BC NDP Ahead of Rivals as Campaign Starts in British Columbia

John Horgan has a 17-point lead over Andrew Wilkinson when voters are asked who would make the Best Premier.

Vancouver, BC [September 24, 2020] – As British Columbia prepares for a unique electoral campaign in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic, the governing New Democratic Party (NDP) is in first place, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 44% of decided voters in British Columbia would support the BC NDP candidate in their constituency in the election scheduled for October 24. The BC NDP has gained three points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in May.

The BC Liberals are in second place with 37% (+4), followed by the BC Green Party with 13% (-3) and the BC Conservative Party with 4% (-5). 

The BC NDP holds a 12-point lead among decided female voters (47% to 35%). The race is significantly closer among decided male voters (41% for the BC NDP and 39% for the BC Liberals).

The BC Liberals are six-points ahead of the BC NDP in Southern BC (43% to 37%). 

The BC Green Party has its best numbers among decided voters aged 18-to-34 (22%, with the BC NDP at 38%) and in Vancouver Island (22%, with the BC NDP at 50%).

Two thirds of British Columbians (67%, -6) approve of the way Premier and BC NDP leader John Horgan is handling his duties, while one-in-four (25%, +7) disapprove.

Since May, the approval rating for BC Liberals leader Andrew Wilkinson dropped by nine points to 39%. Recently selected BC Green Party leader Sonia Furstenau holds similar numbers (37%), while the rating is significantly lower for BC Conservative Party leader Trevor Bolin (23%, -12).

When likely voters are asked who would make the Best Premier of British Columbia, more than two-in-five (44%) select Horgan, while 27% choose Wilkinson. Furstenau and Bolin are in single digits (7% and 2% respectively) and 21% are undecided.

More than one-in-four likely voters (26%, -2) think health care is the most important issue facing the province. Housing, poverty and homelessness is a close second at 24% (+7), followed by the economy and jobs (21%, =), COVID-19 (11%, -10), crime and public safety (8%, +6) and the environment (7%, +3).

“At the start of the provincial campaign, the most pressing concerns of voters in British Columbia vary greatly depending on age,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Housing, poverty and homelessness is especially important for those aged 18-to-34 (29%), while the economy and jobs is top of mind for those aged 35-to-54 (26%) and health care is paramount for those aged 55 and over (29%).”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 21 to September 23, 2020, among 750 likely voters in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.6 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

Photo by James Wheeler

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Liberals Hold a Six-Point Lead Over Conservatives in Canada

The economy and jobs (30%) and health care (25%) are identified as the most important issues facing the country.

Vancouver, BC [September 17, 2020] – The governing Liberal Party is ahead of all other contenders in Canada’s federal political scene, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 38% of decided voters would support the Liberal candidate in their constituency if an election were held today, down one point since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in May.

The Conservative Party is second with 32% (+2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 17% (=), the Bloc Québécois with 8% (+3), the Green Party with 3% (-4) and the People’s Party with 1% (=).

“Among decided voters, the Liberals are the most popular party in Atlantic Canada (45%) and Ontario (43%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The Conservatives lead in Alberta (58%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (45%).”

In Quebec, the Liberals are five points ahead of the Bloc (39% to 34%). In British Columbia, the three main federal parties are locked in a close race (Conservatives 34%, Liberals 31%, New Democrats 29%).

Three-in-ten Canadians (30%) say the economy and jobs is the most important issue facing the country right now, followed by health care (25%), housing, homelessness and poverty (12%), the environment (7%), and accountability and leadership (6%).

Residents of Alberta are particularly preoccupied with the economy and jobs (52%, the highest proportion across all regions), while Atlantic Canadians are more worried about health care (44%).

Housing, homelessness and poverty is a bigger concern in British Columbia and Ontario (each at 19%) than in other Canadian provinces, while Quebec has the highest proportion of residents who think the environment is the most important issue right now (16%).

Across the country, 51% of Canadians approve of the performance of Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau, while 45% disapprove. The incumbent prime minister has his best numbers with Canadians aged 18-to-34 (59%), Ontarians (58%) and Quebecers (52%). 

The approval rating for opposition and Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole stands at 33%, with 34% of Canadians disapproving and 33% being undecided. O’Toole’s rating is highest in Alberta (50%) and lowest in Quebec (26%).

More than two-in-five Canadians (44%) approve of the way NDP leader Jagmeet Singh has handled his duties, while the rating is significantly lower for Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet (20%, and 42% in Quebec), interim Green Party leader Jo-Ann Roberts (21%) and People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier (14%).

Almost two-in-five Canadians (38%) think Trudeau would make the best Prime Minister of Canada. O’Toole is second on the list with 23%, followed by Singh with 13%. Blanchet, Bernier and Roberts are in single digits.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 13, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Embrace Walking as a Fitness Strategy

Two thirds are walking more than they did before the COVID-19 pandemic, as participation in team and racket sports declines.

Vancouver, BC [September 15, 2020] – Most British Columbians are partaking in a specific exercise during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two thirds of British Columbians (66%) say they are walking for fitness more often now than they did before the pandemic began.

Across the province, about one-in-four residents say they are running or jogging (26%) and cycling (24%) more often now than before COVID-19.

Metro Vancouverites are more likely to say they are running or jogging more now (28%). Residents of Southern BC are cycling (34%) and hiking (30%) significantly more at this stage than their counterparts in other regions.

Just under one-in-five British Columbians are also becoming more avid practitioners of yoga (19%), hiking (18%) and golf (also 18%). Women in the province are practicing yoga at a higher rate (22%) than men (17%). 

There are other fitness activities that have seen a decline in participation. One-in-four British Columbians (24%) are not lifting weights as much as they did before the pandemic—a proportion that rises to 31% among those aged 18-to-34. 

In addition, one-in-five of the province’s residents (21%) are not relying on cardiovascular cross-trainer machines—such as ellipticals, stationary bikes and treadmills—as much as they used to.

“The fear of infection is keeping some British Columbians away from their usual exercise routines, particularly visits to gyms,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The top two pandemic fitness activities for British Columbians, walking and jogging, do not require much in the way of equipment.” 

In May, a Research Co. survey found that 47% of British Columbians would not go back to the gym without a vaccine against COVID-19, including 54% of women.

About three-in-ten British Columbians (29%) say they are swimming less often now than they did before the pandemic. Smaller proportions of residents say they are not participating as often on water sports (24%), racket sports (19%), team sports (18%) and climbing (16%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 3 to September 5, 2020, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Biden Keeps National Lead Over Trump in United States Race

The Democratic nominee is regarded as the best person to handle health care, the environment and race relations.

Vancouver, BC [September 9, 2020] – Democratic Party presidential nominee Joe Biden remains ahead of Republican Party incumbent Donald Trump in the United States presidential race, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of likely voters, 53% of decided voters (unchanged since a Research Co. poll conducted in August) will vote for Biden in the election, while 44% (+2) would cast a ballot for Trump.

Support remains low at the national level for Libertarian Party nominee Jo Jorgensen (1%), Green Party nominee Howie Hawkins (also 1%) and other candidates (also 1%).

Among decided voters, Trump gets his best numbers with men (55%) and Americans aged 35-to-54 (54%). Biden leads with women (63%), Americans aged 18-to-34 (57%) and Americans aged 55 and over (61%).

Among White decided voters, Trump is ahead of Biden (51% to 47%). Majorities of decided voters of African American descent (83%) and Hispanic and Latino origin (70%) would support the Democratic nominee.

“Just 7% of likely voters in the United States have not chosen a candidate to support on Election Day,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 4% of decided voters say they may change their mind and support another candidate in the election.”

When asked about their motivation for supporting each of the two major party nominees, almost half of Trump voters (46%) say the most important factor is the candidate’s ideas and policies, followed by his party (30%). 

More than a third of Biden voters (36%) say the candidate’s ideas and policies are paramount, followed by disgust with other candidates (18%) and a desire for change (also 18%).

When likely voters are asked which one of the two main candidates is better suited to handle specific issues, Biden remains well ahead on nine issues: health care (52%), the environment (51%), race relations (also 51%), education (50%), COVID-19 (48%), government accountability (47%), foreign policy (46%), managing the deficit (44%) and energy and oil (43%).

In August, the two contenders, were practically tied on five issues. This month, the Democratic nominee has gained points on three: immigration (Biden 46%, Trump 39%), crime (Biden 44%, Trump 35%) and national defense (Biden 44%, Trump 41%). The numbers are tighter on job creation (Biden 44%, Trump 41%) and the economy (Biden 45%, Trump 42%).

By a 2-to-1 margin, Americans continue to reject the notion of postponing the U.S. presidential election to a later date because of the COVID-19 pandemic. While 29% of likely voters support this course of action, 65% disagree with it.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among 1,114 likely voters in the United States and 1,036 decided voters in the 2020 presidential election. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.9 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 3.0 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: AgnosticPreachersKid 

For more information on this poll, please contact:Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Almost Half of Canadians Expect COVID-19 Pandemic to Worsen

Public support for requiring all customers to wear a mask or face covering when they are indoors reaches 85% across the country.

Vancouver, BC [September 8, 2020] – Canadians hold a gloomier view of the COVID-19 pandemic than they did two months ago, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 46% of Canadians think the worst of the COVID-19 outbreak is “definitely” or “probably” ahead of us, up 11 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in June. The proportion of Canadians who think the worst of COVID-19 is “behind us” dropped from 49% in June to 37% in September.

On a regional basis, British Columbians are more likely to believe that the worst of the pandemic lies ahead (61%) than residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (50%), Alberta (45%), Quebec (44%), Ontario (40%) and Atlantic Canada (42%).

Nine-in-ten Canadians (90%) agree with two regulations that have been in place for weeks: keeping the border with the United States closed to non-essential travel, and placing all travellers arriving to Canada into a mandatory 14-day quarantine or isolation period.

Public support is also extremely high (85%) for requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside. When Research Co. posed this same question to Americans this month, 90% were in favour of this guideline.

A majority of Canadians (51%) agree with allowing K-12 students to go back to in-class learning in their province, while two-in-five (42%) disagree.

Satisfaction with the way provincial governments have handled the COVID-19 pandemic fell by six points since late June to 69%. The rating remained at 83% in British Columbia, but fell in Ontario (68%, -8), Quebec (67%, -2) and Alberta (57%, -5).

Just under two thirds of Canadians (64%, -6) are satisfied with the way the federal government has managed COVID-19. The rating is the same (64%, -6) for municipal governments.

There has been an extraordinary increase in the proportion of Canadians who say they are wearing a mask every time they go out. This month, 70% of Canadians say they are behaving this way, up from 48% in late June and just 14% in May.

“Women are more likely to be wearing a mask every time they go out (75%) than men (65%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Canadians aged 18-to-34 are also more observant of this practice (74%) than their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (70%) and those aged 55 and over (66%).”

More than seven-in-ten Ontarians (81%), Quebecers (73%) and Albertans (71%) say they are always wearing masks outside. The proportion is lower for residents of Atlantic Canada (65%), British Columbia (56%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (53%).

A third of Canadians (33%, -7) say they clean the groceries they buy to prevent infection, and 22% (-1) are not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection.

Almost one-in-four Canadians (23%, -6) say they are overeating or eating more than usual at home. The figures are stable on Canadians drinking more at home (17%, -1) and losing their temper more often (15%, -1).

Across the country, three-in-four Canadians (74%, -1) say they are willing to take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from August 30 to September 1, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Americans Chide Federal Government’s Response to Pandemic

Men in the United States are more likely to believe that the worst is “behind us” than women.

Vancouver, BC [September 7, 2020] – More than half of Americans are disappointed with the federal administration’s response to COVID-19, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 39% of Americans say they are satisfied with how the federal government has dealt with the outbreak, up two points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in August.

A majority of Americans (56%, +3) say they are dissatisfied with the way the federal administration has handled the pandemic, including 64% of Democrats.

The assessment is different for two other levels of administration. More than half of Americans say they are satisfied with the way their local governments (56%, -5) and their state governments (also 56%, unchanged) have dealt with the outbreak.

Across the United States, nine-in-ten Americans (90%, +8) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside.

Two thirds of Americans (66%, +1) say they will “definitely” or “probably” take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available, while just over one-in-five (22%, -3) “probably” or “definitely” will not.

More than half of Americans (55%, +1) disapprove of Donald Trump’s performance as president—including 83% of Democrats, 81% of African Americans, 64% of women, 63% of Americans aged 55 and over.

Two months prior to Election Day, the approval rating for Trump stands at 42%. Satisfaction with how Trump is handling his duties is highest among Republicans (86%), Fox News watchers (65%) Americans aged 35-to-54 (53%), men (52%) and White Americans (48%).

Almost half of Americans (47%, +10 since August) think the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic is behind, while 40% (+11) believe it still lies ahead.

“There is an enormous gender gap in the perceptions of Americans on the future of the pandemic,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 58% of men in the United States believe the situation will improve, only 37% of women share the same point of view.”

White Americans are also more likely to believe that the worst of COVID-19 has passed (51%) than Americans of Hispanic and Latino origin (35%) and African Americans (23%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 4 to September 6, 2020, among 1,200 American adults.  The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Four Canadians Call for Investigation into Birth Tourism

More than half think Canada should consider establishing new guidelines for birthright citizenship.

Vancouver, BC [September 4, 2020] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians believe the issue of “birth tourism” requires the attention of federal lawmakers, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 78% of Canadians agree with the federal government establishing a committee to investigate the full extent of “birth tourism” in Canada.

“Birth tourism” is the practice of traveling to a specific country for the purpose of giving birth there and securing citizenship for the child in a country that has birthright citizenship. Canada allows expectant mothers who are foreign nationals to gain automatic citizenship for their children born in Canada.

There have been reports of unregulated “for profit” businesses that have facilitated the practice of “birth tourism” in Canada. Two-in-five Canadians (41%) say they have followed media stories related to the issue of “birth tourism” in the past year “very closely” or “moderately closely”.

“Residents of British Columbia are more likely to be paying attention to this issue, partly because of the situation that has unfolded in the City of Richmond,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Almost half of British Columbians (49%) are following stories about ‘birth tourism’, compared to just 34% of Albertans.”

Seven-in-ten Canadians (71%) think “birth tourism” can be unfairly used to gain access to Canada’s education, health care and social programs. In addition, more than half of respondents agree that “birth tourism” can degrade the value of Canadian citizenship (59%) and can displace Canadians from hospitals (56%).

Two thirds of Canadians (67%) believe birthright citizenship may have made sense at one point, but now people have taken advantage of existing rules. Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to agree with this view (76%).

A majority of Canadians (54%) think the country should “definitely” or “probably” consider establishing new guidelines for birthright citizenship, while 34% would “definitely” or “probably” maintain existing regulations.

Support for a new approach to birthright citizenship in Canada is highest in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (66%), followed by Alberta (60%), British Columbia (56%), Atlantic Canada (53%), Ontario (52%) and Quebec (48%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 28 to August 30, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Support for New Organ and Tissue Donation Rules Rises in Canada

Seven-in-ten Canadians think their province should consider every adult an organ and tissue donor unless they specifically opt-out.

Vancouver, BC [August 25, 2020] – Seven-in-ten Canadians are in favour of their province implementing new regulations for organ and tissue donation after death, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 70% of Canadians believe their province should “definitely” or “probably” implement an “Active Donor Registration” system for organ and tissue donation after death. This represents at seven-point increase since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in August 2019.

Some jurisdictions around the world have established “Active Donor Registration” systems for organ and tissue donation. Under these systems, every person over the age of 18 is considered an organ and tissue donor after death unless they specifically opt-out of a registry.

 

“Public support for Active Donor Registration has increased markedly over the past year across Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Sizeable majorities of Canadians in every region of the country would favour enacting this modification for organ and tissue donation after death in their own province.”

 

The highest level of support for an “Active Donor Registration” system for organ and tissue donation after death is observed in Alberta (74%), followed by Manitoba and Saskatchewan (73%), Quebec (also 73%), Atlantic Canada (also 73%), Ontario (68%) and British Columbia (65%).

Two thirds of Canadians aged 35-to-54 (67%) support the change to an “Active Donor Registration” system in their province. The proportion of supporters for this modification is higher among Canadians aged 55 and over (69%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (75%).

Only 18% of Canadians believe their province should not move to implement an opt-out system for organ and tissue donation—down seven points in a year—and 12% are undecided.

In 2019, Nova Scotia’s House of Assembly unanimously passed the “Human Organ and Tissue Act”. The law makes every single person who has resided in the province for at least a year a potential organ and tissue donor after death. Nova Scotians who do not wish to be donors are able to opt-out of the system.

Nova Scotia’s “Human Organ and Tissue Act” will come into effect on January 18, 2021.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 7 to August 9, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Maintain Confidence in the Health Care System

Long wait times are still seen as the biggest problem, along with a shortage of medical professionals.

Vancouver, BC [August 18, 2020] – Three-in-four Canadians express commitment to the health care system and are opposed to a decrease in federal funding for medical services, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 76% of Canadians are “very confident” or “moderately confident” that the country’s health care system would be there to provide help and assistance if they had to face an unexpected medical condition.

On a regional basis, Ontarians are more likely to express confidence in the health care system (82%) than residents of British Columbia (75%), Alberta (also 75%), Quebec (74%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (69%) and Atlantic Canada (67%).

When asked about the biggest problem facing the health care system right now, 31% of Canadians mention long wait times, down two points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in January 2019.

A shortage of doctors and nurses is second on the list of problems with the health care system with 26% (+8), followed by bureaucracy and poor management with 13% (-11).

Fewer Canadians cite inadequate resources and facilities (8%), a lack of a wider range of services for patients (6%), little focus on preventive care (also 6%) and insufficient standards of hygiene (3%).

“Long wait times remain a major health care issue for residents of Ontario and Quebec,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Concerns about a shortage of doctors and nurses are more prevalent in Atlantic Canada.”

Across the country, 30% of Canadians (+5) believe Canada’s health care system works well, and only minor changes are needed to make it work better.

A majority of respondents (55%, -5) think there are some good things in Canada’s health care system, but many changes are required.

Only 9% of Canadians (-4) say the country’s health care system has so much wrong with it that we need to completely rebuild it.

A majority of Canadians (51%) disagree with the notion of health care in Canada becoming better than it is now if it were run by the private sector, and three-in-four (75%) are opposed to the federal government making cuts to health care funding in order to reduce government debt.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 7 to August 9, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Americans Reject Delaying the 2020 Presidential Election

Among decided voters, Democratic candidate Joe Biden keeps a sizeable advantage over incumbent Donald Trump. 

Vancouver, BC [August 7, 2020] – Most likely voters in the United States reject the notion of delaying the presidential election that is scheduled for November, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of likely voters, two thirds of respondents (68%) think the election should not be postponed to a later date because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Majorities of likely voters who identify as Democrats (75%), Independents (67%) and Republicans (59%) believe this year’s presidential ballot should go on as planned.

More than half of decided voters (53%) would support prospective Democratic nominee Joe Biden in the November election, while 42% would vote for Republican incumbent Donald Trump.

Support is decidedly lower for Libertarian nominee Jo Jorgensen (2%), Green nominee Howie Hawkins (1%) and other candidates (also 1%).

These results are largely unchanged at the national level since the July Research Co. survey that also placed Biden ahead by double-digits among decided voters.

The bulk of support for Biden comes from women (59%), decided voters aged 18-to-34 (54%) and African Americans (71%). The race is closer among men, where Biden is slightly ahead of Trump (47% to 45%). Among White voters, Trump is practically tied with Biden (48% to 47%).

More than nine-in-ten decided voters (92%) say they are certain that they will vote for their chosen candidate in the election. This includes 94% of those who intend to support Trump and 91% of those who plan to vote for Biden.

There are some sizeable differences when supporters of the two main contenders are asked about the factors for their choice.

About a third of decided voters who support Trump (34%) say their main motivator is the candidate’s ideas and policies, while fewer point to disgust with other candidates (23%) and Trump’s political party (22%).

Biden voters are primarily motivated by disgust with other candidates (30%), and to a lesser extent by the candidate’s ideas and policies (23%) and his political party (21%).

When asked which one of the two main candidates is better suited to handle specific issues, Biden holds the upper hand on the environment (50%), health care (49%), race relations (48%), education (47%), COVID-19 (46%), government accountability (45%), foreign policy (43%), energy and oil (41%) and managing the deficit (40%)

The two contenders are tied or virtually even on five issues: crime (Trump 39%, Biden 39%), the economy (Trump 43%, Biden 41%), job creation (Trump 42%, Biden 41%), immigration (Biden 42%, Trump 40%) and national defense (Trump 41%, Biden 41%).

“In our June survey, Trump was ahead of Biden on job creation, the economy and national defense,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Now the numbers on these issues have tightened considerably, while Biden has also gained ground on energy and oil.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on August 3 and August 4, 2020, among 1,018 likely voters in the United States and 946 decided voters in the 2020 presidential election. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for likely voters and +/- 3.2 percentage points for decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our datasets here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Most Americans Think Worst of COVID-19 Pandemic Lies Ahead

Sizeable majorities of Americans of all political stripes agree with requiring all customers to wear masks at indoor premises.

Vancouver, BC [August 5, 2020] – Americans remain worried about the COVID-19 pandemic, and fewer are satisfied with the way federal authorities have handled the situation, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Americans believe “the worst is ahead” when it comes to the COVID-19 pandemic. This represents an 11-point increase since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June.

Americans aged 55 and over are more likely to expect the COVID-19 situation to worsen (58%) than those aged 35-to-54 (48%) and those aged 18-to-34 (47%).

“In June, 47% of Americans thought they had left the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic behind,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This month, only 37% feel the same way.”

Across the United States, just over a third of Americans (37%) are satisfied with how the federal government has dealt with the COVID-19 outbreak, down nine points since June. Dissatisfaction has risen from 48% to 53%.

The level of satisfaction in how the COVID-19 pandemic has been handled continues to be higher when Americans rate their state governments (56%, -6) and their local governments (61%, -3).

More than four-in-five Americans (82%) agree with requiring all customers or visitors entering an indoor premise to wear a mask or face covering while inside. Support for this measure is high among Democrats (90%), Independents (83%) and Republicans (73%).

About two thirds of Americans (65%, -4) say they would take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available, while 25% (+5) say they would not.

Three-in-ten Republicans (31%) say they are not willing to get inoculated against COVID-19, along with 27% of Independents and 18% of Democrats.

The approval rating for U.S. President Donald Trump stands at 43% this month, up three points since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in July. Satisfaction with Trump’s performance is highest among men (47%), Americans aged 35-to-54 (also 47%), White Americans (46%), Fox News watchers (66%) and Republicans (83%)

A majority of Americans (54%, -2) disapprove of how Trump is handling his duties, including 59% of women, 57% of Americans aged 55 and over, 62% of African Americans and 83% of Democrats.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted on August 3 and August 4, 2020, among 1,200 American adults.  The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our datasets here and here and download the press release here.

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Half of Canadians Have Experienced Racism in Social Interactions

Three-in-four Canadians (74%) think the policy of multiculturalism has been good for the country, up 15 points since January 2019. 

Vancouver, BC [July 21, 2020] – Racist behaviour in day-to-day social interactions has impacted half of Canadians, with a significantly higher incidence reported among those who identify as First Nations, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians say they have experienced racist behaviour in day-to-day social interactions with others, such as shopping and taking public transit.

More than four-in-five Canadians who identify as First Nations, Métis or Inuit (86%) say they have endured racism in day-to-day social interactions, along with 78% of Canadians of African descent, 68% of South Asians, 63% of East Asians and 58% of Southeast Asians.

Slightly lower proportions of Canadians acknowledge experiencing racist behaviour on social media (46%), at school (43%) or at work (41%).

A third of Canadians say they have endured racism during interactions with police or law enforcement officers (33%) and the health care system (29%).

“Canadians of European ancestry are less likely to have endured racism, and the numbers on specific settings go through significant fluctuations according to a person’s ethnicity,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Three-in-five Canadians of African descent (61%) have experienced racism during interactions with police, and seven-in-ten Canadians who identify as First Nations (70%) have endured racism at work.”

Majorities of Canadians of First Nations (56%), South Asian (also 56%) and African descent (58%) say they have faced racism during interactions with the health care system.

When asked if they have witnessed behaviour that they would describe as racist, more than half of Canadians say they have perceived it in day-to-day social interactions (58%) and social media (57%), while fewer have seen it at school (50%), at work (47%), dealing with police and law enforcement (41%) and engaging with the health care system (34%).

Half of Canadians (49%) believe race relations in Canada have improved over the past two years, while 29% feel they have worsened. Men (56%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (61%) are more likely to think that the situation is getting better.

Three-in-four Canadians (74%) believe the policy of multiculturalism has been “very good” or “good” for Canada—up 14 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in January 2019.

The proportion of Canadians who think multiculturalism has been “bad” or “very bad” for the country fell to 18% (-15).

As was the case last year, Canadians are divided when assessing two distinct concepts. Almost half (46%, -3 since January 2019) believe Canada should be a melting pot and immigrants should assimilate and blend into Canadian society.

A smaller proportion of Canadians (41%, -1) believe the country should be a mosaic and think cultural differences within Canadian society are valuable and should be preserved.

Quebecers (51%), Ontarians (48%) and Albertans (also 48%) are more likely to endorse the concept of the melting pot for Canada. Smaller proportions of residents of British Columbia (43%), Atlantic Canada (38%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (also 38%) concur.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online survey conducted from July 3 to July 8, 2020, among 2,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.2 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our data tables here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Four Canadians Would Take a COVID-19 Vaccine

Satisfaction with how provincial governments have handled the pandemic increased to 75% across the country.

Vancouver, BC [July 7, 2020] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians would welcome the idea of inoculation against COVID-19, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-four Canadians (75%) would take a vaccine against COVID-19 if one ultimately becomes available, up two points since a similar survey conducted in April.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) say they are satisfied with the way the federal government has handled the COVID-19 outbreak, up one point since May. The same proportion (70%) are satisfied with the performance of their municipal administrations during the pandemic.

Satisfaction with the way provincial governments have managed COVID-19 increased by 11 points to 75% across Canada. The rating improved in the four most populous provinces: British Columbia, (83%, +14), Ontario (76%, +23), Quebec (69%, +3) and Alberta (62%, +6).

The proportion of Canadians who say they wear a mask every time they go out has increased dramatically, from 14% in May to 48% in late June.

“There is a big gender gap when it comes to wearing protective masks outside the home,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While more than half of women in Canada (57%) are not leaving their home without a mask, only 39% of men are partaking in the same behaviour.”

Two-in-five Canadians (40%, -7) are cleaning the groceries they buy to prevent infection, and about one-in-four (23%, -17) say they are not ordering food from restaurants at all because they fear infection.

The proportion of Canadians who acknowledge eating more than usual at home remained at 29%, while 18% (+5) are drinking more at home and 16% (-2) are losing their temper more often.

Across the country, only 37% of Canadians expect to be able to attend or host a large social gathering before December, while fewer believe they will be able to shake the hand of a person who is not at their home (33%), attend a live sporting event (26%) or travel abroad (21%).

Half of Canadians (49%, +25 since May) believe the worst of the COVID-19 outbreak is “behind us”—a proportion that rises to 57% in Quebec.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 26 to June 28, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Flag First, Monarchy Last in List of What Makes Canadians Proud

The proportion of Canadians who say the monarchy makes them proud fell by seven points since 2019.

Vancouver, BC [July 3, 2020] – The perceptions of Canadians on specific institutions and features of the country went through noticeable changes over the past year, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than four-in-five Canadians (82%) say they are proud of the Canadian flag. This represents an 11-point decrease since a similar Research Co. poll conducted in June 2019.

More than seven-in-ten Canadians express pride in the health care system (75%, -2), the Canadian Armed Forces (74%, -15) and multiculturalism (71%, +5).

More than three-in-five Canadians say they are proud of the state of democracy in Canada (66%, -4), hockey (64%, -8) indigenous culture (62%, +6) and bilingualism (61%, +6).

“Compared to last year, there are significant fluctuations in the way Canadians feel about features and institutions of the country that elicit inclusiveness and togetherness,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There is a deeper appreciation this year for multiculturalism, Indigenous culture and bilingualism than what we saw in 2019.”

Just over half of Canadians express pride in the Canadian justice system (55%, +15), the Canadian economy (53%, -27), Parliament (53%, +8) and the monarchy (40%, -7).

The monarchy is once again the lowest rated item on this list. Women (45%) and British Columbians (50%) are more likely to say that this particular institution elicits feelings of pride than men (35%) and Quebecers (31%).

Quebec posts the highest rating of any region for bilingualism (71%) and the lowest for the health care system (61%).

Two thirds of Ontarians and British Columbians (67% each) say that indigenous culture elicits feelings of pride, followed by residents of Atlantic Canada (60%), Quebec (58%), Alberta (56%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (55%).

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to be proud of multiculturalism (77%) than those aged 35-to-54 (70%) and those aged 55 and over (66%).

There are some major differences along political lines on two items. Large majorities of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2019 federal election say they are proud of Parliament (72%) and the Canadian justice system (66%).

Significantly fewer Canadians who cast ballots for the Conservative Party and the New Democratic Party (NDP) feel the same way about Parliament (41% and 42% respectively) and the Canadian justice system (54% and 43% respectively).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 26 to June 28, 2020, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Lockdown Exposes Areas Where Canadian Couples Are Struggling

Men get significantly lower grades from their partners on cooking meals, taking care of children and keeping the home clean.

Vancouver, BC [June 23, 2020] – While most Canadians who live with their spouse or partner appear happy with the way their significant others have behaved during the COVID-19 pandemic, there are certain aspects where men are faring worse than women, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of adults in Canada who live with a spouse or partner, 69% say they “strongly approve” of the performance of their significant other, while 22% “moderately approve.”

“Ontario (66%), Quebec (64%) and British Columbia (also 64%) are the regions of Canada with the lowest proportion of men and women who strongly approve of their spouses of partners,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are significantly higher in Alberta (75%), Atlantic Canada (80%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (83%).”

The level of “strong approval” of a spouse or partner is higher from men (73%) than women (65%). Both genders currently have the same level of “strong disapproval” (6%).

A majority of Canadians who are living with a spouse or partner say they are “very satisfied” with the way their significant other has handled eight issues:

  • Personal hygiene (69%)
  • Taking care of pets (57%)
  • Cooking meals (56%)
  • Taking care of children (55%)
  • Keeping the home clean and tidy (54%)
  • Overall attitude and demeanour (also 54%)
  • Making decisions about what to do (53%)
  • Providing emotional support when they need it (also 53%).

While 62% of men are “very satisfied” with their spouse or partner on keeping the home clean and tidy, the proportion drops to 46% when women answer the same question. In addition, 64% of men are “very satisfied” with their partner when it comes to cooking meals, but just 48% of women concur.

A similar gap is observed on taking care of children, with just 46% of women saying they are “very satisfied” with their partners—compared to 63% when men are asked.

On all eight issues, the level of strong satisfaction is higher among Canadians who have lived with their current spouse or partner for more than 10 years.

Almost half of Canadians who are living with a spouse or partner (46%) say the experience of the COVID-19 pandemic has made them grow closer as a couple. A similar proportion (47%) report no change in their relationship, while 6% say they have become more distant.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 8 to June 17, 2020, among 796 adults in Canada who live with a spouse or partner. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca