Metro Vancouverites Ponder Bailouts for Tourism Sector

More than three-in-five agree with restaurants, cafés and bars being eligible for government-funded assistance.  

Vancouver, BC [May 1, 2020] – Residents of Metro Vancouver hold differing views on which businesses and corporations that are tied to the tourism industry should be buttressed with taxpayer money as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative sample, 78% of Metro Vancouverites believe that restaurants, cafés and bars that employ fewer than 10 people should be eligible for a government bailout.  

More than half of Metro Vancouverites would also consent to offer financial assistance to restaurants, cafés and bars that employ more than 10 people (76%), individual boutiques and stores (71%) and retail outlets that are part of a chain with five or more stores in the country (51%).  

“Metro Vancouverites appear particularly concerned with the pandemic leading to job losses in the restaurant sector,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 16% of residents believe small eateries should not receive financial assistance, and just 18% feel the same way about venues that employ more than 10 people.”  

At least two-in-five Metro Vancouverites believe taxi companies (47%), airlines (45%) and cruise ship operators (40%) should be eligible for a government-funded bailout.  

Residents of Vancouver and Surrey are more likely to favour government-funded assistance for airlines (47% and 46% respectively) than those who live in Burnaby (37%).  

Just over a third of Metro Vancouverites would consider a bailout for ride-hailing companies (35%), and just 27% would include Airbnb hosts on the same list.  

More than half of residents of Vancouver and Surrey (51%) are against ride-hailing companies being eligible for a government bailout, along with 46% of those in Burnaby and 58% of those who reside in other Metro Vancouver municipalities.  

Across Metro Vancouver, men are more likely than women to reject the notion of government assistance for Airbnb hosts (68% to 59%).  

While 53% of Metro Vancouverites aged 18-to-34 are opposed to bailing out Airbnb hosts, the proportion climbs to 69% among those aged 55 and over and 74% among those aged 35-to-54.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 24 to April 26, 2020, among 800 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadian Parents Mix Learning and Games in COVID-19 Outbreak

One-in-four parents (26%) have not set a time limit for their kids to have access to non-educational entertainment options.

Vancouver, BC [April 24, 2020] – Canadian parents are relying on a variety of options to educate and entertain their young children as the COVID-19 keeps schools closed, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of parents with children aged 14 or under at home, 65% of respondents say their kids are participating in entertainment activities that do not involve electronics, such as board games and puzzles.

Similar proportions of Canadian parents are relying on educational activities that involve electronics, such as tablets or smartphones (64%) and educational activities that do not involve electronics (62%).

Three-in-five parents (61%) are giving their kids access to tablets, smartphones or video game consoles for non-educational purposes, and a majority (53%) are allowing children to have access to non-educational streaming content.

Parents in Manitoba and Saskatchewan are decidedly ahead of all others when it comes to letting children to rely on tablets, smartphones or video game consoles for non-educational purposes (94%). The incidence is significantly lower in Atlantic Canada (65%), British Columbia (64%), Ontario (62%), Alberta (61%) and Quebec (47%).

“The notion of allowing children aged 14 and under to stream non-educational content at home during the COVID-19 outbreak is more popular among parents in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (83%) and British Columbia (62%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer parents in Alberta (52%), Ontario (49%), Quebec (47%) and Atlantic Canada (also 47%) favour this approach.”

Two in five parents (41%) say they have established a time limit for their child (or children) to have access to entertainment options for non-educational purposes and it has been met.

One third of parents (33%) acknowledge setting a time limit for their kids to be entertained, but say it has been difficult to meet. One-in-four (26%) did not establish a time limit at all.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 9 to April 15, 2020, among 824 adults in Canada who have a child aged 14 or under at home. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Most Canadians Foresee “Back to Normal” by Mid-August or Later

More than seven-in-ten (73%) would take a vaccine against COVID-19 if it ultimately becomes available.

Vancouver, BC [April 21, 2020] – A majority of Canadians are not anticipating a return to the routines they had before the COVID-19 outbreak in the early weeks of the summer, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 54% of Canadians expect things in their city or town to go back to the way they were before the outbreak three months from now (16%) or four months from now or longer (38%).  

Only 18% of Canadians expect a return to normal life within the next month (6%) or a month from now (12%), while 31% believe their daily routines will come back two months from now (15%) or three months from now (16%).  

“Across the country, residents of Quebec (55%) and Ontario (54%) are more hopeful of a return to normalcy early in the summer,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents of Atlantic Canada and the western provinces are decidedly more skeptical.”  

More than seven-in-ten Canadians (73%) say they would “definitely” or “probably” take a vaccine against COVID-19 if it ultimately becomes available—including 78% of men, 76% of those aged 18-to-34 and 79% of those in Atlantic Canada.  

When asked about their personal experience during the COVID-19 outbreak, almost half of Canadians (47%) say they are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection and two-in-five (40%) say they are not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection.  

About one-in-seven Canadians (14%) acknowledge wearing a mask every time they go out, including 19% of residents of Ontario and British Columbia and 22% of those aged 18-to-34.  

Three-in-ten Canadians (29%) admit to overeating at home, while smaller proportions acknowledge losing their temper more than usual (18%) and drinking more alcohol (13%).  

Practically two thirds of Canadians (65%) expect most people to maintain their current precautions on hygiene after the COVID-19 outbreak ends. The same proportion (65%) foresee most companies keeping their current hygiene precautions as well.  

One-in-five Canadians (21%) expect more people to consider adopting vegetarian or vegan diets after the COVID-19 outbreak ends—a proportion that rises to 26% in British Columbia.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 13 to April 15, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Canadians Expect to Work from Home More After COVID-19

More than three-in-five (63%) believe more companies will phase out business travel in favour of teleconferencing.  

Vancouver, BC [April 17, 2020] – The way Canadian workers are currently dealing with the COVID-19 outbreak will have repercussions on how we conduct business in the future, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 73% of Canadians think more people will “definitely” or “probably” work from home than before once the COVID-19 outbreak ends.  

In addition, 63% of Canadians expect more companies to phase out business travel in favour of teleconferencing.  

“Many Canadians believe some of the current features of their job will remain in place once offices are fully operational again,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Two thirds of Atlantic Canadians (67%) and Quebecers (also 67%) believe meetings that do not require travel will become the norm.”  

Canadians who are currently working from home instead of their regular office were asked about specific issues they are facing as they fulfill their duties during the COVID-19 outbreak.  

Almost two thirds of Canada’s “provisional home workers” (65%) hope they would like to be able to work from home more often after the COVID-19 outbreak has passed—a proportion that jumps to 72% among men and 76% among those aged 55 and over.  

Across the country, 62% of “provisional home workers” say working from home has been easier than they originally thought, but almost half (46%) are having a difficult time working due to the distractions at home.  

Home distractions are a big concern for “provisional home workers” in British Columbia (55%), while only 23% of those in Atlantic Canada feel the same way.  

Two thirds of “provisional home workers” in Canada (67%) say they miss interacting with other people at their regular office, and a smaller proportion (44%) miss commuting to their workplace.  

“Provisional home workers” in Quebec are more likely to say their miss their daily commute (50%), followed by those who reside in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (47%), Ontario (44%), British Columbia (43%), Atlantic Canada (39%) and Alberta (38%).  

Four-in-five “provisional home workers” (80%) feel their company trusts they are doing their work from home, and almost seven-in-ten (69%) believe their company is perfectly equipped for them to carry on with their duties from home.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 9 to April 11, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

COVID-19 Fosters Interest in National and Local News in Canada

More than two-in-five Canadians have received or seen messages featuring unproven claims about COVID-19.

Vancouver, BC [April 10, 2020] – Most Canadians are paying attention to accurately sourced news related to the COVID-19 outbreak, but more than two-in-five have been exposed to messages featuring unverified assertions about the virus, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than three-in-five Canadians have sought information on the COVID-19 outbreak through national news outlets (69%), briefings and press conferences by the Prime Minister (67%) and local news outlets (62%).  

Almost three-in-five Canadians (59%) have watched briefings and press conferences by their Premier, provincial ministers and health authorities, while fewer have visited the Health Canada website (46%) and provincial government health websites (40%).  

Practically four-in-five Canadians aged 55 and over (79%) have watched the prime minister’s briefings and press conferences, compared to 67% among Canadians aged 35-to-54 and 60% among Canadians aged 18-to-34.  

“There is a noticeable gender gap when it comes to seeking information about COVID-19 online,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than half of Canadian women (53%) have visited the Health Canada website, compared to only 44% of men.”  

Almost two thirds of residents of Atlantic Canada (65%) and Quebec (also 65%) have watched the press briefings from provincial public servants, compared to 58% in both Ontario and British Columbia, 53% in Alberta and 50% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.  

Across the country, 56% of Canadians did not recall receiving or seeing any of five messages—by email, text, WhatsApp or in social media—featuring unproven claims about COVID-19.  

More than one-in-four Canadians were exposed to messages claiming that COVID-19 is an artificially created biological weapon (27%) and that COVID-19 was created in a laboratory (26%).  

Smaller proportions of Canadians recalled claims about COVID-19 originating in the United States (14%) and that getting more sunlight can protect against the virus (10%).  

More than four-in-five Canadians who saw the message related to COVID-19’s hypothetical creation in a laboratory believe it is “definitely” or “probably” true (43%). Similar proportions feel the same way about sunlight providing protection against the virus (39%) and the virus being an artificially created biological weapon (38%).  

Fewer Canadians who recalled an assertion about COVID-19’s supposed American origin find the claim believable (28%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 30 to April 1, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Miss Family, Friends and Travel Most During COVID-19

More than three-in-five Canadians are paying attention to the news more often than they did before the outbreak.

Vancouver, BC [April 3, 2020] – As Canadians remain mostly confined to their homes on account of the COVID-19 outbreak, more than two-in-five are finding it challenging to relinquish personal contact with family and friends, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 45% of Canadians say it has been hard to give up seeing family members in person during the outbreak.  

A similar proportion of Canadians (44%) say it has been difficult to give up seeing friends in person, while 41% find it hard to not be able to travel.  

“Albertans are more likely to say that being away from family members during the COVID-19 outbreak has been difficult (49%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than half of British Columbians (53%) feel the same way about being away from friends.”  

More than a third of Canadians say it has been hard to abandon dining out in restaurants (38%) and being able to attend entertainment events, such as concerts, plays or movies (36%).  

A smaller proportion of Canadians (32%) say it has been difficult to be without live sports—a proportion that rises to 41% among Canadian men.  

Just over half of Canadians with children aged 14 or younger  (51%) say it has been easy having their kids at home all day on account of the COVID-19 outbreak, while 44% say the experience has been difficult.  

When asked about specific activities, more than three-in-five Canadians (61%) say they are following the news—either reading, listening to or watching—more often than they did a few weeks ago.  

More than a third of Canadians say they are participating more regularly in entertainment activities that involve electronics (such as tablets, smartphones or video game consoles) (41%), streaming content online (such as movies or television shows) (40%) and communicating with relatives (36%).  

Slightly smaller proportions of Canadians are exercising at home (30%), reading books (27%), participating in entertainment activities that do not involve electronics (such as board games or puzzles) (20%), ordering food in (14%) and exercising outside their home (10%) more often than before.  

One-in-four Canadians who profess a religion (25%) say they are praying more regularly now than they did before, including 29% of women and 36% of those aged 18-to-34.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 21 to March 22, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Canadians Endorse Harsh Punishment for COVID-19 Opportunists

Three-in-four would support authorizing jail time for people who are offering bogus cures against the coronavirus.

Vancouver, BC [March 31, 2020] – More than seven-in-ten Canadians believe people who have behaved inappropriately during the COVID-19 outbreak should face legal consequences, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 72% of Canadians voice support for imposing monetary fines for people who ignore their quarantine or self-isolation period.

“Public backing for fining people who disregard their quarantine is highest in Atlantic Canada (79%) and British Columbia (77%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support is also high among people who voted for the Liberal Party (77%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (73%) and the Conservative Party (72%) in last year’s federal election.”

Practically four-in-five Canadians (79%) are in favour of imposing monetary fines for people who have bought items and re-sold them at a higher price.

An even larger proportion of Canadians (84%) support imposing monetary fines to people who are offering bogus cures against the coronavirus.

Canadians are evenly divided on whether jail time should be authorized for people who ignore their quarantine or self-isolation period, with 45% voicing support for this idea and 45% saying they are opposed to it.

More than half of Canadians (56%) would be willing to authorize jail time for people who have bought items and re-sold them at a higher price, and three-in-four (74%) would follow the same course of action for people who are offering bogus cures against the coronavirus.

Photo Credit: Sarang 

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 21 to March 22, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Some Canadians Forgoing Social Distancing in COVID-19 Crisis

Three-in-ten say it is “reasonable” to attend a gathering of 10 people or fewer—against the advice of health authorities.  

Vancouver, BC [March 21, 2020] – While more than seven-in-ten Canadians are resigned to a worsening situation on account of the COVID-19 outbreak, some believe specific activities that could spread the virus are still sensible at this time, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 72% of Canadians think the worst is “definitely” or “probably” ahead of us when it comes to COVID-19.

Albertans (82%), Atlantic Canadians (81%) and residents aged 55 and over (76%) are more likely to believe that the situation will worsen.  

Over the past two weeks, health authorities and governments of all levels have urged Canadians to abide by social distancing guidelines and increase the physical space between people to avoid spreading the illness. These recommendations include working from home instead of at the office and avoiding in-person visits to loved ones.  

More than one-in-five Canadians (22%) believe visiting elderly relatives, such as parents or grandparents, is “reasonable” at this time—including 28% of those aged 18-to-34, 26% of men and 27% of Ontarians.

Three-in-ten Canadians (30%) think it is “reasonable” to hold a gathering of 10 people or fewer at this time.  

“Toronto’s chief medical officer of health, Dr. Eileen de Villa, stated on March 18 that having people over for dinner or coffee is not social distancing,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Yet we see that 41% of Canadians aged 18-to-34, 38% of Albertans and 34% of men believe this is reasonable behaviour during the COVID-19 outbreak.”  

Significantly fewer Canadians think it is “reasonable” at this point to eat inside restaurants (15%), hold a gathering of more than 10 people (13%) and exercise at gyms or fitness facilities (12%).

Across the country, 82% of Canadians refer to the COVID-19 outbreak as a “major crisis”, including 85% of women, 85% of Quebecers and 92% of Atlantic Canadians.  

Conversely, 13% of Canadians believe the outbreak represents a “minor crisis”, while only 3% believe it is “not a crisis at all.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 19 to March 20, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most in Canada and U.S. Friendly to Breastfeeding in Public

Agreement is lowest among Canadians who voted for the Conservatives and Americans who identify as Republican.

Vancouver, BC [March 20, 2020] – Sizeable majorities of Canadians and Americans have no problem with women breastfeeding in specific public spaces, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 82% of Canadians and 74% of Americans think women should have the right to breastfeed a baby in a park.

Most residents of the two countries believe women should be allowed to breastfeed a baby in a shopping mall (78% in Canada and 71% in the United States), in a restaurant (74% in Canada and 65% in the United States) and in a public transit vehicle (71% in Canada and 68% in the United States).

Conversely, more than one-in-five Canadians are not sympathetic to breastfeeding in public transit vehicles (23%) and at restaurants (21%), while fewer believe the practice should be allowed in shopping malls (16%) and parks (12%).

In the United States, at least one-in-five Americans voice opposition to breastfeeding in each of the four locations: restaurants (28%), public transit vehicles (27%), shopping malls (23%) and parks (20%).

“While most Canadians and Americans preserve the right of women to breastfeed in public, there are some nuances when it comes to opposition,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Some Americans are more likely to resist the practice inside a restaurant, while some Canadians are more hesitant about it happening inside a public transit vehicle.”

Among Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in last year’s federal election, the level of opposition climbs to 31% for breastfeeding in a public transit vehicle.

In the United States, at least a third of those who identify as Republicans are against breastfeeding inside a public transit vehicle (33%) and a restaurant (36%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 7 to February 9, 2020, among 1,000 Canadian adults, and an online study conducted from February 6 to February 8, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each study, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full Canadian dataset here, our full American dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Four-in-Five British Columbians Would Delay Cruise Ship Season

Support for this measure, on account of the COVID-19 outbreak, is high across all demographics in the province.

Vancouver, BC [March 12, 2020] – Most residents of British Columbia would follow a recent suggestion made by provincial health officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry, to postpone the start of the cruise ship season in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 82% of British Columbians agree with delaying the start of the cruise ship season on account of the COVID-19 outbreak, while 12% disagree and 6% are undecided.

The cruise ship season is currently slated to begin in April in Victoria and Vancouver. Public support for a postponement of the cruise ship season is strong across both genders in British Columbia (84% among women and 80% among men) and all three major age groups (79% among those aged 18-to-34 and 84% among both those aged 35-to-54 and aged 55 and over).

On a regional basis, support for a delay in the cruise ship season is highest in Vancouver Island (92%), followed by Northern BC (89%), the Fraser Valley (85%), Metro Vancouver (82%) and Southern BC (71%).

“British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the last provincial election are the most likely to agree with postponing the cruise ship season (86%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support is slightly lower among BC Green Party voters (84%) and BC Liberal voters (80%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 9 to March 11, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Half of Canadians Expect to Remain a Monarchy in Twenty Years

Queen Elizabeth holds the highest favourability rating in the Royal Family, while Prince Charles remains below the 50% threshold.

Vancouver, BC [March 11, 2020] – While indifference towards the monarchy has increased in Canada, most Canadians believe the country will maintain the current system of government for the next two decades, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Canadians believe Canada will “definitely” or “probably” be a monarchy twenty years from now, while 27% expect to have an elected head of state by then.

Almost seven-in-ten Canadians (69%, down two points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2019) have a favourable opinion of Queen Elizabeth II. The rating is slightly lower for Prince Harry (64%, -6) and Prince William (63%, -8).

More than half of Canadians hold favourable views of Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge (64%, -4), and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex (56%, -4).

The rating is lower for Prince Philip (48%, -6), Prince Charles (44%, +1) and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall (32%, unchanged).

Across the country, 32% of Canadians (down one point since 2019) would prefer for Canada to have an elected head of state, while 27% (down four points) would rather keep the monarchy. The proportion of Canadians who say they do not care either way increased by eight points to 28%.

“The level of support for the continuation of the monarchy in Canada is lowest among women (23%) and among those who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) in last year’s federal election (20%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “On a regional basis, more than two-in-five Quebecers (41%) would like to have an elected head of state.”

More than a third of Canadians (35, -6%) would prefer to see Prince William as monarch after Queen Elizabeth II dies or abdicates, while 25% (+5) would rather have Prince Charles ascend the throne.

Men are evenly divided when assessing the next monarch (29% for Prince Charles and 29% for Prince William). Women prefer Prince William over Prince Charles by a 2-to-1 margin (41% to 21%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 22 to February 25, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

Photo Credit: Michal Klajban

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Most Women in British Columbia Have Endured Discrimination

More than one-in-four women have experienced verbal harassment in the province.

Vancouver, BC [March 6, 2020] – A significant number of women in British Columbia have experienced discrimination on account of their gender, and younger residents are more likely to have faced harassment in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, one-in-five women (21%) have experienced “a significant amount” or “a moderate amount” of discrimination on account of their gender in British Columbia. More than a third of women in British Columbia have endured “a small amount” of gender discrimination (37%) in the province.

“Half of women in British Columbia aged 55 and over (50%) have not experienced discrimination because of their gender in the province.” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are decidedly lower in the other age brackets, with just 34% of women aged 35-to-54 and only 21% of women aged 18-to-34 saying they have not endured gender discrimination in British Columbia.”

More than one-in-four women in British Columbia (28%) have been verbally harassed on account of their gender, while 24% have been sexually harassed.

At least one-in-five women in the province have experienced poor customer service (23%), sexist jokes (20%) and unfair treatment in the workplace (also 20%).

In addition, 17% of women have been mocked or ridiculed and 12% lost a potential employment opportunity because of their gender.

Seven-in-ten women in British Columbia aged 18-to-34 (71%) have experienced at least one of the 12 negative incidents tested in the survey, compared to 66% among women aged 35-to-54 and 44% among women aged 55 and over.

More than a third of women who reside in Metro Vancouver (34%) have experienced verbal harassment, and practically one-in-four (24%) have endured sexual harassment.

Women who reside in Southern BC were more likely to report being mocked or ridiculed because of their gender (26%), while those in Northern BC were more likely to have been treated unfairly in the workplace (27%).

Methodology:

Results are based on online studies conducted from December 12 to December 16, 2019, and from January 21 to January 24, 2020, among 800 adult women in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Food Delivery Options Altering Dining Habits in British Columbia

A third of British Columbians—including 44% of those aged 18-to-34—have ordered food delivery using an app on their phone.

Vancouver, BC [February 28, 2020] – Some British Columbians are relying more often on food delivery at home, a trend that is more prevalent among Millennials, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, three-in-ten British Columbians (30%) say they are ordering food delivery to their homes more often than five years ago.

In addition, 45% of British Columbians report no change from their food ordering habits since 2015, while 22% are partaking in this behaviour less often than five years ago.

“Age is the key differentiator when it comes to the reliance of British Columbians on food delivery,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 9% of those aged 55 and over and 26% of those aged 35-to-54 are ordering in more often than five years ago, the proportion increases to 45% among British Columbians aged 18-to-34.”

Across the province, 43% of British Columbians said they had food delivered to their home after placing a phone call to a specific restaurant over the past year, while more than a third (36%) ordered online through the website of a restaurant or chain.

One third of British Columbians (32%) relied on a food delivery app on their phone, such as DoorDash, GrubHub, Uber Eats, Foodora or Skip The Dishes. This particular way or ordering food currently finds more acceptance in Metro Vancouver (34%) than in other regions of the province.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are significantly more likely to have ordered food through an app in the past year(44%) than those aged 35-to-54 (30%) and those aged 55 and over (13%).

Just over one-in-five British Columbians (22%) order food that is delivered to their home “about once a week or more”, while one-in-five (25%) order food that they pick up themselves from a restaurant at the same rate.

A slightly larger proportion of British Columbians (28%) dine out at a restaurant “about once a week or more”, including 36% of those in the Fraser Valley.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 11 to February 14, 2020, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Conscience Rights on Physician-Assisted Death Split Canadians

About two-in-five Canadians would allow health care professionals to object to providing abortion services.

Vancouver, BC [February 26, 2020] – While practically half of Canadians are not in favour of legislative action that would entrench conscience rights for health care workers, the country is evenly divided when assessing cases of physician-assisted death, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 44% of Canadians agree that health care professionals should have the ability to object to providing services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to physician-assisted death. A similar proportion of Canadians (42%) disagree with this stipulation.

Alberta—where public debate over Bill 207 intensified late last year—has the lowest proportion of residents who would agree to entrench conscience rights in cases of physician-assisted death (38%).

The level of support for a caveat for health care professionals on physician-assisted suicide cases is highest in British Columbia (48%), followed by Quebec (47%), Atlantic Canada (46%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (46%) and Ontario (41%).

When asked about conscience rights on two other instances, Canadians are not as divided. Practically half (49%) disagree with health care professionals objecting to provide services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to abortion, while 39% agree.

A majority of Canadians (58%) disagree with health care professionals objecting to provide services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to serving lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, gender diverse, queer and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2+) people, while 31% agree.

“Canadians who profess a religion are more likely to extend the ability for health care professionals to have moral or faith-based objections in cases of physician-assisted suicide (52%), abortion (46%) and serving LGBT people (37%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The level of support is considerably lower among Canadians who have no religious affiliation (28%, 24% and 18% respectively).”

Across the country, 49% of Canadians say that they would oppose a bill that sought to allow health care professionals the ability to have a moral or faith-based objection to providing services, while 39% would support this provincial legislation.

Opposition to this type of bill is highest in Alberta (59%), followed by Atlantic Canada (53%), British Columbia (51%), Ontario (49%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (45%) and Quebec (42%).  

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 14 to February 17, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Snowstorm Made British Columbians Drive Less, Work From Home

Three in ten residents say their municipality is “getting better” when it comes to dealing with snow.

Vancouver, BC [February 19, 2019] – The snowstorm that affected most of British Columbia last month had an effect on the daily lives of residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two-in-five British Columbians (39%) say they chose not to drive their own vehicle on account of the snowstorm.

“A majority of residents of the Fraser Valley (51%) avoided getting behind the wheel with snow on the roads,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Vancouver Island was a close second on this question at 49%.”

In addition, three-in-ten British Columbians (31%) acknowledge that they, or somebody in their household, worked from home on account of the snowstorm.

Practically half of British Columbians report having witnessed two negative behaviours, with 49% saying that they saw neighbours who did not shovel snow on their sidewalk and 48% witnessing a vehicle with snow on the top circulating in their municipality.

Across the province, two thirds of British Columbians (68%) say they are satisfied with how their municipality dealt with the timeliness of alerts, such as school closures, and 61% feel the same way about snow clearing on roads.

The satisfaction rating is lower for snow clearing on sidewalks (54%) and responsiveness to requests on social media (51%, with 30% undecided).

Three-in-ten British Columbians (29%) say that, compared to five years ago, their municipality is “getting better” when it comes to dealing with snow. Half of the province’s residents (49%) see no change, and 16% believe the situation has “worsened” over the past five years.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are significantly more likely to believe that their municipality is now better equipped to deal with snow (40%) than their older counterparts (22% among those aged 35-to-54 and those aged 55 and over).

A majority of residents of Northern BC (57%) believe their municipality is handling snow better than it did in 2015. The numbers are lower in all other regions of the province, including Vancouver Island (30%), Metro Vancouver (29%), Southern BC (20%) and the Fraser Valley (18%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 21 to January 24, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca