More Than Half of British Columbians Have Boycotted a Company

Half of “boycotters” say they disagreed with how an organization or establishment pays or treats its employees.

Vancouver, BC [September 11, 2019] – A majority of British Columbians admit to having voluntarily abstained from using, buying or dealing with an organization of establishment, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 55% of British Columbians say that, over the course of their lives, they have boycotted an organization or establishment.

Women (58%), British Columbians aged 55 and over (59%) and Vancouver Islanders (62%) are more likely to say that they have boycotted a company.

Half of British Columbians who have actively participated in a boycott (50%) point to disagreements with how employees of a specific organization of establishment were paid or treated.

Other reasons cited for boycotts include disagreements over environmental practices (43%), disagreements over the ownership of an organization or establishment (37%) and disagreements with animal welfare practices (33%).

“Women in British Columbia are significantly more likely to have boycotted a company for labour (56%) or animal welfare reasons (42%) than men (44% and 23% respectively),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Boycotts originating from a disagreement with ownership are more common in Metro Vancouver (41%).”

More than two-in-five British Columbians (43%) say they research the environmental practices of companies before purchasing a product or service “all the time” or “some of the time”. 

Slightly smaller proportions of British Columbians also look into a company’s social practices (39%) and labour practices (37%) before making a purchase.

When it comes to their recent experiences as consumers, more than a third of British Columbians say they review a company’s social, environmental, labour and/or investment practices when shopping for groceries (41%), clothing or shoes (40%), household goods (39%), cleaning products (also 39%), a vehicle (38%), dinner at a restaurant (37%) and electronics (36%).

Across the seven recent consumer experiences tested, British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are significantly more likely to review a company’s practices than their older counterparts.

While only 27% of British Columbians aged 55 and over review a company’s social, environmental, labour and/or investment practices when shopping for clothing or shoes, the proportion climbs to 44% among those aged 35-to-54 and 58% among those aged 18-to-34.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views of Canadians on China and Huawei Clearly Worsen

Two thirds of respondents think Ottawa should not allow Huawei to participate in the development of Canada’s 5G mobile networks.

Vancouver, BC [July 17, 2019] – The perceptions of Canadians on China have deteriorated markedly over the past five months, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 67% of Canadians think Canada should not work to establish closer ties with China.

In December 2018, Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou was arrested in Vancouver. Meng faces charges in the United States—including bank fraud and obstruction of justice—and the U.S. has formally requested her extradition. 

After Meng’s arrest, China’s detained two Canadians—Michel Kovrig and Michael Spavor—on espionage allegations, and banned exports of Canadian canola, pork and beef.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (72%, +9 since a Research Co. poll conducted in February 2019) agree with the way Canadian authorities have acted in the Meng case.

Agreement with the way Ottawa has handled this matter is highest among women (76%), Canadians aged 55 and over (82%) and Liberal Party voters in the 2015 federal election (86%).

The federal government is currently reviewing the guidelines for the development of 5G (or “Fifth Generation”) mobile networks, which are expected to provide Canadians with larger data capacity and faster connections. 

Two thirds of Canadians (68%) think the federal government should not allow Huawei to participate in the development of Canada’s 5G mobile networks.

“In February, 57% of Canadians felt that Huawei should be barred from Canada’s 5G development,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “That proportion has increased by 11 points and now includes 81% of British Columbians and 74% of Ontarians.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from July 6 to July 9, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Support Still Strong for Automated Speed Enforcement in BC

The use of red light cameras to catch vehicles speeding at intersections is backed by two thirds of British Columbians.

Vancouver, BC [July 10, 2019] – Most British Columbians are in favour of a specific type of automated speed enforcement that will be present in some municipalities this summer, a new Research Co. poll has found. 

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, seven-in-ten residents (68%, -2 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in August 2018) approve of using speed-on-green cameras, or red light cameras that also capture vehicles that speed through intersections.

Support for the use of speed-on-green cameras is highest among women (74%) and British Columbians aged 55 and over (76%). 

“Seven-in-ten British Columbians who do not drive (72%) are in favour of relying on speed-on-green cameras,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In addition, about three-in-five residents who drive five days a week or more (66%), three or four times a week (74%) and once or twice a week (64%) are also in favour of this measure.”

Automated speed enforcement works by using cameras or sensors to pick up a vehicle speeding. A ticket is then issued to the owner of the vehicle. Driver’s license points are not issued as the driver of the vehicle cannot be identified.

Earlier this year, the provincial government announced that 35 existing red light cameras will begin capturing vehicles that are speeding through intersections this summer. The cameras are located in 14 municipalities: Abbotsford, Burnaby, Coquitlam, Delta, Kelowna, Langley, Maple Ridge, Nanaimo, North Vancouver, Pitt Meadows, Port Coquitlam, Richmond, Surrey and Vancouver.

Just over half of British Columbians (52%, -3 since August 2018) approve of point-to-point speed enforcement, which uses cameras at two or more distant points on a road. The average speed of vehicles that pass between points is calculated and tickets are issued to vehicles whose average speed over the distance was excessive.

More than three-in-five British Columbians approve of two other types of automated speed enforcement: 69% (-2 since August 2018) for fixed speed cameras, or cameras that stay in one location and measure speed as a vehicle passes, and 63% (-2 since August 2018) for mobile speed cameras, which can be moved from place to place and measure speed as a vehicle passes.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from June 22 to June 26, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Are Comfortable Online, But Some Worries Remain

Seven-in-ten have received “scam” emails, and almost two thirds are concerned about someone hacking their devices.

Vancouver, BC [June 11, 2019] – While a large proportion of Canadians have embraced the Internet for banking and shopping, there are still lingering concerns about identity theft, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 87% of Canadians say they are comfortable accessing banking information online, and 86% feel the same way about shopping for goods and services online.

Just over four-in-five Canadians (82%) say they are comfortable commenting on online forums that require their email address, and 73% are comfortable making a charitable donation online.

“As expected, younger residents are less likely to have qualms about performing specific tasks on the Internet,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However, more than a third of Canadians aged 55 and over say they are not comfortable making charitable donations online.”

Over the past couple of months, 64% of Canadians have worried about somebody hacking into their own computer or smartphone. 

More than seven-in-ten Canadians have been concerned recently about computers and technology being used to invade their privacy (71%) and having their personal information stolen over the Internet (72%).

British Columbians (79%), Women (77%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (74%) are more likely to say they have worried about having their personal information stolen online.

Across the country, 72% of Canadians say they have received an email—sometimes referred to as the “Nigerian Scam”—offering them money for assistance or help, and 62% have received a “phishing” email, where somebody tried to acquire information by masquerading as a trustworthy entity.

One-in-five Canadians (20%) say their email address has been hacked at some point, and 4% say hackers took control of their social media platform.

Two-in-five Canadians (39%) say their computer became infected with a virus while they were browsing the Internet. Men are more likely to have acquired a virus online than women (44% to 34%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 31 to June 3, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most British Columbians Want Slower Speeds on Residential Streets

Two-in-five residents say they perceive a car going over the speed limit on the street where they live “at least once a day.”

Vancouver, BC [June 7, 2019] – A sizeable proportion of British Columbians would like to see changes to municipal speed limits, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 58% of British Columbians say they would “definitely” or “probably” like to see the speed limit reduced to 30 km/h on all residential streets in their own municipality, while keeping the speed limit on arterial and collector roads at 50 km/h.

Support for the implementation of this policy is highest among women (63%), British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (62%) and residents of Vancouver Island (60%).

Earlier this year, Vancouver City Council unanimously passed a motion to establish a pilot project that will see the speed limit reduced to 30 km/h on select residential streets in the city. 

Two thirds of British Columbians (66%) believe the City of Vancouver’s pilot project is a “very good” or “good idea”, while 22% consider it “bad” or “very bad.”

“While many British Columbians are in favour of the City of Vancouver’s pilot project, there are some differences related to political allegiance,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) and the BC Green Party in the last provincial election are more supportive of the project (74% and 72% respectively) than those who voted for the BC Liberals in 2017 (60%).”

More than two-in-five British Columbians (42%) say they see a car that they perceive is circulating above the current speed limit on the street where they reside “at least once a day”, while only 16% say this “never” happens.

Residents of the Fraser Valley (54%), Northern BC (50%) and Southern BC (48%) are significantly more likely to perceive speeding vehicles on their street “at least once a day” than those who live in Vancouver Island (40%) and Metro Vancouver (39%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 26 to May 28, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Drivers in British Columbia Are Considering Electric Vehicles

Seven-in-ten residents agree with the goal of making all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province “zero emission” by 2040.

Vancouver, BC [May 31, 2019] – A significant proportion of car drivers in British Columbia would consider acquiring a “zero emission” vehicle in the future, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 51% of British Columbians who drive their own vehicles say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that the next vehicle they acquire for themselves or their household will be electric.

Majorities of drivers in Metro Vancouver (55%) and Vancouver Island (52%) are likely to consider a “zero emission” vehicle as their next purchase. The proportion is lower in the Fraser Valley (43%), Southern BC (40%) and Northern BC (37%)

When asked about specific issues that might make them less likely to purchase an electric vehicle, 24% of drivers say that they are too expensive when compared to non-electric vehicles, 24% fear becoming stranded if they cannot find a charging station, and 23% say they do not have enough places to charge the vehicle in the areas where they usually drive.

“There are some significant regional differences when the concerns of potential electric vehicle owners are analyzed,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than a third of drivers who reside in Southern BC (35%) and Northern BC (45%) claim they lack places to charge electric vehicles, compared to just 20% among those who live in Metro Vancouver.”

Earlier this year, the Government of British Columbia passed legislation to ensure that, by the year 2040, all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province will be “zero emission.” Seven-in-ten residents (70%) agree with this decision, while 21% disagree and 10% are undecided.

Almost half of British Columbians (49%) believe the goal established by the provincial government on “zero emission” vehicles is “achievable”, while 42% think it is “not achievable.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 20 to May 22, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Radio Still the Top Source Among Canadian Music Listeners

Half of Canadians think that, in this day and age, music creators are being fairly compensated for their work.

Vancouver, BC [March 21, 2019] – A sizeable majority of Canadians are relying on their radios for music, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 69% of Canadians say they listened to music on a regular radio over the past week.

One third of Canadians (32%) report listening to music on streaming services over the past week, while a similar proportion (31%) listened to music files stored in a device, such as a computer or phone.

One-in-five Canadians (21%) listened to LP records, cassettes or CDs in the past week, while 15% listened to music on satellite radio.

Across the country, 19% of Canadians say they paid to access a music streaming service in the last month, including 36% of those aged 18-to-34. 

Smaller proportions of Canadians paid for and downloaded a song online (12%) or bought a compact disc or LP record (9%).

On a regional basis, Atlantic Canadians are the undisputed leaders when it comes to paying to access music streaming services (35%), followed by residents of Alberta (25%), Ontario (19%), British Columbia (17%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (15%) and Quebec (11%).

“While radio is the top choice for music listeners of all ages in Canada, Millennials are definitely more likely to be embracing streaming services than their older counterparts,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The country’s youngest adults are also more likely to already be spending money on streaming services or downloaded songs.”

When asked if they think that, in this day and age, music creators are being fairly compensated for their work, half of Canadians (51%) believe that they “definitely” or “probably” are, while one third (33%) assert that they are not.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 21 to February 24, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Canadians Would Welcome Biometrics to Make Purchases

Only 8% believe the technology will be available sometime in the next 10 years.

Vancouver, BC [February 21, 2019] – A significant proportion of Canadians would be comfortable with the use of biometrics (such as fingerprints, palm recognition or iris scans) to pay for things, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians say they “definitely” or “probably” would like to see people relying on biometrics to make purchases, while two-in-five (40%) would not and 11% are not sure.

“Canadian Men (57%) and Millennials (54%) are definitely more likely to endorse biometrics at this stage,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There is also a higher craving for this type of technology from Quebecers (66%) and Albertans (55%).”

However, two-in-five Canadians (40%) say they do not expect biometric payments to materialize in the next 20 years, and 15% foresee that they will never be available.

When asked about the way they currently pay for things, Canadians rely on a combination of sources. One third of payments (34%) involve a debit card, followed by cash (31%) and credit cards (24%).

Across the country, 8% of all transactions are conducted through a smartphone—a proportion that climbs to 18% among Canadians aged 18-to-34—and 3% are done with a cheque.

Residents of Atlantic Canada (39%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (37%) and Alberta (also 37%) rely more heavily on debit cards than those in other parts of the country.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) report that there was a time in the past month when they did not have any actual money (coins or bills) on them and had to use their credit card, debit card or smartphone to make a purchase of less than $10.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 2 to February 5, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Would Exclude Huawei from Future 5G Networks

A majority agrees with the way Canadian authorities have acted in the Meng Wanzhou case.

Vancouver, BC [February 12, 2019] – Many Canadians are concerned about the possible involvement of Chinese telecommunications firm Huawei in the development of the country’s 5G (or “Fifth Generation”) mobile networks, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 57% of Canadians think the federal government should not allow Huawei to participate in 5G.

On a regional basis, British Columbia has the highest level of rejection for Huawei’s involvement in 5G (73%), followed by Ontario (62%) and Alberta (57%).

The federal government is currently reviewing the guidelines for the development of 5G mobile networks, which are expected to provide Canadians with larger data capacity and faster connections.

In December, Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou was arrested in Vancouver. Meng faces charges in the United States—including bank fraud and obstruction of justice—and the U.S. has formally requested her extradition. 

Across Canada, 43% of respondents say they have been following media stories related to Meng’s arrest “very closely” or “moderately closely.”

More than three-in-five Canadians (63%) say they agree with the way Canadian authorities have acted in this case, while 25% disagree and 12% are undecided.

Support for Canada’s actions is highest among women (67%), residents aged 55 and over (73%) and Liberal Party voters in the 2015 federal election (76%).

“Most Canadians approve of the decisions that the federal government has taken on this file,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Most are also wary of enabling Huawei to play a role in Canada’s future telecommunications networks.”

More than half of Canadians (57%) think Canada should not work to establish closer ties with China—a proportion that includes majorities of those who voted for the Conservative Party (62%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (55%) in the last federal ballot.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 2 to February 5, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Raysonho

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Website Visits Crucial for British Columbians Who Dine Out

Almost two-in-five left a gratuity of more than 20% at a restaurant, while one-in-five walked out without leaving a tip.

Vancouver, BC [January 10, 2019] – Many British Columbians are venturing on the web to decide where to have their next meal outside the home, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 47% of British Columbians say they visited a restaurant’s website before making a reservation over the past year—including 62% of those who reside in the Lower Mainland.

Across the province, 48% of residents say they dine out about once a month or less. Conversely, 13% say they dine out a couple of times a week or more—a proportion that reaches 18% among those aged 18-to-34.

One-in-five British Columbians (19%) took a photograph of a dish that was served to them or someone at their table when dining out. Residents aged 18-to-34 are decidedly more likely to have pointed their cameras at food inside a restaurant (33%) than those aged 35-to-54 (18%) and those aged 55 and over (7%).

Millennials are also more likely to report waiting or standing in line for more than hour to enter a restaurant (12%, compared to the provincial average of 7%).

For the most part, the experiences of British Columbians who dine out have been positive over the past year. Almost two-in-five (38%) say they left a restaurant after tipping more than 20%, while only one-in-five (21%) admit to exiting a restaurant without tipping.

More than a third of British Columbians (35%) complimented good service to a restaurant manager over the past year—including 43% of those aged 55 and over—and only 15% actively complained about bad service.

One-in-four British Columbians (25%) say they sent a bad dish to the kitchen while dining out, and 28% affirm they were served hot food that was too cold.

More than half of British Columbians (52%) say they would go back to a restaurant where the food is great, but too expensive—including 70% of those aged 18-to-34.

Fewer British Columbians would revisit a restaurant where the food is great, but the service is terrible (36%) or a restaurant where the food is cheap, but not great (24%). Only one-in-twenty residents (5%) would go back to a restaurant where the service is great, but the food is terrible.

“There is an interesting gender gap when it comes to revisiting cheap restaurants that are not remarkable,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Men in British Columbia (29%) are more likely to have no qualms about this than women (18%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 2 to January 4, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Almost One-in-Five Canadians Say Global Warming is a Theory

Half of Canadians say the federal government is paying “the right amount” of attention to the environment. 

Vancouver, BC [January 4, 2019] – A large majority of Canadians believe in human-made climate change, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-five Canadians (60%) think global warming (or climate change) is a fact and is mostly caused by emissions from vehicles and industrial facilities.

An additional 15% of Canadians think global warming is a fact and is mostly caused by natural changes.

Almost one-in-five respondents (18%) refer to global warming as a theory that has not yet been proven—a proportion that includes 22% of Canadians aged 55 and over and 36% of those who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2015 federal election.

Across the country, two thirds of Canadians (66%) say it is more important to them to protect the environment, even at the risk of hampering economic growth.

A significantly smaller proportion of respondents (22%) say they would prefer to foster economic growth, even at the risk of damaging the environment.

“Political allegiance plays a big role in the struggle between environmental stewardship and economic development,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While more than three-in-five Canadians who voted for the Liberals or the New Democrats in 2015 believe environmental protection is paramount, the proportion falls to 47% among Conservative voters.”

Half of Canadians (50%) think the current federal government is paying the right amount of attention to the environment, including 59% of Liberal voters.

Conversely, 31% of Canadians believe Ottawa is not paying enough attention to the environment, including 40% of New Democrat voters in 2015.

About one-in-six Canadians (14%) think the federal government is paying too much attention to the environment, including 43% of Conservative voters.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 17 to December 20, 2018, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two-in-Five Canadians Say Their Home Heating Use Has Increased

Three-in-ten Canadians in a relationship say they change the temperature at home without telling their partner. 

Vancouver, BC [December 6, 2018] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians are relying more heavily on home heating this year, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, two-in-five Canadians (41%) say their energy and heating use at home has increased over the past few weeks—a proportion that reaches 46% in Atlantic Canada, and 43% in both Ontario and British Columbia.

Across the country, 9% of Canadians say they typically set their home heating at 18C or lower. Most residents select 19C or 20C (38%) and 21C or 22C (40%), while 6% set the thermostat at 23C or higher.

Respondents to this survey who are married or living with a significant other were asked who is in charge of setting the temperature at home. Two-in-five (40%) say they are solely responsible, while 18% say their spouse or partner takes care of this task, and 30% affirm that the decision is taken by both equally.

Women are more likely to say that the home thermostat is a joint responsibility (34%, compared to 25% for men), while men are more likely to say they are solely responsible for home heating settings at home (43%, compared to 38% for women).

Three-in-ten Canadians in a relationship (30%) admit that they change the temperature at home without telling their spouse or significant other “all of the time” (8%) or “most of the time” (22%), while just 19% say they have “never” done this.

“Women (35%) are more likely to acknowledge that they adjust the thermostat without telling their spouse or partner than men (25%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “On a regional basis, Quebecers are more likely to say they would never change the settings without consulting first (35%), while British Columbians (8%) are the least likely to do so.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 26 to November 29, 2018, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Metro Vancouverites Ponder Regulations for Ride-Hailing

Most residents support having a cap on the number of drivers, as well as a Class 4 license requirement.

Vancouver, BC [November 26, 2018] – Most residents of Metro Vancouver believe people who want to operate a ride-hailing service should hold a driver’s license that requires more training, a medical exam and security checks, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 57% say they are in favour of only allowing drivers with a commercial (or Class 4) license to operate a ride-hailing service.

Conversely, three-in-ten respondents (30%) would allow drivers with a standard (or Class 5) license to operate a ride-hailing service.

Two thirds of Metro Vancouverites (66%) want the provincial government to cap the number of ride-hailing drivers to reduce traffic congestion.

In contrast, one-in-four (23%) think the provincial government should have no restrictions on the number of ride-hailing drivers, even if this creates traffic congestion.

Earlier this month, the Government of British Columbia announced that ride-hailing services will be allowed to operate in the province by the Fall of 2019.

Almost half of Metro Vancouverites (49%) believe this is a reasonable timeline, because it takes time to review the effect of ride-hailing on existing transportation options.

Two-in-five Metro Vancouverites (42%) believe this is not a reasonable timeline and think ride-hailing should be allowed in the province earlier than the Fall of 2019.

“Women (55%), residents aged 55+ (53%) and voters who supported the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the last election (59%) are more likely to think the government’s ride-hailing timeline is reasonable,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Men (47%), residents aged 18-to-34 (also 47%) and voters who supported the BC Liberals in the last election (52%) are more likely to say the timeline is not reasonable”.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 25, 2018, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Wpcpey

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Canadians Would Not Date Someone Who Vapes

Most residents agree with the government’s decision to prohibit the sale of vaping products to minors and ban certain flavours.

Vancouver, BC [November 21, 2018] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians appear to be put off by users of electronic cigarettes, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 50% of Canadians say they would not consider dating a person who used e-cigarettes.

The areas where most residents say they would not date vapers are British Columbia (60%) and Ontario (52%).

Across the country, 11% of Canadians say they have used an electronic cigarette in the past year—a proportion that rises to 19% among those aged 18-to-34, 15% in Atlantic Canada and 13% in Alberta.

Majorities of Canadians agree with a series of policies to address vaping that were implemented by the federal government as part of Bill S-5, including prohibiting the sale of vaping products to minors (88%), restricting any reference to e-cigarettes as healthier than standard tobacco products (73%), restricting the use of testimonials and “lifestyle” advertising for vaping products (71%) and banning certain flavours of vaping products, such as “confectionery” (62%).

In addition, three-in-four Canadians (76%) believe there should be a ban on the use of e-cigarettes in public places where smoking is currently prohibited, and 91% want vaping products that contain nicotine to display a warning, similar to the one used for tobacco products.

“While vaping has been around for a few years, it has not become a pervasive ritual in Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Most Canadians are comfortable with vapers getting the same treatment that is afforded to smokers.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 27 to August 30, 2018, among 1,001 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

One-in-Six British Columbians Rely Solely on “Doctor Internet”

Women are more likely than men to search online for information on nutrition, exercise or weight control.

Vancouver, BC [September 5, 2018] – Many British Columbians are going online to seek information about health, but one-in-six are doing so without the added benefit of a visit to the doctor, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, 16% of residents acknowledge they went online to diagnose or treat a medical condition on their own, without consulting a doctor, over the past year.

Two thirds of British Columbians (68%) have searched online for information about a particular illness or condition over the past year.

There are some differences among specific demographic groups on what exactly residents are looking for online.

While 41% of British Columbians have sought information about prescription drugs online over the past year, the proportion climbs to 49% among those aged 55 and over.

More than half of women in British Columbia (54%) have searched online for information about nutrition, exercise and weight control, compared to just 41% of men in the province.

Across British Columbia, 23% of residents have sought information about mental health online, including 32% of those aged 18-to-34.

Millennials are also more likely to have searched online for information about sexual health (33%, compared to the provincial average of 18%).

More than a third of British Columbians (35%) have gone online to gather information before and after visiting their doctor,

“There is a generational gap when it comes to British Columbians who combine information from the Internet with a trip to the general practitioner,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Millennials are more likely to conduct research before they see their doctor, while Baby Boomers are more likely to go online after their visit.”

One-in-five British Columbians (22%) have sought information online about alternative or experimental treatments or medicines over the past year, including 35% in Northern BC.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 13 to August 14, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca