Concerns About Opioid Crisis Stagnant in Canada, Rise in U.S.

Just over a third of Canadians and Americans are satisfied with the way Justin Trudeau and Joe Biden are managing this issue.

Vancouver, BC [October 21, 2022] – Residents of Canada and the United States voice a high level of support for specific strategies to deal with the opioid crisis, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 45% of Canadians and 60% of Americans describe the current situation related to the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in their community as “a major problem”.

Grave concerns about the opioid crisis remain stagnant in Canada compared to a Research Co. poll conducted in October 2021, but have risen by seven points in the United States since September 2020.

Respondents to this survey were asked to consider six ideas related to opioids. More than four-in-five Canadians and Americans endorse two of them: launching more education and awareness campaigns about drug use (CAN 84%, USA 88%) and creating more spaces for drug rehabilitation (CAN 82%, USA 84%).

The concept of “safe supply” programs, where alternatives to opioids can be prescribed by health professionals, is supported by 74% of Canadians and 80% of Americans. In addition, three-in-four residents of each country (CAN 75%, USA 75%) believe it is time to reduce the prescription of opioids by medical professionals.

Two other proposals are more contentious. Majorities of Canadians and Americans (CAN 63%, USA 56%) agree with setting up more “harm reduction” strategies, such as legal supervised injection sites.

The notion of decriminalizing all drugs for personal use is endorsed by 40% of Canadians and 35% of Americans.

“Nationwide support for the decriminalization of all drugs for personal use increased in Canada from 33% in 2021 to 40% this year,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the United States, it dropped from 47% in 2020 to 35% in 2022.”

Canadians and Americans have similar opinions on the work of elected politicians to deal with the opioid crisis. More than a third consider the performance of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the Canadian federal government (36%) and President Joe Biden and the American federal government (34%) as satisfactory.

While 34% of Canadians think their own Member of Parliament is doing a “good job” managing the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in your community, only 23% of Americans feel the same way about the U.S. Congress.

The ratings are equivalent for Canadians premiers and provincial governments (36%) and American governors and state governments (also 36%).

Local governments fare slightly better, with 39% of Americans endorsing the work of their mayor and local government on the opioid crisis and 38% of Canadians feeling the same way about their mayor and council.

Methodology: Results are based on online studies conducted from October 15 to October 17, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Endorse Pardons for Simple Possession of Marijuana

Two thirds of Canadians agree with cannabis being legal in Canada, as reliance on licensed retailers increases.

Vancouver, BC [October 12, 2022] – More than three-in-five Canadians are in favour of a plan to pardon people convicted of simple possession of marijuana, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 64% of Canadians agree with the federal government providing expungement orders to people convicted of possession of cannabis for personal use with no intent to traffic.

In Canada, an expungement order compels police forces, federal departments or agencies to destroy or remove any judicial record of a conviction.

“The issue of pardons for simple possession of marijuana is not particularly divisive politically,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Sizeable majorities of Canadians who voted for the New Democrats (78%), the Liberals (70%) and the Conservatives (63%) in 2021 believe it is the right course of action.”

Two thirds of Canadians (66%, +2 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in April 2021) agree with cannabis being legal in Canada.

There are some significant differences among Canadians of different ethnic backgrounds when it comes to marijuana. Majorities of Canadians of Indigenous (80%), European (68%) and South Asian (57%) heritage agree with cannabis being legal in the country, compared to just 41% of those of East Asian descent.

While half of Canadians (50%) have never tried marijuana, about two-in-five (39%) used cannabis before it became legal in October 2018.

Just over one-in-ten Canadians (11%) consumed it only after legalization—a proportion that rises to 16% among those aged 18-to-34.

Almost half of Canadians who have used marijuana after legalization (48%) say they acquired “all” of their product at a licensed retailer, up 10 points since 2021.

There is also a reduction in the proportion of marijuana consumers who have not bought any cannabis from a licensed retailer, from 20% in April 2021 to 15% this month.

Few Canadians think it is time to make other substances legal in Canada, including ecstasy (10%, -4), powder cocaine (10%, -6), heroin (10%, -5), fentanyl (8%,-6), crack cocaine (8%, -5) and methamphetamine or “crystal meth” (8% -5).

Three-in-five Canadians (60%, -1) believe companies should be able to administer “drug tests” to any employee now that marijuana is legal in Canada, even if they do not operate machinery (such as pilots, truck drivers or crane operators).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from October 1 to October 3, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Some British Columbians Keep Options Open to Work from Home

Only 11% of British Columbians who worked from home during the COVID-19 pandemic have returned to the office full time.

Vancouver, BC [October 7, 2002] – Employed British Columbians are still figuring out the new qualms of office life, and more than a third are not particularly thrilled with their current arrangements to work from home, a new Research Co. poll has found

In the online survey of a representative sample, more than three-in-five home workers in British Columbia (63%) say they are happy with their current arrangements to perform their duties away from the office. Similar proportions claim to be working from home more often (19%) or less often (18%) than they would like to.

Just over one-in-ten British Columbians who worked from home during the COVID-19 pandemic (11%) have returned to the office full time. About a third (32%) are working from home once or twice a week, while 25% are there three to four times a week and 31%  work from home five days a week.

“There is a significant generational divide when it comes to the home office in British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 19% of home workers aged 18-to-34 are not commuting at all, the proportion rises to 35% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 47% among those aged 55 and over.”

More than half of British Columbians who worked from home during the pandemic (53%) say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to seek a different job if their current company does not allow them to work from home as often as they want. Just under one-in-ten (8%) have already left a position because of this reason.

Two thirds of home workers in British Columbia (66%, +2 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2022) say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to explore the possibility of switching to a different job that can be performed from home in their own metropolitan area.

Smaller proportions of home workers in British Columbia would consider switching to a different job that can be performed from home for a company headquartered in the province (59%, +2) or in a different Canadian province (45%, =).

Compared to January 2022, we see fewer employed British Columbians reporting an increase in virtual staff meetings (28%, -17) and virtual business development (21%, -24) at their workplace.

Conversely, employed British Columbians say that they have seen more in person staff meetings (27%, +13) and more in-person business development (21%, +6) than three months ago.

The change is not as pronounced on business travel, with 15% of employed British Columbians (+5) noticing more trips and 31% (-8) saying they are less common than three months ago. In addition, there is a slight reduction in the amount of virtual communications between offices (27%, -19).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 28 to September 30, 2022, among 700 adults who work in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Support Wide Use of Territory Acknowledgements

Almost three-in-five of the country’s residents think the practice is a positive step towards reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.

Vancouver, BC [October 4, 2022] – While fewer than half of Canadians have been at an event that featured a territory acknowledgement, most believe that the practice should become more common across the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 39% of Canadians say they have attended a ceremony, lecture or public event that featured a territory acknowledgement.

Residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (49%), Alberta (46%) and British Columbia (44%) are more likely to have listened to a territory acknowledgement than their counterparts in Atlantic Canada (36%), Quebec (also 36%) and Ontario (35%).

Territory acknowledgements are usually worded this way: “I want to acknowledge that we are on the traditional territory of [nation names].”

More than half of Canadians (54%) think territory acknowledgements should be adopted widely before ceremonies, lectures and public events held in Canada, while 26% disagree and 19% are undecided.

“Support for the wide adoption of territory acknowledgements is highest among Canadians aged 18-to-34 (62%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer Canadians aged 35-to-54 (57%) and aged 55 and over (45%) share the same point of view.”

More than three-in-five Canadians who cast ballots for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (62%) and the Liberal Party (64%) in the 2021 federal election are in favour of the wide adoption of territory acknowledgements in Canada. Fewer than half of Conservative Party voters (44%) welcome this idea.

Just over half of Canadians (53%) consider territory acknowledgements as a sincere and important practice, and practically three-in-five (59%) think they are a positive step towards reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.

For 57% of Canadians, territory acknowledgements amount to a lip-service gesture, while just under two thirds (63%) believe they do little to address the problems facing Indigenous peoples.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 25 to September 27, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Appetite for Political Correctness Rises in Canada, Sinks in U.S.

One-in-five Americans (20%) claim to never act “politically correct”, compared to just 11% of Canadians.

Vancouver, BC [September 28, 2022] – Residents of Canada and the United States hold differing views on the concept of “political correctness”, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 55% of Canadians and 45% of Americans support the use of “political correctness” in their respective countries.

The term “political correctness” has been used to describe language and/or behaviour that seeks to minimize possible offenses to racial, cultural and gender identity groups, among others.

Since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2020, support for “political correctness” has increased by five points in Canada and fallen by eight points in the United States.

“Canadians who voted for the Conservatives in 2021 (41%) and Americans who identify as Independent (35%) or Republican (29%) are less likely to endorse political correctness,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are higher among (66%) in the United States (66%) and among Canadians who voted for the Liberals (64%) or the New Democrats (67%) in 2021.”

There is little change when Canadians are asked about their own behaviour, with just over a third (34%, +2) claiming to always act “politically correct” because it’s the right thing to do. Two-in-five (40%, =) sometimes act “politically correct” because it’s the safe thing to do, while only 11% (=) do not act “politically correct” because it’s the wrong thing to do.

In the United States, the proportion of Americans who claim to never act “politically correct” increased to 20% (+5), while those who sometimes act “politically correct” rose to 41% (+4). About one-in-four Americans (24%, -12) say they always act “politically correct” because it’s the right thing to do.

As was the case in 2020, more than half of Canadians and Americans think three groups in society should act in a “politically correct” manner “always” or “most of the time”: teachers (75% in Canada and 64% in the U.S.), politicians (72% in Canada and 60% in the U.S.) and journalists (67% in Canada and 55% in the U.S.).

Significantly fewer Canadians (41%) and Americans (28%) believe comedians should act in a “politically correct” way “always” or “most of the time”.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%, +5) and just under three-in-five Americans (59%, -3) are in favour of adding a disclaimer to explain that programs or movies are presented “as originally created” and “may contain outdated cultural depictions.”

Opposition grew in the United States toward the notion of printing new editions of books that remove words that may be deemed offensive to a specific race or ethnicity (65%, +6). More than half of Canadians (55%, -6) feel the same way (55%, -6).

A similar scenario ensues when residents of the two countries are asked about re-dubbing movies to remove words that may be deemed offensive to a specific race or ethnicity. Just under two thirds of Americans are opposed (64%, +7), along with a majority of Canadians (56%, -6).

Methodology: Results are based on online surveys conducted from September 16 to September 18, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Want King to Focus on Reconciliation and Environment

More than half of Canadians would have preferred a full holiday to observe and mark the passing of Queen Elizabeth II.

Vancouver, BC [September 22, 2022] – More than two thirds of Canadians think the country’s new head of state should make an effort to address two pressing issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, almost seven-in-ten Canadians (69%) believe King Charles III should advance the cause of reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, while almost three-in-four (74%) want him to commit to reduce the carbon footprint of the entire Royal Family.

