Vancouver 2010 Was Worth It for Most British Columbians

Three-in-five of the province’s residents would welcome a bid for Vancouver to become the host of the Summer Olympics.

Vancouver, BC [February 12, 2020] – A decade after Vancouver hosted the Winter Olympics, most British Columbians appear content with the event and its legacy, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two thirds of British Columbians (68%) think holding the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver was worth it.

“Only 24% of British Columbians currently have second thoughts about the decision to host the Winter Olympics in 2010,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of residents in all five regions of the province say organizing the games was worth it, including 71% in Metro Vancouver and 73% in the Fraser Valley.”

At least two thirds of British Columbians believe the 2010 Winter Olympics had a positive impact on the City of Vancouver (70%), the entire Metro Vancouver region (67%), the Province of British Columbia (69%) and Canada (74%).

Four-in-five British Columbians (82%) are satisfied with the infrastructure projects of the 2010 Winter Olympics, such as the Canada Line SkyTrain and improvements to the Sea-to-Sky Highway.

More than seven-in-ten of the province’s residents (72%) are satisfied with the legacy projects of the 2010 Winter Olympics, such as the Richmond Oval and the Hillcrest Community Centre.

When asked if Vancouver should launch a bid to host the Summer Olympics, British Columbians support the idea by a 2-to-1 margin (62% to 31%).

The level of excitement about a Vancouver Summer Olympics bid is highest among British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (67%), but also includes majorities of those aged 35-to-54 (61%) and those aged 55 and over (52%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 21 to January 24, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of British Columbians Expect an Early Provincial Election

Residents aged 18-to-34 are more likely to say they would like to vote this year than their older counterparts.

Vancouver, BC [February 5, 2020] – A sizeable proportion of British Columbians believe the province will hold an early election to the Legislative Assembly this year, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 51% of British Columbians expect to have an early provincial election this year, while one third (32%) do not and 16% are undecided.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (62%) are more likely to expect an early election in 2020 than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (47%) and aged 55 and over (35%).

When asked if they would like to have an early provincial ballot in 2020, a slim majority of British Columbians (52%) said they would, while 32% answered that they would not. The next provincial election in British Columbia is tentatively scheduled for October 2021.

On a regional basis, the appetite for an early election is strongest in Northern BC (75%), followed by Southern BC (52%), Metro Vancouver (also 52%), the Fraser Valley (50%) and Vancouver Island (49%).

“Almost two thirds of British Columbians who voted for the BC Liberals in 2017 (65%) say they would like to hold an early election this year,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among those who voted for the BC Green Party (55%) and the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (42%) in 2017.”

Across the province, three-in-five British Columbians (60%) say they would “definitely” or “probably” consider voting for the BC NDP in the next provincial election. The voter pool is lower for the BC Liberals (54%), the BC Conservative Party (46%) and the BC Green Party (45%).

The BC NDP holds the edge over the BC Liberals on currently having a definite or probable consideration from voters in Metro Vancouver (62% to 53%). Conversely, the BC Liberals have a higher commitment from voters than the BC NDP in Southern BC (61% to 50%).

In Vancouver Island, the Green Party is slightly ahead with 53%, with the BC NDP and the BC Liberals both at 51%.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 21 to January 24, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Than Seven-in-Ten British Columbians Endorse Housing Taxes

Almost half of residents think these actions will be effective in making housing more affordable in the province.

Vancouver, BC [January 3, 2020] – The “speculation tax” introduced by the Government of British Columbia is still backed by a sizeable proportion of the province’s residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 76% of British Columbians agree with the implementation of the “speculation tax” in specific urban areas targeting foreign and domestic homeowners who pay little or no income tax in BC, and those who own second properties that aren’t long-term rentals.

The survey outlines an eight-point increase in agreement with the “speculation tax” since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in March 2019.

“Agreement with this particular tax is strong among voters of all three major political parties in the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “It encompasses 86% for those who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in 2017, as well as 75% of those who cast ballots for candidates from the BC Liberals and the BC Green Party.”

More than three-in-four British Columbians agree with two other policies: Increasing the foreign buyers tax from 15% to 20% (77%, -3) and expanding the foreign buyers tax to areas located outside of Metro Vanncouver (also 77%, +2).

Agreement is also strong with two other measures: increasing the property transfer tax from 3% to 5% for homes valued at more than $3 million. The 5% portion only applies to the value greater than $3 million (72%, +8) and introducing a tax of 0.2% on the value of homes between $3 million and $4 million, and a tax rate of 0.4% on the portion of a home’s value that exceeds $4 million (also 72%, +6).

Across the province, 49% of residents think the actions of the provincial government will be “effective”, in making housing more affordable in British Columbia, while 39% consider they will be ”ineffective.”

There is a pronounced regional divide on this question. While majorities of residents of Northern BC (56%) and Metro Vancouver (52%) think the provincial government’s actions will help make housing more affordable, the proportion is lower in the Fraser Valley (45%), Vancouver Island (44%) and Southern BC (40%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 12 to December 16, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Unhappy with Their Mobile Phone Plan Prices

Most residents are skeptical about the promises of lower wireless costs issued by the federal and provincial governments.

Vancouver, BC [December 25, 2019] – Most residents of British Columbia are dissatisfied with how much they are paying for wireless communications, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, seven-in-ten mobile phone users (70%) describe the cost of their plan as “very expensive” or “moderately expensive.”

Mobile phone users aged 35-to-54 (77%) and those who reside in the Fraser Valley (74%) are more likely to believe that they currently pay too much for wireless services.

A monthly plan for a mobile phone in Canada with two gigabytes of data costs about $75. More than three-in-five British Columbians (62%) say a similar plan would be less expensive in the United States. 

More than a third of residents also think the cost of a similar phone plan would be lower in Italy (39%) and Australia (37%). 

“Most British Columbians know that wireless costs are lower in the United States than in Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But the current cost of a monthly plan for a mobile phone with two gigabytes of data in Australia and Italy is significantly lower, at $21 and $25 a month respectively.”

Two levels of government have promised action on this issue. The federal Liberal Party pledged to reduce the cost of wireless bills for Canadians by 25 per cent over the next four years. 

The Government of British Columbia recently appointed MLA Bob D’Eith to work with the federal government to explore more affordable and transparent mobile phone options.

Across British Columbia, only 31% of residents believe that the federal government will actually deliver on its promise of lower phone bills for Canadians.

A slightly higher proportion (35%) think the provincial government’s push for more affordable and transparent mobile phone options will ultimately be successful.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 12 to December 16, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views of Pipeline Expansion in British Columbia Remain Stable

Two thirds believe the project will create hundreds of jobs, but fewer than two-in-five expect lower gas prices.

Vancouver, BC [December 18, 2019] – After six months that included a federal election, the perceptions of British Columbians on pipeline expansion did not go through a severe fluctuation, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 56% of British Columbians agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion, while 35% disagree and 10% are undecided.

“There has been practically no change in the way British Columbians feel about this project,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Our survey from June also showed 56% of British Columbians agreeing with the re-approval of the project.”

More than seven-in-ten residents of Southern BC (74%) and Northern BC (71%) are in favour of the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion. Support for the course of action authorized by the federal government is lower in the Fraser Valley (59%), Metro Vancouver (51%) and Vancouver Island (49%).

There is a sizeable gender gap on this question. While two thirds of men (66%) agree with the pipeline expansion, only 46% of women concur.

Two thirds of British Columbians (68%, -5 since May) expect the Trans Mountain Pipeline to create hundreds of jobs for British Columbians—an argument that resonates especially well with 81% of those who voted for the BC Liberals in the 2017 provincial election.

Three-in-five British Columbians (59%, unchanged) say they are disappointed with the way the federal government has handled the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion. 

More than two-in-five British Columbians (45%, -1) believe the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of British Columbians. Voters who cast ballots for the BC Green Party (64%) and the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (59%) in 2017 are more likely to have this point of view.

Across the province, 40% of British Columbians (-1) believe the provincial government should do anything necessary to ensure that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion does not happen—including 45% of women, 51% of residents aged 18-to-34, and 63% of BC Green Party voters in 2017.

The notion of gas prices being lower in British Columbia now that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion has been re-approved is convincing for just over a third of British Columbians (37%, -2).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 4 to December 7, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Gas Prices Stirring New Behaviours in British Columbia Drivers

Just under one-in-five drivers in the province have gone to the United States with the sole purpose of purchasing cheaper fuel.

Vancouver, BC [December 11, 2019] – A significant proportion of drivers in British Columbia are taking steps to deal with the cost of fuel in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, half of drivers in British Columbia (51%) say they have purchased gas for their vehicle in their community even if the tank was not near empty because prices were suddenly lower.

Drivers in Vancouver Island (56%) are more likely to have purchased gas after they noticed a drop in prices.

Two-in-five drivers in the province (39%) say they have purchased less gas for their vehicle in their community—or did not fill up the entire tank—because prices were suddenly higher.

Almost half of drivers in the Fraser Valley (47%) have chosen not to completely fill up because of inflated gas prices.

Just under one-in-five drivers in British Columbia (18%) say they have driven to the United States with the sole purpose of purchasing cheaper gas for their vehicle.

“Two-in-five drivers who reside in the Fraser Valley (40%) say they have visited the United States only to get gas in the past year” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “They have been joined by one-in-five (21%) drivers in Metro Vancouver.”

The Government of British Columbia recently introduced legislation to compel oil and gas companies to disclose supply and pricing data. More than four-in-five British Columbians (85%) support this legislation, including 90% of residents aged 55 and over.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 27 to November 29, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Would Ban Mobile Phones in K-12 Classrooms

Public support for the measure that was implemented in Ontario earlier this year is high among parents and non-parents alike.

Vancouver, BC [November 29, 2019] – The notion of forbidding students from using their mobile phones in classrooms unreservedly is very popular in British Columbia, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 88% of British Columbians think the province should implement a ban on the use of mobile phones during instructional time in K-12 classrooms.

Earlier this year, the Province of Ontario restricted the use of mobile phones in K-12 classrooms, unless the devices are required for health or medical purposes, or to support educational needs as decided by an instructor.

In British Columbia, residents aged 55 and over are more likely to express support for a prohibition (85%) than those aged 35-to-54 (80%) and those aged 18-to-34 (68%).

At least four-in-five residents of Vancouver Island (86%), the Fraser Valley (83%) and Metro Vancouver (80%) are in favour of banning mobile phones during instructional time in K-12 classrooms. Support is lower, but still high, in Northern BC (75%) and Southern BC (62%).

“More than four-in-five British Columbians who have a child currently enrolled in K-12 are supportive of a classroom mobile phone ban (81%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is similar (77%) for those who have no children in school at this point.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 6 to November 8, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Agree with Physician-Assisted Suicide Rules

Fewer than one-in-five of the province’s residents would completely ban medical assistance in dying.

Vancouver, BC [November 15, 2019] – Most British Columbians are in favour of allowing physician-assisted suicide under the guidelines implemented by the federal government, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, three-in-four British Columbians (75%) support allowing a person to seek medical assistance to die in Canada under the conditions authorized in June 2016.

In Canada, federal legislation allows physician-assisted suicide if five conditions are met:

  • Being eligible for health services funded by the federal government, or a province or territory (or during the applicable minimum period of residence or waiting period for eligibility).
  • Being at least 18 years old and mentally competent.
  • Having a grievous and irremediable medical condition.
  • Making a voluntary request for medical assistance in dying that is not the result of outside pressure or influence.
  • Giving informed consent to receive medical assistance in dying.

“The highest level of opposition to allowing physician-assisted suicide in British Columbia is observed in the Fraser Valley (32%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, Metro Vancouver holds the highest level of support (78%).”

When asked about their personal feeling about medical assistance in dying, almost three-in-five British Columbians (58%) think it should be allowed, but only under specific circumstances.

Fewer than one-in-five British Columbians (18%) think physician-assisted suicide should never be allowed, regardless of who requests it, while 12% believe it should always be permitted.

Just under half of British Columbians (47%) say they are satisfied with the regulations that are currently in place in Canada to deal with the issue of physician-assisted suicide. One-in-four residents of the province (25%) are dissatisfied and a similar proportion (28%) are undecided.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 4 to November 6, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca


Two Thirds of British Columbians Unaffected by Carbon Tax

Residents are divided on whether the goal of making people more mindful of their carbon consumption has been achieved.

Vancouver, BC [November 6, 2019] – Most British Columbians believe the provincial carbon tax—originally implemented on July 1, 2008—has not been detrimental to their domestic assets, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 66% of British Columbians believe that the provincial carbon tax has not negatively affected the finances of their household, while one-in-five (21%) think it has.

Men (28%) are more likely to believe that the carbon tax has negatively affected their household finances than women (15%). Residents aged 18-to-34 are also more likely to have an adverse opinion on this issue (26%) than those aged 35-to-54 (20%) and those aged 55 and over (15%).

When asked if they think the introduction of the carbon tax in British Columbia has led people to be more mindful of their carbon consumption, residents of the province are deeply divided.

While 45% of British Columbians believe the carbon tax has led people to change their behaviour, 44% disagree and 13% are undecided.

“Residents of Northern BC (63%) are more likely to believe that the carbon tax has made residents more mindful,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are significantly lower in the Fraser Valley (45%), Southern BC (44%), Metro Vancouver (43%) and Vancouver Island (42%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 25 to October 28, 2019, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error — which measures sample variability — is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Some Marijuana Users in British Columbia Shun Licensed Retailers

Across the province, 24% of consumers say they have not acquired any cannabis at a licensed retailer.

Vancouver, BC [October 18, 2019] – A year after marijuana became legal in Canada, only a third of cannabis users in British Columbia are acquiring their product exclusively at licensed retailers, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, only 33% of British Columbians who have consumed marijuana since legalization say that “all” of their cannabis was acquired at a licensed retailer.

About one-in-five marijuana consumers in British Columbia (19%) say “most” of their cannabis was obtained at a licensed retailer, and 14% acknowledge that “some” of it was purchased this way.

One-in-four marijuana consumers in British Columbia (24%) say that “none” of the cannabis they have used since legalization has been acquired at a licensed retailer—including 37% of consumers aged 55 and over.

Across the province. 44% of residents say they consumed marijuana in Canada before it became legal, while 43% have never tried it. 

In April, only 6% of British Columbians said they had consumed marijuana only after it became legal,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Now, the proportion has risen to 13%, including more than one-in-five residents aged 18-to-34 (22%).”

As was the case in a Research Co. survey conducted six months ago, more than three-in-five British Columbians (63%) agree with marijuana being legal in Canada, while 29% disagree.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (70%) and residents of Northern BC (67%) are more likely to endorse the legal status of marijuana.

When asked to review the decisions that the provincial government has taken to enable the legal sale of marijuana in British Columbia, four-in-five residents (81%) agree with prohibiting the use of marijuana on school properties and in vehicles.

Sizeable majorities of residents also agree with establishing 19 years as the legal age to purchase, sell or consume marijuana in the province (73%), restricting marijuana smoking to areas where tobacco smoking is allowed (74%), authorizing adults to grow up to four cannabis plants per household, as long as the plants are not visible from public spaces off the property, and home cultivation is banned in homes used as day-cares (60%), and establishing the Liquor Distribution Branch (LDB) as the wholesale distributor of non-medical marijuana in British Columbia (56%)

Two thirds of British Columbians (67%, +7 since April) think companies that operate in the province should be able to administer “drug tests” to any employee now that marijuana is legal.

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians disagree with legalizing ecstasy (72%), heroin (76%), powder cocaine (77%), crack cocaine (79%), methamphetamine or “crystal meth” (also 79%) and fentanyl (also 79%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 7 to October 10, 2019, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error — which measures sample variability — is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Unsolicited Calls and Messages Affect Most British Columbians

More than a third of the province’s  residents received a text asking about their support for a party or policy.

Vancouver, BC [September 27, 2019] – A significant proportion of British Columbians recently had to deal with unsolicited text messages and calls on their mobile phone, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, 37% of respondents say that, over the course of the past two months, they received text messages asking them if they support a specific party or policy sent by an individual they do not know.

Men (42%) and British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (44%) are more likely to report getting text messages of a political nature from unknown senders.

A similar proportion of British Columbians (35%) received phone calls and/or phone messages from an individual purporting to represent a government agency (such as the Canada Revenue Agency).

Women (36%) and Metro Vancouverites (39%) are more likely to have received calls or messages from a scammer over the past two months.

Three-in-ten British Columbians (31%) say they received phone calls or messages over the past two months where an individual speaks Cantonese or Mandarin, including 42% of those who reside in Metro Vancouver.

“Younger British Columbians appear to be more affected by unsolicited phone calls and messages than their older counterparts,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 40% of residents aged 55 and over say they did not receive any of the three types of calls or messages included in the survey, the proportion falls to 25% among those aged 35-to-54 and 20% among those aged 18-to-34.”

More than a third of British Columbians (37%) have reported an unwanted call or phone number to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre (formerly known as PhoneBusters).

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (46%), men (43%) and residents of both Northern BC (47%) and the Fraser Valley (44%) are more likely to have contacted the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre to report an unwanted call or number.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 14, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Assess Pro-Democracy Protests in Hong Kong

Two-in-five residents of the province want Ottawa to support the protesters, while one third would not get involved.

Vancouver, BC [September 25, 2019] – Most British Columbians have been paying attention to the current unrest in Hong Kong, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, 53% of respondents say they have followed the protests against the “extradition bill” in Hong Kong “very closely” or “moderately closely.”

British Columbians who were born in, have lived in or have travelled to Hong Kong are significantly more likely to be paying attention to the current unrest (81%) than those who have no ties to the region (40%).

When asked what the position of the Canadian government should be in this situation, two-in-five British Columbians (39%) believe Ottawa should “definitely” or “probably” support the protesters in Hong Kong.

Conversely, a third of British Columbians (34%) would prefer for the federal government to avoid getting involved, while only 6% want Ottawa to support the Chinese government.

“British Columbians aged 55 and over are more likely to call for the federal government to do nothing in this case (45%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion falls to 29% among those aged 35-to-54 and 25% among those aged 18-to-34.”

More than three-in-five British Columbians (62%) believe Hong Kong would be better off today if it had remained under the administration of the United Kingdom—a proportion that rises to 68% among those who have ties to the region, 72% among those aged 55 and over and 76% among residents of Southern BC.

Half of British Columbians (49%) are worried that the current situation will lead to many residents of Hong Kong relocating to British Columbia, including 52% of those aged 35-to-54 and 61% of those who reside in the Fraser Valley.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 14, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Studio Incendo

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most British Columbians Bought a Lottery Ticket in the Past Year

Two thirds want the government to do more to deal with the negative effects of gambling.

Vancouver, BC [September 20, 2019] – A majority of British Columbians bought a lottery ticket in the past year, with a sizeable proportion of players anticipating a “big win” in the process, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, almost three-in-five residents (58%) say they bought a lottery ticket in the past year.

Lottery ticket buyers in British Columbia are divided in their expectations on the game itself. While 41% do not anticipate they will win anything, 38% say they expect to get “a small prize” and 21% foresee winning “a big prize”.

“The youngest lottery ticket buyers in British Columbia have bigger dreams than their older counterparts,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 24% of those aged 18-to-34 do not believe they will win a prize, the proportion rises to 40% among those aged 35-to-54 and 50% among those aged 55 and over.”

British Columbians found other ways to gamble in the past year. Almost half (48%) bought a Scratch & Win ticket, more than a third (36%) attended a casino, and about one-in-five (19%) visited the PlayNow.com website.

Fewer residents of the province played poker (or other card games) online (12%), placed bets on a sporting event with a friend or relative (10%), through SportAction (9%) or on a horse race (5%) in the past 12 months.

Sport bets with friends or relatives are more popular among British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (15%) than among those aged 55 and over (5%).

When asked directly about casinos, three-in-five British Columbians (61%) believe these venues bring tourism dollars and create jobs. Conversely, 27% feel casinos increase gambling addiction and lead to more crime and traffic.

Almost nine-in-ten British Columbians (88%) think people will continue to find ways to gamble even if it was made illegal, and two thirds (67%) believe the government should do more to deal with the negative effects of gambling.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 14, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: GoToVan

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Non-European British Columbians Have Faced Discrimination

Just under one-in-four respondents have endured poor customer service and verbal harassment on account of their ethnicity.

Vancouver, BC [September 13, 2019] – A significant proportion of British Columbians who described their ethnicity as non-European have experienced discrimination in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians who described their ethnicity as non-European, a third of respondents (33%) say they have experienced “a significant amount” (11%) or a “moderate amount” (22%) of discrimination on account of their ethnicity.

“Only 19% of respondents aged 55 and over say they have experienced ethnic-based discrimination in British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is higher among those aged 18-to-34 (33%) and those aged 35-to-54 (also 33%).”

More than three-in-five British Columbians who described their ethnicity as non-European (62%) say they have personally experienced one of 11 different incidents on account of their ethnicity.

About one-in-four respondents say they have endured poor customer service (24%) and verbal harassment (23%) on account of their ethnicity.

Other experiences reported by British Columbians who described their ethnicity as non-European are being the subject of racist jokes (17%), being mocked or ridiculed because of their ethnicity (16%), unfair treatment in the workplace (also 16%), and loss of potential employment opportunity (16%).

More than one-in-ten respondents also report facing denial of facilities or accommodation (12%), exclusion from social groups within work (11%), exclusion from social groups within school (also 11%) and denial of goods or services (also 11%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 6 to September 9, 2019, among 391 adults in British Columbia who described their ethnicity as non-European. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 4.0 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Than Half of British Columbians Have Boycotted a Company

Half of “boycotters” say they disagreed with how an organization or establishment pays or treats its employees.

Vancouver, BC [September 11, 2019] – A majority of British Columbians admit to having voluntarily abstained from using, buying or dealing with an organization of establishment, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 55% of British Columbians say that, over the course of their lives, they have boycotted an organization or establishment.

Women (58%), British Columbians aged 55 and over (59%) and Vancouver Islanders (62%) are more likely to say that they have boycotted a company.

Half of British Columbians who have actively participated in a boycott (50%) point to disagreements with how employees of a specific organization of establishment were paid or treated.

Other reasons cited for boycotts include disagreements over environmental practices (43%), disagreements over the ownership of an organization or establishment (37%) and disagreements with animal welfare practices (33%).

“Women in British Columbia are significantly more likely to have boycotted a company for labour (56%) or animal welfare reasons (42%) than men (44% and 23% respectively),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Boycotts originating from a disagreement with ownership are more common in Metro Vancouver (41%).”

More than two-in-five British Columbians (43%) say they research the environmental practices of companies before purchasing a product or service “all the time” or “some of the time”. 

Slightly smaller proportions of British Columbians also look into a company’s social practices (39%) and labour practices (37%) before making a purchase.

When it comes to their recent experiences as consumers, more than a third of British Columbians say they review a company’s social, environmental, labour and/or investment practices when shopping for groceries (41%), clothing or shoes (40%), household goods (39%), cleaning products (also 39%), a vehicle (38%), dinner at a restaurant (37%) and electronics (36%).

Across the seven recent consumer experiences tested, British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are significantly more likely to review a company’s practices than their older counterparts.

While only 27% of British Columbians aged 55 and over review a company’s social, environmental, labour and/or investment practices when shopping for clothing or shoes, the proportion climbs to 44% among those aged 35-to-54 and 58% among those aged 18-to-34.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca