Most Americans Blame Trump for Government Shutdown

More than half disagree with the president’s assertion that the current situation at the U.S.-Mexico border as “a crisis”.

Vancouver, BC [January 22, 2018] – A majority of Americans think the current president deserves the blame for the partial shutdown of the federal government, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Americans, 57% of United States residents think Donald Trump is more responsible for the situation, while one third (33%) blame the Democrats in Congress.

Trump’s approval rating stands at 38% this month, while 58% of Americans disapprove of his performance as president.

While a sizable majority of self-described Republicans (74%) agree with the way Trump is handling his duties, the proportion is decidedly lower among Independents (36%) and Democrats (6%).

The survey was conducted after President Trump addressed the nation from the Oval Office to discuss border security. Most Americans (54%) disagree with his assertion that the situation in the U.S.-Mexico border is “a crisis”.

Trump’s proposal to build a wall along the entire U.S.-Mexico border is endorsed by two-in-five Americans (40%), while a majority (55%) is opposed. Republicans are more likely to agree with the president’s plan (76%) than Independents (38%) and Democrats (7%).

Almost three-in-five Americans (59%) think it would be unreasonable for President Trump to declare a “national emergency” over the current situation at the U.S.-Mexico border.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 2 to January 4, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Carol M. Highsmith

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Would Ban Smoking in Multi-Family Buildings

Agreement with existing regulations on smoking in public spaces and private vehicles is also high. 

Vancouver, BC [January 17, 2019] – Most Canadians are in favour of prohibiting residents of apartment buildings and condominiums from smoking, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, seven-in-ten Canadians (72%) support banning smoking (tobacco and marijuana) in multi-family buildings, while one-in-four (25%) are opposed.

The highest level of support for the ban is observed among women (74%), Canadians aged 55 and over (also 74%), Quebecers (75%) and British Columbians (74%).

More than two thirds of Canadians (69%) agree with the federal government’s decision to implement plain and standardized tobacco packaging. This was one of several areas covered by Bill C-5, which also established guidelines for vaping products.

Practically nine-in-ten Canadians (89%) agree with banning smoking in indoor public spaces, public transit facilities and workplaces (including restaurants, bars and casinos).

In addition, three-in-four Canadians (76%) agree with banning smoking in private vehicles occupied by children.

“The regulations that have been in place for years to deal with smoking across Canada remain popular,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There is a high level of support for bringing multi-family dwellings to the list of places where people should not be allowed to smoke.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 2 to January 4, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Willing to Ban Clothing Donation Bins

More than seven-in-ten residents would have no problem taking clothes to a specific facility for donation, instead of relying on bins.

Vancouver, BC [January 15, 2019] – A sizable proportion of British Columbians supports a ban on clothing donation bins, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 70% of British Columbians agree with banning all clothing donation bins in their municipality after several fatalities have been reported in connection with the containers.

Across the province, 69% of residents say they have donated clothes to a charity through a bin or drop box over the course of the past year.

Women (76%) and British Columbians aged 55 and over (also 76%) are the most likely to have placed garments in a clothing donation bin over the past 12 months.

Most British Columbians (71%) believe charities should find a way to collect clothes without having to use donation bins.

In addition, 73% of residents say they would have no problem taking clothes to a specific facility for donation, instead of relying on the bins.

“All demographic groups in British Columbia are voicing support for the elimination of clothing donation bins,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “It is important to note that majorities of the heaviest current users of these containers—women and residents aged 55 and over—say they are willing to travel to a specific venue to make their donations.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 2 to January 4, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Mike Klassen

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Website Visits Crucial for British Columbians Who Dine Out

Almost two-in-five left a gratuity of more than 20% at a restaurant, while one-in-five walked out without leaving a tip.

Vancouver, BC [January 10, 2019] – Many British Columbians are venturing on the web to decide where to have their next meal outside the home, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 47% of British Columbians say they visited a restaurant’s website before making a reservation over the past year—including 62% of those who reside in the Lower Mainland.

Across the province, 48% of residents say they dine out about once a month or less. Conversely, 13% say they dine out a couple of times a week or more—a proportion that reaches 18% among those aged 18-to-34.

One-in-five British Columbians (19%) took a photograph of a dish that was served to them or someone at their table when dining out. Residents aged 18-to-34 are decidedly more likely to have pointed their cameras at food inside a restaurant (33%) than those aged 35-to-54 (18%) and those aged 55 and over (7%).

Millennials are also more likely to report waiting or standing in line for more than hour to enter a restaurant (12%, compared to the provincial average of 7%).

For the most part, the experiences of British Columbians who dine out have been positive over the past year. Almost two-in-five (38%) say they left a restaurant after tipping more than 20%, while only one-in-five (21%) admit to exiting a restaurant without tipping.

More than a third of British Columbians (35%) complimented good service to a restaurant manager over the past year—including 43% of those aged 55 and over—and only 15% actively complained about bad service.

One-in-four British Columbians (25%) say they sent a bad dish to the kitchen while dining out, and 28% affirm they were served hot food that was too cold.

More than half of British Columbians (52%) say they would go back to a restaurant where the food is great, but too expensive—including 70% of those aged 18-to-34.

Fewer British Columbians would revisit a restaurant where the food is great, but the service is terrible (36%) or a restaurant where the food is cheap, but not great (24%). Only one-in-twenty residents (5%) would go back to a restaurant where the service is great, but the food is terrible.

“There is an interesting gender gap when it comes to revisiting cheap restaurants that are not remarkable,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Men in British Columbia (29%) are more likely to have no qualms about this than women (18%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 2 to January 4, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Metro Vancouverites Ponder Best Way to Enjoy Granville Island

While 44% would turn the venue into a pedestrian zone, 61% say they would visit more often is parking were easier.

Vancouver, BC [January 8, 2019] – Granville Island remains a popular destination for Metro Vancouverites, but there is no clear consensus on whether personal vehicles should be allowed inside the venue, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 22% say they have gone to Granville Island six times or more over the past two years, while 42% have visited two to five times.

Among those who have visited the venue, 29% say their main reason was to go shopping at the Public Market, while 25% went sightseeing. Other reasons cited by visitors to Granville Island are going for a meal ort snack (17%), going to an Arts and Culture performance (16%) or shopping at a store that is not located inside the Public Market (5%).

Respondents were provided with three statements about the future of Granville Island. Metro Vancouverites are almost evenly split on whether the venue should be turned into a pedestrian zone where no personal vehicles would be allowed (44% agree with this idea, and 47% disagree).

Three-in-five Metro Vancouverites (61%) say they would visit Granville Island more often if it were easier to find a parking spot, and a majority (58%) disagrees with making all parking spaces at the venue paid.

“Residents of the City of Vancouver are decidedly more likely to support the notion of a car-free Granville Island,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But more than three-in-five of those who live in Surrey and other Metro Vancouver municipalities say they would actually make the trip to Granville Island more often if it were easier to find a place to park their vehicles.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 25, 2018, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca