British Columbians Love Coffee, Few Are Keen Travel Mug Users

A third of British Columbians who consume coffee outside of their home never bring their own travel mug to the coffee shop.

Vancouver, BC [May 9, 2019] – Many British Columbians enjoy coffee when they are away from home, but only about one-in-five rely on travel mugs “all of the time”, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, only one-in-five British Columbians (20%) say they never have coffee outside of their home in a regular week.

About three-in-ten British Columbians (29%) have one or two cups of coffee outside of their home in a week, while a similar proportion (30%) consumes three to six cups. 

More than one-in-five British Columbians (22%) drink seven or more cups of coffee outside of their home each week.

A third of British Columbians who consume coffee outside of their home (34%) say they never bring their own travel mug to the coffee shop, while about half (46%) say they do this “only a few times” or “some of the time.” 

Only 19% of British Columbians who consume coffee outside of their home “always” rely on their travel mug when they visit a coffee shop.

“Three-in-five female coffee drinkers in the province (60%) acknowledge using their travel mug at a coffee shop at least a few times,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Among men, the proportion of travel mug users is actually higher, at 71%.”

Among British Columbians who consume coffee outside of their home, the favourite venue to visit is Tim Hortons (43%), followed by Starbucks (31%).

When asked about which stores they never visit, 20% of British Columbians who consume coffee outside of their home mentioned Tim Hortons, while 18% selected Starbucks. About a third (34%) say they do not have a place they would never go to in order to get coffee.

Almost two thirds of British Columbians who consume coffee outside of their home (65%) say they are part of a loyalty program (where they may receive merchandise, rewards, coupons, or free products) at their favourite coffee shop.

Membership in loyalty programs is higher among British Columbians who select Starbucks as their favourite coffee shop (77%) than among those who picked Tim Hortons (65%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 2 to May 5, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Job Responsibilities Dent Lifestyle for Employed British Columbians

Two-in-five residents who are employed say their work has put a strain on their relationships with family and friends.

Vancouver, BC [April 30, 2019] – A majority of British Columbians who work part time or full time acknowledge putting their career ahead of their health, leisure, family and spirituality, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 53% of employed British Columbians say work is “definitely” (23%) or “probably” (30%) taking precedence over lifestyle.

One third of employed British Columbians (33%) claim to have a perfect balance between work and lifestyle, while 12% say their lifestyle is taking precedence over work.

Almost half of employed British Columbians (47%) acknowledge having to stay late after work over the course of the past six months, while about three-in-ten missed a “lifestyle” engagement (such as a family gathering or leisure activity) because of work (29%) or had to reply to a work-related e-mail while they were with family or friends (28%).

One-in-four employed British Columbians (25%) had to take a work-related call on the cell phone while they were with family or friends, while similar proportions had to work from home on a weekend (24%) or had to work from home at night (21%).

“There is a staggering age gap when it comes to work getting in the way of the lifestyle of British Columbians,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 44% of those aged 55 and over say they did not experience any off-work interruptions, the proportion drops to 26% for those aged 35-to-54 and just 15% for those aged 18-to-34.”

More than two-in-five employed British Columbians (42%) say their work has put a strain on their relationships with family and friends, a proportion that reaches 48% among those aged 18-to-34 and 61% among those who live in Northern BC.

One-in-five employed British Columbians (19%) say it is easier for them to achieve a work-life balance than it was for their parents, while 41% believe that this undertaking is now harder.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 4 to April 7, 2019, among 646 adults in British Columbia who are employed full time or part time. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Blame Parents for Perceived Decline of Civility

More than half of residents (52%) think people in Canada have become less polite than five years ago.

Vancouver, BC [April 25, 2019] – A majority of Canadians believe residents have become cruder over the past five years, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Canadians think people in Canada have become “less polite” than they were five years ago.

Only 8% of Canadians think people are “more polite” than in 2014, while 33% say the situation is “about the same” as it was five years ago.

More than four-in-five Canadians (84%) think “parents failing to teach their children proper behaviour” are “definitely” or “probably” responsible for the current state of civility in the country.

Other negative factors mentioned by Canadians include “the influence of television and movies” (77%), “technology that enables people to talk face-to-face less often” (also 77%), “poor examples from celebrities, athletes and other public figures” (74%), “politicians engaging in personal attacks” (69%), “people being too busy with their lives” (66%) and “teachers and schools failing to teach students proper behaviour” (59%).

Three-in-ten Canadians (31%) say they deal with someone being rude and/or impolite when using social media “a few times a week.”

“Almost half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (46%) say they experience impoliteness on social media a few times a week,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 12% of Canada’s Millennials say they only face rudeness on social media less often than a few times a year.”

Other instances in which Canadians experience someone being rude and/or impolite “a few times a week” include driving a car or riding in a car (25%), shopping at a store (16%), at the workplace (15%), walking on the street (14%) or using public transit (13%). 

One third of Canadians (33%) think the people they deal with on a daily basis in Canada say “please” and “thank you” less often than five years ago—a proportion that includes 40% of those aged 55 and over and 43% of Albertans.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 4 to April 7, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

God Exists for British Columbians, But Few Attend Religious Services

Two thirds of residents (67%) say they only attend on special occasions, such as weddings, baptisms and funerals.

Vancouver, BC [April 18, 2019] – Most residents of British Columbia believe or tend to believe that God is real, but significantly fewer actively participate in religious ceremonies, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 39% of British Columbians are “convinced” that God exists, while 22% “tend to believe” that God exists.

Conversely, 16% of residents are “convinced” that God does not exist, and 13% “tend to believe” that God does not exist.

Women are more likely to be “convinced” that God exists than men (43% to 35%). British Columbians aged 55 and over are also more likely to be “convinced” about God’s existence (45%) than those aged 35-to-54 (38%) and those aged 18-to-34 (32%).

Two thirds of British Columbians (67%) say they never attend religious services other than weddings, baptisms or funerals. 

Only 3% of British Columbians attend services “at least once a week”, while 13% visit a church, temple or synagogue  “at least once a month.”

Similar proportions of British Columbians acknowledge having meditated (27%) or prayed to God (24%) over the past 12 months. 

Just over one-in-ten British Columbians (11%) visited a mental health professional, such as a psychiatrist or a psychologist, and slightly fewer (7%) consulted with a “life coach” to help identify personal goals. 

Only 2% of residents say they confessed or sought advice from a religious figure.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 4 to April 7, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Colin Knowles

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Six Months Later, British Columbians Content with Legal Marijuana

Across the province, 6% of adults say they tried cannabis for the first time after it was legalized.

Vancouver, BC [April 16, 2019] – Most British Columbians appear satisfied with both the legalization of marijuana and the framework to acquire cannabis in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 63% of British Columbians agree with marijuana being legal in Canada, while 29% disagree.

Agreement with the legalization of cannabis in Canada is highest among British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (70%), as well as residents of Northern BC (72%) and Vancouver Island (also 72%).

More than two-in-five British Columbians (43%) acknowledge having consumed marijuana in Canada before it was legal, while 51% reveal they have never used cannabis in the country. 

Just over one-in-twenty British Columbians (6%) say they used marijuana in Canada only after it became legal last year, including 10% of those aged 18-to-34.

When asked to review the decisions that the provincial government has taken to enable the legal sale of marijuana in British Columbia, practically four-in-five residents agree with two measures: establishing 19 years as the legal age to purchase, sell or consume marijuana in the province (79%) and restricting marijuana smoking to areas where tobacco smoking is allowed (also 79%).

In addition, two thirds of residents (67%) agree with authorizing adults to grow up to four cannabis plants per household, as long as the plants are not visible from public spaces off the property, and home cultivation is banned in homes used as day-cares.

A majority of respondents to the survey (57%) agree with establishing the Liquor Distribution Branch (LDB) as the wholesale distributor of non-medical marijuana in British Columbia, while 31% disagree.

In October 2018, a Research Co. survey found that British Columbians were split on having a marijuana shop a block away from their home.

More than three-in-four British Columbians disagree with legalizing ecstasy (78%), powder cocaine (79%), heroin (also 79%), crack cocaine (83%), methamphetamine or “crystal meth” (83%) and fentanyl (84%).

“There is little appetite from British Columbians to extend marijuana’s legal framework to other substances,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Few residents want to allow other drugs to be readily available for any adult who wants to access them.”

In some countries, including the United States, a company can administer “drug tests” to employees, even if they do not operate machinery (such as pilots, truck drivers or crane operators). 

Three-in-five British Columbians (60%) think companies in British Columbia should be able to administer “drug tests” to any employee now that marijuana is legal—a proportion that rises to 68% among residents aged 55 and over.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 4 to April 7, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca