Half of Canadians Anxious About the End of COVID-19 Mandates

Almost two thirds plan to still wear a mask or face covering when entering an indoor premise in the next two weeks.  

Vancouver, BC [March 25, 2022] – Many Canadians are preoccupied about the next stage of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Canadians say they are “very anxious” or “moderately anxious” about COVID-19 restrictions and mandates being lifted in their community.  

Residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba are more likely to report feeling anxiety over the end of COVID-19 restrictions and mandates (61%) than their counterparts in British Columbia (53%), Alberta (52%), Ontario (also 52%), Atlantic Canada (also 52%) and Quebec (50%).  

“Majorities of Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (62%) and the Liberal Party (60%) in the last federal election are anxious about the current state of affairs,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 45% of those who voted for the Conservative Party in 2021 share this feeling.”  

In a poll conducted by Research Co. earlier this month, 72% of Canadians thought that the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic was now “behind us.”  

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%) think the recent protests and blockades related to the COVID-19 pandemic are responsible “a great deal” or “a fair amount” for restrictions and mandates being lifted in their community.  

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to credit the protests and blockades for the recent policy changes related to COVID-19 (59%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (46%) and aged 55 and over (31%).  

Across the country, 65% of Canadians say they will continue to wear a mask or face covering when entering an indoor premise in the next two weeks—a proportion that rises to 73% among those aged 55 and over. However, only 45% of Canadians plan to wear a mask or face covering when leaving their home.  

Almost three-in-five Canadians (58%) plan to visit relatives or friends in person over the next two weeks.  

Fewer than half of Canadians have made plans to partake in five other activities over the next two weeks: go out for dinner at a sit-down restaurant (43%), go out for lunch at a sit-down restaurant (39%), go to the theatre or cinema (21%), go to a live sporting event as a spectator (11%) or go to a live concert as a spectator (9%).  

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from March 18 to March 20, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Seven-in-Ten Canadians Think Worst of COVID-19 is Behind Us

Vancouver, BC [March 22, 2022] – The perceptions of Canadians on the future of COVID-19 are now better than at any other moment of the pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 72% of Canadians think the worst of COVID-19 is “behind us”, up 20 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in January 2022. Only 15% of Canadians (-14) believe the worst of the pandemic is “ahead of us” while 14% (-6) are not sure.  

“There is a remarkable regional consistency in the way Canadians are looking at the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Practically seven-in-ten residents of each province believe that the worst of COVID-19 is now behind us.”  

Across Canada, 81% of residents (-4) believe COVID-19 is a real threat—a proportion that rises to 86% among those aged 55 and over.   Just over three-in-five Canadians (61%, +5) are satisfied with the way the federal government has dealt with COVID-19. The rating is slightly lower for municipal governments (60%, +3) and provincial governments (56%, +6) across the country.  

This month, the governments of Quebec (63%, +8) and British Columbia (also 63%, +3) post the highest satisfaction levels across the four most populous Canadian provinces, followed by Ontario (57%, +6) and Alberta (37%, +4).

More than three-in-five Canadians (63%) are satisfied with the way the federal chief public health officer has managed the COVID-19 pandemic, and 61% feel the same way about their provincial health officer or chief medical officer.  

Majorities of residents of Quebec (63%), British Columbia (also 63%), Ontario (61%) and Alberta (53%) are content with the performance of their provincial health officer or chief medical officer.  

Just over two thirds of Canadians (68%) say they are wearing a mask every time they go out, including 76% of those aged 55 and over.  

More than seven-in-ten residents of Atlantic Canada (73%), Ontario (72%) and Quebec (71%) acknowledge wearing a mask every time they go out. The proportion is lower in British Columbia (62%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (60%) and Alberta (57%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from March 14 to March 16, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

What Is Saskatchewan?

Canada’s first crowdsourced poll reveals a province divided, deadlocked and potentially disengaged.  

Vancouver, BC [February 25, 2022] – Last week, Saskatchewan residents, hungry for a new way to inform themselves about their government, community and province, crowdsourced Vancouver’s Research Co. to conduct a poll on their behalf.  

The answer to the question “What is Saskatchewan?”, however, remains fairly elusive.  

An online study conducted from February 19 to February 23, 2022, among a representative sample of 808 adults in Saskatchewan, with a focus on the present and future of the province’s politics, COVID-19 pandemic response and economic conditions, revealed consensus opinion on very little.  

For example, one of the most consistent answers, 1 in 4, was “Not sure”, in response to questions on the necessity of new or rebranded political parties to replace the New Democratic Party (NDP) or the Saskatchewan Party. More than a third of residents (37%) agreed with the statement that “neither of the two major political parties in Saskatchewan truly represent my views.”  

“While support for the Saskatchewan Party amongst all voters remains strong, a significant number of residents feel disengaged when it comes to Saskatchewan’s political future,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Premier Scott Moe’s approval rating stands at 50%, yet 54% of residents agree that his government is not doing enough to deal with the suicide crisis in northern Saskatchewan.”  

Tammy Nicklas-Robert, a Saskatoon, Saskatchewan-based researcher and communications’ consultant, used the GoFundMe platform to crowdsource the Research Co. study as one potential solution to what she sees as mounting frustration in her province due to a collective sense of isolation and powerlessness.  

“When I first floated the idea on social media, I was overwhelmed by the volume and intensity of the response,” says Nicklas-Robert. “What I heard is after two years of the pandemic, Saskatchewan people are feeling isolated, disheartened by what they perceive to be a lack of trustworthy data and facts related to their province’s social, economic and political reality, but also ready to reconnect with like-minded collectives.”  

She points to the result on mask-wearing in Saskatchewan after the mandate drops as evidence that those collectives will emerge. More than three-in-five Saskatchewanians (63%) say they plan to continue wearing a mask or face covering when entering businesses and public venues, even if this is no longer a requirement.  

“When we know how much anger can be triggered in others when they see someone wearing a medical mask, even during a pandemic, those who plan to continue to wear one in public after February 28 will hopefully find some comfort in knowing that they are well within the majority planning to do the same,” she continued.    

More highlights from this study:    

COVID-19  

A majority of Saskatchewan residents (58%) consider COVID-19 as a real threat to them and their familys health and safety. More than a third (36%) think COVID-19 is not a real threat.  

Most of the province’s residents (53%) are satisfied with the way their municipal government has dealt with COVID-19. The rating is lower for the Saskatchewan government (48%) and the federal Liberal government (37%).  

While a majority of Saskatchewanians trust their provincial government to respond to a natural disaster (57%), the trust-level drops on all other issues tested, such as managing the provincial budget (49%), ensuring the sustainability of the health care system (46%) and collaborating with public health and medical professionals to establish health guidelines and restrictions (44%).  

Just over two-in-five residents trust their provincial government to release accurate (43%) and complete (41%) information about COVID-19 cases and hospitalization rates to the media and the public.  

More than half of Saskatchewanians (55%) agree with the provincial governments decision to cancel “Proof of Vaccination” or negative test requirement in order to enter specific businesses and public venues, while two-in-five (40%) disagree with it.  

Residents are evenly divided on the provincial governments decision to end the indoor mask mandate on February 28 (Agree 48%, Disagree 47%).    

The Economy  

Residents are also evenly divided on the state of Saskatchewans economy, with 43% considering it very good” or good” and 45% deeming it bad” or very bad.”  

One-in-four Saskatchewanians (26%) expect the provincial economy to improve over the next six months, while 43% foresee no change and one-in-five (19%) predict a decline.    

Politics  

Half of the province’s residents (50%) approve of Scott Moe’s performance as Premier and Saskatchewan Party leader, while two-in-five (40%) disapprove. The rating is lower for departing Saskatchewan NDP leader Ryan Meili (34%), Progressive Conservative Party leader Glen Leson (17%), Green Party leader Naomi Hunter (15%) and Liberal Party leader Jeff Walters (13%).  

More than half of decided voters in the province (53%) would support the Saskatchewan Party if a provincial election were held today, with the Saskatchewan NDP a distant second with 37%. Support is in single digits for the Buffalo Party (3%), the Green Party (2%), the Progressive Conservative Party (also 2%) and the Liberal Party (1%).  

Almost half of residents (47%) say they would vote for the Saskatchewan Party if Moe is no longer its leader in the next provincial election—including 86% of those who voted for the party in 2020.  

A third of Saskatchewanians (34%) say they plan to vote for the NDP even with a leader other than Meili—including 84% of those who cast ballots for NDP candidates in the last provincial election.  

More than three-in-ten residents believe the province needs a new centre-right political party that is not the Saskatchewan Party (33%) or a new centre-left political party that is not the NDP (32%). More than a third (37%) feel that neither of the two major parties in Saskatchewan truly represent their views.  

A majority of residents (55%) believe the NDP should consider a re-brand before the next election—a proportion that rises to 61% among those who voted for the New Democrats in 2020.  

Just under half of Saskatchewanians believe that the provincial government is doing enough to deal with two pending concerns: the discovery of residential school grave sites (49%) and the future of the oil and gas industry (46%).  

Fewer residents think the provincial government is paying enough attention to the impact of climate change (42%), the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs (30%) and the suicide crisis in northern Saskatchewan (27%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from February 19 to February 23, 2022, among 808 adults in Saskatchewan. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Saskatchewan. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Back Reliance on Emergencies Act By 2-to-1 Margin

Almost three-in-five oppose the protests and blockades against restrictions and mandates related to the COVID-19 pandemic.  

Vancouver, BC [February 24, 2022] – Most Canadians are not supportive of the people who have participated in protests and blockades against restrictions and mandates related to the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 59% of Canadians oppose the protests and blockades, while 35% are in favour of them and 6% are not sure.  

The highest level of rejection to the protests and blockades is observed in Atlantic Canada (66%), followed by British Columbia (62%), Alberta (also 62%), Quebec (60%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (59%) and Ontario (55%).  

A slight majority of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (52%) oppose the protests and blockades. The proportion is higher among Canadians aged 35-to-54 (54%) and aged 55 and over (71%).  

“Almost two thirds of Canadians who have been vaccinated against COVID-19 (64%) voice opposition to the protests and blockades,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, seven-in-ten Canadians who have not been vaccinated (70%) are supportive.”  

More than four-in-five Canadians (81%) say they are following news stories related to the protests and blockades “very closely” or “moderately closely.”  

More than three-in-five Canadians (63%) think the federal government was justified in invoking the Emergencies Act to deal with the protests and blockades against restrictions and mandates related to the COVID-19 pandemic, while 28% think Ottawa’s actions were unjustified.  

Majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (83%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (67%) and the Green Party (53%) in the September 2021 federal election endorse the government’s invocation of the Emergencies Act. Support is lower among Canadians who cast ballots for the Conservative Party (46%) and the People’s Party (30%) last year.  

Just over four-in-five Canadians (81%) are “very concerned” or “moderately concerned” about violence breaking out at the site of protests and blockades. Slightly smaller proportions of Canadians are worried about foreign money being used to fund the activities of protestors (71%), Canada’s image in the world being negatively affected by the protests and the federal government’s actions (70%), and the federal government relying on the Emergencies Act to end other protests in the future (65%).

More than three-in-five Canadians (65%) disagree with the notion that the federal government should be overthrown. Just over one-in-four Canadians (26%) agree with this statement, including 30% of Albertans, 30% of Ontarians, 46% of Conservative voters and 55% of People’s Party voters.  

Majorities of Canadians disagree with three other ideas: that the people protesting against restrictions and mandates are fighting for freedom (64%), that the actions of the people protesting against restrictions and mandates are justified (58%) and that all COVID-19 mandates and restrictions should be repealed (54%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from February 18 to February 20, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

BC NDP Remains Ahead of BC Liberals in British Columbia

The approval rating for Premier John Horgan stands at 69%, while Kevin Falcon starts his tenure as BC Liberal leader at 38%.  

Vancouver, BC [February 18, 2022] – The BC New Democratic Party (NDP) holds an eight-point advantage over the opposition BC Liberals among decided voters in British Columbia, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 46% of decided voters would cast a ballot for the BC NDP candidate in their constituency if a provincial election were held today.  

The BC Liberals are in second place with 38%, followed by the BC Green Party with 13% and the BC Conservative Party with 2%.  

The BC NDP holds substantial leads over the BC Liberals among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (43% to 36%) and decided voters aged 35-to-54 (48% to 35%). The race is closer among decided voters aged 55 and over (BC NDP 46%, BC Liberals 42%).  

While the two main parties are separated by just three points among male decided voters (BC NDP 44%, BC Liberals 41%), the New Democrats have a substantial lead over the BC Liberals among female decided voters (47% to 35%).  

Almost seven-in-ten British Columbians (69%) approve of the performance of Premier and BC NDP leader John Horgan, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted just before the last provincial election in October 2020.  

The approval rating for Kevin Falcon—who became the leader of the BC Liberals earlier this month—stands at 38%. The indicator is similar for BC Greens leader Sonia Furstenau (36%, -10) and lower for BC Conservative leader Trevor Bolin (19%).  

“British Columbia’s two main party leaders are not having difficulties connecting with their base of support,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Nine-in-ten BC NDP voters in 2020 approve of Horgan (90%), while two thirds of BC Liberal voters in the last provincial ballot approve of Falcon (67%).”  

A third of British Columbians (33%, +10) identify housing, homelessness and poverty as the most important issue facing the province today—a proportion that rises to 41% among those aged 18-to-34.   Health care is second on the list of concerns with 23% (+2), followed by the economy and jobs (16%, -9), the environment (10%, +3), COVID-19 (6%, -7) and crime and public safety (4%, =).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from February 12 to February 14, 2022, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Xue Dong

Most Canadians Perceive “Booster Shot” Campaign Positively

Just over three-in-five are satisfied with the current pace of COVID-19 vaccination efforts in their province.  

Vancouver, BC [February 8, 2022] – Significant proportions of Canadians are content with the way in which governments are managing the campaign to provide COVID-19 “booster shots”, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 68% of Canadians are satisfied with the procurement of “booster shot” doses from the federal government while 22% are dissatisfied and 9% are undecided.  

More than four-in-five Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in last year’s federal election (84%) are satisfied with the procurement of “booster shots”, along with two thirds of those who cast ballots for candidates representing the New Democratic Party (NDP) (69%) and the Conservative Party (68%).  

Almost two thirds of Canadians (65%) are satisfied with the “booster shot” plans and phases outlined by their province and just over three-in-five (61%) are content with the pace of “booster shot” vaccination efforts.  

“As was the case in the early stages of the COVID-19 vaccination rollout in 2021, older Canadians are more likely to believe that the current effort is proceeding at the proper pace,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 55% of Canadians aged 18-to-34 are satisfied with how vaccines are being provided in their province, the proportion rises to 61% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 67% among those aged 55 and over.”  

In Quebec, 68% of residents are satisfied with the “booster shot” plans and phases outlined by the provincial government. The rating is similarly high in British Columbia (67%), Ontario (65%) and Atlantic Canada (64%), but lower in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (60%) and Alberta (55%).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from January 28 to January 30, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

COVID-19 Rating for Governments Drops Markedly Across Canada

Satisfaction with the federal government fell by seven points since December, while Quebec experienced a 17-point drop.  

Vancouver, BC [February 4, 2022] – Fewer Canadians are content with the way various levels of government are dealing with COVID-19, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 56% of Canadians are satisfied with the way the federal government has managed the pandemic, down seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in December 2021.  

Fewer Canadians are also content with the way municipal governments (57%, -7) and provincial governments (51%, -11) are handling COVID-19.  

Satisfaction with the performance of the provincial administration fell drastically in Quebec, from 72% in December to 55% in late January. The numbers also declined in three other provinces: from 68% to 60% in British Columbia, from 56% to 51% in Ontario, and from 42% to 33% in Alberta.  

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%) believe the measures that are in place in their province to deal with COVID-19 are correct for the situation, down two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May 2021. In addition, 27% (-2) think the measures do not go far enough and 23% (+4) say they go too far.  

“In Quebec, where the government hinted at taxing the unvaccinated, 34% of residents believe the COVID-19 measures go too far,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In Alberta, 42% of residents think their provincial administration has not done enough.”

Compared to May 2021, fewer Canadians endorse their provincial governments on specific competencies. Fewer than three-in-ten Canadians trust their provincial administration to respond to a natural disaster (57%, -3), establish public health guidelines (55%, -3), release accurate information (53%, -8), release complete information (51%, -5) and ensure the sustainability of the health care system (50%, -5). Even fewer Canadians have confidence in their provincial governments to spend tax dollars wisely (38%, -5).  

Sizeable proportions of Canadians both consider COVID-19 as a real threat (85%, =) and support requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside (84%, +1). In addition, just under three-in-four (72%, -4) acknowledge wearing a mask every time they go out.  

Just over three-in-five Canadians (61%, -8) agree with the decision to allow K-12 students to go back to in-class learning in their province. Support for this measure is highest in British Columbia, Quebec and Atlantic Canada (each at 63%).  

Just over half of Canadians (52%, +5) think the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic is “behind us”, while 29% (-4) believe it is still “ahead of us.”  

The concept of “vaccine passports” continues to be backed by majorities of Canadians for travel abroad (70%, -3), to a different province (68%, -3) and within the same province (62%, -2).  

Practically two thirds of Canadians also think it is a good idea to rely on  “vaccine passports” to go to live sporting events (69%, -2), visit a gym or fitness facility (68%, -3), go to live concerts (also 68%, -3), go to the cinema or theater (67% -5) or work at an office (65%, -3).

Methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted from January 28 to January 30, 2022, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490 [e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Views on Pandemic Worsen Considerably Across Canada

Only 47% of Canadians think the worst of COVID-19 is “behind us”, down 18 points since November.  

Vancouver, BC [December 17, 2021] – Fewer than half of Canadians are optimistic about the future ramifications of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 47% of Canadians say that the worst of the pandemic is “behind us”, down 18 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in November.  

A third of Canadians (33%, +12) believe the worst of COVID-19 is “ahead of us”, while 20% (+5) are not sure.  

“More than half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (55%) and aged 35-to-54 (52%) believe that the pandemic will not worsen,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 37% of those aged 55 and over feel the same way.”  

Across the country, 85% of Canadians (=) consider COVID-19 as a real threat.There is little movement in the level of satisfaction that Canadians express when asked to rate the way their municipal (64%, +1), federal (63%, +1) and provincial governments (62%, +3) have dealt with the pandemic.  

More than two thirds of residents of Quebec (72%, -4) and British Columbia (68%, +6) believe that their provincial administrations have handled COVID-19 well. The rating is stagnant in Ontario (56%, =). Alberta continues to hold the lowest numbers among the four most populous provinces, but saw its standing improve markedly, from 29% in December to 42% this month.  

More than four-in-five Canadians (83%, +2) are in favour of requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside. Just over three-in-four Canadians (76%, +6) say they wear a mask every time they go out.  

The notion of allowing K-12 students to go back to in-class learning is supported by 69% of Canadians (-5).  

Sizeable proportions of Canadians continue to support the use of a “vaccine passport” for specific endeavours, including travel to other countries (73%, -1 since November), to go to the theatre or cinema (72%, +3), to go to live concerts (also 71%, +1), to go to live sporting events (also 71%, +1), to visit a gym or fitness facility (also 71%, +1), for travel to other Canadian provinces (also 71%, +1), to be able to work at an office (68%, +1) and for travel inside the same province (66%, +1).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from December 8 to December 10, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Most British Columbians Will Avoid Travel During Holiday Season

More than four-in-five of the province’s residents are concerned about travellers not following COVID-19 protocols.  

Vancouver, BC [November 26, 2021] – Many residents of British Columbia acknowledge that they are not going to go on a trip in the next few weeks, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 56% of British Columbians say they do not plan to take a holiday—or spend at least one night away from their current location—in the next three months.  

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to say that they intend to travel during this holiday season (56%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (45%) and aged 55 and over (34%).  

Significant proportions of British Columbians are uneasy about relying on specific forms of transportation at this point. Fewer than half of the province’s residents (46%) say they are willing to travel on a ferry right now—a proportion that rises to 58% among residents of Vancouver Island.  

At least one-in-four British Columbians are willing to take an airplane flight to another province (36%), an airplane flight within British Columbia (32%), a trip by car to the United States (27%) or a bus trip shorter than 3 hours (25%).  

Fewer British Columbians are willing to take a railway trip (23%), an airplane fight to a different continent (22%), an airplane flight to the United States (21%), a bus trip longer than 3 hours (16%) or a trip on a cruise ship (11%).  

“More than a third of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (35%) say they would have no problem taking a trip by car to the United States,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion drops to 26% among those aged 35-to-54 and to 22% among those among those aged 55 and over.”  

When asked about possible problems that may arise during travel, more than four-in-five British Columbians (83%) say they are “very concerned” or “moderately concerned” about travellers not following COVID-19 protocols.  

At least three-in-four British Columbians say they are worried about three other issues: facing delays due to COVID-19 restrictions (78%), losing money due to cancellations (77%) and getting infected with COVID-19 during a trip (75%).  

Concerns about travellers not following COVID-19 protocols and getting infected with COVID-19 during a trip are higher among British Columbians who have a child under the age of 12 in their household (85% and 79% respectively).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 15 to November 17, 2021, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Two Thirds of Canadians Endorse Vaccine Passports in Offices

Only 9% of Canadians say they do not plan to get vaccinated against COVID-19, unchanged since September.  

Vancouver, BC [November 19, 2021] – More Canadians are in favour of implementing “vaccine passports” in order to allow employees to return to the country’s workplaces, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 67% of Canadians think it is a “good idea” to rely on COVID-19 “Proof of Vaccination” certificates for people to be able to work at an office.  

“In May 2021, when we first asked about COVID-19 vaccine certificates, just over half of Canadians (52%) were in favour of their use in offices,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support grew to 63% in September 2021 and once again this month to 67%.”  

Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to welcome “vaccine passports” in the workplace (77%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (66%) and aged 18-to-34 (59%).  

Support for the use of COVID-19 “Proof of Vaccination” certificates is highest in Quebec (73%), followed by British Columbia (70%), Ontario (68%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 68%), Alberta (64%) and Atlantic Canada (58%).  

Just over four-in-five Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in this year’s federal election (81%) are in favour of using “vaccine passports” in offices, along with 73% of those who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP), 64% of those who supported the Conservative Party and 58% of those who supported the Green Party. Only 19% of Canadians who voted for the People’s Party agree with this course of action.  

More than two thirds of Canadians continue to endorse the use of “vaccine passports” for people to go to live concerts as spectators (70%, +2), to go to live sporting events as spectators (also 70%, +4), to visit a gym or fitness facility (also 70%, +3) and to go to the theatre or cinema (69%, +3).  

Sizeable proportions of Canadians are also in favour of relying on  “Proof of Vaccination” certificates for travel to other countries (74%, +1), for travel to other Canadian provinces (70%, +2) and for travel inside the same province (65%, +3).  

Across the country, seven-in-ten Canadians (70%, -1) say they wear a mask every time the leave their home. As has been the case throughout the pandemic, women (74%) and Canadians aged 55 and over (81%) are more likely to be observing this guideline.  

There is little movement on some of the habits that Canadians may have developed as a result of the pandemic. More than one-in-ten Canadians say they are losing their temper more than usual at home (15%, =), having a bath or shower less often (14%, +2), drinking more alcohol than usual at home (13%, =), not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection (12%, -2) or brushing their teeth less often than before the pandemic (6%, -1).  

More than one-in-five Canadians continue to clean the groceries they buy to prevent infection (23%, +2) and admit to overeating or eating more than usual at home (22%, -1).  

Only 9% of Canadians (unchanged since September) say they do not plan to get inoculated against COVID-19, while 89% (+1) have already done so or intend to do so.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 8 to November 10, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

COVID-19 Ratings Improve for Most Governments in Canada

Almost two thirds of Canadians believe the worst of the pandemic is now behind us.
 
Vancouver, BC [November 15, 2021] – The views of Canadians on the way various levels of government have managed the COVID-19 pandemic are better now than they were two months ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 62% of Canadians say they are satisfied with the way the federal government has dealt with the pandemic, up seven points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September 2021.  
 
“More than three-in-five of residents of Quebec (70%), Atlantic Canada (68%) and Ontario (64%) are happy with the performance of the federal government on COVID-19,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are lower in British Columbia (58%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (54%) and Alberta (43%).”  
 
The satisfaction rating for municipal governments stands at 63% (+3) and rises to 70% among Canadians aged 55 and over.  
 
Almost three-in-five Canadians (59%, +3) are satisfied with how their provincial government is managing COVID-19. Among the four most populous provinces, Quebec has the highest rating this month (76%, +9), followed by British Columbia (62%, -4), Ontario (56%, +6) and Alberta (29%, +3).
 
Across the country, 65% of Canadians think the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic is behind us, up 17 points since September 2021.  
 
Residents of Quebec are the most likely to believe that the pandemic will not worsen (72%), followed by those who live in Ontario (68%), Alberta (62%), Atlantic Canada (60%), British Columbia (57%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 57%).  
 
As was the case two months ago, more than four-in-five Canadians (85%, +1) believe COVID-19 is a real threat, while 13% (+1) disagree with this assessment.  
 
Sizeable proportions of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (93%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (92%), the Green Party (86%) and the Conservative Party (75%) in the last federal election consider COVID-19 as a real threat. Only 27% of those who cast ballots for the People’s Party concur.  
 
Almost three-in-four Canadians (74%, +3) are in favour of allowing K-12 students to go back to in-class learning in their province.  
 
Just over four-in-five Canadians (81%, -3) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside.  
 
Only 32% of People’s Party voters endorse the mask mandate, compared to 72% of Green voters, 76% of Conservative voters, 80% of NDP voters and 89% of Liberal voters.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from November 8 to November 10, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

The Opioid Crisis is a Major Problem for Almost Half of Canadians

More than three-in-four Canadians believe more action is needed on education and awareness, as well as drug rehabilitation.  

Vancouver, BC [November 5, 2021] – The level of concern expressed by Canadians about the opioid crisis has increased over the past year, a new Research Co. poll has found.  

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 45% of Canadians describe the current situation related to the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in their community as “a major problem”, up six points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in September 2020.  

More than half of British Columbians (58%) and Albertans (55%) refer to the current state of affairs as ”a major problem.”  

Canadians are not overly satisfied with the actions of elected politicians on this file. Just over a third of Canadians (34%, -1) believe Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the federal government are doing a “very good” or “good” coming up with solutions to deal with the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs.  

Premiers and provincial governments have a slightly better rating on this question (39%, -4), with a higher level of satisfaction reported in British Columbia (43%, +7) than in Ontario (35%, -6), Quebec (34%, -10) and Alberta (28%, -19).  

Fewer Canadians are satisfied with the job their mayors and councils (37%, -3), their own Member of Parliament (33%, -5) and their own members of provincial legislatures (33%, -6) are doing to come up with solutions to deal with the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs.  

“The preoccupation of Canadians with the opioid crisis has grown, particularly in Western Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “At the same time, the level of satisfaction with the work of elected officials is stagnant or in a downward trend.”  

More than three-in-four Canadians agree with launching more education and awareness campaigns about drug use (77%, -7) and creating more spaces for drug rehabilitation (76%, -2).  

A majority of Canadians are also in favour of three other ideas: reducing the prescription of opioids by medical professionals (69%, -4), establishing “safe supply” programs where alternatives to opioids can be prescribed by health professionals (61%, -9) and setting up more “harm reduction” strategies, such as legal supervised injection sites (56%, -3).  

A proposal to decriminalize all drugs for personal use remains decidedly more contentious, with 33% of Canadians (-1) saying they favour this idea and 54% (+1) voicing disagreement.  

Support for the decriminalization of all drugs for personal use is highest in Ontario (37%), followed by British Columbia (33%), Atlantic Canada (also 33%), Quebec (31%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (30%) and Alberta (26%).  

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 25 to October 27, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Canadians Reject Health Care Cuts, Question Private Involvement

A shortage of doctors and nurses is the biggest problem facing the health care system for one third of Canadians.  
 
Vancouver, BC [October 11, 2021] – A majority of Canadians are skeptical about the effect that the private sector would have on the country’s delivery of health care services, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 56% of Canadians disagree with the notion that health care in Canada would be better than it is now if it were run by the private sector, up five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August 2020.  
 
In addition, more than four-in-five Canadians (82%, +7) disagree with the federal government making cuts to health care funding in order to reduce government debt.  
 
Across the country, more than three-in-four Canadians (77%, +1) feel “very confident” or “moderately confident” that the country’s health care system would be there to provide help and assistance if they had to face an unexpected medical condition.  
 
The lowest levels of confidence on this question are observed in Quebec and Atlantic Canada (65% and 66% respectively). More than seven-in-ten residents of Alberta (73%), British Columbia (78%), Ontario (79%), and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (80%) think the health care system will be there if and when they need it.  
 
Practically three-in-five Canadians (59%, +4) think there are some good things in Canada’s health care system, but many changes are required. One-in-four respondents (25%, -5) believe the system works well and only minor changes are needed to make it work better, while 12% (+3) say health care has so much wrong with it that we need to completely rebuild it.  
 
“One-in-four Atlantic Canadians (25%) believe it is time to completely rebuild Canada’s health care system,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion reaches double digits in three other provinces: Quebec (15%), Alberta (11%) and British Columbia (10%).”  
 
One third of Canadians (32%, +6) identify a shortage of doctors and nurses as the biggest problem facing the health care system right now—including 66% of Atlantic Canadians and 36% of British Columbians.  
 
More than a quarter of Canadians (27%. -4) say long wait times are the biggest hindrance in the health care system—including 39% of those in Saskatchewan and Manitoba and 31% of those in Ontario.  
 
Other problems with the health care system outlined by Canadians are bureaucracy and poor management (14%, +1), inadequate resources and facilities (8%, =), little focus on preventive care (6%, =), lack of a wider range of services for patients (5%, -1) and insufficient standards of hygiene (2%, -1).  
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from October 4 to October 6, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 

Support for Vaccine Passports Increases Markedly Across Canada

Most Canadians who voted for the People’s Party in the federal election (66%) say they will not get inoculated against COVID-19.  
 
Vancouver, BC [October 4, 2021] – More Canadians are in favour of the concept of “vaccine passports” than five months ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 68% of Canadians think it is a “good idea” to rely on “Proof of Vaccination” certificates for people who have been inoculated against COVID-19 in order to be able to go live concerts as spectators, up 11 points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May.  
 
More than three-in-five Canadians also endorse the use of “vaccine passports” to visit a gym or fitness facility (67%, +13), to go to the theatre or cinema (66%, +11), to go to live sporting events as spectators (also 66%, +9) and to work at an office (63%, +11).  
 
Support for the use of the “Proof of Vaccination” certificates is also higher for travel to other countries (73%, +9), for travel to other Canadian provinces (68%, +9) and for travel inside the same province (62%, +8).  
 
Majorities of Canadians continue to voice satisfaction with three specific aspects of the COVID-19 vaccine rollout in Canada: the vaccination plans and phases outlined by their province (71%, -2 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in July), the pace of vaccination efforts in their province (70%, -2) and the procurement of COVID-19 vaccine doses from the federal government (69%, -3).  
 
As was the case in July, practically nine-in-ten Canadians (88%, =) say they have already been inoculated against COVID-19, or plan to do so.
 
 “In late September, only 9% of Canadians readily acknowledge that they will definitely or probably not get vaccinated against COVID-19,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This proportion includes 66% of Canadians who voted for People’s Party candidates in the most recent federal election.”  
 
Practically seven-in-ten Canadians (69%, -1) say that they wear a mask every time they go out—a proportion that rises to 75% among women and to 71% among Canadians aged 35-to-54.  
 
More than one-in-five Canadians say they are overeating or eating more than usual at home (23%, -4) and cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection (21%, -3).  
 
Fewer Canadians admit to losing their temper more than usual at home (15%, -1), not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection (14%, -2), having a bath or shower less often (12%, -2), drinking more alcohol than usual at home (13%, -1) and brushing their teeth less often than before the pandemic (7%, -2).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 25 to September 27, 2021, among 1,000 Canadian adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 

Fewer Canadians Believe the Worst of COVID-19 is Behind Us

Only 26% of Albertans are satisfied with how their provincial government is handling the pandemic.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 23, 2021] – The proportion of Canadians who envision a quick end to the COVID-19 pandemic has reduced drastically since the middle of the summer, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, just under half of Canadians (48%) believe the worst of the pandemic is behind us, down 24 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in July.  
 
Conversely, more than a third of Canadians (36%, +21) think that the worst of COVID-19 is ahead of us.
 
“Almost two thirds of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (64%) believe that the COVID-19 situation will not worsen,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Significantly smaller proportions of Canadians aged 35-to-54 (50%) and aged 55 and over (39%) hold the same view.”
 
More than four-in-five Canadians (84%) consider the COVID-19 pandemic as a real threat, while 12% disagree and 4% are undecided.  
 
Fewer than one-in-five Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party (5%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (6%) and the Conservative Party (16%) in this month’s federal election suggest that COVID-19 is not a real threat.  
 
The proportion of “pandemic skeptics” reaches 22% among Canadians who cast ballots for the Green Party and 58% among those who supported the People’s Party.  
 
More than half of Canadians (55%, -6) are satisfied with the way the federal government in Ottawa has dealt with COVID-19—including majorities of those who reside in Atlantic Canada (60%), Quebec (60%), Ontario (56%) and British Columbia (51%).  
 
Satisfaction is slightly lower this month for the way in which municipal governments (60%, -3) and provincial governments (56%, -6) have performed during the pandemic.  
 
At least two thirds of residents of Quebec (67%, -4) and British Columbia (66%, -5) are satisfied with the way their provincial administrations have managed COVID-19, along with half of those in Ontario (50%, -1).  
 
The situation is extremely different in Alberta, where only 26% of residents are satisfied with the provincial administration on this file. This represents a 20-point decrease since July and the lowest level recorded for a government of any level since Research Co. started asking this question in March 2020.  
 
Seven-in-ten Canadians (71%) agree with allowing K-12 students to go back to in-class learning in their province. Support for this measure is highest in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (79%), followed by Ontario (72%), Quebec (71%), British Columbia (69%), Atlantic Canada (65%) and Alberta (61%).  
 
More than four-in-five Canadians (84%) are in favour of requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on September 18 and September 19, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Dave Doe

All Tied Up as Canadians Prepare to Vote in the Federal Election

Support for both the Liberal Party and the Conservative Party is 32%, while approval of their two leaders is also identical (42%).  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 19, 2021] – Voters in Canada head to tomorrow’s federal election with the two main contending parties enjoying the same level of voter support across the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 32% of decided voters (-2 since a similar Research Co. poll conducted earlier this month) would cast a ballot for the candidate of the Liberal Party in their constituency, while 32% (+2) would support the contender of the Conservative Party.  
 
The New Democratic Party (NDP) is in third place with 19% (-1), followed by the Bloc Québécois with 7% (=), the People’s Party with 6% (+1) and the Green Party with 4% (+1). In addition, 1% of decided voters in the country would vote for a different political party or an independent candidate.  
 

On a regional basis, the Liberals are in first place in Atlantic Canada (42%, with the Conservatives at 27%), Quebec (34%, with the Bloc at 31%) and Ontario (37%, with the Conservatives at 30%).  
 
Conversely, the Conservatives dominate in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (43%, with the NDP at 23%) and Alberta (50%, with the NDP at 21%). In British Columbia, the Conservatives are slightly ahead of the New Democrats (33% to 31%), with the Liberals at 25%.  
 
The Green Party gets its best result in British Columbia (6%, but reaching 14% in its stronghold of Vancouver Island). The People’s Party is particularly prevalent in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (10%) and Alberta (8%).  
 
As the campaign draws to a close, the approval rating for the two main contenders is exactly the same. Just over two-in-five Canadians (42%) approve of the way both Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau and Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole have performed in their jobs. The disapproval rating is higher for Trudeau (53%) than it is for O’Toole (47%).  
 
NDP leader Jagmeet Singh has the highest approval rating (51%, +2), while the numbers are significantly lower for Green Party leader Annamie Paul (24%, +1) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (20%, +5). Since the start of the campaign, one-in-four Canadians report having an improved opinion of both Singh (26%) and O’Toole (25%). The proportions are significantly lower for Trudeau (16%), Paul (10%) and Bernier (also 10%).  
 
Trudeau remains ahead when Canadians are asked which of the five leaders running nationwide campaigns would make the best Prime Minister (31%, -2), followed by O’Toole (27%, +1), Singh (19%, +1), Bernier (7%, +2) and Paul (2%, =).  
 
More than a quarter of Canadians (27%, +4) think health care is the most important issue facing the country. The economy and jobs is second on the list with 22% (=), followed by housing, homelessness and poverty (15%, -1) and the environment (10%, -2).  
 
The COVID-19 pandemic is the most important issue for 8% of Canadians—a proportion that rises to 16% in Alberta.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted on September 18 and September 19, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada, and 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for the survey of Canadians and +/- 3.5 percentage points for the survey of British Columbians, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Iouri Goussev

Canadians Pick Trudeau to Manage Pandemic, O’Toole for Jobs

There is no clear leader on two matters: housing, homelessness and poverty, and transportation projects.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 15, 2021] – The incumbent prime minister is the first choice of Canadians to handle issues such as health care and the COVID-19 pandemic, while the leader of the official opposition is preferred for financial and public safety concerns, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
The online survey of a representative national sample asked Canadians to select which one of the five federal party leaders who are running nationwide campaigns is the best person to manage 16 different issues.  
 
More than a third of Canadians (36%) think Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is better suited to handle the COVID-19 pandemic, followed by Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole with 22%, New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Jagmeet Singh with 12%, People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier with 6% and Green Party leader Annamie Paul with 2%.  
 
More than three-in-ten Canadians also pick Trudeau to manage foreign affairs (31%), child care (also 31%) and regulations related to firearms (also 31%).  
 
Earlier in the campaign, Erin O’Toole was tied with Justin Trudeau on the foreign affairs file,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In the final week before votes are cast, Trudeau has a five-point lead on this particular issue.”  
 
The Liberal leader is also ahead of all rivals on being the best person to handle immigration (29%), health care (also 29%), the environment (28%), Indigenous issues and reconciliation (27%), seniors care (26%), and racism and discrimination (also 26%).  
 
One third of Canadians (33%) believe O’Toole would be the best leader to manage the economy and jobs, followed by Trudeau with 29%, Singh with 15%, Bernier with 4% and Paul with 2%.  
 
The Conservative leader is in first place on three other issues: crime and public safety (29%), accountability and leadership (27%), and energy and pipelines (also 27%).  
 
There is a tie on two specific concerns. Across the country, 25% of Canadians select either Trudeau or Singh as the best leaders to manage housing, homelessness and poverty. When asked about transportation projects, equal proportions of respondents pick Trudeau and O’Toole (25% each).  
 
Paul gets her best rating on the environment (14%), while Bernier scores highest on the COVID-19 pandemic (6%).  
 
In a survey released by Research Co. this week, health care, the economy and jobs, housing homelessness and poverty, and the environment were identified as the most important issues facing Canada.
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 13, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Tobi 87
 
 

Liberals Regain Lead, Conservatives and NDP Drop in Canada

One-in-ten Conservative Party voters from 2019 say they will cast a ballot for the People’s Party in this month’s election.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 14, 2021] – As Canada heads to the final week of campaigning in the 2021 federal election, the governing Liberal Party is ahead of its competitors, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 34% of decided voters in Canada would support the Liberal candidate in their constituency, up one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in late August.  
 
The Conservative Party is second with 30% (-2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 20% (-2), the Bloc Québécois with 7% (+1), the People’s Party with 5% (+2) and the Green Party with 3% (-1). In addition, 1% of decided voters in the country would back a different party or an independent candidate.  
 
The Conservatives remain ahead of the Liberals among male voters (36% to 31%) and voters aged 55 and over (35% to 31%). The Liberals hold the upper hand over the Conservatives among female voters (38% to 25%) and voters aged 35-to-54 (39% to 30%). The Liberals are also in first place among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (37%, with the NDP at 27% and the Conservatives at 18%).  
 
In Atlantic Canada, the Liberals remain the most favoured option for voters (40%, with the Conservatives at 34%). In Quebec, the governing party holds an eight-point lead over the Bloc (37% to 29%).  
 
Half of decided voters in Alberta (50%) would support the Conservative candidate in their constituency, along with more than two-in-five (43%) of those who reside in Saskatchewan and Manitoba.  
 
The race remains closely contested in Ontario, where the Liberals are slightly ahead of the Conservatives (37% to 34%) and in British Columbia, where the three main federal parties are virtually tied (30% for the Conservatives, 29% for the New Democrats and 28% for the Liberals).  
 
The People’s Party is benefiting from a higher level of support in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (9%), Alberta (7%) and Ontario (6%). In fact, 10% of Canadians who supported the Conservatives in the 2019 federal election say they will be voting for the People’s Party in 2021.  
 
Almost one-in-four Canadians (23%, -3) think health care is the most important issue facing the country today, followed by the economy and jobs (22%, +2), housing, homelessness and poverty (16%, +1) and the environment (12%, -1).  
 
Across Canada, the NDP’s Jagmeet Singh continues to post the highest approval rating among the five leaders who are running nationwide campaigns (49%, -2), followed by Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau (43%, -2), Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole (40%, -1), Annamie Paul of the Green Party (23%, +2) and Maxime Bernier of the People’s Party (15%, =).  
 
Singh also remains ahead on personal momentum, with 27% of Canadians saying their opinion of him has improved since the start of the campaign. The numbers on this indicator are lower for O’Toole (22%), Trudeau (15%), Paul (12%) and Bernier (8%).  
 
On the “Best Prime Minister” question, Trudeau remains in first place with 33% (+1), followed by O’Toole (26%, =), Singh (18%, -2), Bernier (5%, +2) and Paul (2%, +1).  
 
“A third of Canadian women (33%) feel Justin Trudeau is the best person to manage the federal government, while only one-in-five (19%) select Erin O’Toole,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The race is significantly tighter among male voters on this same question, with Trudeau at 34% and O’Toole at 33%.”
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 13, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490
 
Photo Credit: Dave Doe
 

Canadians Hold Mixed Views on Which Leader is Best on Issues

Just under one-in-five Canadians (17%) say they intend to vote by mail in this year’s federal election.  
 
Vancouver, BC [September 6, 2021] – As the federal election campaign continues, the three main federal party leaders are connecting in different ways with Canadians on the most important issues facing the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.  
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, just under a third of Canadians (32%) think Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau is the best person to handle crime and public safety.  
 
Trudeau is also the preferred choice of Canadians to manage immigration (30%), health care (29%) and the environment (28%).  
 
Official opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole is the top option for Canadians to handle the economy and jobs (34%), energy and pipelines (32%), and accountability and leadership (27%). O’Toole and Trudeau are tied, with 30% each, when Canadians are asked about the best leader to manage foreign affairs (30%).  
 
New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Jagmeet Singh is the most popular leader to deal with housing, homelessness and poverty (27%), with Trudeau and O’Toole tied at 24%.  
 
Health care is identified as the most important issue facing Canada for 26% of respondents, followed by the economy and jobs with 20%, housing, homelessness and poverty with 15% and the environment with 13%.  
 
The survey also asked Canadians about other characteristics and topics related to the three main federal party leaders. Trudeau emerged as the most popular option to be the Prime Minister in the event of another Quebec referendum (31%) and to represent Canada at the next round of climate change talks (30%).  
 
The incumbent prime minister is also ahead on four personality traits: having a drink with you at the local bar (28%), being on your sports team (also 28%), babysitting your kids or a relative’s kids (25%) and being part of your trivia quiz team (23%, with Singh close behind at 21%).  
 
Singh is practically tied with Trudeau on two of the items tested: having a coffee or tea with you at the local coffee shop (27%, with Trudeau at 26%) and giving you a good recommendation on a book to read (22%, with Trudeau at 21%).  
 
More than three-in-ten Canadians express a preference for O’Toole on three separate matters: negotiating with U.S. President Joe Biden on trade and security issues (34%), being the Prime Minister in the event of a terrorist attack (32%) and negotiating with Russia over Arctic sovereignty (31%).  
 
“There is a theme developing when it comes to the perceptions of Canadians on the three main party leaders,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While Trudeau and Singh score highly on some of the personality traits, like hanging around at a bar or coffee shop, O’Toole has a decisive advantage on foreign policy items.”  
 
This week, there will be two televised debates organized by the Leaders’ Debate Commission. More than two-in-five Canadians (42%) agree with the Commission’s decision to not extend an invitation to these debates to People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier, while 33% disagree and 25% are undecided.  
 
The results are similar when Canadians are asked about the presence of Maverick Party leader Jay Hill on the televised meetings, with 44% agreeing with the decision to leave him out, 27% disagreeing and 29% saying they are not sure.  
 
Almost half of Quebecers (49%) are in favour of the Commission’s decision to leave both Bernier and Hill off the stage.  
 
Across the country, 17% of Canadians say they plan to vote by mail this year—a proportion that includes 30% of British Columbians and 21% of Albertans.  
 
While more than one-in-four Canadians (26%) plan to cast their ballot during Advance Voting from September 10 to September 13, more than two-in-five (44%) intend to vote on Election Day (September 20).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490

Conservatives Close Gap in Canada as Liberal Lead Disappears

Justin Trudeau’s approval rating fell to 45% (-5 since June), but he is still ahead of Erin O’Toole in the “Preferred PM” question.
 
Vancouver, BC [August 31, 2021] – The federal election in Canada is currently a dead heat between the two most prominent parties in the country, a new Research Co. poll has found.
 
In the online survey of a representative national sample, 33% of Canadian decided voters would cast a ballot for the candidate of the Liberal Party in their riding, down five points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June.
 
The Conservative Party remains in second place with 32% (+2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 22% (+2), the Bloc Québécois with 6% (+1), the Green Party with 4% (-1) and the People’s Party with 3% (+2). Fewer than 1% of decided voters would vote for the Maverick Party, for another party or for an independent candidate.
 
In June, the Liberals were ahead of the Conservatives by 15 points among female decided voters in Canada. This month, the advantage has narrowed to just eight points (36% to 28%). The Tories are now in first place among male decided voters (36% to 31%).
 
The Liberals are still popular among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (34%, followed by the NDP with 29%) and among decided voters aged 35-to-54 (38%, with the Conservatives at 32%). The Tories hold a seven-point advantage over the Liberals among decided voters aged 55 and over (37% to 30%).
 
The Liberals are in first place among decided voters in Atlantic Canada (40%) and Quebec (also 40%). The Conservatives have outright leads in Alberta (49%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (46%).
 
There are close races developing in two Canadian provinces. In Ontario, the Conservatives and the Liberals are essentially tied (36% and 35% respectively). In British Columbia, the Liberals—who were leading in a Research Co. survey conducted in early August—have fallen to third place (28%), with both the Conservatives and the New Democrats at 32%.
 
There is some movement when Canadians are asked about the most important issue facing the country. Health care is first with 26% (-3), followed by the economy and jobs with 20% (-3) and housing, homelessness and poverty with 15% (+1). The environment is fourth on the list with 13% (+6).
 
“While health care remains the dominant issue for Atlantic Canadians and Quebecers, financial matters are crucial for those who reside in Alberta,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “One-in-five Ontarians and British Columbians are worried about housing, but the issue that has seen the biggest gains since June is the environment.”
 
The approval rating for Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau stands at 45% at the end of the month. This is higher than the numbers posted by Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole (41%, +7) and lower than NDP leader Jagmeet Singh (51%, +1).
 
Just over one-in-five Canadians (21%, -11) approve of the way Green Party leader Annamie Paul is handling her duties, while there was no significant movement for People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (15%, +1).
 
When Canadians are asked which one of the five leaders who are running nationwide campaigns would make the best head of government, the incumbent prime minister also lost some ground. Trudeau is in first place with 32% (-5), followed by O’Toole (26%, +11), Singh (20%, +4), Bernier (3%, =) and Paul (1%, -1).
 
Since the start of the campaign, Trudeau posts a negative momentum score (-24, with 39% of Canadians saying their opinion of him has worsened). Paul and Bernier are also in negative territory (-18 and -19 respectively), while O’Toole is even and Singh is at +10 (with 27% of Canadians reporting a better assessment of the current NDP leader).
 
Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2021, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.
 

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.

778.929.0490