More than half of Canadians (55%) say they would have preferred to see Prince William become King of the United Kingdom and the other 14 Commonwealth realms, including Canada.

Women (57%), Canadians aged 35-to-54 (58%) and British Columbians (59%) are more likely to be supportive of William’s ascension to the throne.

When asked about the fact that King Charles III will be featured on coins and bills that will be used in Canada, 56% of Canadians say they do not have a problem with this situation, while one third (34%) disagree.

Animosity towards the presence of King Charles III on Canada’s currency reaches 42% among Canadians aged 18-to-34 and 38% among women.

More than half of Canadians (54%) believe Queen Elizabeth II’s passing should have been observed and marked with a full holiday for everyone, while 9% would have preferred a full holiday for public sector employees only.

Just under three-in-ten Canadians (29%) think a holiday should not have been considered at all—a proportion that jumps to 39% among Conservative Party voters in the 2021 federal election.

Compared to a Research Co. survey conducted in February 2022, the perceptions of Canadians on the country have changed.

More than a third of Canadians (36%) say they would prefer for Canada to have an elected head of state, down 13 points since February. In contrast, just over three-in-ten Canadians (31%, +10) would like for Canada to remain a monarchy, while 24% (+6) do not care either way.

“More than a third of Albertans (42%), Atlantic Canadians (40%) and British Columbians (34%) are supportive of the continuation of the monarchy in Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower in Ontario (31%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (26%) and Quebec (25%).”

The notion of an elected head of state is more prevalent among Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (39%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (also 39%) in the 2021 federal election than among those who cast ballots for the Conservatives (32%).

Positive perceptions of six members of the Royal family have improved since February. Almost half of Canadians (46%, +11) have a favourable view of King Charles III, while just under a third (32%, +5) feel the same way about Queen Consort Camilla.

Just over two thirds of Canadians hold favourable views on William, Prince of Wales (67%, +9) and Catherine, Princess of Wales (also 67%, +7). The rating is lower for Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex (64%, +14) and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex (53%, +9).

A majority of Canadians (52%, +4) believe Canada will still be a monarchy in twenty years, while just over three-in-ten (31%, +1) think the country will have an elected head of state.

Residents of Alberta are significantly more likely to predict Canada remaining a monarchy in 2042 (65%) than their counterparts in Atlantic Canada (60%), Ontario (55%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (51%), British Columbia (45%) and Quebec (also 45%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from September 16 to September 18, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Canadian Couples Did Mostly Well Cohabiting During Pandemic

Significant gender gaps are observed when Canadians ponder their spouse or partner’s cleanliness and ability to prepare meals.

Vancouver, BC [September 20, 2022] – While most Canadians appear to be content with the manner in which their spouse or live-in partner behaved during the COVID-19 pandemic, there are some components of life at home where the discrepancies between genders are evident, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of adults who are living with their spouse or partner, 70% of respondents say they “strongly approve” of their significant other’s performance during the COVID-19 pandemic, while 22% “moderately approve.”

Canadians aged 55 and over who are living with their spouse or partner are more likely to say they “strongly approve” of their pandemic performance (80%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (64%) and aged 18-to-34 (58%).

“More than seven-in-ten Atlantic Canadians (76%) and Quebecers (72%) are particularly happy with the way their spouse or live-in partner managed the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The rating is slightly lower in British Columbia (69%), Ontario (68%), Alberta (67%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (65%).”

In spite of this high level of satisfaction, there are certain aspects of life at home where a significant difference between men and women is observed.

More than three-in-five men (63%) say they are “very satisfied” with their spouse or live-in partner on the matter of keeping the home clean and tidy. The proportion of women who feel the same way about their spouse or live-in partner is markedly smaller (41%).

While 73% of men are “very satisfied” with their spouse or live-in partner’s personal hygiene, the proportion drops to 64% among women.

A gender gap also emerges on the issue of cooking meals, with 67% of men saying they are “very satisfied” with the involvement of their spouse or live-in partner, compared to 56% of women.

The satisfaction levels are fairly stable across cohabiting couples on five other issues: taking care of pets (65%), taking care of children (62%), providing emotional support when needed (59%), making decisions about what to do (55%) and overall attitude and demeanour (also 55 %).

Almost half of Canadian adults who are living with their spouse or partner (47%) say their experience during the COVID-19 pandemic made them grow closer as a couple. More than two-in-five (44%) report no change, while 7% believe they grew more distant.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from August 14 to August 21, 2022, among a representative sample of 1,135 adults in Canada who are living with their spouse or partner. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.9 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Automated Speed Enforcement Still Favoured in British Columbia

More than three-in-five residents of the province agree with four different types of automated speed enforcement.

Vancouver, BC [September 16, 2022] – Sizeable majorities of British Columbians continue to endorse the use of technology to identify vehicles whose drivers choose not to abide by existing speed limits, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 76% of British Columbians approve of the use of fixed speed cameras, or cameras that stay in one location and measure speed as a vehicle passes, up four points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2021.

Automated speed enforcement works by using cameras or sensors to pick up a vehicle speeding. A ticket is then issued to the owner of the vehicle. Driver’s license points are not issued as the driver of the vehicle cannot be identified.

Majorities British Columbians have voiced support for automated speed enforcement in Research Co. surveys conducted in 2018, 2019, 2020 and 2021.

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (72%, +1) approve of the use of speed-on-green intersection cameras in the province. This type of enforcement entails using red light cameras to capture vehicles that are speeding through intersections.

“Women (74%) and British Columbians aged 55 and over (79%) are particularly supportive of speed-on-green intersection cameras,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The practice is also endorsed by majorities of British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (77%), the BC Liberals (75%) and the BC Green Party (69%) in the 2020 provincial election.”

Two thirds of British Columbians (66%, +2) are in favour of mobile speed cameras, or devices that can be moved from place to place to measure speed as a vehicle passes.

Just over three-in-five British Columbians (61%, +8 since 2021) favour the use of point-to-point speed enforcement, which relies on cameras placed at two or more distant points on a road. The average speed of vehicles that pass between points is calculated and tickets are issued to vehicles whose average speed over the distance was excessive.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online survey conducted from September 8 to September 10, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

More in Canada and U.S. Feel Climate Change is Major Crisis

Most Canadians and Americans are willing to pay higher taxes in order to adequately address global warming.

Vancouver, BC [September 13, 2022] – The concerns of residents of Canada and the United States about global warming have increased over the past two years, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 68% of Canadians (+6 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2020) and 60% of Americans (+9) feel that climate change is a “major crisis”.

Almost seven-in-ten Canadians (69%, +5) and three-in-five Americans (60%, +7) think global warming is a fact and is mostly caused by emissions from vehicles and industrial facilities.

About one-in-five respondents in the two countries (20% in Canada and 21% in the United States) believe climate change is a fact and is mostly caused by natural changes. Only 5% of Canadians and 12% of Americans brand global warming as a theory that has not yet been proven.

“Belief in human-made climate change is low among Republicans in the United States (35%) and Conservatives in Canada (47%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are strikingly different among Democrats in the United States (80%) and Liberal Party voters in Canada (82%).”

Majorities of Canadians and Americans (59% and 61% respectively) say they are willing to pay higher taxes to adequately address climate change. Only two other issues come close to this level of acceptance for higher taxation: schools (CAN 57%, USA 64%) and homelessness (CAN 57%, USA 61%).

Fewer Canadians and Americans are willing to pay higher taxes in order to adequately address four other issues: forest fires (55% and 58% respectively), floods (52% and 56% respectively), housing improvements (51% each) and transit improvements (44% and 46% respectively).

Sizeable majorities of Canadians and Americans believe three groups should be doing more now to deal with issues related to climate change that are happening or impacting people directly now: companies and corporations (75% and 70% respectively), governments (69% and 65%) and individuals and consumers (67% and 65%).

Most residents of both countries also believe that more action is required to address issues related to climate change that may happen or impact people directly in the future from companies and corporations (76% in Canada and 70% in the United States), governments (72% and 66% respectively) and individuals and consumers (68% and 65%).

Parents of children under the age of 18 were asked about the effect of conversations they have had with their kids about climate change. Significant proportions of parents in Canada (85%) and the United States (79%) say they are recycling more as a result of these chats.

Practically half of American parents (49%) and a majority of Canadian parents (55%) claim to be driving less, and more than two-in-five (44% in the United States, 47% in Canada) say they are taking shorter showers as a result of conversations about global warming with their children.

Fewer parents in each country acknowledge taking other steps, such as reducing their consumption of meat (CAN 36%, USA 30%), changing the way they voted in a federal election (24% each) or changing the way they voted in a local election (CAN 18%, USA 21%).

Methodology: Results are based on online studies conducted from August 19 to August 21, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults in Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Just Under Half of Canadians Dread Their City or Town’s Drivers

Practically seven-in-ten Canadians saw a driver not signaling before a turn in the past month. 

Vancouver, BC [September 6, 2022] – The level of confidence that Canadians bestow upon drivers in their city or town has dropped drastically over the past year, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 48% of Canadians think drivers in their city or town are worse now than five years ago, up 18 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2021.

More than half of Canadians who live in Atlantic Canada (61%, +36), British Columbia (57%, +13) and Ontario (56%, +26) say drivers are worse now. The proportions are lower in Alberta (43%, +10), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (42%, +7) and Quebec (34%, +10).

More than half of Canadians aged 55 and over (58%, +22) and aged 35-to-54 (52%, +20) claim that drivers in their city or town are worse now than five years ago. The proportion is lower among Canadians aged 18-to-34 (34%, +13).

The survey also tracks the incidence of six specific occurrences on the country’s roads over the past month. Practically seven-in-ten Canadians (69%, +14) say they witnessed a driver not signalling before a turn, a proportion that climbs to 74% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

A majority of Canadians (54%, +13) recently observed a car taking up two or more spots in a parking lot.

Practically half of Canadians (49%, +11) saw a driver not stopping at an intersection. This behaviour is more prevalent in Atlantic Canada (58%), British Columbia (55%) and Ontario (54%).

Two-in-five Canadians (40%, +8) witnessed a driver turning right or left from an incorrect lane, including 49% of British Columbians.

More than a third of Canadians (37%, +9) went through a close call, such as having to slam the brakes or steer violently to avoid a collision—including 48% of Atlantic Canadians and 44% of Albertans.

“Only 15% of Canadians say they did not see any illegal or regrettable behaviour on the road over the past month,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This represents a 12-point drop since our previous survey in 2021.”

Just under three-in-five Canadians (58%, +7) claim that there are specific groups or people in their city or town who are worse drivers than others—a proportion that rises to 67% in British Columbia.

As was the case last year, the top four responses issued by Canadians who point the finger at a specific group for bad driving behaviours are “young” (40%, +8), “Asian (19%, +3), “elderly” (18%, -3) and “immigrant” (8%, +2).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 19 to August 21, 2022, among a representative sample of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Fewer Than One-in-Four Albertans Support Outright Sovereignty

Public backing for the creation of an independent state rises if other western provinces join the new nation.

Vancouver, BC [September 2, 2022] – Few Albertans openly endorse the idea of their province becoming a sovereign entity, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 23% of Albertans support their province becoming a country independent from Canada, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in February 2021. Seven-in-ten Albertans (70%, +1) are opposed to this idea.

Support for establishing an independent country encompassing Alberta and Saskatchewan reaches 24% (-2). The same proportion of Albertans (24%) would welcome the creation of a sovereign state featuring their province, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

The notion of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and British Columbia becoming a country independent from Canada is supported by three-in-ten Albertans (30%), while just over three-in-five (61%) are opposed.

Almost three-in-four Albertans (73%, -3) oppose the idea of Alberta joining the United States, while 21% (+3) are supportive—including 26% of those aged 18-to-34.

Just over three-in-five Albertans (61%, +2 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in July 2019) consider themselves “Canadians first, Albertans second.” Fewer than three-in-ten (28%, +1) say they are “Albertans first, Canadians second.”

“There is a remarkable political divide when Albertans ponder their allegiance to province and country,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 17% of those who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) in the last provincial election say they are Albertans first, the proportion rises to 45% among those who supported the United Conservative Party (UCP).”

More than a third of Albertans (37%, -7) believe Ralph Klein is the best premier the province has had since November 1985. Rachel Notley is second on the list with 20% (+3).

When asked to name the worst recent premier of the province, two-in-five Albertans (40%, +37) select current head of government Jason Kenney. Notley (19%, -7) and Alison Redford (12%, -13) are the only former premiers to reach double-digits on this question.

Half of Albertans (50%) say they would move to British Columbia if they had to leave and relocate to another Canadian province. Saskatchewan is a distant second  with 11%, followed by Ontario with 10% and Nova Scotia with 4%.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 21 to August 23, 2022, among 700 adults in Alberta. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Alberta. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Young British Columbians Lose Faith on Staying in the Province

Only 19% of British Columbians believe the province would be better off as its own country.

Vancouver, BC [August 30, 2022] – Young adults who reside in British Columbia are having a hard time envisioning the possibility of growing old in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 72% of British Columbians believe they will stay in the province for the rest of their lives, down three points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in 2021.

“Only 56% of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 expect to stay in the province for the rest of their lives,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are significantly higher among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (70%) and aged 55 and over (84%).”

More than four-in-five British Columbians (82%, -2) say they are very proud of the province that they live in and just under three-in-five (59%, +2) consider their views as different from the rest of the country.

More than three-in-five British Columbians (62%, +3) believe they have more in common with the people of Seattle and Portland than with those in Toronto or Montreal.

Residents of the Fraser Valley are more likely to express an affinity towards the people of Seattle and Portland (64%), followed by those who live in Metro Vancouver (63%), Vancouver Island (62%), Northern BC (61%) and Southern BC (55%).

Just under one-in-five British Columbians (19%, +1) think British Columbia would be better off as its own country—a proportion that rises to 23% among those aged 18-to-34.

More than three-in-five respondents (63%, +2) claim to consider themselves “Canadians first, and British Columbians second”, while 22% (=) acknowledge being “British Columbians first, and Canadians second.”

Three-in-ten British Columbians (30%, +1) think that John Horgan has been the province’s best premier since 1986, followed by Christy Clark (7%, -2), Gordon Campbell (also 7%, +1) and Mike Harcourt (6%, =).

Just under one-in-five British Columbians (19%, -2) believe Clark is the worst recent head of government, followed by Campbell (10%, -1) and Horgan (also 10%, +2).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 20 to August 22, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Americans More Upset Than Canadians When Pondering Freedom

Just over half of residents of each country feel their vote in federal elections does not make a difference.

Vancouver, BC [August 25, 2022] – Residents of the United States are significantly more likely than their counterparts in Canada to keep their political views to themselves, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 49% of Americans and 32% of Canadians say they cannot express their political views sometimes because they fear reprisals.

“Most Republicans in the United States (55%) claim to withhold their political views sometimes, compared to 47% of Democrats and 48% of Independents,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In Canada, this behaviour is more pronounced among those who voted for the People’s Party (68%), the Green Party (43%) and the Conservative Party (41%) in last year’s federal election.”

While more than seven-in-ten Americans (73%) feel that their freedoms are under attack by elected politicians, only 39% of Canadians hold the same sentiment.

More than three-in-five Americans (62%) and just over two-in-five Canadians (41%) believe their respective federal governments are oppressive and controlling.

More than half of Americans (52%) and Canadians (51%) feel that their vote in federal elections does not make a difference.

More than a third of Canadians think four issues are worse now than ten years ago: the ability of people to disagree with each other on social media (46%), the ability of people to disagree with each other in conversation (40%), the ability of people to convince others about looking at an issue differently (38%) and the ability of people to question stories they learn about in the media (37%).

Americans are significantly more likely to believe that certain elements of public discourse have deteriorated over the past decade, including the ability of people to disagree with each other on social media (63%), the ability of people to disagree with each other in conversation (62%), the ability of people to convince others about looking at an issue differently (58%) and the ability of people to question stories they learn about in the media (50%).

More than one-in-five Canadians say they find themselves disagreeing with other people “many times” about COVID-19 mandates and vaccines (26%), federal politics (24%) and provincial politics (22%).

In the United States, at least one-in-four residents disagree with other people “many times” about national politics (40%), COVID-19 mandates and vaccines (36%), state politics (28%), immigration (also 28%), morality (25%) and local politics (also 25%).

More than three-in-ten Canadians (31%) say they stopped talking to a person, or avoided a person, on account of a disagreement related to COVID-19 mandates and vaccines. Fewer Canadians chose the same route to deal with a person who they disagreed with on morality (22%), religion (20%), federal politics (19%) and immigration (18%).

In the United States, at least one-in-five Americans have ceased talking to a person, or avoided a person, due to a disagreement on national politics (32%), COVID-19 mandates and vaccines (30%), morality (25%), religion (24%), immigration (22%) and state politics (21%).

Methodology: Results are based on online studies conducted from August 19 to August 21, 2022, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our data tables for Canada here, the data tables for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Canadians Say Their City or Town is Noisier Than in 2021

More than a third of the country’s residents (36%) have been bothered by unnecessary noise from vehicles in their own homes.

Vancouver, BC [August 23, 2022] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians have been bothered by a variety of noises while inside their homes, and practically half claim that their surroundings are not as quiet as they were in 2021, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians believe their city or town has become noisier over the past year, up 22 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in January 2021.

Just over two-in-five Canadians (41%, +18) think their street is noisier now than it was in 2021, while three-in-ten (30%, +2) feel the same way about their homes.

More than two-in-five Canadians of Indigenous (44%) and South Asian (41%) descent feel their home is noisier now, along with 32% of women, 40% of Canadians aged 18-to-34 and 37% of British Columbians.

When asked about specific disturbances that have bothered them at home over the past year, more than a third of Canadians (36%, +6) mention unnecessary noise from vehicles (such as motorcycles and cars revving up).

At least one-in-four Canadians were also subjected to construction-related noises (such as roofing, land clearing and heavy machinery) (29%, new), loud people outside their home (28%, +8), dogs barking (27%, +3), a car alarm (25%, +5) and yard work (such as lawnmowers and leaf blowers) (also 25%, +6).

Fewer Canadians were disturbed over the past 12 months by nine other noises, including loud music playing inside a vehicle (21%, +3), power tools (such as electric saws and sanders) (21%, +3), drivers honking the horn excessively (20%, +8), yelling or screaming at a nearby home (19%, +1), loud music at a nearby home (18%, +1), fireworks (18%, +2), a loud gathering or party at a nearby home (17%, +2), a home alarm (10%, +1) and cats meowing (7%, +2).

“Compared to 2021, there is significant growth in the proportion of Canadians who have been bothered at home by drivers honking the horn excessively,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In British Columbia, three-in-ten residents (30%) have experienced this nuisance.”

Practically three-in-four Canadians (74%, -5) have not taken any action to deal with noise at home. About one-in-seven (14%, +2) have worn earplugs or earmuffs to mitigate noise—including 20% of Quebecers and 22% of Canadians aged 18-to-34.

Fewer Canadians have chosen to report noise concerns to the police (8%, +3), acquired hardware to mitigate noise while inside their home (such as noise cancelling headphones or earphones) (7%, =) or moved away from their previous dwelling because of noise (5%, +1).

Methodology: Results are based on an online survey conducted from August 14 to August 16, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Say Homelessness Has Increased in Province

Most residents think all levels of government have done a “bad job” coming up with solutions to deal with this problem.

Vancouver, BC [August 19, 2022] – Majorities of residents of British Columbia are disappointed with the way their elected officials have addressed the issue of homelessness, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 61% of British Columbians think the federal government has done a “bad” or “very bad” job coming up with solutions to deal with homelessness.

More than half of British Columbians also believe both the provincial government (56%) and their municipal government (55%) have done a “bad” or “very bad” job on this file.

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (73%) consider the current situation related to homelessness in the province as a major problem—a proportion that rises to 83% in the Fraser Valley.

More than half of the province’s residents (52%) think homelessness in their municipality is a major problem, while 27% feel the same way about the current state of affairs in their neighbourhood.

Practically four-in-five British Columbians (79%) believe homelessness has increased across the province over the past three years, and more than three-in-five (63%) feel the same way about the current situation in their municipality. Just over two-in-five (42%) also say that homelessness has intensified in their neighbourhood.

When asked about factors that are to blame “a great deal” for the current situation regarding homelessness in the province, most British Columbians point the finger at addiction and mental health issues (60%) and a lack of affordable housing (53%).

Fewer British Columbians blame poverty and inequality (41%), personal actions and decisions (30%) and bad economy and unemployment (24%) for homelessness.

British Columbians are evenly split on whether homelessness can be eradicated. While 47% of the province’s residents believe this can be achieved with the proper funding and policies, 46% claim that homelessness will always be a problem in British Columbia.

“More than three-in-five British Columbians aged 55 and over (62%) believe that the notion of a province without homelessness is unattainable,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Fewer of their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (39%) and aged 18-to-34 (34%) are skeptical.”

Most British Columbians agree with four different ideas to reduce homelessness in the province: increasing temporary housing options for people experiencing homelessness (80%), offering incentives to developers if they focus on building affordable housing units (78%), devoting tax money to build units to house homeless residents (67%) and changing zoning laws to allow property owners to build more units on standard lots (60%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 13 to August 15, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Few Canadians Want to Go Back to Imperial Measurement System

A sizeable majority of the country’s residents rely on feet and inches, and not metres, to measure a person’s height.

Vancouver, BC [August 15, 2022] – While Canadians are not particularly supportive of moving away from the International Metric System, many continue to use Imperial measurements in their daily lives, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, only 29% of Canadians would like to see the country adopting the Imperial system. More than half (56%) disagree and would carry on with the International Metric System.

“Practically two-in-five Canadians aged 55 and over (38%) would go back to the Imperial system of units,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This wish is less prevalent among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (23%) and aged 18-to-34 (24%).”

When asked about how they personally measure six different things, majorities of Canadians gravitate towards Imperial units in three specific cases.

Four-in-five Canadians (80%) measure a person’s height in feet and inches, while 20% rely on metres and centimetres.

More than three-in-four Canadians (76%) use pounds when calculating a person’s weight, while 24% rely on kilograms.

Three-in-five Canadians (59%) measure the temperature of their ovens in degrees Fahrenheit, while 41% use degrees Celsius.

Feet and inches are the preferred units to measure a person’s height for Canadians aged 18-to-34 (71%), aged 35-to-54 (79%) and aged 55 and over (88%).

Across Canada, three other measurements are more likely to be conducted using the International Metric System.

More than four-in-five Canadians (84%) calculate the amount of liquid in a container using litres, while 16% rely on quarts and gallons.

More than four-in-five Canadians (82%) measure a vehicle’s speed in kilometres per hour, while 28% use miles per hour.

More than three-in-four Canadians (77%) gauge the temperature outside their home in degrees Celsius, while 23% rely on degrees Fahrenheit.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 1 to August 3, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Not All Metro Vancouverites Are Keen on Amalgamation

Almost two-in-five likely voters in the region think housing is the most important issue facing their municipality right now.

Vancouver, BC [August 12, 2022] – The idea of merging all Metro Vancouver municipalities into a single entity is not particularly attractive to all likely voters in the region, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of likely voters in Metro Vancouver, 44% of respondents think it would be worthwhile to explore the idea of amalgamating all of the municipalities in Metro Vancouver, like they did in Toronto or Montreal.

“Majorities of likely voters in Surrey (53%) and Vancouver (52%) favour the concept of amalgamation,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In all other regions of Metro Vancouver, the level of support for this concept is decidedly lower.”

In the North Shore municipalities, only 40% of likely voters think it is time to explore amalgamation. The proportions are lower in Burnaby, Richmond and New Westminster (37%), the Tri-Cities (35%), Delta, White Rock, the City of Langley and the Township of Langley (23%) and Pitt Meadows and Maple Ridge (13%).

More than two-in-five likely voters in Metro Vancouver (45%) think their municipality should abandon the “at-large system” (where voters select individual councillors) and move to a “ward system” (where councillors can be elected in specific constituencies).

The “ward system” is more popular in the two most populous municipalities: Vancouver (60%) and Surrey (53%).

Almost two-in-five likely voters in Metro Vancouver (38%) say housing is the most important issue facing their municipality, followed by property taxes (11%), crime (9%), climate change (also 9%) and COVID-19 (8%).

Housing is a particularly serious concern for likely voters in Burnaby, Richmond and New Westminster (55%), while concerns over crime are more prevalent in Surrey (18%) and Delta, White Rock, the City of Langley and the Township of Langley (13%) .

More than half of likely voters in the Tri-Cities (64%), the North Shore (61%), Vancouver (54%) and Burnaby, Richmond and New Westminster (53%) are satisfied with the performance of their mayors. The rating is lower in Delta, White Rock, the City of Langley and the Township of Langley (40%), Pitt Meadows and Maple Ridge (also 40%) and Surrey (23%).

More than three-in-five likely voters in the Tri-Cities (62%) and the North Shore (61%) are satisfied with the work of their councils. All other regions are below the 50% mark on this question, including Burnaby, Richmond and New Westminster (47%), Vancouver (37%), Pitt Meadows and Maple Ridge (36%), Delta, White Rock, the City of Langley and the Township of Langley (34%) and Surrey (28%).

Almost half of likely voters across Metro Vancouver (47%) say they are satisfied with the state of affairs in their municipality. Pitt Meadows and Maple Ridge hold the lowest ranking on this question (20%) while the Tri-Cities are at the top (68%).

More than half of likely voters in Metro Vancouver are satisfied with three other issues in their respective municipalities: public safety (55%), the quality of services (64%) and  cleanliness (67%).

The lowest rating for public safety is observed in Surrey, where 39% of likely voters are satisfied and a majority (57%) are dissatisfied.

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 3 to August 6, 2022, among 800 likely voters in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

A Third of Canadian Households Experienced COVID-19 Recently

The country’s residents are divided on whether restrictions and mandates were lifted at the right time in their community.

Vancouver, BC [August 8, 2022] – A growing number of Canadians acknowledge that their household has been negatively impacted by COVID-19 over the past few weeks, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 37% of Canadians say themselves, or someone else in their household, became infected with COVID-19 after restrictions and mandates were lifted in their community, up 14 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2022.

Across the country 46% of Canadians (+3) believe restrictions and mandates were abandoned too early in their community, while 44% (-5) think the decision was made at the right time.

“More than half of Atlantic Canadians (55%) appear disappointed with the absence of restrictions and mandates related to COVID-19,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportions are lower in Alberta (48%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (47%), British Columbia (45%), Quebec (also 45%) and Ontario (43%).”

Compared to May, there is little fluctuation when Canadians are asked about the possible return of specific regulations. Two thirds (66%, -2) would be satisfied if they have to wear a mask or face covering when entering an indoor premise. Slightly smaller proportions of Canadians would feel the same way if a reduction of capacity at venues (such as cinemas, theatres, concert halls and sports arenas) is implemented (63%, -1) or if proof of vaccination is required once again to go to restaurants or public events (60%, -1).

Three-in-five Canadians (60%, +1) believe it is only a matter of time before everyone catches COVID-19, and a majority (54%, +2) claim that, as long as people are vaccinated, the virus is a minor nuisance. In addition, 63% of Canadians (+3) foresee being vaccinated against COVID-19 at least once again in the next six months.

Just over two thirds of Canadians (68%) state that the worst of COVID-19 is definitely or probably “behind us”, down eight points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2022.

More than three-in-four Canadians (77%, -1) continue to brand COVID-19 as a real threat—including 82% of those aged 55 and over.

Public satisfaction with the pandemic performance of the federal government dropped from 61% in May to 55% this month. The rating is highest in Quebec (60%) and Atlantic Canada (58%), followed by Ontario (53%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (52%), British Columbia (49%) and Alberta (48%).

The satisfaction rating also fell this month for provincial administrations (53%, -10) and municipal governments (59%, -6).

In the four most populous provinces of Canada, the level of satisfaction with COVID-19 management is highest in British Columbia (62%, =), followed by Quebec (58%, -9), Ontario (48%, -17) and Alberta (39%, -14).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from August 1 to August 3, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Great11

Two-in-Five Canadians Expect National Economy to Decline

Positive perceptions of Justin Trudeau as an economic manager have fallen to 41% across the country. 

Vancouver, BC [August 28, 2022] – A majority of Canadians perceive the nation’s finances in a negative light, and there is a significant increase in the proportion of the country’s residents who foresee a worsening situation, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 57% of Canadians consider the economic conditions in Canada right now as “bad” or “very bad”, up three points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2022.

Only two-in-five Canadians (40%, -1) describe the country’s economic conditions as “very good” or “good” today.

Positive views on the national economy reach 55% in Quebec (+7). The rating is significantly lower across all other regions of Canada, including British Columbia (37%, -3), Atlantic Canada (36%, -7) Ontario (34%, -9), Alberta (32%, -1) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (30%, +4).

Just 13% of Canadians (-7) believe the Canadian economy will improve over the next six months, while 40% (+10) predict a decline and 40% (-1) foresee conditions staying as they are.

While 57% of Canadians (-1) define their own personal finances today as “very good” or “good”, just over two-in-five (41%, +3) describe them as “bad” or “very bad.”

Only 41% of Canadians (-6) express confidence in Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to do the right thing to help the economy, while a majority (52%, +4) distrust him.

“Two thirds of Albertans (68%) have misgivings about Trudeau as an economic manager,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The negative rating is lower in British Columbia (55%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (53%), Atlantic Canada (51%), Ontario (48%) and Quebec (46%).”

More than a third of Canadians (37%, =) trust Governor of the Bank of Canada Tiff Macklem to make the right decisions to help the nation’s finances. The rating is lower (26%) for federal Leader of the Opposition Candice Bergen.

There are some significant changes in the perceptions of Canadians on inflation. More than four-in-five (81%, -2) continue to expect higher prices for a week’s worth of groceries over the next six months, and majorities also foresee paying more for a new car (68%, -3) and a new television set (57%, -5).

The needle moved on two items, with 61% of Canadians (-21) expecting to pay more for gasoline in the next six months and only 44% (-28) thinking real estate will be more expensive.

Half of Canadians have worried “frequently” or “occasionally” about the safety of their savings (50%, +6) and the value of their investments (50%, +9) over the past couple of months.

Fewer Canadians are preoccupied about unemployment affecting their household (34%, +3), being able to pay their mortgage or rent (34%, +3) or their employer running into serious financial trouble (24%, -2).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from July 11 to July 13, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Few British Columbians Ponder Calorie Counts When Dining Out

More than three-in-four believe it should be mandatory to display calories on any menu that lists or depicts standard food items.

Vancouver, BC [July 26, 2022] – Residents of British Columbia pay more attention to the nutritional value of foods when they are at the supermarket than when dining out or ordering in, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, more than a third of British Columbians (37%) say they “frequently” check labels to review nutritional content when buying groceries for themselves or others in their household.

Significantly fewer British Columbians “frequently” pay attention to menus to review nutritional content when dining out (13%) or when ordering food delivery (11%).

While almost three-in-ten British Columbians (29%) “frequently” check labels at the grocery store to review the total calories of a product, the proportion drops drastically when residents dine out (14%) or order in (11%).

A similar scenario ensues when respondents are asked about checking for two other items in the food they consume. About three-in-ten British Columbians check labels at the grocery store for sodium (32%) and fat (29%). Fewer follow the same course of action when they go to a restaurant (Sodium 14%, Fat 13%) or when they browse menus or apps for food delivery (Sodium 10%, Fat 11%).

In the Province of Ontario, it is mandatory to display calories on any menu that lists or depicts standard food items offered for sale by a regulated food service premises. More than three-in-four British Columbians (76%, -5 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November 2018) are in favour of adopting this regulation.

In 2012, the Province of British Columbia implemented the Informed Dining initiative, a program designed to allow residents to have nutrition information available when eating at participating food service establishments. The voluntary program was abandoned in 2020.

“British Columbians appear to be affected by the lack of standards when it comes to nutritional information in restaurants,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Customers do not have the same information to make a decision that they currently have at the grocery store.”

The proportion of British Columbians who use an activity tracker to monitor certain fitness-related metrics—such as distance walked, amount of exercise and/or calorie consumption—increased from 41% in November 2018 to 45% this month.

Practically half of Metro Vancouverites (49%) rely on an activity tracker. The proportions are lower in Southern BC (46%), Northern BC (42%), Vancouver Island (36%) and the Fraser Valley (35%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from July 4 to July 6, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca