Half of Drivers in British Columbia Are Considering Electric Vehicles

Seven-in-ten residents agree with the goal of making all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province “zero emission” by 2040.

Vancouver, BC [May 31, 2019] – A significant proportion of car drivers in British Columbia would consider acquiring a “zero emission” vehicle in the future, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 51% of British Columbians who drive their own vehicles say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that the next vehicle they acquire for themselves or their household will be electric.

Majorities of drivers in Metro Vancouver (55%) and Vancouver Island (52%) are likely to consider a “zero emission” vehicle as their next purchase. The proportion is lower in the Fraser Valley (43%), Southern BC (40%) and Northern BC (37%)

When asked about specific issues that might make them less likely to purchase an electric vehicle, 24% of drivers say that they are too expensive when compared to non-electric vehicles, 24% fear becoming stranded if they cannot find a charging station, and 23% say they do not have enough places to charge the vehicle in the areas where they usually drive.

“There are some significant regional differences when the concerns of potential electric vehicle owners are analyzed,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than a third of drivers who reside in Southern BC (35%) and Northern BC (45%) claim they lack places to charge electric vehicles, compared to just 20% among those who live in Metro Vancouver.”

Earlier this year, the Government of British Columbia passed legislation to ensure that, by the year 2040, all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province will be “zero emission.” Seven-in-ten residents (70%) agree with this decision, while 21% disagree and 10% are undecided.

Almost half of British Columbians (49%) believe the goal established by the provincial government on “zero emission” vehicles is “achievable”, while 42% think it is “not achievable.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 20 to May 22, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

NDP Ahead in British Columbia Two Years After Last Election

Two-in-five residents identify “housing, homelessness and poverty” as the most important issue in the province.

Vancouver, BC [May 29, 2019] – The governing New Democratic Party (NDP) is the top choice in British Columbia’s current political landscape, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 39% of decided voters in British Columbia would cast a ballot for the BC NDP candidate in their riding if a provincial election were held tomorrow.

The BC Liberals are in second place with 30%, followed by the BC Green Party with 21% and the BC Conservative Party with 9%.

The New Democrats are ahead among female voters (42%, with the BC Liberals and the BC Greens tied at 24%), as well as voters aged 18-to-34 and 35-to-54 (40% among each group).

Among male voters, the BC Liberals and the BC NDP are practically tied (37% and 36% respectively), while the New Democrats enjoy a six-point edge among voters aged 55 and over (38% to 32%).

The BC Greens are particularly popular with women (24%) and voters aged 18-to-34 (25%)

“The BC NDP and the BC Green Party are holding on to more than four-in-five of the voters who supported them in the 2017 provincial election,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “For the BC Liberals, the number is slightly lower at 76%.”

Just over half of British Columbians (51%) approve of the performance of Premier and BC NDP leader John Horgan, while 34% disapprove.

Green Party leader Andrew Weaver’s approval rating stands at 42%, while the numbers are lower for BC Liberals leader Andrew Wilkinson (34%) and BC Conservatives leader Trevor Bolin (20%).

More than two-in-five British Columbians (42%) believe “housing, homelessness and poverty” is the most important issue facing the province today—a proportion that climbs to 49% among residents aged 18-to-34, 47% among Metro Vancouverites and 45% among women.

“Health care” and “the economy and jobs” are tied at 11%, followed by “the environment” at 10%, “energy and pipelines” at 9%, and “crime and public safety” at 7%.

Concerns about “housing, homelessness and poverty” are decidedly higher among residents who voted for the BC NDP (46%) and the BC Greens (44%) in 2017 than among BC Liberal supporters (29%).

Conversely, “energy and pipelines” is the second most important issue for BC Liberal supporters (17%, compared to 8% among BC NDP voters and 5% among BC Green voters).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 20 to May 22, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Owen 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Endorse Money Laundering Public Inquiry

More than a third (36%) would place the emphasis on “identifying solutions to help reduce the impact of money laundering.”

Vancouver, BC [May 24, 2019] – A sizeable majority of British Columbians voice satisfaction with the provincial government’s decision to call a public inquiry into money laundering in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 86% of British Columbians “strongly agree” (55%) or “moderately agree” (31%) with this decision.

Victoria’s course of action is endorsed by 93% of residents who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the 2017 provincial election, as well as 86% of those who supported the BC Liberals and 80% of those who voted for the BC Green Party.

In surveys conducted by Research Co. in June 2018August 2018 and February 2019, more than three-in-four British Columbians voiced support for a public inquiry into money laundering. 

When asked about specific goals that the public inquiry should deal with, more than a third of British Columbians (36%) mentioned “identifying solutions to help reduce the current and future impact of money laundering in the province.”

“In Metro Vancouver, the proportion of residents who want the public inquiry to concentrate on solutions reaches 39%,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This course of action is also slightly more popular among women (38%) than men (35%).”

Three-in-ten residents (30%) believe “finding out those responsible (in government and crown corporations) for allowing money laundering to become such a big problem” should be the main priority.

Fewer British Columbians would concentrate the public inquiry’s efforts on “recovering ill-gotten gains and assets from people who laundered money in British Columbia” (17%) or “figuring out how money laundering became such a big problem” (11%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 16 to May 19, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Fewer Than Half of British Columbians Have an Emergency Kit

Three-in-four residents think an earthquake strong enough to damage buildings is “likely” to occur in the next 50 years.

Vancouver, BC [May 22, 2019] – Many British Columbians expect to face a destructive earthquake, but most have not assembled an emergency kit, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 76% of British Columbians say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that an earthquake strong enough to damage buildings will occur in the province in the next 50 years.

When asked about their level of concern about specific emergencies they might face, British Columbians place “a fire” (79%), “an earthquake” (68%), “high winds” (65%) and “intense rainfall” (61%) at the top of the list.

Fewer than three-in-five British Columbians are worried about being personally affected by “a flood” (57%), “heavy snowfall” (56%), “a toxic spill” (55%), “a terrorist attack” (54%), “a tsunami” (46%) or “a landslide” (also 46%).

Only 46% of British Columbians acknowledge having purchased or prepared an emergency kit with supplies they might need in case of an emergency.

“In spite of the high level of concern expressed about an earthquake affecting the province, more than half of British Columbians have not put together an emergency kit,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents aged 35-to-54 are doing better on this particular matter (55% have an emergency kit) than those aged 18-to-34 (45%) and those aged 55 and over (39%).”

Across the province, two-in-five residents (39%) have prepared an emergency plan that includes how to get in touch with family or friends in case of an emergency, and just over a third (35%) have established a meeting place with family or friends in case of an emergency.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 2 to May 5, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Five British Columbians Grow or Cultivate Plants at Home

More than half of the province’s home gardeners focus primarily on ornamental plants, while 29% are mostly growing food.

Vancouver, BC [May 17, 2019] – A majority of British Columbians can be safely described as home gardeners, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, three-in-five British Columbians (59%) say they currently grow or cultivate plants in their home, either indoors or outdoors.

The largest incidence of home gardeners is observed among British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (64%), residents of Northern BC (68%) and BC Green Party voters in the 2017 provincial election (70%).

More than half of the province’s home gardeners (56%) say they focus mostly on plants for ornamental purposes, while three-in-ten (29%) prefer to grow or cultivate plants for consumption, such as vegetables, fruits and herbs.

“There are some age discrepancies when it comes to the type of plants British Columbia’s home gardeners are interested in,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Growing plants that can be consumed is more popular among those aged 18-to-34 (53%), but less so among those aged 35-to-54 (31%) and those aged 55 and over (21%).”

One-in-four of British Columbia’s home gardeners (25%) say they spend less than $50 each year on gardening tools, plants and/or seeds. 

About two-in-five of British Columbia’s home gardeners (39%) allocate $50 to $100 a year for gardening, while more than a third (36%) spend more than $100 annually.

A majority of the province’s home gardeners (58%) say the plants they grow or cultivate are “about the same as most” in their neighbourhood, while 26% consider them “better” and 11% believe they are “worse.”

British Columbia’s home gardeners aged 18-to-34 (35%), men (30%) and those who reside in Southern BC (29%) are more likely to claim that their own plants are better than the ones grown by their neighbours.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 2 to May 5, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca