British Columbians Want to Work from Home After Pandemic Ends

Employed residents of the province expect fewer in-person staff meetings and business travel once COVID-19 is over.

Vancouver, BC [March 23, 2021] – A significant proportion of British Columbians who have had to work from home in the past year expect to be able to continue doing so after the COVID-19 pandemic ends, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample, 54% of employed British Columbians say they have worked from home during the pandemic, including 63% of those aged 18-to-34 and 59% of those who reside in Metro Vancouver.

More than two-in-five employed British Columbians foresee fewer in-person staff meetings (47%), less business travel (44%) and a reduction of in-person business development meetings (43%) at their workplace once the pandemic ends.

Conversely, employed British Columbians believe their companies will see an increase in virtual staff meetings (50%), virtual business development (47%) and virtual communications between offices (46%) after COVID-19.

One third of British Columbians who have worked from home (33%) believe they will be able to keep doing it once or twice a week when the pandemic ends, while 18% foresee working from home three for four times a week and 20% believe they will be able to do so five days a week.

“Only 10% of British Columbians who have worked from home in the past year believe their post-COVID arrangements will not include any days at the home office,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This includes 14% of those aged 55 and over and 20% of those who reside in Northern BC.”

Only a third of British Columbians who have worked from home have been informed by their company about two post-pandemic plans: how employees will return to the office (32%) and how employees will be able to work from home (also 32%).

Practically half of employed British Columbians who have worked from home (49%) say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to seek a different job if their current company does not allow them to work from home as often as they want—including 52% of men and 56% of those aged 18-to-34.

In addition, majorities of employed British Columbians who have worked from home would consider switching to different jobs that can be performed from home in their own metropolitan area (56%) or province (54%). Two-in-five (39%) would consider reporting to a company located in a different province, if they can perform their duties from home.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on March 8 and March 9, 2021, among 700 adults who work in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Support Return to System of Compulsory Trades Certification

Astounding 94 per cent of British Columbians considered government’s initiative important.

Vancouver, BC [March 12, 2021] – A new survey finds that most British Columbians support compulsory certification of the skilled trades and believe certification will make the construction industry safer.

“This poll demonstrates that British Columbians overwhelmingly support a return to compulsory trades certification,” noted Brynn Bourke, interim executive director of the BC Building Trades.

A compulsory trade is a skilled trade that requires training or apprenticeship in order to legally work in that trade. The provincial Liberals eliminated compulsory trades in 2002, and today B.C. is the only province in Canada that doesn’t have compulsory trades training.

A poll conducted March 8 and 9 by Research Co. and commissioned by the BC Building Trades shows 80 per cent of British Columbians support restoring compulsory trades in this province. A full 90 per cent of British Columbians believe that compulsory trades will make the construction industry safer due to the requirement for training and regulation, and that compulsory trades will contribute to workers being more highly skilled.

Meanwhile, 89 per cent of British Columbians believe compulsory trades will build consumer confidence and an expectation of quality workmanship.

“The results of this poll could not be clearer,” said Bourke. “British Columbians support and understand the importance of compulsory trades, they believe in compulsory trades, and they think compulsory trades will contribute to increased safety, skills development and quality work in the construction sector.”

The BC NDP government has committed to restoring compulsory trades. The poll also found that 94 per cent of British Columbians consider the government’s initiative either very or moderately important. Interestingly, women and residents 55 and over were more likely to consider the initiative “very important.”

The online survey polled 800 adults in B.C. Results are considered correct plus or minus 3.5 percentage points 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Brynn Bourke, interim executive director, 
BC Building Trades
778-397-2220

A Third of British Columbians Endure COVID-19 Financial Struggles

More than half of the province’s residents (54%) say they are spending more on groceries than they did a year ago.

Vancouver, BC [March 15, 2021] – One third of British Columbians acknowledge that the financial situation of their household has not returned to the level it had before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 33% of British Columbians say that their household’s financial standing is worse now than prior to the pandemic.

While almost half of British Columbians (48%) report no change in their financial situation over the past year, 17% say they are better off now.

“There are specific groups of British Columbians who are more likely to have been negatively impacted by the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than a third of women (36%) and practically half of residents of Northern BC (49%) say their household’s finances have suffered on account of COVID-19.”

About a third of British Columbians of European and East Asian origins (32% and 33% respectively) say their household’s financial situation has worsened because of the pandemic, along with 38% of the province’s residents of First Nation and South Asian descent.

When asked about specific things they pay for, a majority of British Columbians (54%) say their household expenditures on groceries are higher now than they were before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. This proportion climbs to 63% among women, British Columbians aged 55 and over and residents of the Fraser Valley.

Another area of increased spending for British Columbians is electronic entertainment, such as cable television and streaming services. While 6% of the province’s residents say they are paying less for these items than they did a year ago, almost three-in-ten (29%) are allocating more money to them.

Conversely, while 18% of British Columbians say they are spending more on transportation—such as fuel for vehicles, transit passes and taxis—more than a third (37%) say their costs are lower now than before COVID-19.

Significantly fewer residents of the province say they are spending more on four other categories than they did before the start of the pandemic: books (15%), housing (14%), board games (13%) and newspapers and magazines (9%). 

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from March 1 to March 3, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here, and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Than One-in-Six British Columbians Are COVID Skeptics

Residents who think the pandemic is not a real threat are more likely to shun family and friends because of their views.

Vancouver, BC [March 9, 2021] – Residents of British Columbia who do not believe COVID-19 is a real threat are more likely to criticize politicians and the media and cut off friends and family members because of their position, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 82% of British Columbians consider COVID-19 a real threat, while 15% do not and 3% are undecided. 

“British Columbia’s pandemic skeptics amount to a tiny minority of the population, but there are some demographic pockets where these views are slightly more common,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The group includes 18% of British Columbians aged 18 to 34, 29% of residents of Northern BC and 26% of residents of Southern BC.”

When British Columbians are asked about the performance of specific entities to handle the COVID-19 pandemic, majorities of respondents are satisfied with the work done by the provincial government (60%), municipal administrations (58%) and the federal government (53%). The numbers are lower for the official opposition in Victoria (32%) and Ottawa (also 32%).

Significant proportions of British Columbians are also satisfied with how their family (83%) and their friends (73%) have managed the pandemic.

More than half of the province’s residents are also content with the work of television news (63%), radio news (57%), newspapers (55%) and non-governmental associations (52%) during the pandemic. The rating drops to 35% for unions and 34% for trade associations, with a higher number of undecided respondents.

British Columbia’s pandemic skeptics express particularly low levels of satisfaction with how the provincial government (14%), the federal government (13%), television news (10%), radio news (7%) and newspapers (also 7%) have managed COVID-19 .

Across the province, 16% of British Columbians say that, because of a disagreement related to COVID-19, they have unfollowed a person on social media, while 13% ceased communication with a friend and 8% have stopped talking to a family member.

Among British Columbians who do not consider COVID-19 to be a real threat, the results on this question are significantly higher. About a third of pandemic skeptics (32%) have unfollowed a person on social media, while 26% have stopped talking to a family member and 25% have ceased communication with a friend because of a disagreement related to the pandemic.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from March 1 to March 3, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here, and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Adults 55+ Most Satisfied with Digital Health Tools During Pandemic

Over the past year, 51 per cent of British Columbians essentially “migrated” to virtual care.

Vancouver, BC [March 3, 2021] – Despite typical narratives about older adults’ reluctance to adopt technology, a poll released today by Research Co. and Digital Health Circle found that, during the COVID-19 pandemic, British Columbians 55 and over have been the most satisfied with digital health tools of any age group (86 per cent were very satisfied or moderately satisfied versus 75 per cent and 80 per cent for ages 18- 34 and 35-54 respectively).

The COVID-19 pandemic has spurred both the innovation and adoption of more and more digital health solutions as healthcare providers and consumers were forced to pivot, and virtual care and wellness activities became necessary. Digital Health Circle partnered with Research Co. to better understand how British Columbians, especially older adults, have been using digital health products during the pandemic, in order to help local businesses and healthcare providers better address their consumers’ needs.

“As Digital Health Circle’s work focuses on assisting tech companies to develop products that meet consumers’ needs, we wanted to learn if and how people were using these tools, if they were satisfied and what the barriers or gaps might be,” said Dr. Sylvain Moreno, Chief Executive Officer and Scientific Director, Digital Health Circle. “We learned that as the silver tsunami continues, clearly those older adults have an appetite and an urgent need for digital health tools, which means there is a real opportunity to help improve health outcomes, as well as for product and job creation in B.C.”

Today’s poll is a follow up to the one Research Co. did pre-pandemic, September 18, 2018 to understand how British Columbians were using digital tools for health care.

“The data in our poll refutes the stereotype that older adults, including baby boomers, are averse to technology adoption and avoid using digital health solutions,” said Mario Canseco, President, Research Co. “The high uptake amongst older adults may be in part due to concerns about exposure to COVID-19 in the community, making this group more likely to avoid going to the doctor in person or seeking traditional health care. Older adults also have higher healthcare needs and less transportation access, making digital health solutions very convenient.”page1image63486976page1image63474112

The data also provides two distinct learnings to inform the Provincial Government’s health policy development:

  • Government should continue to build on the digital capacity the health sector gained during the COVID-19 pandemic—the data tells us that use of digital health solutions holds a promise to satisfy older adults’ care needs.
  • It is now up to Government, including health authorities, to keep their feet on the gas and continue to make these products available in the health care system or incur the frustrations of this cohort, which includes baby boomers.“This data will help DHC as we assist small tech companies increase their chance of developing the best possible digital health solutions for British Columbians,” said Dr. Moreno. “The survey suggests that older adults want digital health solutions and products to be developed for them at least at the same rate as the general public.”

Other findings included:

  • During the pandemic, 51 per cent of British Columbians essentially “migrated” to virtual care. It was even higher for older adults (55+) at 54 per cent.
  • Vancouver Islanders are most divided on whether they will keep using digital solutions post pandemic, with 50 per cent saying they will continue to use them, 16 per cent saying they won’t and 34 per cent unsure.
  • Higher income residents say they will rely on these tools more post-pandemic: 64 per cent of those earning over $100,000/year versus 42 per cent of those earning under $50,000/year. However, the lowest income group had a higher satisfaction level that higher earners. Digital Health Circle plans to further explore the issue of access in the coming year.
  • More than two-in-five British Columbians are relying on digital health solutions, but the way they come into contact with them is different. The 55+ group is more likely to be getting recommendations from their physicians. Word of mouth and ads resonate with Millennials and Generation X.
  • There is generally similar use and perspectives on digital health products across ethnic groups and regions, with similar levels of satisfaction. One of the main differences is observed with tools for mental well-being, where adoption is highest among British Columbians of First Nations descent (23 per cent) but drops among those of South Asian (13 per cent), East Asian (8 per cent) and European heritage (7 per cent). Further investigation would be needed to understand if this is due to need, willingness to adopt technologies or another reason.
  • The most popular digital health care tools were in the following categories: physical activity and exercise (38 per cent), sleep tracking (14 per cent), nutrition (12 per cent), heart health/blood pressure (11 per cent) and mental well-being (9 per cent). This may be due to availability of apps, so this might not correlate to interest or willingness.

This comprehensive poll of 800 adults in British Columbia was undertaken as an online survey conducted from February 22 and February 23, 2021. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Laura Cropper, Coast Communications and Public Affairs
778.323.382790
[e] laura@coastcomms.ca

British Columbians Still Shun Activities Without COVID-19 Vaccine

Almost two thirds of the province’s residents think the economy’s reopening should happen slowly to ensure low infection rates.

Vancouver, BC [February 23, 2020] – Almost two thirds of British Columbians balk at the prospect of attending a concert or game before being inoculated against COVID-19, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 65% of British Columbians say they would not be comfortable attending a live sporting event as spectators without a COVID-19 vaccine, up four points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2020.

An equally high proportion of British Columbians (64%, +5) are not ready to attend a concert at a music venue, including 66% of those who reside in Metro Vancouver.

Three-in-five British Columbians (60%, +13) say they would not visit a gym or fitness facility unless they have been inoculated against COVID-19.

“Across the province, 41% of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 say they would be willing to go to the gym right now or if the venue is regularly cleaned and there is enough room to physically distance,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 33% of those aged 35-to-54 and 22% of those aged 55 and over share the same view.”

One third of British Columbians say they would not go to three different venues unless they are vaccinated against COVID-19: a library (33%, +4), a barbershop or salon (also 33%, +6) or dinner at a patio (also 33%, +4). A slightly larger proportion of the province’s residents (35%, +3) would not visit a restaurant to eat indoors if they have not been vaccinated.

A majority of the province’s residents (51%, +11) are not willing to go to a Community Centre without being inoculated against COVID-19, while almost half would not ride the bus (46%, +3) or rely on SkyTrain (also 46%, +1).

Almost two thirds of British Columbians (64%, +2 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May 2020) think we should reopen the economy slowly and ensure that COVID-19 infection rates remain low, while three-in-ten (29%, -6) would prefer to reopen the economy quickly and ensure that no more jobs are lost due to the pandemic.

Women (67%) and British Columbians aged 55 and over (74%) are more likely to suggest that any eventual economic reopening should be done gradually.

Across the province, 73% of residents of Vancouver Island call for a slow reopening of the economy, along with 67% of those in Northern BC, 64% of those in Metro Vancouver and 56% of those who reside in both Southern BC and the Fraser Valley.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from February 14 to February 16, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

One-in-Four Albertans Support Becoming an Independent Nation

The idea of independence is more appealing to the province’s residents if Saskatchewan and British Columbia join in.

Vancouver, BC [February 16, 2021] – Support for the formation of a country independent of Canada grows in both Alberta and Saskatchewan if British Columbia is included in the territory, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative sample of Canadians in the three western provinces gauged support for sovereignty under various scenarios.

The idea of an independent country that would encompass British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan is appealing to 29% of both Albertans and Saskatchewanians, but only to 12% of British Columbians.

Almost half of Albertans who voted for the United Conservative Party (UCP) in the 2019 provincial election (47%), more than a third of men in Saskatchewan (35%) and almost three-in-ten residents of Northern BC (28%) voice support for an independent country encompassing the three western provinces.

In this survey, one-in-four Albertans (25%) are in favour of their province becoming a country independent from Canada. This level of support is consistent with what was observed in similar questions asked by Research Co. in December 2018 (25%) but lower than the numbers registered in July 2019 (30%).

Fewer than one-in-six residents of Saskatchewan (16%) and British Columbia (12%) are in favour of their respective provinces becoming sovereign on their own.

When asked about the possibility of an independent nation encompassing Alberta and Saskatchewan, one-in-four Albertans (26%) and one-in-five Saskatchewanians (21%) are in favour.

Only 13% of British Columbians agree with the prospect of forming a sovereign nation with Alberta. While 18% of Albertans support their province joining the United States, only 7% of British Columbians concur.

Residents of the three provinces were also asked about their perceptions of specific levels of government. At least three-in-five Saskatchewanians (62%) and British Columbians (60%) consider their own provincial government as “very responsive” or moderately responsive” to their needs and the needs of other residents. In Alberta, only 43% of respondents feel the same way.

“In Alberta, the criticism towards the provincial government is not coming exclusively from supporters of opposition parties,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Half of those who voted for the UCP in 2019 (50%) believe that the current administration is responsive, but two-in-five (41%) do not.”

The responsiveness of local governments was rated positively by majorities of residents in each of the three provinces (64% in Saskatchewan, 60% in British Columbia and 58% in Alberta). 

While more than two-in-five British Columbians (45%) believe the federal government is responsive to their needs, the proportion drops to 32% in Alberta and 26% in Saskatchewan.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from February 7 to February 9, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia, 600 adults in Alberta and 600 adults in Saskatchewan. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in each province. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for British Columbia and +/- 4.0 percentage points for Alberta and Saskatchewan, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables for British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

COVID-19 Impacts Dining Behaviours Across British Columbia

Millennials and Metro Vancouverites are more likely to be relying on apps to have food delivered to their homes.

Vancouver, BC [February 9, 2021] – British Columbians are not ordering food delivered to their homes as often as they did a year ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 32% of British Columbians say they order food that is delivered to their homes once every two weeks or more often, down 14 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in February 2020.

More than half of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (54%) are having food delivered to their homes at least once every fortnight, compared to 37% among those aged 35-to-54 and 10% among those aged 55 and over.

In a poll conducted by Research Co. in January 2021, 21% of Canadians—and 19% of British Columbians—said they are not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection from COVID-19.

Just under half of British Columbians (45%, -1) order food that they pick up themselves from a restaurant at least once every fortnight. 

Three-in-ten British Columbians (30%) dine out at a restaurant at least once every two weeks, down from 55% in 2020.

While 27% of British Columbians say they are ordering food delivered to their home more often than last year, a similar proportion (28%) is partaking on this option less than before.

“The momentum for the food delivery business in British Columbia is being driven primarily by Millennials,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 42% of residents aged 18-to-34 say they are ordering food for their homes more often, only 31% of those aged 35-to-54 and 13% of those aged 55 and over are joining them.”

One third of Metro Vancouverites (34%) are ordering food for their homes more often than last year. The Fraser Valley is a close second on this indicator (29%), followed by Vancouver Island (18%), Northern BC (15%) and Southern BC (13%).

Over the past year, more than a third of British Columbians relied on three different methods to have food delivered to their home: a phone call to a specific restaurant (39%, -4 since February 2020), online through the website of a restaurant or chain (37%, -1) and using an app on their phone, such as DoorDash, Uber Eats or Skip The Dishes (36%, +4).

While two thirds of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 have used an app to order food in the past year (65%), the proportion drops to 39% among those aged 35-to-54 and 13% among those aged 55 and over.

On a regional basis, Metro Vancouverites relied primarily on apps to order food over the past year (47%). In the other four regions, the most favoured method is a phone call to a specific restaurant: 58% in Northern BC, 45% in the Fraser Valley, 39% in Southern BC and 37% in Vancouver Island.

More than half of British Columbians (54%) say they always leave a tip for the delivery person or courier who brings food to their home, including 57% of women, 58% of British Columbians aged 35-to-54 and 66% of Vancouver Islanders.

Only 28% of British Columbians say they always leave a tip or donation for the restaurant—an option that can be accessed in some applications at the time deliveries are finalized—while 34% never do this.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from February 1 to February 3, 2021, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Want Data Access and Decorum in Legislature

More than three-in-five of the province’s residents believe it is time to eliminate heckling during Question Period.

Vancouver, BC [January 29, 2021] – Many residents of British Columbia are on board with some changes recently suggested by the outgoing Speaker of the Legislative Assembly, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In December, Darryl Plecas—who served as speaker from  September 2017 to December 2020—issued a report outlining several recommendations for the future of the Legislative Assembly.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, four-in-five British Columbians (80%) are in favour of providing public access, wherever possible, to the data and information being used to make decisions in accessible and manageable ways.

In addition, seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%) agree with establishing a non-partisan “fact-checker” of statements made by MLAs in the Chamber, and more than three-in-five (63%) want to develop strategies for civic organizations to engage with the Legislative Assembly.

There is also wide support for specific measures aimed at fostering respectful behaviour inside the legislature. More than half of British Columbians (57%) support establishing an all-party parliamentary committee to examine parliamentary decorum, including heckling. This includes majorities of British Columbians who voted for the BC Green Party (57%), the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (62%) and the BC Liberals (66%) in last year’s provincial election.

There is no definite consensus on what type of behaviour British Columbians would like to banish from Question Period in the legislature. While only 41% of British Columbians would eliminate clapping, there is majority support for abandoning two other practices: the banging of desks (55%) and heckling (63%).

The idea of lowering the voting age for provincial elections to 16 years is supported by 28% of British Columbians, while 64% are opposed. 

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be in favour of lowering the voting age (38%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (31%) and aged 55 and over (17%).

“There is very little opposition from British Columbians to the proposals that seek to address information transparency and public participation in the legislature,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The most contentious idea is the one related to lowering the voting age.”

In a two-country survey conducted by Research Co. in November 2020, 62% of Canadians and 58% of Americans rejected the notion of allowing people aged 16 and 17 to vote in federal elections.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from January 16 to January 18, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Support Pandemic Ban on In-Person Worship

Only 12% of the province’s residents think the current fine of $2,300 for those who break the rules is “too high.”

Vancouver, BC [January 22, 2021] – The provincial government’s decision to forbid in-person worship services across British Columbia on account of the COVID-19 pandemic is endorsed by a sizeable majority of residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 81% of British Columbians agree with the prohibition, while 13% disagree and 6% are not sure.

In November 2020, the provincial health officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry, banned all in-person faith-related gatherings in an effort to curb the spread of COVID-19.

Churches, temples, mosques, synagogues and gurdwaras can only hold services for special occasions—such as baptisms, weddings and funerals—and with 10 people or fewer in attendance.

Support for the decision to forbid in-person worship services is slightly higher among women (84%) than men (77%). Majorities of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (81%), aged 35-to-54 (75%) and aged 55 and over (85%) also agree with the government’s course of action.

“Four-in-five British Columbians who describe themselves as Christian (81%) believe the government made the right decision in banning in-person worship during the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support for the regulation is also high among residents who are atheist (87%), agnostic (75%) or who profess no religion (79%).” 

Some churches in British Columbia have been issued $2,300 tickets for holding in-person worship services in contravention of provincial orders. 

Two-in-five British Columbians (40%) believe the fine is “about right”, while a similar proportion (39%) deem it “too low.” Only 12% of the province’s residents feel the fine is “too high.”

While one-in-four residents of Northern BC (25%) believe the current monetary penalty is “too high”, the proportion drops 16% in the Fraser Valley and Southern BC, 11% in Metro Vancouver and 6% in Vancouver Island.

British Columbians of European descent are more likely to think that the $2,300 fine for holding in-person worship services is “too low” (43%) than those who described their ancestry as East Asian (37%), South Asian (30%) or First Nations, Métis or Inuit (26%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from January 16 to January 18, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Western Canadians Support Banning Single-Use Plastics

Majorities of residents of the four Canadian provinces say they are relying on reusable bags when shopping for groceries.

Vancouver, BC [January 12, 2021] – The federal government’s plan to curb the use of single-use plastics in Canada is supported by most residents of the four western provinces, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative provincial samples, 82% of British Columbians, 78% of Manitobans, 71% of Albertans and 69% of Saskatchewanians support the proposal.

The federal plan calls for as ban on grocery checkout bags, straws, stir sticks, six-pack rings, plastic cutlery and food takeout containers made from hard-to-recycle plastics.

Support for the ban on single-use plastics is highest among British Columbians who voted for the BC Green Party in the 2020 provincial election (91%), as well as those who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) in the most recent provincial democratic processes held in Saskatchewan (90%) and Alberta (86%).

In British Columbia, more than three-in-four respondents to this survey (77%) say they rely on their own re-usable bag when shopping for groceries—a proportion that rises to 80% among those aged 35-to-54.

Majorities of residents of Alberta (69%), Saskatchewan (64%) and Manitoba (60%) are also using their own bags when they shop for groceries, instead of bags provided by the stores.

More than half of British Columbians (54%) say they go out of their way to recycle—such as holding on to bottles and cans until they can be placed into a proper recycling bin—“all of the time”. The proportion for this particular behaviour is slightly lower in Saskatchewan (50%), Manitoba (48%) and Alberta (46%).

One-in-four British Columbians (26%) say they limit hot water usage in their home—taking shorter showers or running the washing machine or dishwasher with full loads only—“all of the time”, compared to 19% in both Alberta and Saskatchewan and 17% in Manitoba.

Other behaviours are not as widely embraced across Western Canada. While 13% of British Columbians and 11% of Albertans say they unplug electrical devices in their home—such as TVs, computers and cell phone chargers—when they are not in use “all of the time”, only 5% of Saskatchewanians and 4% of Manitobans follow the same course of action.

Fewer than one-in-ten residents of each province say they buy biodegradable products or eat organic or home-grown foods “all of the time.”

“Western Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to be keeping an eye on hot water usage in their homes,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, those aged 18-to-34 have been quicker to adopt biodegradable products.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from January 4 to January 6, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia, 600 adults In Alberta, 600 adults in Saskatchewan and 600 adults in Manitoba. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in each province. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for British Columbia and +/- 4.0 percentage points for Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views on Safety in British Columbia Unchanged Since 2019

Four-in-five residents support enacting municipal bans on handguns and military-style assault weapons.

Vancouver, BC [January 5, 2021] – The perceptions of British Columbians on the possibility of being affected by criminal activity have not gone through a significant fluctuation over the past year and a half, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two thirds of British Columbians (68%) say they would feel “very safe” or “moderately safe” walking alone in their own neighbourhood after dark—unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2019.

More than seven-in-ten residents of the Fraser Valley (72%) and Metro Vancouver (71%) say they would feel safe walking alone in their own neighbourhood after dark, compared to 67% in Southern BC and 56% in both Vancouver Island and Northern BC.

Just over two-in-five British Columbians (41%, +1 since August 2019) say they fear becoming victims of a crime in their community “a great deal” or “a fair amount”, while almost three-in-five (58%) do not.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to fear becoming victims of crime (53%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (46%) and aged 55 and over (33%).

When asked about the current situation regarding crime in their community, more than a third of British Columbians blame addiction and mental health issues (45%) and gangs and the illegal drug trade (38%).

Smaller proportions of the province’s residents point the finger at poverty and inequality (26%), an inadequate court system (26%), lack of values and the improper education for youth (24%),  a bad economy and unemployment (19%), insufficient policing and a lack of resources to combat crime (16%) and immigrants and minorities (9%).

In April, 27% of British Columbians suggested that insufficient policing was one of the factors to blame for criminal activity in their community,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In December, only 16% feel the same way.” 

Four-in-five British Columbians (80%, +1 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in September 2018) support enacting a ban on handguns within the limits of their municipality, while a slightly higher proportion (83%, -3) would prohibit military-style assault weapons.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 14 to December 16, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Endorse Tougher Penalties for Distracted Driving

Seven-in-ten residents of the province agree with seizing the electronic devices of repeat offenders.

Vancouver, BC [December 25, 2020] – A large proportion of residents of British Columbia report seeing distracted drivers on the road, and sizeable majorities are supportive of implementing new measures to curb the illegal practice, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, more than half of British Columbians (55%) say they witnessed a driver talking on a hand-held cell phone or texting while driving over the past month.

Residents of Southern BC (64%) and Vancouver Island (also 64%) are more likely to have recently seen a driver texting or chatting on a cell phone, compared to 61% in both Northern BC and the Fraser Valley and 49% in Metro Vancouver.

Drivers caught emailing, texting, or using an electronic device while driving in British Columbia face a fine of $368 and four penalty points (equivalent to $252) in their insurance penalty point premium. This means a total of $620 for a first-time infraction. 

Just over half of British Columbians (52%) believe the current fine for distracted driving is “about right”, while 30% consider it “too low” and 14% deem it “too high.”

Only 18% of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 believe the current fine for distracted driving in British Columbia is “too low”, compared to 29% among those aged 35-to-54 and 38% among those aged 55 and over.

When asked about other possible penalties for drivers caught emailing, texting, or using an electronic device in British Columbia, more than half of residents (54%) agree with suspending the driver for one year.

Support is higher for two other penalties: doubling the current fine to $1,240 (59%) and seizing the electronic devices of repeat offenders (70%).

“British Columbians who voted for each of the province’s major parties in the last election are in favour of tougher legislation to curtail distracted driving,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 50% of BC Liberal voters endorse doubling the current fine, the proportion rises to 57% among those who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) and 66% among those who cast ballots for BC Green Party candidates.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 14 to December 16, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Age and Gender Shape Views on Health Care in British Columbia

Almost half of the province’s residents agree with the recent court ruling on private delivery, while three-in-ten disagree.

Vancouver, BC [December 8, 2020] – The views of British Columbians on how best to manage the province’s health care system vary greatly by age and gender, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 27% of British Columbians identify long waiting times as the biggest problem facing the health care system right now, down 11 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2019.

A shortage of doctors and nurses is second on the list of concerns with 24% (+4), followed by inadequate resources and facilities (13%, -2), and bureaucracy and poor management (10%, =).

Fewer British Columbians believe the most important health care problems right now are the absence of a focus on preventive care (9%, +6), a lack of a wider range of services for patients (6%, =), vague legal rights of patients (3%, -1) and insufficient standards of hygiene (1%, unchanged).

Long waiting times is identified as the most important problem by women (30%), British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (34%) and British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (29%). Conversely, a shortage of doctors and nurses is the most prevalent concern for men (26%) and British Columbians aged 55 and over (33%).

In Metro Vancouver, one third of residents (33%) cite long waiting times as the biggest health care problem. A shortage of doctors and nurses is the top concern for respondents in Southern BC (25%), Vancouver Island (32%), the Fraser Valley (41%) and Northern BC (55%).

Almost two thirds of British Columbians (64%, +6) think there are some good things in health care in the province, but some changes are required.

Just over one-in-five British Columbians (22%, -4) believe the health care system in the province works well and only minor changes are needed to make it work better, while 11% (-1) think health care has so much wrong with it that we need to completely rebuild it.

“There are some significant gender differences when British Columbians assess the health care system,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 28% of men think only minor changes are needed, only 16% of women share the same point of view.”

The proportion of British Columbians who say they would be willing to pay out of their own pocket to have quicker access to medical services that currently have long waiting times fell from 45% in August 2019 to 40% this year.

In addition, only 27% of British Columbians are willing to travel to another country to have quicker access to medical services that currently have long waiting times, down 10 points since last year.

In September, a B.C. Supreme Court justice ruled that access to private health care is not a constitutional right, even if wait times for care under the public system are too long. Almost half of British Columbians (46%) agree with this decision, while 31% disagree and 23% are undecided.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 25 to November 27, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Western Canadians Perceive Increase in Criminal Activity

Fewer than a third of residents of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba have reported crimes to the police.

Vancouver, BC [November 24, 2020] – More than two-in-five residents of four Canadian provinces believe that unlawful activity is on the rise in their communities, even if significantly fewer have actually been victims of crime, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative provincial samples, 54% of Manitobans say the level of criminal activity has increased in their community over the past three years.

Almost half of Albertans (48%) also feel that criminal activity in their communities has risen in the past three years. The numbers are slightly lower in British Columbia (42%) and Saskatchewan (41%).

The proportion of residents of the four western provinces who feel crime has decreased is in single digits (7% in Manitoba, 6% in Alberta and British Columbia, and 5% in Saskatchewan).

When respondents are asked if they have been victims of a crime that was reported to the police (such as an assault or a car break-in) in their community, only 20% of British Columbians answered affirmatively. The proportion is higher in Alberta (24%), Saskatchewan (27%) and Manitoba (31%).

“There is a clear divide between perceptions of crime and the reality that communities across Western Canada are reporting,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Respondents are significantly more likely to believe that unlawful activity has increased than to have personally experienced crime.”

In British Columbia, three-in-ten residents of Northern BC (31%) and one-in-five residents of Metro Vancouver (21%) say that they have been victims of a crime that was reported to the police over the past three years. 

In Alberta, residents of Edmonton are more likely to have experienced crime (26%) than those in Calgary (22%) or in the rest of the province (23%). 

A similar situation is observed in Saskatchewan, where more residents of Saskatoon (28%) say they have been victims of crime than those who live in Regina (24%) or in the rest of the province (18%).

In Manitoba, the proportion criminal activity reported to the police stands at 29% in Winnipeg and at 33% in the remaining areas of the province.

The groups that are more likely to believe that criminal activity is on the rise in their communities are British Columbians aged 55 and over (45%), Albertans aged 55 and over (56%), women in Saskatchewan (45%) and Manitobans aged 35-to-54 (58%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 14 to November 16, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia, 600 adults In Alberta, 600 adults in Saskatchewan and 600 adults in Manitoba. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in each province. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for British Columbia and+/- 4.0 percentage points for Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Want Ottawa to Focus on Environmental Issues

More than three-in-five of the province’s residents are “personally concerned” about global warming or climate change.

Vancouver, BC [November 17, 2020] – Residents of British Columbia are not particularly satisfied with the way the federal government has handled environmental issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, 41% think the federal government is not paying enough attention to the environment.

Women (45%) and British Columbians aged 55 and over (47%) are more likely to feel that Ottawa has not done enough on the environment.  

Smaller proportion of British Columbians believe their municipal governments (38%) and the provincial government in Victoria (35%) are not focusing as much on the environment as they should. 

When asked specifically about 10 different environmental problems, at least three-in-five British Columbians said they are personally concerned about five of them: the pollution of rivers, lakes and reservoirs (66%), air pollution (65%), the pollution of drinking water (also 65%), global warming or climate change (63%) and the contamination of soil and water by toxic waste (60%).

“Concerns about climate change in British Columbia are more prevalent among women (67%) and residents aged 55 and over (also 67%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) or the BC Green Party in last month’s provincial election are also more likely to be personally worried about global warming (72% each) than those who supported the BC Liberals (52%).”

Majorities of British Columbians are also personally concerned about deforestation (58%), the extinction of plant and animal species (also 58%), the depletion of fish stocks through overfishing (also 58%), the loss of tropical rain forests (55%) and the maintenance of the supply of fresh water for household needs (also 55%).

Almost two thirds of British Columbians (64%) say that the carbon tax that was implemented in July 2008 across the province has not negatively affected the finances of their  household.

More than a third of British Columbians (37%) think the introduction of the carbon tax in the province has led people to be more mindful of their carbon consumption and change their behaviour—a proportion that rises to 53% among those aged 18-to-34 and 52% among residents of Northern BC.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 29 to October 31, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: James Wheeler

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Pandemic Affects Casinos, But Not Lotteries in British Columbia

There is no change in the proportion of residents who bought a lottery ticket over the past 12 months.

Vancouver, BC [November 13, 2020] – While most British Columbians continue to buy lottery tickets in the province, the number of casino visitors has greatly decreased on account of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, almost three-in-five residents (58%, unchanged since a similar Research Co. poll conducted last year) purchased a lottery ticket over the past 12 months.

British Columbians aged 55 and over are more likely to have bought a lottery ticket (76%) than those aged 35-to-54 (58%) and those aged 18-to-34 (35%). 

Just over half of lottery ticket buyers in the province (51%) say they do not expect to win any prize, up 10 points since 2019. Just over three-in-ten (31%, -7) foresee winning a small prize, while 18% (-3) believe they will win a big prize,

Since March, all casinos in British Columbia have been closed following a directive issued by the Attorney General. Only 20% of British Columbians say they have attended a casino over the past 12 months, down from 36% who reported the same behavior in 2019.

More than half of British Columbians (56%, -5) believe casinos bring tourism dollars and create jobs in the province, while 31% (+4) think these venues increase gambling addiction and lead to more crime and traffic.

“All of the casino visits reported by British Columbians took place in the final two months of 2019 and the first two and a half months of 2020,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In spite of the evident effect of the pandemic on casino visits, the only type of gambling that has seen a slight increase in users is the PlayNow.com website.”

Across the province, 22% of residents say they have visited PlayNow.com, up three points since 2019. British Columbians aged 35-to-54 are more likely to be doing this (25%) than those aged 55 and over (22%) and those aged 18-to-34 (19%).

More than two-in-five British Columbians (45%, -3) bought a Scratch & Win ticket over the past 12 months—a proportion that rises to 54% on Vancouver Island and 52% in Northern BC.

As was the case last year, fewer British Columbians relied on for other forms of gambling: playing poker (or other card games) online (9%, -3), placing bets on a sporting event with a friend or relative (8%, -2), through SportsAction (7%, -2) or on a horse race (4%, -1).

Across the province, seven-in-ten British Columbians (71%, +4) think it is the right of the individual to gamble, regardless of the consequences.

In addition, 86% of residents (-2) believe people will continue to find ways to gamble even if it was made illegal, and 64% (-3) want the government to do more to deal with the negative effects of gambling.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 29 to October 31, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half in BC, Three-in-Four in Alberta Agree with Pipeline Expansion

Majorities of Albertans and British Columbians are disappointed with the way the federal government has handled this issue.

Vancouver, BC [November 10, 2020] – Just over half of British Columbians and practically three-in-four Albertans want to carry on with the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative provincial samples, 52% of British Columbians and 74% of Albertans agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the project.

“There is a higher level of support for the pipeline’s expansion from residents aged 55 and over in both British Columbia (60%) and Alberta (83%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Agreement with the federal government’s decision is lower among those aged 18-to-34 In each province (44% in BC, 68% in Alberta).”

In British Columbia, agreement with the pipeline expansion has dropped by four points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in December 2019

Opposition to the project fell by six points in British Columbia (from 35% to 29%) , while the proportion of undecided respondents increased from 10% last year to 18% now.

More than half of residents of each Canadian province (59% in Alberta and 54% in British Columbia) are disappointed with the way the federal government has handled the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion. These groups include 66% of Green Party voters in British Columbia and 70% of United Conservative Party voters in Alberta.

While two-in-five British Columbians (40%) want the provincial government to do anything necessary to ensure that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion does not happen, the proportion of Albertans who feel the same way about the actions of their own provincial administration stands at 22%.

Only 17% of Albertans believe the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of the province’s residents. The proportion is significantly higher in British Columbia (44%).

Two thirds of British Columbians (68%) and four-in-five Albertans (79%) believe the Trans Mountain Pipeline will create hundreds of jobs for residents of each province.

More than a third of Albertans (34%) and British Columbians (38%) believe gas prices will be lower now that the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion has been re-approved.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 29 to October 31, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia, and an online study conducted from November 2 to November 4, 2020, among 700 adults in Alberta. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia and Alberta. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points for British Columbia and +/- 3.4 percentage points for Alberta, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables for British Columbia here, our data tables for Alberta here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Majority of British Columbians Support Ride-Hailing

While 15% of residents have used the services in the province, the proportion rises to 26% among those aged 18-to-34.

Vancouver, BC [October 30, 2020] – Most residents of British Columbia are satisfied with the presence of ride-hailing services in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 72% of British Columbians support allowing ride-hailing services to operate, while 20% are opposed and 8% are undecided.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be in favour of ride-hailing in the province (78%) than those aged 35-to-54 (74%) and those aged 55 and over (65%).

On a regional basis, support for ride-hailing operations is highest in the Fraser Valley (79%), followed by Metro Vancouver (76%), Northern BC (68%), Vancouver Island (66%) and Southern BC (62%).

Three-in-four residents of the province who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (76%) and the BC Liberals (also 76%) in last month’s provincial election hold positive views on ride-hailing companies having a presence in British Columbia, along with 66% of those who cast a ballot for BC Green Party candidates.

Across the province, 15% of British Columbians have used ride-hailing services since they became available earlier this year, including 26% of those aged 18-to-34, 18% of men and 19% of Metro Vancouverites.

More than half of British Columbians who have relied on ride-hailing services in the province say they rate them more favourably than taxis on two features: overall cost (55%) and payment options (55%).

Half of the province’s residents who ride-hailed were also satisfied with the cleanliness of the vehicles (50%) and with how long they waited for the vehicle to pick them up (also 50%).

The rating is lower on three other issues. Just over two-in-five British Columbians who used ride-hailing services consider them better than taxis on accountability (44%) and transparency (41%), while slightly fewer feel the same way about the safety of passengers (39%).

“Few British Columbians aged 55 and over (4%) have actually experienced ride-hailing in the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However. they are more likely to be satisfied than their younger counterparts on issues such as price (72%) and wait times (73%).”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 22 to October 25, 2020, among 832 adult British Columbians who voted in the 2020 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbia Voters Satisfied with NDP and Green Campaigns

A majority of voters in the province say they would have been “very upset” if the BC Liberals had formed the government again.

Vancouver, BC [October 30, 2020] – A majority of British Columbians who cast ballots in this year’s provincial election commend the campaigns of two contending political parties, a new Research Co. “exit poll” has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbian voters, 59% describe the campaign of the governing BC New Democratic Party (NDP) as “positive”, while 28% brand it as “negative”.

Just over half of voters (53%) believe the campaign of the BC Green Party was “positive”, while 25% deem it “negative.”

The results are different for the BC Liberals. While two-in-five voters (41%) think the BC Liberal campaign was “positive”, 46% describe it as “negative.”

More than half of British Columbian voters (55%) say they would have been “very upset” if the BC Liberals had formed the government again. Majorities of voters in Vancouver Island (65%), the Fraser Valley (59%) and Metro Vancouver (55%) feel this way, along with 45% of voters in Southern BC and 38% of those in Northern BC.

About two-in-five British Columbian voters (39%) say they would have supported the BC Liberals in the most recent election if Dianne Watts had been their leader—a proportion that rises to 42% among women, 44% among voters aged 18-to-34 and 43% in both Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley.

Across British Columbia, 38% of voters think the BC NDP and the BC Green Party should consider a formal merger into a single provincial political party. This idea is more popular among those aged 18-to-34 (48%) and those who voted for the BC NDP this year (46%) but is only supported by 30% of BC Green voters and 19% of those who reside in Vancouver Island.

The notion of a merger between the BC Liberals and the BC Conservative Party is supported by 34% of voters—but climbs to 62% among those who cast a ballot for BC Liberal candidates this month.

A comparison of voting behaviour shows that 42% of BC NDP voters in 2020 cast a ballot for the federal NDP in the 2019 federal contest. 

“Liberal Party voters at the federal level were almost evenly split between the BC Liberals (31%) and the BC NDP (25%) at the provincial level,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, three-in-five Conservative Party voters in the last federal election (60%) were BC Liberal voters in 2020.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 22 to October 25, 2020, among 832 adult British Columbians who voted in the 2020 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by James Wheeler

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca