Most Canadians Foresee “Back to Normal” by Mid-August or Later

More than seven-in-ten (73%) would take a vaccine against COVID-19 if it ultimately becomes available.

Vancouver, BC [April 21, 2020] – A majority of Canadians are not anticipating a return to the routines they had before the COVID-19 outbreak in the early weeks of the summer, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 54% of Canadians expect things in their city or town to go back to the way they were before the outbreak three months from now (16%) or four months from now or longer (38%).  

Only 18% of Canadians expect a return to normal life within the next month (6%) or a month from now (12%), while 31% believe their daily routines will come back two months from now (15%) or three months from now (16%).  

“Across the country, residents of Quebec (55%) and Ontario (54%) are more hopeful of a return to normalcy early in the summer,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents of Atlantic Canada and the western provinces are decidedly more skeptical.”  

More than seven-in-ten Canadians (73%) say they would “definitely” or “probably” take a vaccine against COVID-19 if it ultimately becomes available—including 78% of men, 76% of those aged 18-to-34 and 79% of those in Atlantic Canada.  

When asked about their personal experience during the COVID-19 outbreak, almost half of Canadians (47%) say they are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection and two-in-five (40%) say they are not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection.  

About one-in-seven Canadians (14%) acknowledge wearing a mask every time they go out, including 19% of residents of Ontario and British Columbia and 22% of those aged 18-to-34.  

Three-in-ten Canadians (29%) admit to overeating at home, while smaller proportions acknowledge losing their temper more than usual (18%) and drinking more alcohol (13%).  

Practically two thirds of Canadians (65%) expect most people to maintain their current precautions on hygiene after the COVID-19 outbreak ends. The same proportion (65%) foresee most companies keeping their current hygiene precautions as well.  

One-in-five Canadians (21%) expect more people to consider adopting vegetarian or vegan diets after the COVID-19 outbreak ends—a proportion that rises to 26% in British Columbia.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 13 to April 15, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 
Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.
 
For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

COVID-19 Fosters Interest in National and Local News in Canada

More than two-in-five Canadians have received or seen messages featuring unproven claims about COVID-19.

Vancouver, BC [April 10, 2020] – Most Canadians are paying attention to accurately sourced news related to the COVID-19 outbreak, but more than two-in-five have been exposed to messages featuring unverified assertions about the virus, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than three-in-five Canadians have sought information on the COVID-19 outbreak through national news outlets (69%), briefings and press conferences by the Prime Minister (67%) and local news outlets (62%).  

Almost three-in-five Canadians (59%) have watched briefings and press conferences by their Premier, provincial ministers and health authorities, while fewer have visited the Health Canada website (46%) and provincial government health websites (40%).  

Practically four-in-five Canadians aged 55 and over (79%) have watched the prime minister’s briefings and press conferences, compared to 67% among Canadians aged 35-to-54 and 60% among Canadians aged 18-to-34.  

“There is a noticeable gender gap when it comes to seeking information about COVID-19 online,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than half of Canadian women (53%) have visited the Health Canada website, compared to only 44% of men.”  

Almost two thirds of residents of Atlantic Canada (65%) and Quebec (also 65%) have watched the press briefings from provincial public servants, compared to 58% in both Ontario and British Columbia, 53% in Alberta and 50% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.  

Across the country, 56% of Canadians did not recall receiving or seeing any of five messages—by email, text, WhatsApp or in social media—featuring unproven claims about COVID-19.  

More than one-in-four Canadians were exposed to messages claiming that COVID-19 is an artificially created biological weapon (27%) and that COVID-19 was created in a laboratory (26%).  

Smaller proportions of Canadians recalled claims about COVID-19 originating in the United States (14%) and that getting more sunlight can protect against the virus (10%).  

More than four-in-five Canadians who saw the message related to COVID-19’s hypothetical creation in a laboratory believe it is “definitely” or “probably” true (43%). Similar proportions feel the same way about sunlight providing protection against the virus (39%) and the virus being an artificially created biological weapon (38%).  

Fewer Canadians who recalled an assertion about COVID-19’s supposed American origin find the claim believable (28%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 30 to April 1, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Miss Family, Friends and Travel Most During COVID-19

More than three-in-five Canadians are paying attention to the news more often than they did before the outbreak.

Vancouver, BC [April 3, 2020] – As Canadians remain mostly confined to their homes on account of the COVID-19 outbreak, more than two-in-five are finding it challenging to relinquish personal contact with family and friends, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 45% of Canadians say it has been hard to give up seeing family members in person during the outbreak.  

A similar proportion of Canadians (44%) say it has been difficult to give up seeing friends in person, while 41% find it hard to not be able to travel.  

“Albertans are more likely to say that being away from family members during the COVID-19 outbreak has been difficult (49%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than half of British Columbians (53%) feel the same way about being away from friends.”  

More than a third of Canadians say it has been hard to abandon dining out in restaurants (38%) and being able to attend entertainment events, such as concerts, plays or movies (36%).  

A smaller proportion of Canadians (32%) say it has been difficult to be without live sports—a proportion that rises to 41% among Canadian men.  

Just over half of Canadians with children aged 14 or younger  (51%) say it has been easy having their kids at home all day on account of the COVID-19 outbreak, while 44% say the experience has been difficult.  

When asked about specific activities, more than three-in-five Canadians (61%) say they are following the news—either reading, listening to or watching—more often than they did a few weeks ago.  

More than a third of Canadians say they are participating more regularly in entertainment activities that involve electronics (such as tablets, smartphones or video game consoles) (41%), streaming content online (such as movies or television shows) (40%) and communicating with relatives (36%).  

Slightly smaller proportions of Canadians are exercising at home (30%), reading books (27%), participating in entertainment activities that do not involve electronics (such as board games or puzzles) (20%), ordering food in (14%) and exercising outside their home (10%) more often than before.  

One-in-four Canadians who profess a religion (25%) say they are praying more regularly now than they did before, including 29% of women and 36% of those aged 18-to-34.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 21 to March 22, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Food Delivery Options Altering Dining Habits in British Columbia

A third of British Columbians—including 44% of those aged 18-to-34—have ordered food delivery using an app on their phone.

Vancouver, BC [February 28, 2020] – Some British Columbians are relying more often on food delivery at home, a trend that is more prevalent among Millennials, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, three-in-ten British Columbians (30%) say they are ordering food delivery to their homes more often than five years ago.

In addition, 45% of British Columbians report no change from their food ordering habits since 2015, while 22% are partaking in this behaviour less often than five years ago.

“Age is the key differentiator when it comes to the reliance of British Columbians on food delivery,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 9% of those aged 55 and over and 26% of those aged 35-to-54 are ordering in more often than five years ago, the proportion increases to 45% among British Columbians aged 18-to-34.”

Across the province, 43% of British Columbians said they had food delivered to their home after placing a phone call to a specific restaurant over the past year, while more than a third (36%) ordered online through the website of a restaurant or chain.

One third of British Columbians (32%) relied on a food delivery app on their phone, such as DoorDash, GrubHub, Uber Eats, Foodora or Skip The Dishes. This particular way or ordering food currently finds more acceptance in Metro Vancouver (34%) than in other regions of the province.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are significantly more likely to have ordered food through an app in the past year(44%) than those aged 35-to-54 (30%) and those aged 55 and over (13%).

Just over one-in-five British Columbians (22%) order food that is delivered to their home “about once a week or more”, while one-in-five (25%) order food that they pick up themselves from a restaurant at the same rate.

A slightly larger proportion of British Columbians (28%) dine out at a restaurant “about once a week or more”, including 36% of those in the Fraser Valley.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 11 to February 14, 2020, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full dataset here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Are Watching More Recorded TV Than Live TV

More than four-in-five cable subscribers say there are many channels in their current plan that they never watch.

Vancouver, BC [February 7, 2019] – Canadians who watch television are spending more time enjoying programming that has been digitally recorded than watching shows the moment they air, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample asked Canadians to describe how they watch television.

About a third of the time spent by Canadians who watch television (32%) is done through a digital recording device, while 25% of the time is spent watching live television and 23% is spent streaming on online sites, such as Netflix, CraveTV or Disney Plus.

“Women are significantly more likely to watch recorded content (37% of their time) and to stream (28% of their time) than men,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, men are more likely to be watching live programming than women (34% of their time).”

Streaming is decidedly more popular among Canadians aged 18-to-34 (35% of their time) than among those aged 35-to-54 (24% of the time) and those aged 55 and over (11% of the time).

When it comes to cable television, three-in-four Canadian subscribers (75%) say they watch Canadian networks “daily or a few times a week”. 

Majorities of Canadian cable subscribers also watch news channels (63%), American networks (61%) and sports channels (53%) “daily or a few times a week”, while fewer watch lifestyle channels (47%), specialty channels (41%) and movie channels (34%) at the same rate.

While 15% of Canadian cable subscribers have a large package with many premium channels, 40% describe their deal as mid-sized, with some premium channels. Equal proportions of cable subscribers have a small package, but not the cheapest (21%) or the cheapest available (also 21%).

More than four-in-five Canadian cable subscribers (83%) say there are many channels included in their current plan that they never watch, and three-in-four (75%) believe they pay too much money for cable television.

Across the country, 59% of Canadian cable subscribers claim to be disappointed with the variety of programming they are getting from their plan—a proportion that grows to 64% in both Atlantic Canada and British Columbia.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 23 to January 26, 2020, among 895 adults in Canada who watch television at home. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.3 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Remain Opposed to Huawei in 5G Networks

Two thirds of respondents think Canada should not work to establish closer ties with China.

Vancouver, BC [January 31, 2019] – A sizeable majority of Canadians continue to believe that a telecommunications company from the People’s Republic of China should be excluded from the 5G spectrum, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The federal government is currently reviewing the guidelines for the development of 5G (or “Fifth Generation”) mobile networks, which are expected to provide Canadians with larger data capacity and faster connections. 

In the online survey of a representative national sample, two thirds of Canadians (66%) think the federal government should not allow Huawei to participate in Canada’s 5G mobile networks.

The level of rejection for Huawei’s presence in the 5G spectrum is similar to what was observed by Research Co. in July 2019 (68%), and remains higher than what was first reported in February 2019 (57%).

Canadians aged 55 and over (72%) and British Columbians (81%) are the groups that are voicing the highest opposition to Huawei’s participation in the 5G spectrum.

A series of extradition hearings for Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou were held in the BC Supreme Court earlier this month. Meng was arrested in December 2018 and faces charges in the United States, including bank fraud and obstruction of justice. 

Two thirds of Canadians (67%, -5 since July 2019) agree with the way Canadian authorities have acted in this case.

“More than four-in-five Liberal Party voters in last year’s election (83%) endorse the performance of the federal government on the Meng case,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Smaller majorities of federal New Democratic Party (NDP) voters (68%) and Conservative Party voters (53%) concur.”

Following Meng’s arrest, China’s detained two Canadians—Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor—on espionage allegations, and banned exports of Canadian canola, pork and beef.

When asked if Canada should work to establish closer ties with China, one-in-five Canadians (19%, +1 since July 2019) believe that it should, while a majority (67%, -1) think it should not.

In a Research Co. survey conducted in December 2019, 27% of Canadians expressed a positive opinion of China, while 61% had negative views. 

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 23  to January 26, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Unhappy with Their Mobile Phone Plan Prices

Most residents are skeptical about the promises of lower wireless costs issued by the federal and provincial governments.

Vancouver, BC [December 25, 2019] – Most residents of British Columbia are dissatisfied with how much they are paying for wireless communications, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, seven-in-ten mobile phone users (70%) describe the cost of their plan as “very expensive” or “moderately expensive.”

Mobile phone users aged 35-to-54 (77%) and those who reside in the Fraser Valley (74%) are more likely to believe that they currently pay too much for wireless services.

A monthly plan for a mobile phone in Canada with two gigabytes of data costs about $75. More than three-in-five British Columbians (62%) say a similar plan would be less expensive in the United States. 

More than a third of residents also think the cost of a similar phone plan would be lower in Italy (39%) and Australia (37%). 

“Most British Columbians know that wireless costs are lower in the United States than in Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But the current cost of a monthly plan for a mobile phone with two gigabytes of data in Australia and Italy is significantly lower, at $21 and $25 a month respectively.”

Two levels of government have promised action on this issue. The federal Liberal Party pledged to reduce the cost of wireless bills for Canadians by 25 per cent over the next four years. 

The Government of British Columbia recently appointed MLA Bob D’Eith to work with the federal government to explore more affordable and transparent mobile phone options.

Across British Columbia, only 31% of residents believe that the federal government will actually deliver on its promise of lower phone bills for Canadians.

A slightly higher proportion (35%) think the provincial government’s push for more affordable and transparent mobile phone options will ultimately be successful.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 12 to December 16, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Would Ban Mobile Phones in K-12 Classrooms

Public support for the measure that was implemented in Ontario earlier this year is high among parents and non-parents alike.

Vancouver, BC [November 29, 2019] – The notion of forbidding students from using their mobile phones in classrooms unreservedly is very popular in British Columbia, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 88% of British Columbians think the province should implement a ban on the use of mobile phones during instructional time in K-12 classrooms.

Earlier this year, the Province of Ontario restricted the use of mobile phones in K-12 classrooms, unless the devices are required for health or medical purposes, or to support educational needs as decided by an instructor.

In British Columbia, residents aged 55 and over are more likely to express support for a prohibition (85%) than those aged 35-to-54 (80%) and those aged 18-to-34 (68%).

At least four-in-five residents of Vancouver Island (86%), the Fraser Valley (83%) and Metro Vancouver (80%) are in favour of banning mobile phones during instructional time in K-12 classrooms. Support is lower, but still high, in Northern BC (75%) and Southern BC (62%).

“More than four-in-five British Columbians who have a child currently enrolled in K-12 are supportive of a classroom mobile phone ban (81%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is similar (77%) for those who have no children in school at this point.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 6 to November 8, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two-in-Five Canadian Social Media Users Are Finding “Fake News”

About three-in-ten have been exposed to racist content on their social media feeds.

Vancouver, BC [October 16, 2019] – A sizeable proportion of social media users in Canada say they have seen “fake news” in their feeds, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of social media users, 41% of respondents say they found links to stories on current affairs that were obviously false.

“Almost half of Canadian social media users aged 18-to-34 (48%) say they have found blatantly false stories on social media,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among those aged 35-to-54 (41%) and those aged 55 and over (36%).”

About three-in-ten Canadian social media users (29%) say they have found racist content or comments in their feed. About one-in-five also report finding homophobic content or comments (21%) and content or comments offensive to people with disabilities (20%).

Canadian social media users aged 18-to-34 are more likely to report someone for offensive content or comments (35%, compared to the national average of 21%) and to post something on social media that they deleted after thinking it over twice (28%, compared to the national average of 21%). 

When asked about specific ideas that could be implemented on social media platforms, two thirds of Canadian users (68%) are in favour of banning “anonymous” accounts to only allow people to comment and post if they use their real name and likeness.

Three-in-five Canadian social media users (60%) believe “creeping” should be dealt with and would like platforms to always allow users to see who has viewed their profiles, photos and posts.

A sizeable proportion of respondents (72%) acknowledge that it is difficult to discern which social media accounts are real and which ones are fake.

More than three-in-five social media users (63%) believe politicians who have a social media account should not be able to block users from engaging with them.

Canadian social media users who voted for the Liberal Party or the New Democratic Party (NDP) in the 2015 federal election (67%) are more likely to support block-free accounts for politicians than those who voted for the Conservative Party (60%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 24 to September 26, 2019, among 840 adult social media users in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.4 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Unsolicited Calls and Messages Affect Most British Columbians

More than a third of the province’s  residents received a text asking about their support for a party or policy.

Vancouver, BC [September 27, 2019] – A significant proportion of British Columbians recently had to deal with unsolicited text messages and calls on their mobile phone, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, 37% of respondents say that, over the course of the past two months, they received text messages asking them if they support a specific party or policy sent by an individual they do not know.

Men (42%) and British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (44%) are more likely to report getting text messages of a political nature from unknown senders.

A similar proportion of British Columbians (35%) received phone calls and/or phone messages from an individual purporting to represent a government agency (such as the Canada Revenue Agency).

Women (36%) and Metro Vancouverites (39%) are more likely to have received calls or messages from a scammer over the past two months.

Three-in-ten British Columbians (31%) say they received phone calls or messages over the past two months where an individual speaks Cantonese or Mandarin, including 42% of those who reside in Metro Vancouver.

“Younger British Columbians appear to be more affected by unsolicited phone calls and messages than their older counterparts,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 40% of residents aged 55 and over say they did not receive any of the three types of calls or messages included in the survey, the proportion falls to 25% among those aged 35-to-54 and 20% among those aged 18-to-34.”

More than a third of British Columbians (37%) have reported an unwanted call or phone number to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre (formerly known as PhoneBusters).

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (46%), men (43%) and residents of both Northern BC (47%) and the Fraser Valley (44%) are more likely to have contacted the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre to report an unwanted call or number.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 14, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

More Than Half of British Columbians Have Boycotted a Company

Half of “boycotters” say they disagreed with how an organization or establishment pays or treats its employees.

Vancouver, BC [September 11, 2019] – A majority of British Columbians admit to having voluntarily abstained from using, buying or dealing with an organization of establishment, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 55% of British Columbians say that, over the course of their lives, they have boycotted an organization or establishment.

Women (58%), British Columbians aged 55 and over (59%) and Vancouver Islanders (62%) are more likely to say that they have boycotted a company.

Half of British Columbians who have actively participated in a boycott (50%) point to disagreements with how employees of a specific organization of establishment were paid or treated.

Other reasons cited for boycotts include disagreements over environmental practices (43%), disagreements over the ownership of an organization or establishment (37%) and disagreements with animal welfare practices (33%).

“Women in British Columbia are significantly more likely to have boycotted a company for labour (56%) or animal welfare reasons (42%) than men (44% and 23% respectively),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Boycotts originating from a disagreement with ownership are more common in Metro Vancouver (41%).”

More than two-in-five British Columbians (43%) say they research the environmental practices of companies before purchasing a product or service “all the time” or “some of the time”. 

Slightly smaller proportions of British Columbians also look into a company’s social practices (39%) and labour practices (37%) before making a purchase.

When it comes to their recent experiences as consumers, more than a third of British Columbians say they review a company’s social, environmental, labour and/or investment practices when shopping for groceries (41%), clothing or shoes (40%), household goods (39%), cleaning products (also 39%), a vehicle (38%), dinner at a restaurant (37%) and electronics (36%).

Across the seven recent consumer experiences tested, British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are significantly more likely to review a company’s practices than their older counterparts.

While only 27% of British Columbians aged 55 and over review a company’s social, environmental, labour and/or investment practices when shopping for clothing or shoes, the proportion climbs to 44% among those aged 35-to-54 and 58% among those aged 18-to-34.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views of Canadians on China and Huawei Clearly Worsen

Two thirds of respondents think Ottawa should not allow Huawei to participate in the development of Canada’s 5G mobile networks.

Vancouver, BC [July 17, 2019] – The perceptions of Canadians on China have deteriorated markedly over the past five months, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 67% of Canadians think Canada should not work to establish closer ties with China.

In December 2018, Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou was arrested in Vancouver. Meng faces charges in the United States—including bank fraud and obstruction of justice—and the U.S. has formally requested her extradition. 

After Meng’s arrest, China’s detained two Canadians—Michel Kovrig and Michael Spavor—on espionage allegations, and banned exports of Canadian canola, pork and beef.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (72%, +9 since a Research Co. poll conducted in February 2019) agree with the way Canadian authorities have acted in the Meng case.

Agreement with the way Ottawa has handled this matter is highest among women (76%), Canadians aged 55 and over (82%) and Liberal Party voters in the 2015 federal election (86%).

The federal government is currently reviewing the guidelines for the development of 5G (or “Fifth Generation”) mobile networks, which are expected to provide Canadians with larger data capacity and faster connections. 

Two thirds of Canadians (68%) think the federal government should not allow Huawei to participate in the development of Canada’s 5G mobile networks.

“In February, 57% of Canadians felt that Huawei should be barred from Canada’s 5G development,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “That proportion has increased by 11 points and now includes 81% of British Columbians and 74% of Ontarians.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from July 6 to July 9, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Support Still Strong for Automated Speed Enforcement in BC

The use of red light cameras to catch vehicles speeding at intersections is backed by two thirds of British Columbians.

Vancouver, BC [July 10, 2019] – Most British Columbians are in favour of a specific type of automated speed enforcement that will be present in some municipalities this summer, a new Research Co. poll has found. 

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, seven-in-ten residents (68%, -2 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in August 2018) approve of using speed-on-green cameras, or red light cameras that also capture vehicles that speed through intersections.

Support for the use of speed-on-green cameras is highest among women (74%) and British Columbians aged 55 and over (76%). 

“Seven-in-ten British Columbians who do not drive (72%) are in favour of relying on speed-on-green cameras,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In addition, about three-in-five residents who drive five days a week or more (66%), three or four times a week (74%) and once or twice a week (64%) are also in favour of this measure.”

Automated speed enforcement works by using cameras or sensors to pick up a vehicle speeding. A ticket is then issued to the owner of the vehicle. Driver’s license points are not issued as the driver of the vehicle cannot be identified.

Earlier this year, the provincial government announced that 35 existing red light cameras will begin capturing vehicles that are speeding through intersections this summer. The cameras are located in 14 municipalities: Abbotsford, Burnaby, Coquitlam, Delta, Kelowna, Langley, Maple Ridge, Nanaimo, North Vancouver, Pitt Meadows, Port Coquitlam, Richmond, Surrey and Vancouver.

Just over half of British Columbians (52%, -3 since August 2018) approve of point-to-point speed enforcement, which uses cameras at two or more distant points on a road. The average speed of vehicles that pass between points is calculated and tickets are issued to vehicles whose average speed over the distance was excessive.

More than three-in-five British Columbians approve of two other types of automated speed enforcement: 69% (-2 since August 2018) for fixed speed cameras, or cameras that stay in one location and measure speed as a vehicle passes, and 63% (-2 since August 2018) for mobile speed cameras, which can be moved from place to place and measure speed as a vehicle passes.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from June 22 to June 26, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Are Comfortable Online, But Some Worries Remain

Seven-in-ten have received “scam” emails, and almost two thirds are concerned about someone hacking their devices.

Vancouver, BC [June 11, 2019] – While a large proportion of Canadians have embraced the Internet for banking and shopping, there are still lingering concerns about identity theft, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 87% of Canadians say they are comfortable accessing banking information online, and 86% feel the same way about shopping for goods and services online.

Just over four-in-five Canadians (82%) say they are comfortable commenting on online forums that require their email address, and 73% are comfortable making a charitable donation online.

“As expected, younger residents are less likely to have qualms about performing specific tasks on the Internet,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However, more than a third of Canadians aged 55 and over say they are not comfortable making charitable donations online.”

Over the past couple of months, 64% of Canadians have worried about somebody hacking into their own computer or smartphone. 

More than seven-in-ten Canadians have been concerned recently about computers and technology being used to invade their privacy (71%) and having their personal information stolen over the Internet (72%).

British Columbians (79%), Women (77%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (74%) are more likely to say they have worried about having their personal information stolen online.

Across the country, 72% of Canadians say they have received an email—sometimes referred to as the “Nigerian Scam”—offering them money for assistance or help, and 62% have received a “phishing” email, where somebody tried to acquire information by masquerading as a trustworthy entity.

One-in-five Canadians (20%) say their email address has been hacked at some point, and 4% say hackers took control of their social media platform.

Two-in-five Canadians (39%) say their computer became infected with a virus while they were browsing the Internet. Men are more likely to have acquired a virus online than women (44% to 34%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 31 to June 3, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most British Columbians Want Slower Speeds on Residential Streets

Two-in-five residents say they perceive a car going over the speed limit on the street where they live “at least once a day.”

Vancouver, BC [June 7, 2019] – A sizeable proportion of British Columbians would like to see changes to municipal speed limits, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 58% of British Columbians say they would “definitely” or “probably” like to see the speed limit reduced to 30 km/h on all residential streets in their own municipality, while keeping the speed limit on arterial and collector roads at 50 km/h.

Support for the implementation of this policy is highest among women (63%), British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (62%) and residents of Vancouver Island (60%).

Earlier this year, Vancouver City Council unanimously passed a motion to establish a pilot project that will see the speed limit reduced to 30 km/h on select residential streets in the city. 

Two thirds of British Columbians (66%) believe the City of Vancouver’s pilot project is a “very good” or “good idea”, while 22% consider it “bad” or “very bad.”

“While many British Columbians are in favour of the City of Vancouver’s pilot project, there are some differences related to political allegiance,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) and the BC Green Party in the last provincial election are more supportive of the project (74% and 72% respectively) than those who voted for the BC Liberals in 2017 (60%).”

More than two-in-five British Columbians (42%) say they see a car that they perceive is circulating above the current speed limit on the street where they reside “at least once a day”, while only 16% say this “never” happens.

Residents of the Fraser Valley (54%), Northern BC (50%) and Southern BC (48%) are significantly more likely to perceive speeding vehicles on their street “at least once a day” than those who live in Vancouver Island (40%) and Metro Vancouver (39%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 26 to May 28, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca