforcement in the United States,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower for Native Americans (51%), Asian and Pacific Islanders (42%) and White Americans (38%).”

More than half of Americans say they have witnessed racist behaviour on social media (68%), during day-to-day interactions with others (65%), at work (56%), at school (55%) and during interactions with police or law enforcement officers (also 55%). 

More than two-in-five Americans (46%) say they have witnessed racist behaviour during interactions with the health care system.

A majority of Americans (56%) have a positive opinion of the Black Lives Matter movement, while 35% hold negative views. 

Perceptions on Black Lives Matter vary greatly according to ethnicity, from a high of 71% among African Americans to a low of 40% among Native Americans.

Half of Americans (50%) hold positive views on the #MeToo and #TimesUp movement, while 30% have a negative opinion.

Positive perceptions of #MeToo and #TimesUp are higher with Americans aged 18-to-34 and aged 35-to-54 (56% each) than among those aged 55 and over (40%).

Respondents to this survey were also asked about four recent decisions and proposals. 

More than half of Americans agree with NASCAR’s decision to ban the Confederate Flag from events (56%) while 33% disagree.

On a regional basis, agreement with NASCAR’s choice is highest in the West (64%), followed by the Midwest (58%), the South (54%) and the Northeast (52%).

The nationwide results are similar for the State of Mississippi’s decision to change its flag to a new one that will not feature the Confederate battle emblem. A majority of Americans (56%) agree with this decree, while one third (33%) disagree.

On this particular decision, support is also highest from Americans who reside in the West (64%), followed by the Midwest (57%), the South (55%) and the Northeast (50%).

Two other proposals are decidedly more contentious. While 46% of respondents agree with the removal of monuments and sculptures that feature Americans who owned slaves, 46% disagree and 8% are undecided.

Support for the removal of these monuments and sculptures stands at 63% among Democrats and 74% among African Americans, but drops to 42% among Independents, 30% among Republicans and 40% among White Americans.

The results are similar for the notion of renaming U.S. Army installations named after Confederate historical figures. Across the country, 45% of Americans agree with this proposal, while 44% disagree.

Support for changing the names of these installations is higher among Democrats (65%) and African Americans (61%) and lower among Republicans (28%) and White Americans (39%).

Methodology:
Results are based on online studies conducted on August 3 and August 4, 2020, and from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among 2,400 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.0 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Photo: Life Matters

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Many Likely Voters in British Columbia Plan to Vote by Mail in 2020

Nine-in-ten likely voters in the province have confidence in Elections BC to oversee the entire voting process this year.

Vancouver, BC [September 28, 2020] – British Columbia could see a substantial number of mail-in ballots in this year’s provincial election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, three-in-ten likely voters in British Columbia (29%) say they intend to cast their ballot by mail this year, up from 2% who recall voting this way in 2017.

While 58% of respondents to this survey remember voting in person on Election Day in the last provincial election, only 28% say they are currently planning to cast their ballot in the same fashion on October 24.

The proportion of likely voters who intent to cast their ballot during the Advance Voting period is also lower in 2020. In 2017, 36% of respondents say they took advantage of this option. This year, only 27% intend to vote this way.

In addition, 16% of likely voters in British Columbia are currently not sure about the way in which they will cast their ballot in 2020.

“The concept of postal voting is particularly attractive for likely voters in Vancouver Island (32%) and the Fraser Valley (also 32%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “A similar proportion of those who reside in Metro Vancouver (29%) would also currently prefer to vote by mail,”

Likely voters aged 55 and over are slightly less likely to cast their ballot on Election Day (25%) than those aged 18-to-34 (31%) and those aged 35-to-54 (30%).

Conversely, voting by mail is a more popular option for likely voters aged 35-to-54 (33%) and aged 55 and over (31%) than for those aged 18-to-34 (21%).

Across the province, 90% of likely voters are “very confident” or “moderately confident” that Elections BC —the non-partisan office of the British Columbia legislature responsible for conducting provincial and local elections—will be able to oversee the entire voting process in this year’s provincial ballot.

Sizeable proportions of likely voters also express confidence in Elections BC to ensure that there is no fraudulent activity with mailed ballots (82%) and to enforce social distancing at polling stations (74%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 21 to September 23, 2020, among 750 likely voters in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.6 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by James Wheeler

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians and Americans Would Shun Debate on Abortion

The proportion of Conservatives in Canada and Republicans in the U.S. who want a discussion on this topic fell by double digits.

Vancouver, BC [September 25, 2020] – The appetite for national discussions on abortion has dropped drastically in North America, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 58% of Canadians and Americans believe there is no point in re-opening a debate about abortion in their respective countries.

Only three-in-ten Americans (30%) and one-in-four Canadians (25%) think a debate on abortion is long overdue and the discussion should be re-opened.

This represents a 16-point drop in the United States and a 12-point drop in Canada since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in July 2019.

Majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (64%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (63%) and the Conservative Party (56%) in the last federal election believe there is no point in reopening a debate about abortion right now.

“Republicans in the United States and Conservatives in Canada are not particularly convinced that this is the right time to debate abortion,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 55% of Republicans were willing to engage in a national discussion about this topic in 2019, the proportion has fallen to 40% this year. Among Canadian Conservatives, appetite for this debate dropped from 44% to 28%.”

In Canada, just under half of residents (48%, +2 since 2019) think abortion should be legal under any circumstances. More than a third of Canadians (36%, -7) think the procedure should only be allowed under certain circumstances.

In the United States, more than two-in-five respondents (44%, -4) believe abortion should be legal only under certain circumstances, while more than a third (37%, +9) think the procedure should be legal under any circumstances.

Few Americans (13%, -6) and Canadians (8%, +3) endorse the concept of abortion being illegal in all circumstances.

Americans aged 35-to-54 (43%), residents of the West (46%) and Democrats (also 46%) are more likely to believe that abortion should be legal under any circumstances.

Methodology:

Results are based on online studies conducted from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States.

Find our Canadian tables here, our American tables here and download the press release here.

Photo by Josh Hild.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians and Americans Differ on Issues Related to Animals

While residents of both countries hold similar views on animals as food, Canadians are more likely to oppose zoos and aquariums.

Vancouver, BC [September 22, 2020] – The perceptions of residents of Canada and the United States on animals are similar when it comes to food, but vary greatly on entertainment, fur and trophy hunting, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 76% of Canadians and 75% of Americans are in favour of eating animals.

About two thirds of respondents in the two countries (65% in Canada and 67% in the United States) are in favour of hunting animals for meat.

While only 8% of Canadians endorse trophy hunting, the proportion rises to 25% in the United States.

“Residents of Canada and the United States establish a clear difference between hunting animals for meat and hunting animals for sport,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Still, while fewer than one-in-ten Canadians are in favour of trophy hunting, the proportion of Americans who consent to this practice is significantly higher.”

While almost two thirds of Americans (64%) favour keeping animals in zoos or aquariums, only 39% of Canadians share this point of view.

More than three-in-five American men (66%) and American women (61%) support keeping animals in zoos or aquariums. In Canada, 47% of men favour this practice, along with 33% of women.

The use of animals in rodeos is endorsed by almost half of Americans (46%) but only one third of Canadians (32%).

In Canada, 49% of Albertans are in favour of using animals in rodeos. Support for the practice is lower in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (39%), Atlantic Canada (36%), British Columbia (33%), Quebec (27%) and Ontario (24%).

In the United States, residents of the Midwest are more likely to favour the use of animals in rodeos (51%) than those in the South (47%), West (45%) and Northeast (39%).

Only one-in-four Americans (25%) and one-in-five Canadians (19%) are in favour of killing animals for their fur.

In Canada, support for killing animals for their fur is highest in Atlantic Canada (30%), followed by Saskatchewan and Manitoba (26%), Alberta (20%), Quebec (19%), Ontario (16%) and British Columbia (12%).

Methodology:

Results are based on online studies conducted from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States.

Find our Canadian tables here, our American tables here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Thomas J. Whitmore is Most Popular Fictional President in U.S.

Three-in-five likely voters would vote for the character played by Bill Pullman in the movie “Independence Day”.

Vancouver, BC [September 16, 2020] – Three fictional presidents could count on the support of more than half of voters in the United States if they were actually running for office, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample asked American likely voters whether they would cast a ballot for seven different fictional presidents that have appeared in movies and television series.

Three-in-five respondents (61%) say they would “definitely” or “probably” vote for Thomas J. Whitmore (as played by Bill Pullman in the movie “Independence Day”) if he was actually running for office.

“Support for Whitmore is extraordinary across the political spectrum,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In this survey, 64% of Democrats, 60% of Independents and 56% of Republicans would vote for Whitmore.”

Two other presidents could count on the support of half of likely voters in an election: Andrew Shepherd (as played by Michael Douglas in the movie “The American President”) (56%) and Jed Bartlett (as played by Martin Sheen in the TV series “The West Wing”) (52%).

Shepherd and Bartlett—who are both portrayed as representing the Democratic Party—are particularly popular with American likely voters who identify as Democrats (62% for each fictional president). 

The proportion of would-be voters across the United States is slightly lower for David Palmer (as played by Dennis Haysbert in the TV series “24”) (48%), Dave Kovic (as played by Kevin Kline in the movie “Dave”) (44%) and Selina Meyer (as played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus in the TV Series “Veep”) (40%).

Francis Underwood (as played by Kevin Spacey in the TV series “House of Cards”) could count on the support of a third of likely voters in the United States (34%).

Palmer and Kovic are particularly popular with women (54% and 52% respectively). In addition, while 48% of female likely voters would cast a ballot for Meyer, only 34% of men would join them. 

Underwood has his best numbers among likely voters aged 18-to-34 (51%) but drops slightly to 44% among those aged 35-to-54. Only 13% of American likely voters aged 55 and over would consider casting a ballot for Underwood in a presidential election.

The most popular fictional presidents for White likely voters in the United States are Whitmore (59%) and Shepherd (55%). The top two is identical among likely voters of Hispanic and Latino descent (Whitmore 70%, Shepherd 63%), while African American voters choose Whitmore (61%) and Palmer (57%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among 1,200 American adults.  The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Embrace Walking as a Fitness Strategy

Two thirds are walking more than they did before the COVID-19 pandemic, as participation in team and racket sports declines.

Vancouver, BC [September 15, 2020] – Most British Columbians are partaking in a specific exercise during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two thirds of British Columbians (66%) say they are walking for fitness more often now than they did before the pandemic began.

Across the province, about one-in-four residents say they are running or jogging (26%) and cycling (24%) more often now than before COVID-19.

Metro Vancouverites are more likely to say they are running or jogging more now (28%). Residents of Southern BC are cycling (34%) and hiking (30%) significantly more at this stage than their counterparts in other regions.

Just under one-in-five British Columbians are also becoming more avid practitioners of yoga (19%), hiking (18%) and golf (also 18%). Women in the province are practicing yoga at a higher rate (22%) than men (17%). 

There are other fitness activities that have seen a decline in participation. One-in-four British Columbians (24%) are not lifting weights as much as they did before the pandemic—a proportion that rises to 31% among those aged 18-to-34. 

In addition, one-in-five of the province’s residents (21%) are not relying on cardiovascular cross-trainer machines—such as ellipticals, stationary bikes and treadmills—as much as they used to.

“The fear of infection is keeping some British Columbians away from their usual exercise routines, particularly visits to gyms,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The top two pandemic fitness activities for British Columbians, walking and jogging, do not require much in the way of equipment.” 

In May, a Research Co. survey found that 47% of British Columbians would not go back to the gym without a vaccine against COVID-19, including 54% of women.

About three-in-ten British Columbians (29%) say they are swimming less often now than they did before the pandemic. Smaller proportions of residents say they are not participating as often on water sports (24%), racket sports (19%), team sports (18%) and climbing (16%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 3 to September 5, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Pandemic Curbs Buying Behaviour of Sports Fans in North America

Canadians and Americans are less likely to purchase apparel from teams and watch games at a pub or bar than in 2019.

Vancouver, BC [September 11, 2020] – The COVID-19 pandemic has severely affected the consumer behaviour of sports fans in Canada and the United States, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, only 12% of Americans and 8% of Canadians say they have gone to a pub or bar to watch professional sports in the year 2020.

In contrast, 23% of Americans and 18% of Canadians say they watched professional team sports at a pub or a bar in 2019.

While 23% of Americans and 16% of Canadians bought apparel from a professional sports team in 2019, the proportion has dropped to 15% in the United States and 7% in Canada during 2020.

In addition, 10% of Americans and 7% of Canadians have cancelled a subscription to a cable or satellite channel where they watched sports—down from 20% and 15% respectively who had a subscription in 2019.

A similar situation is observed on streaming services that show professional sports, with 8% of Americans and 7% of Canadians cancelling a subscription—down from 20% and 11% respectively who had one last year.

Fewer Americans are participating in sports pools (from 11% in 2019 to 7% in 2020) and placing wagers on sporting events (from 12% to 8%). The drops on these two indicators are not as pronounced in Canada, where fantasy league participation went from 9% to 7%, and placing wagers went from 6% to 5%.

More than half of Canadians (54%) consider themselves fans of the National Hockey League (NHL). Fewer than two-in-five Canadians are fans of the National Basketball Association (NBA) (37%), Major League Baseball (MLB) 33%, the Canadian Football League (CFL) (31%), the National Football League (NFL) (31%) and Major League Soccer (MLS) (21%).

In the United States, 59% of Americans say they are fans of the NFL, and 51% are fans of MLB. Fewer Americans consider themselves fans of the NBA (44%), the NHL (36%) and MLS (26%). 

A majority of Canadians think the NHL (59%) and the NBA (52%) did a “good job” in dealing with the challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic. Fewer Canadians (37%) offer the same positive assessment to the CFL, the NFL, MLB and MLS.

In the United States, 51% of Americans say the NBA did a “good job” in facing the pandemic, followed by the NFL with 49%, MLB with 46%, the NHL with 44% and MLS with 37%.

Almost two thirds of respondents in each country (64% of in Canada and 64% in the United States) think professional athletes should speak their mind if they are concerned about social and political issues.

Photo Credit: Phillyfan0419

Methodology:

Results are based on online studies conducted from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and 1,200 adults in the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for Canada and +/- 2.8 percentage points for the United States.

Find our Canadian tables here, our American tables here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Almost Half of Canadians Expect COVID-19 Pandemic to Worsen

Public support for requiring all customers to wear a mask or face covering when they are indoors reaches 85% across the country.

Vancouver, BC [September 8, 2020] – Canadians hold a gloomier view of the COVID-19 pandemic than they did two months ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 46% of Canadians think the worst of the COVID-19 outbreak is “definitely” or “probably” ahead of us, up 11 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in June. The proportion of Canadians who think the worst of COVID-19 is “behind us” dropped from 49% in June to 37% in September.

On a regional basis, British Columbians are more likely to believe that the worst of the pandemic lies ahead (61%) than residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (50%), Alberta (45%), Quebec (44%), Ontario (40%) and Atlantic Canada (42%).

Nine-in-ten Canadians (90%) agree with two regulations that have been in place for weeks: keeping the border with the United States closed to non-essential travel, and placing all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period.

Public support is also extremely high (85%) for requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside. When Research Co. posed this same question to Americans this month, 90% were in favour of this guideline.

A majority of Canadians (51%) agree with allowing K-12 students to go back to in-class learning in their province, while two-in-five (42%) disagree.

Satisfaction with the way provincial governments have handled the COVID-19 pandemic fell by six points since late June to 69%. The rating remained at 83% in British Columbia, but fell in Ontario (68%, -8), Quebec (67%, -2) and Alberta (57%, -5).

Just under two thirds of Canadians (64%, -6) are satisfied with the way the federal government has managed COVID-19. The rating is the same (64%, -6) for municipal governments.

There has been an extraordinary increase in the proportion of Canadians who say they are wearing a mask every time they go out. This month, 70% of Canadians say they are behaving this way, up from 48% in late June and just 14% in May.

“Women are more likely to be wearing a mask every time they go out (75%) than men (65%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Canadians aged 18-to-34 are also more observant of this practice (74%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (70%) and those aged 55 and over (66%).”

More than seven-in-ten Ontarians (81%), Quebecers (73%) and Albertans (71%) say they are always wearing masks outside. The proportion is lower for residents of Atlantic Canada (65%), British Columbia (56%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (53%).

A third of Canadians (33%, -7) say they clean the groceries they buy to prevent infection, and 22% (-1) are not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection.

Almost one-in-four Canadians (23%, -6) say they are overeating or eating more than usual at home. The figures are stable on Canadians drinking more at home (17%, -1) and losing their temper more often (15%, -1).

Across the country, three-in-four Canadians (74%, -1) say they are willing to take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from August 30 to September 1, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca