Most in Canada and U.S. Friendly to Breastfeeding in Public

Agreement is lowest among Canadians who voted for the Conservatives and Americans who identify as Republican.

Vancouver, BC [March 20, 2020] – Sizeable majorities of Canadians and Americans have no problem with women breastfeeding in specific public spaces, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 82% of Canadians and 74% of Americans think women should have the right to breastfeed a baby in a park.

Most residents of the two countries believe women should be allowed to breastfeed a baby in a shopping mall (78% in Canada and 71% in the United States), in a restaurant (74% in Canada and 65% in the United States) and in a public transit vehicle (71% in Canada and 68% in the United States).

Conversely, more than one-in-five Canadians are not sympathetic to breastfeeding in public transit vehicles (23%) and at restaurants (21%), while fewer believe the practice should be allowed in shopping malls (16%) and parks (12%).

In the United States, at least one-in-five Americans voice opposition to breastfeeding in each of the four locations: restaurants (28%), public transit vehicles (27%), shopping malls (23%) and parks (20%).

“While most Canadians and Americans preserve the right of women to breastfeed in public, there are some nuances when it comes to opposition,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Some Americans are more likely to resist the practice inside a restaurant, while some Canadians are more hesitant about it happening inside a public transit vehicle.”

Among Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in last year’s federal election, the level of opposition climbs to 31% for breastfeeding in a public transit vehicle.

In the United States, at least a third of those who identify as Republicans are against breastfeeding inside a public transit vehicle (33%) and a restaurant (36%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 7 to February 9, 2020, among 1,000 Canadian adults, and an online study conducted from February 6 to February 8, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each study, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full Canadian dataset here, our full American dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Most British Columbians Would Steer Clear of Wexit Party

More than half of voters in the province would consider casting a ballot for the NDP or the Liberals in the next federal election.

Vancouver, BC [March 13, 2020] – A minuscule proportion of voters in British Columbia are enthralled by the possibility of the Wexit Party running a candidate in their federal constituency, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, only 15% of British Columbians say they would “definitely” or “probably” consider voting for the secessionist political organization in the next federal election.

“Almost two thirds of British Columbians (64%) say they would not contemplate the Wexit Party as an option in the next election to the House of Commons,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This includes 58% of voters aged 18-to-34, 62% of those aged 35-to-54 and 75% of those aged 55 and over .”

More than half of British Columbians say they would “definitely” or “probably” consider casting a ballot for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (58%) and the Liberal Party (56%) in the next federal election.

The voter pool in British Columbia is slightly lower for the Conservative Party (46%) and the Green Party (45%).

More than three-in-five women in the province (63%) would consider supporting the NDP in the next federal election. A similar proportion of female voters would contemplate the Liberals (59%), while fewer would ponder the Greens (45%), the Conservatives (39%) or Wexit (9%).

Among male voters, the NDP also currently has the largest voter pool (55%), with Liberals and Conservatives tied at 51% each. Consideration is lower for the Greens (45%) and Wexit (21%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 4 to March 7, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Half of Canadians Expect to Remain a Monarchy in Twenty Years

Queen Elizabeth holds the highest favourability rating in the Royal Family, while Prince Charles remains below the 50% threshold.

Vancouver, BC [March 11, 2020] – While indifference towards the monarchy has increased in Canada, most Canadians believe the country will maintain the current system of government for the next two decades, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Canadians believe Canada will “definitely” or “probably” be a monarchy twenty years from now, while 27% expect to have an elected head of state by then.

Almost seven-in-ten Canadians (69%, down two points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2019) have a favourable opinion of Queen Elizabeth II. The rating is slightly lower for Prince Harry (64%, -6) and Prince William (63%, -8).

More than half of Canadians hold favourable views of Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge (64%, -4), and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex (56%, -4).

The rating is lower for Prince Philip (48%, -6), Prince Charles (44%, +1) and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall (32%, unchanged).

Across the country, 32% of Canadians (down one point since 2019) would prefer for Canada to have an elected head of state, while 27% (down four points) would rather keep the monarchy. The proportion of Canadians who say they do not care either way increased by eight points to 28%.

“The level of support for the continuation of the monarchy in Canada is lowest among women (23%) and among those who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) in last year’s federal election (20%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “On a regional basis, more than two-in-five Quebecers (41%) would like to have an elected head of state.”

More than a third of Canadians (35, -6%) would prefer to see Prince William as monarch after Queen Elizabeth II dies or abdicates, while 25% (+5) would rather have Prince Charles ascend the throne.

Men are evenly divided when assessing the next monarch (29% for Prince Charles and 29% for Prince William). Women prefer Prince William over Prince Charles by a 2-to-1 margin (41% to 21%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 22 to February 25, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

Photo Credit: Michal Klajban

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Death Penalty Splits Views in Canada and the United States

More Canadians than Americans select life imprisonment without parole as their preferred punishment for murder.

Vancouver, BC [March 3. 2020] – More than half of Canadians and Americans are supportive of capital punishment, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 51% of Canadians are in favour of reinstating the death penalty for murder in their country, and 59% of Americans support the possibility of prosecutors relying on capital punishment for murder cases.

Support for reinstating the death penalty in Canada is highest among Canadians aged 55 and over (56%) and people who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2019 federal election (68%).

In the United States, the groups that voice the highest support for prosecutors relying on the death penalty are people who voted for Republican Party nominee Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election (76%) and those who reside in the West (69%).

Supporters of the death penalty in the two North American countries believe that, if a convicted murdered has taken a life, the death penalty fits the crime (60% in Canada and 68% in the United States).

“A sizeable majority of Canadians who are in favour of the return of the death penalty (57%) believe it would save taxpayers money and the costs associated with having murderers in prison,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the United States, only 43% of supporters of capital punishment feel the same way.”

Opponents of the death penalty in both North American countries are primarily concerned with the possibility of executing a person who was wrongfully convicted (73% in Canada and 65% in the United States).

When asked about their personal point of view about the death penalty, Canadians are more likely to believe that it is “never appropriate” (27%) than Americans (18%).

Conversely, Americans are slightly more likely to say that capital punishment is “always appropriate” (16%) than Canadians (13%).

Almost half of Canadians (47%) select life imprisonment without the possibility of parole over the death penalty (34%) as their preferred punishment in cases of murder.

In the United States, respondents are evenly split when pondering the two approaches (42% for the death penalty and 42% for life imprisonment without parole).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 7 to February 9, 2020, among 1,000 Canadian adults, and an online study conducted from February 6 to February 8, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each study, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full Canadian dataset here, our full American dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Conscience Rights on Physician-Assisted Death Split Canadians

About two-in-five Canadians would allow health care professionals to object to providing abortion services.

Vancouver, BC [February 26, 2020] – While practically half of Canadians are not in favour of legislative action that would entrench conscience rights for health care workers, the country is evenly divided when assessing cases of physician-assisted death, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 44% of Canadians agree that health care professionals should have the ability to object to providing services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to physician-assisted death. A similar proportion of Canadians (42%) disagree with this stipulation.

Alberta—where public debate over Bill 207 intensified late last year—has the lowest proportion of residents who would agree to entrench conscience rights in cases of physician-assisted death (38%).

The level of support for a caveat for health care professionals on physician-assisted suicide cases is highest in British Columbia (48%), followed by Quebec (47%), Atlantic Canada (46%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (46%) and Ontario (41%).

When asked about conscience rights on two other instances, Canadians are not as divided. Practically half (49%) disagree with health care professionals objecting to provide services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to abortion, while 39% agree.

A majority of Canadians (58%) disagree with health care professionals objecting to provide services if they have a moral or faith-based objection to serving lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, gender diverse, queer and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2+) people, while 31% agree.

“Canadians who profess a religion are more likely to extend the ability for health care professionals to have moral or faith-based objections in cases of physician-assisted suicide (52%), abortion (46%) and serving LGBT people (37%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The level of support is considerably lower among Canadians who have no religious affiliation (28%, 24% and 18% respectively).”

Across the country, 49% of Canadians say that they would oppose a bill that sought to allow health care professionals the ability to have a moral or faith-based objection to providing services, while 39% would support this provincial legislation.

Opposition to this type of bill is highest in Alberta (59%), followed by Atlantic Canada (53%), British Columbia (51%), Ontario (49%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (45%) and Quebec (42%).  

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 14 to February 17, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Canadians and Americans Agree on Vaccinations for Children

Majorities in both countries believe individuals should decide if they want to get immunized against seasonal diseases.

Vancouver, BC [February 14, 2020] – While four-in-five Canadians endorse the concept of mandatory inoculations for children, the proportion of Americans who feel the same way is smaller, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, 81% of Canadians—up three points since a similar study conducted in 2018—believe that vaccinations for children should “definitely” or “probably” be mandatory in their province.

The proportion of Americans who think immunizations for children should “definitely” or “probably” be mandatory in their state is lower (68%).

“More than one-in-four Americans (27%) believe decisions on childhood vaccinations should be made by parents,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion of Canadians who would follow this course of action is decidedly lower (12%).”

In Canada, Quebec has the highest proportion of residents (17%) who believe parents should choose whether their children should be vaccinated. In the United States, 30% of residents of the South and the West feel the same way.

When asked about inoculations and seasonal diseases (such as the flu), slim majorities of Canadians and Americans (51% in each country) believe each person should “definitely” or “probably” be allowed to decide whether they want to get vaccinated or not.

Just over two-in-five respondents in each country (44% in Canada and 43% in the United States) feel the flu vaccine should be mandatory for everybody in their province or state.

In the late 1990s, a study published in the weekly medical journal The Lancet—which has since been discredited and retracted—attempted to link childhood vaccination and autism.

In Canada, 26% of respondents to this survey think there is a connection between the childhood vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella and autism. The proportion of Americans who believe this is slightly higher, at 30%.

Respondents aged 18-to-34 in both countries (36% in Canada and 43% in the United States) are more likely to believe in the debunked connection between childhood immunization and autism than their older counterparts.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 7 to February 9, 2020, among 1,000 Canadian adults, and an online study conducted from February 6 to February 8, 2020, among 1,000 American adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each study, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full Canadian dataset here, our full American dataset here and download the press release here.

Photo Credit: John Keith

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Are Watching More Recorded TV Than Live TV

More than four-in-five cable subscribers say there are many channels in their current plan that they never watch.

Vancouver, BC [February 7, 2019] – Canadians who watch television are spending more time enjoying programming that has been digitally recorded than watching shows the moment they air, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample asked Canadians to describe how they watch television.

About a third of the time spent by Canadians who watch television (32%) is done through a digital recording device, while 25% of the time is spent watching live television and 23% is spent streaming on online sites, such as Netflix, CraveTV or Disney Plus.

“Women are significantly more likely to watch recorded content (37% of their time) and to stream (28% of their time) than men,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, men are more likely to be watching live programming than women (34% of their time).”

Streaming is decidedly more popular among Canadians aged 18-to-34 (35% of their time) than among those aged 35-to-54 (24% of the time) and those aged 55 and over (11% of the time).

When it comes to cable television, three-in-four Canadian subscribers (75%) say they watch Canadian networks “daily or a few times a week”. 

Majorities of Canadian cable subscribers also watch news channels (63%), American networks (61%) and sports channels (53%) “daily or a few times a week”, while fewer watch lifestyle channels (47%), specialty channels (41%) and movie channels (34%) at the same rate.

While 15% of Canadian cable subscribers have a large package with many premium channels, 40% describe their deal as mid-sized, with some premium channels. Equal proportions of cable subscribers have a small package, but not the cheapest (21%) or the cheapest available (also 21%).

More than four-in-five Canadian cable subscribers (83%) say there are many channels included in their current plan that they never watch, and three-in-four (75%) believe they pay too much money for cable television.

Across the country, 59% of Canadian cable subscribers claim to be disappointed with the variety of programming they are getting from their plan—a proportion that grows to 64% in both Atlantic Canada and British Columbia.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 23 to January 26, 2020, among 895 adults in Canada who watch television at home. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.3 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Remain Opposed to Huawei in 5G Networks

Two thirds of respondents think Canada should not work to establish closer ties with China.

Vancouver, BC [January 31, 2019] – A sizeable majority of Canadians continue to believe that a telecommunications company from the People’s Republic of China should be excluded from the 5G spectrum, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The federal government is currently reviewing the guidelines for the development of 5G (or “Fifth Generation”) mobile networks, which are expected to provide Canadians with larger data capacity and faster connections. 

In the online survey of a representative national sample, two thirds of Canadians (66%) think the federal government should not allow Huawei to participate in Canada’s 5G mobile networks.

The level of rejection for Huawei’s presence in the 5G spectrum is similar to what was observed by Research Co. in July 2019 (68%), and remains higher than what was first reported in February 2019 (57%).

Canadians aged 55 and over (72%) and British Columbians (81%) are the groups that are voicing the highest opposition to Huawei’s participation in the 5G spectrum.

A series of extradition hearings for Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou were held in the BC Supreme Court earlier this month. Meng was arrested in December 2018 and faces charges in the United States, including bank fraud and obstruction of justice. 

Two thirds of Canadians (67%, -5 since July 2019) agree with the way Canadian authorities have acted in this case.

“More than four-in-five Liberal Party voters in last year’s election (83%) endorse the performance of the federal government on the Meng case,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Smaller majorities of federal New Democratic Party (NDP) voters (68%) and Conservative Party voters (53%) concur.”

Following Meng’s arrest, China’s detained two Canadians—Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor—on espionage allegations, and banned exports of Canadian canola, pork and beef.

When asked if Canada should work to establish closer ties with China, one-in-five Canadians (19%, +1 since July 2019) believe that it should, while a majority (67%, -1) think it should not.

In a Research Co. survey conducted in December 2019, 27% of Canadians expressed a positive opinion of China, while 61% had negative views. 

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 23  to January 26, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views of Canadians on Donald Trump Remain Mostly Negative

More than half of respondents think the American President has “accomplished little” since taking office.

Vancouver, BC [January 24, 2020] – As the United States gets ready for a presidential election in November, a large majority of Canadians continue to hold negative views on the current occupant of the White House, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 62% of Canadians think the presidency of Donald Trump has been “bad” or “very bad” for Canada, down three points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2019.

One-in-five Canadians (21%,+4) believe Trump’s tenure has been “very good” or “good” for Canada, while 18% (=) remain undecided.

“There is a pronounced gender gap when it comes to the perceptions of Canadians on Donald Trump,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 14% of women believe his tenure has been positive for Canada, the proportion increases to 27% among men.”

More than half of Canadians (54%, +17) believe that Trump has “accomplished little” as president, while 16% (+6) think he has “accomplished much” and 16% (-23) say it is too early to judge his achievements as president.

Albertans (24%) and Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in last year’s federal election (30%) are more likely to believe that Trump has “accomplished much” since taking office three years ago.

Three-in-ten Canadians (31%, -15) think Trump has performed “about the same” as they expected, while 16% (+8) feel he has performed “better” than they expected.” More than two-in-five Canadians (44%, +4) believe Trump has performed “worse” than they expected.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 6 to January 9, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views of Canadians on Moral Issues Vary Greatly by Gender

Men are significantly more likely than women to believe pornography and prostitution are “morally acceptable.”

Vancouver, BC [January 22, 2020] – More than two thirds of Canadians have no moral qualms when assessing four issues related to human relations, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than two thirds of Canadians find contraception (75%), divorce (71%), sexual relations between an unmarried man and woman (70%) and having a baby outside of marriage (68%) as “morally acceptable.”

In addition, at least half of Canadians consider the following issues “morally acceptable”: physician-assisted death (62%), sexual relations between two people of the same sex (61%), abortion (56%) and gambling (50%).

“There are some issues where political allegiance leads to severe fluctuations,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Abortion is morally acceptable for only 45% of Conservative Party voters, but to more than three-in-five Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (61%) or the New Democratic Party (NDP) (68%) in last year’s federal election.”

More three-in-ten Canadians believe medical research using stem cells obtained from human embryos (49%), the death penalty (40%), pornography (36%), prostitution (33%) and buying and wearing clothing made of animal fur (32%) are “morally acceptable.”

Fewer than one-in-four Canadians think eight other issues are morally acceptable: medical testing on animals (22%), suicide (also 22%), using illegal drugs (21%), cloning animals (19%), polygamy (17%), married men and/or women having an affair (14%), cloning humans (10%) and paedophilia (3%).

There is a sizeable gender gap when Canadians are asked about animals. Men are more likely than women to believe that three issues are morally acceptable: buying and wearing clothing made of animal fur (Men 41%, Women 24%), medical testing on animals (Men 31%, Women 14%) and cloning animals (Men 26%, Women 13%).

Conversely, 45% of men have no moral qualms about pornography or prostitution, but the proportion of women who agree with these views is significantly smaller (28% and 21% respectively).

Ethnicity also plays a role in the perceptions of specific issues. While 23% of Canadians of European descent think using illegal drugs is morally acceptable, the proportion drops to 12% for South Asians and 11% for East Asians.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 6 to January 9, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Are Not Getting Enough Sleep Each Night

Money and relationships are the two issues that are more likely to make it harder for Canadians to fall asleep.

Vancouver, BC [January 14, 2020] – Just over a third of Canadians are actually meeting the night sleep guidelines issued by Health Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 35% of Canadians say their typical night’s sleep on a weekday or workday lasts from 7 to 9 hours—matching the recommendations endorsed by Health Canada.

Almost two thirds of Canadians (64%) say they slumber for fewer than 7 hours on a typical night’s sleep on a weekday or workday.

On weekends, the proportion of Canadians who reach the recommended guidelines of 7 to 9 hours of sleep rises to 45%. However, more than half (51%) still spend fewer than 7 hours in bed.

Across the country, 17% of Canadians claim to be “very well rested” after a typical night’s sleep on a weekday or workday, while 53% say they are “moderately well rested.” Conversely, three-in-ten Canadians (30%) are “not too well rested” or “not well rested at all” on a weekday or workday.

Women (38%), Canadians aged 18-to-34 (35%) and residents of Manitoba and Saskatchewan (34%) are more likely to say that they are usually “not too well rested” or “not well rested at all” when facing a new workday or weekday.

The proportion of Canadians who feel “very well rested” or “moderately well rested” rises to 75% after a typical night’s sleep on a weekend or non-workday.

One-in-four Canadians (25%) say they never find it hard to sleep at night during the course of an average week. More than a third (36%) find it hard to sleep for 1 or 2 days each week, while almost two-in-five (39%) have a difficult time sleeping at least 3 days a week.

Practically half of Canadians (49%) say worrying about money and financial matters made it harder for them to fall asleep at night over the course of the past month.

“Albertans (62%) are significantly more likely to say that they were kept awake by financial concerns than residents of all other regions,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Women are also more likely to have lost sleep because of financial matters than men (54% to 43%).”

Almost a third of Canadians (32%) lost sleep at night because they were concerned about relationships and family, while a similar proportion (29%) had trouble sleeping because of health worries.

About one-in-four Canadians (23%) say they had difficulty falling sleep because they were concerned about work—including 41% of those aged 18-to-34 and 3% of Albertans.

Significantly fewer Canadians say domestic politics and issues (6%) or international politics and issues (also 6%) kept them awake at night.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 18 to December 20, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Have Favourable View of UK, Split on USA

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians have a positive opinion of Saudi Arabia, Iran and North Korea.

Vancouver, BC [January 10, 2020] – More than four-in-five Canadians hold a favourable opinion of the United Kingdom, but just under half feel the same way about the United States, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 83% of Canadians have a positive view of the United Kingdom.

At least seven-in-ten Canadians hold positive opinions on four other nations: Germany (73%), Italy (72%), Japan (also 72%) and France (70%). More than half of Canadians (52%) have a positive view of South Korea.

Canadians are split when assessing the United States, with 47% saying they have a positive opinion of the country and 48% stating they have a negative one.

Canadian men are more likely to have a positive opinion of the United States than Canadian women (50% to 42%). Canadians aged 18-to-34 are also more likely to hold favourable views on the United States (53%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (43%) and 55 and over (45%). 

“A majority of Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in last year’s federal election (64%) have a positive opinion of the United States,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are decidedly lower among Canadians who voted for the Liberals (42%) or the New Democrats (31%) last year.”

Just under half of Canadians (46%) have a positive view of Mexico, while more than a third (36%) have a positive opinion of India and three-in-ten (30%) have a favourable view of Venezuela.

Just over one-in-four Canadians have a positive opinion of China (27%) and Russia (26%), while more than three-in-five (61%) have a negative view of each country.

In the specific case of China, the proportion of positive opinions varies greatly around the country: 29% in Atlantic Canada, Ontario and Quebec, 28% in Alberta, 22% in British Columbia and 17% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

Fewer than one-in-five Canadians have a positive view of Saudi Arabia (17%), Iran (14%) and North Korea (11%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 18 to December 20, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Ontarians and Albertans Dismayed by Their Current Premiers

More than half of residents of each province say they would be “better off” with a different person in charge.

Vancouver, BC [January 8, 2020] – As a debate over national unity continues in Canada, a large proportion of Albertans and Ontarians are dissatisfied with their current provincial heads of government, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Canadians believe their province would be better off with a different premier in charge.

The proportion of residents who are unhappy with their provincial head of government is highest in Ontario (60%), Alberta (57%), Atlantic Canada (52%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 52%). Fewer than half of residents of Quebec (44%) and British Columbia (42%) feel the same way.

In addition, 50% of Canadians believe their province would be better off with a different Prime Minister in Ottawa. 

Majorities of residents of Alberta (65%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (59%), British Columbia (53%) and Ontario (51%) believe their province would be better off with someone other than Justin Trudeau in charge of the federal government. Fewer than half of those living in Atlantic Canada (48%) and Quebec (38%) concur.

One-in-four Canadians (25%) believe their province would be better off as its own country, including 40% of residents of both Alberta and Quebec. 

Separatist sentiment in Alberta has increased by 10 points since a Research Co. survey conducted in July 2019 and by six points in Quebec since a Research Co. survey conducted in October 2018.

Finally, 16% of Canadians say their province would be better off joining the U.S. and becoming an American state—a feeling that is more pronounced in Alberta (22%) and Quebec (20%).

“The level of disagreement with the notion of a province joining the United States is highest among Canadians aged 55 and over at 87%,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers also amount to a majority among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (71%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (66%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 18 to December 20, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

One-in-Five Canadians Currently Pay Attention to Astrology

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to believe in the concept than their older counterparts.

Vancouver, BC [January 1, 2020] – A majority of Canadians question the concept of studying the movements and relative positions of celestial objects to make observations about human affairs and terrestrial events, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than a third of Canadians (36%) say they “definitely” or “probably” believe in astrology, while more than half (55%) “probably” or “definitely” do not.

Women (40%) are more likely to lend credence to astrology than men (30%). While only 27% of Canadians aged 55 and over believe in the concept, the proportion increases to 37% among those aged 35-to-54 and 49% among those aged 18-to-34.

“Across Canada, Ontario has the largest proportion of residents who express a belief in astrology at 42%,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Alberta has the lowest at 27%.”

When asked about their current attitude towards the concept, one-in-five Canadians (20%) acknowledge currently paying attention to astrology—including 30% of those aged 18-to-34, 25% of Ontarians and 25% of Atlantic Canadians.

More than one-in-four Canadians (27%) say they used to pay attention to astrology, but don’t anymore. A majority (54%) claim to have never paid attention to the concept, including 62% of those aged 55 and over.

Belief in other concepts was slightly lower across the country. One third of Canadians (33%) believe in haunted houses, or buildings being inhabited by spirits of dead people, while 58% do not.

Just over three-in-ten Canadians (31%) believe in mediumship, or mediating communication between living human beings and spirits of dead people, while 60% do not.

The same proportion (31%) believe in clairvoyance, or gaining information about an object, person, location or physical event through extrasensory perception, while 58% do not.

On these three concepts, there is a sizeable gender gap, with more women in Canada believing in haunted houses (40%), mediumship (39%), clairvoyance (36%) than men (25%, 22% and 26% respectively).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 2 to December 6, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians More Stressed Over Holiday Season Than Last Year

Two thirds of Canadians prefer “Merry Christmas” as a greeting, down nine points since 2018.

Vancouver, BC [December 20, 2019] – While half of Canadians expect a relatively easy-going December, three-in-ten believe this time of the year will bring tension, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 50% of Canadians say they expect the current holiday season to be “more fun than stressful”, down seven points since a similar survey conducted in 2018.

Conversely, 30% of Canadians (+5) believe the holiday season will be more stressful than fun, and 20% are undecided.

“More than one third of Canadians aged 35-to-54 (36%) are foreseeing more tension than entertainment this month,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “British Columbia is ahead of all other regions on the expectations of a fun holiday season (60%), while Alberta and Atlantic Canada have the lowest numbers (45% and 44% respectively).”

Across the country, 65% of Canadians (-9 since 2018) say “Merry Christmas” is their preferred greeting for the season, while 18% (+4) say “Happy Holidays” is their favourite.

“Merry Christmas” remains extremely popular with Canadians aged 55 and over (73%), residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (75%) and Conservative Party voters in this year’s federal election (also 75%).

Conversely, the groups that express the highest penchant for “Happy Holidays” are Canadians aged 18-to-34 (26%) and Quebecers (31%).

There is a sizeable change in the way Canadians are feeling about spirituality compared to 2018. Across the country, 48% of Canadians claim that religion is “very important” or “moderately important” in their daily lives—a 10-point increase since 2018.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 2 to December 6, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca