Desire for Abortion Debate is Higher in the U.S. than in Canada

British Columbians and Quebecers are more likely to say that the procedure should be legal under any circumstances.

Vancouver, BC [July 12, 2019] – Americans are more likely than Canadians to call for a nationwide discussion on abortion, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, almost half of Americans (46%) believe a debate about abortion is long overdue in the country and want the discussion to be re-opened. 

Conversely, over a third of Americans (36%) believe there is no point in re-opening a debate about abortion right now.

In Canada, a significantly smaller proportion of residents (37%) would welcome a debate on abortion, while a majority (53%) thinks there is no point in revisiting the issue.

“Democrats in the United States are more likely to wish for a new debate on abortion (42%) than Republicans (34%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In Canada, Conservative Party voters in 2015 are more eager for a discussion (44%) than those who cast a ballot for the New Democrats (33%) or the Liberals (27%).”

Almost half of Canadians (46%) believe abortion should be legal under any circumstances, while more than two-in-five (43%) would allow the procedure only under certain circumstances. 

In the United States, just under three-in-ten Americans (28%) believe abortion should be legal under any circumstances, while almost half (48%) would allow it only under certain circumstances.

While almost one-in-five Americans (19%) think abortion should be illegal in all circumstances, only 5% of Canadians agree with this point of view.

Canadians aged 18-to-34 (48%), British Columbians (54%), Quebecers (also 54%), as well as Liberal (58%) and New Democratic Party (NDP) (55%) voters in the 2015 federal election, are more likely to say that abortion should be legal under any circumstances.

In the United States, men (21%), Americans aged 18-to-34 (21%), residents of the Midwest (24%) and those who identify as Republicans (26%) are more likely to support a ban on abortion.

Methodology:

Results are based on online studies conducted from July 2 to July 5, 2019, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our full data set for Canada here, full data set for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Support More Action on Child Care

Nine-in-ten consider the investments to build a quality affordable child care system as “very important” or “moderately important.”

Vancouver, BC [June 13, 2019] – In an online survey of a representative provincial sample, 76% of British Columbians think the province should move more quickly to achieve the established goals of more affordable parent fees, more spaces, and better wages and education for those who work in child care settings, a new Research Co. poll conducted on behalf of the $10aDay Child Care Plan has found.

When parents who currently have a child enrolled in child care were asked about their experience, 64% said the current government investments are having a positive impact on their situation.

There is still more to be done, as 70% of parents report that their return to work was delayed because of lack of access to child care.

“British Columbians of all ages, regions and political allegiances agree that children, parents and employers benefit when there’s access to quality affordable child care,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co.

Two thirds of British Columbians (66%) believe the provincial government should continue to put a priority on public funding for child care, to make it more affordable and available for families. 

“Some parents are experiencing benefits of new investments in child care, but many families are still struggling when it comes to cost, finding a licensed space, and educators are still earning low wages—BC need further investments,” says Sharon Gregson, spokesperson for the $10aDay Child Care Plan.

Across the province, almost two-in-five parents who currently have a child in child care (38%) say they waited at least five months before a space became available for their child. Three-in-four parents (76%) say the cost of child care has put a financial strain on their families.

Four-in-five British Columbians (81%) believe that, when child care is affordable and available to parents, more mothers work and pay taxes. An even larger proportion of residents (86%) agree with the notion that having children today costs a lot more than it did 40 years ago.

About the $10aDay Child Care Plan

Since 2011, supporters across the province have advanced the $10aDay Child Care Plan as the solution to BC’s child care chaos calling for parent fees of no more than $10aDay, access to licensed spaces for all families who choose child care, and fair wages for early childhood educators.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 9 to May 12, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Sharon Gregson, $10aDay Child Care Plan.
[c] 604.505.5725
[e] info@10aday.ca

Wait Times, Red Tape Are Main Health Care Snags for Canadians

Four-in-five Canadians are confident that medical services will be there if they were to need them unexpectedly.

Vancouver, BC [January 30, 2019] – More than half of Canadians identify two issues as the main glitches facing the country’s health care system, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, a third of Canadians (33%) identify long wait times as the biggest problem facing the health care system, while one-in-four (24%) mention bureaucracy and poor management.

A shortage of doctors and nurses is third on the list with 18%, followed by little focus on preventive care (9%), inadequate resources and facilities (5%), lack of a wider range of services for patients (3%) and insufficient standards of hygiene (also 3%).

“There are some significant regional differences when it comes to the perceptions of Canadians on what needs to be fixed about the health care system,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Albertans and Quebecers are decidedly more critical on management, while Atlantic Canadians are more concerned about a lack of physicians.”

Across the country, four-in-five Canadians (79%) say they are “very confident” (25%) or “moderately confident” (54%) that Canada’s health care system would be there to provide the help and assistance they would need if they faced an unexpected medical condition or disease.

Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to express confidence in the health care system (86%) than those aged 18-to-34 (79%) and those aged 35-to-54 (75%).

One-in-four Canadians (25%) think the health care system works well and only minor changes are needed to make it work better, while three-in-five (60%) believe there are some good things in Canada’s health care system, but many changes are required.

Just over one-in-seven Canadians (13%) believe the health care system has so much wrong with it that it needs to be completely rebuilt—a proportion that reaches 20% in Quebec and 16% in Alberta.

Three-in-four Canadians (74%) are opposed to the notion of the federal government making cuts to health care funding in order to reduce government debt. 

When asked if health care in Canada would be better than it is now if it were run by the private sector, a majority of Canadians (57%) disagree with the idea, while two-in-five (39%) are in agreement.

On a regional basis, two thirds of Quebecers (66%) assert that the private sector would do a better job delivering health care in Canada. In no other region of the country does this idea garner the backing of more than 40% of residents.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 14 to January 17, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Citobun

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Support Mandatory Vaccinations for Children

Almost one-in-five believe the decision should be up to parents.

Vancouver, BC [October 3, 2018] – While a sizeable majority of Canadians are in favour of mandatory childhood immunization in their province, almost one-in-five believe the decision should be up to parents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 78% of Canadians believe vaccinations for children should “definitely” or “probably” be mandatory in their province.

Conversely, 18% think parents should “probably” or “definitely” be the ones deciding whether their children should be vaccinated.

In the late 1990s, a study published in the weekly medical journal The Lancet—which has since been discredited and retracted—attempted to link childhood vaccination and autism.

Across Canada, 23% of respondents think there “definitely” or “probably” is a correlation between the childhood vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella and autism in children—including 25% of Ontarians and Quebecers.

“One third of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (32%) and one-in-four of those aged 35-to-54 (25%) believe the widely debunked notion of childhood immunization leading to autism is definitely or probably true,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Respondents over the age of 55 are significantly less likely to think the same way (13%).”

When it comes to vaccinations and seasonal diseases (such as the flu), Canadians are more likely to reject a compulsory program.

Three-in-five Canadians (59%) think each person should “definitely” or “probably” be allowed to decide whether they want to get the flu vaccine, while just under two-in-five (38%) believe the flu vaccine should be mandatory in their province.

A majority of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (51%) voices support for the flu vaccine to be mandatory in their province, compared to 36% for those aged 35-to-54 and 29% for those aged 55 and over.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 27 to August 30, 2018, among 1,001 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Credit: Armin Kübelbeck

One-in-Six British Columbians Rely Solely on “Doctor Internet”

Women are more likely than men to search online for information on nutrition, exercise or weight control.

Vancouver, BC [September 5, 2018] – Many British Columbians are going online to seek information about health, but one-in-six are doing so without the added benefit of a visit to the doctor, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, 16% of residents acknowledge they went online to diagnose or treat a medical condition on their own, without consulting a doctor, over the past year.

Two thirds of British Columbians (68%) have searched online for information about a particular illness or condition over the past year.

There are some differences among specific demographic groups on what exactly residents are looking for online.

While 41% of British Columbians have sought information about prescription drugs online over the past year, the proportion climbs to 49% among those aged 55 and over.

More than half of women in British Columbia (54%) have searched online for information about nutrition, exercise and weight control, compared to just 41% of men in the province.

Across British Columbia, 23% of residents have sought information about mental health online, including 32% of those aged 18-to-34.

Millennials are also more likely to have searched online for information about sexual health (33%, compared to the provincial average of 18%).

More than a third of British Columbians (35%) have gone online to gather information before and after visiting their doctor,

“There is a generational gap when it comes to British Columbians who combine information from the Internet with a trip to the general practitioner,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Millennials are more likely to conduct research before they see their doctor, while Baby Boomers are more likely to go online after their visit.”

One-in-five British Columbians (22%) have sought information online about alternative or experimental treatments or medicines over the past year, including 35% in Northern BC.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 13 to August 14, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca