Radio Still the Top Source Among Canadian Music Listeners

Half of Canadians think that, in this day and age, music creators are being fairly compensated for their work.

Vancouver, BC [March 21, 2019] – A sizeable majority of Canadians are relying on their radios for music, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 69% of Canadians say they listened to music on a regular radio over the past week.

One third of Canadians (32%) report listening to music on streaming services over the past week, while a similar proportion (31%) listened to music files stored in a device, such as a computer or phone.

One-in-five Canadians (21%) listened to LP records, cassettes or CDs in the past week, while 15% listened to music on satellite radio.

Across the country, 19% of Canadians say they paid to access a music streaming service in the last month, including 36% of those aged 18-to-34. 

Smaller proportions of Canadians paid for and downloaded a song online (12%) or bought a compact disc or LP record (9%).

On a regional basis, Atlantic Canadians are the undisputed leaders when it comes to paying to access music streaming services (35%), followed by residents of Alberta (25%), Ontario (19%), British Columbia (17%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (15%) and Quebec (11%).

“While radio is the top choice for music listeners of all ages in Canada, Millennials are definitely more likely to be embracing streaming services than their older counterparts,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The country’s youngest adults are also more likely to already be spending money on streaming services or downloaded songs.”

When asked if they think that, in this day and age, music creators are being fairly compensated for their work, half of Canadians (51%) believe that they “definitely” or “probably” are, while one third (33%) assert that they are not.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 21 to February 24, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Canadians Would Welcome Biometrics to Make Purchases

Only 8% believe the technology will be available sometime in the next 10 years.

Vancouver, BC [February 21, 2019] – A significant proportion of Canadians would be comfortable with the use of biometrics (such as fingerprints, palm recognition or iris scans) to pay for things, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians say they “definitely” or “probably” would like to see people relying on biometrics to make purchases, while two-in-five (40%) would not and 11% are not sure.

“Canadian Men (57%) and Millennials (54%) are definitely more likely to endorse biometrics at this stage,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There is also a higher craving for this type of technology from Quebecers (66%) and Albertans (55%).”

However, two-in-five Canadians (40%) say they do not expect biometric payments to materialize in the next 20 years, and 15% foresee that they will never be available.

When asked about the way they currently pay for things, Canadians rely on a combination of sources. One third of payments (34%) involve a debit card, followed by cash (31%) and credit cards (24%).

Across the country, 8% of all transactions are conducted through a smartphone—a proportion that climbs to 18% among Canadians aged 18-to-34—and 3% are done with a cheque.

Residents of Atlantic Canada (39%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (37%) and Alberta (also 37%) rely more heavily on debit cards than those in other parts of the country.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) report that there was a time in the past month when they did not have any actual money (coins or bills) on them and had to use their credit card, debit card or smartphone to make a purchase of less than $10.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 2 to February 5, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Would Exclude Huawei from Future 5G Networks

A majority agrees with the way Canadian authorities have acted in the Meng Wanzhou case.

Vancouver, BC [February 12, 2019] – Many Canadians are concerned about the possible involvement of Chinese telecommunications firm Huawei in the development of the country’s 5G (or “Fifth Generation”) mobile networks, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 57% of Canadians think the federal government should not allow Huawei to participate in 5G.

On a regional basis, British Columbia has the highest level of rejection for Huawei’s involvement in 5G (73%), followed by Ontario (62%) and Alberta (57%).

The federal government is currently reviewing the guidelines for the development of 5G mobile networks, which are expected to provide Canadians with larger data capacity and faster connections.

In December, Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou was arrested in Vancouver. Meng faces charges in the United States—including bank fraud and obstruction of justice—and the U.S. has formally requested her extradition. 

Across Canada, 43% of respondents say they have been following media stories related to Meng’s arrest “very closely” or “moderately closely.”

More than three-in-five Canadians (63%) say they agree with the way Canadian authorities have acted in this case, while 25% disagree and 12% are undecided.

Support for Canada’s actions is highest among women (67%), residents aged 55 and over (73%) and Liberal Party voters in the 2015 federal election (76%).

“Most Canadians approve of the decisions that the federal government has taken on this file,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Most are also wary of enabling Huawei to play a role in Canada’s future telecommunications networks.”

More than half of Canadians (57%) think Canada should not work to establish closer ties with China—a proportion that includes majorities of those who voted for the Conservative Party (62%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (55%) in the last federal ballot.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 2 to February 5, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Raysonho

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Website Visits Crucial for British Columbians Who Dine Out

Almost two-in-five left a gratuity of more than 20% at a restaurant, while one-in-five walked out without leaving a tip.

Vancouver, BC [January 10, 2019] – Many British Columbians are venturing on the web to decide where to have their next meal outside the home, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 47% of British Columbians say they visited a restaurant’s website before making a reservation over the past year—including 62% of those who reside in the Lower Mainland.

Across the province, 48% of residents say they dine out about once a month or less. Conversely, 13% say they dine out a couple of times a week or more—a proportion that reaches 18% among those aged 18-to-34.

One-in-five British Columbians (19%) took a photograph of a dish that was served to them or someone at their table when dining out. Residents aged 18-to-34 are decidedly more likely to have pointed their cameras at food inside a restaurant (33%) than those aged 35-to-54 (18%) and those aged 55 and over (7%).

Millennials are also more likely to report waiting or standing in line for more than hour to enter a restaurant (12%, compared to the provincial average of 7%).

For the most part, the experiences of British Columbians who dine out have been positive over the past year. Almost two-in-five (38%) say they left a restaurant after tipping more than 20%, while only one-in-five (21%) admit to exiting a restaurant without tipping.

More than a third of British Columbians (35%) complimented good service to a restaurant manager over the past year—including 43% of those aged 55 and over—and only 15% actively complained about bad service.

One-in-four British Columbians (25%) say they sent a bad dish to the kitchen while dining out, and 28% affirm they were served hot food that was too cold.

More than half of British Columbians (52%) say they would go back to a restaurant where the food is great, but too expensive—including 70% of those aged 18-to-34.

Fewer British Columbians would revisit a restaurant where the food is great, but the service is terrible (36%) or a restaurant where the food is cheap, but not great (24%). Only one-in-twenty residents (5%) would go back to a restaurant where the service is great, but the food is terrible.

“There is an interesting gender gap when it comes to revisiting cheap restaurants that are not remarkable,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Men in British Columbia (29%) are more likely to have no qualms about this than women (18%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 2 to January 4, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Almost One-in-Five Canadians Say Global Warming is a Theory

Half of Canadians say the federal government is paying “the right amount” of attention to the environment. 

Vancouver, BC [January 4, 2019] – A large majority of Canadians believe in human-made climate change, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-five Canadians (60%) think global warming (or climate change) is a fact and is mostly caused by emissions from vehicles and industrial facilities.

An additional 15% of Canadians think global warming is a fact and is mostly caused by natural changes.

Almost one-in-five respondents (18%) refer to global warming as a theory that has not yet been proven—a proportion that includes 22% of Canadians aged 55 and over and 36% of those who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2015 federal election.

Across the country, two thirds of Canadians (66%) say it is more important to them to protect the environment, even at the risk of hampering economic growth.

A significantly smaller proportion of respondents (22%) say they would prefer to foster economic growth, even at the risk of damaging the environment.

“Political allegiance plays a big role in the struggle between environmental stewardship and economic development,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While more than three-in-five Canadians who voted for the Liberals or the New Democrats in 2015 believe environmental protection is paramount, the proportion falls to 47% among Conservative voters.”

Half of Canadians (50%) think the current federal government is paying the right amount of attention to the environment, including 59% of Liberal voters.

Conversely, 31% of Canadians believe Ottawa is not paying enough attention to the environment, including 40% of New Democrat voters in 2015.

About one-in-six Canadians (14%) think the federal government is paying too much attention to the environment, including 43% of Conservative voters.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 17 to December 20, 2018, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca