British Columbians Worried About Real Estate Tax Expansion

Most residents think the provincial government will apply the additional school tax for properties valued at $1 million.

Vancouver, BC [November 22, 2018] – Many British Columbians are concerned about the possibility of a new tax on real estate being expanded to include lower priced properties, a new Research Co. poll conducted for STEPUP has found.

The provincial government introduced the additional school tax of 0.2% on the value of homes between $3 million and $4 million, and a tax rate of 0.4% on the portion of a home’s value that exceeds $4 million.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, seven-in-ten residents (70%) think the provincial government will likely expand the additional school tax to properties valued from $2 million to $2.99 million.

A majority of residents (53%) think the provincial government will likely expand the additional school tax to properties valued from $1 million to $1.99 million, and two-in-five (42%) think the tax may be expanded to include all properties.

Three-in-five residents (61%) approve of an eventual expansion of the additional school tax to properties valued from $2 million to $2.99 million. However, 66% of home owners who reside in a property currently assessed at $2 million or more disapprove of this expansion.

Most residents (51%) disapprove of expanding the additional school tax to properties valued from $1 million to $1.99 million, and almost three-in-four residents (73%) disapprove of expanding the additional school tax to all properties.

“While two thirds of British Columbians (67%) approve of the additional school tax in its current form, support drops if it is applied to lower priced properties,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Homeowners are decidedly opposed to the idea of the tax being expanded to include their places of residence.”

In addition, most British Columbians (57%) are not confident that the revenue generated by the additional school tax will be used to provide education in the province.

Almost half of British Columbians (46%) think provincial politicians have sought to divide over the past year, while more than a third (36%) think they have sought to unite.

A majority of BC New Democratic Party (NDP) voters in the last provincial election (56%) think politicians have sought to unite, while seven-in-ten BC Liberal voters (70%) think they have sought to divide.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 2 to September 5, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Larry LaRose

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Canadians Would Not Date Someone Who Vapes

Most residents agree with the government’s decision to prohibit the sale of vaping products to minors and ban certain flavours.

Vancouver, BC [November 21, 2018] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians appear to be put off by users of electronic cigarettes, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 50% of Canadians say they would not consider dating a person who used e-cigarettes.

The areas where most residents say they would not date vapers are British Columbia (60%) and Ontario (52%).

Across the country, 11% of Canadians say they have used an electronic cigarette in the past year—a proportion that rises to 19% among those aged 18-to-34, 15% in Atlantic Canada and 13% in Alberta.

Majorities of Canadians agree with a series of policies to address vaping that were implemented by the federal government as part of Bill S-5, including prohibiting the sale of vaping products to minors (88%), restricting any reference to e-cigarettes as healthier than standard tobacco products (73%), restricting the use of testimonials and “lifestyle” advertising for vaping products (71%) and banning certain flavours of vaping products, such as “confectionery” (62%).

In addition, three-in-four Canadians (76%) believe there should be a ban on the use of e-cigarettes in public places where smoking is currently prohibited, and 91% want vaping products that contain nicotine to display a warning, similar to the one used for tobacco products.

“While vaping has been around for a few years, it has not become a pervasive ritual in Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Most Canadians are comfortable with vapers getting the same treatment that is afforded to smokers.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 27 to August 30, 2018, among 1,001 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Dead Heat in British Columbia’s Electoral Reform Referendum

Millennials are more likely to support changing the system, while Baby Boomers are keener on leaving things as they are.

Vancouver, BC [November 21, 2018] – There is no clear favourite as voters in British Columbia ponder their options in the referendum on electoral reform, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, 40% say they will “definitely” or “probably” vote for the current First Past the Post system, while 40% say they will “definitely” or “probably” vote for a proportional representation system.

Across the province, 15% of voters are undecided, including 20% of women, 19% of those aged 18-to-34 and 18% of those aged 35-to-54.

“A majority of voters aged 55 and over (57%) hold extremely favourable views of the current system,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In stark contrast, more than half of those aged 18-to-34 (53%) prefer proportional representation.”

Most British Columbians who plan to vote to keep the current First Past the Post system cite confusion with the options that are on the ballot (57%) as the main reason for their decision. Three-in-ten of these voters (31%) also consider that the existing system is fair because candidates need to win the election in their riding.

Conversely, almost half of proportional representation supporters (48%) think this system is fairer because the share of the votes a party receives is reflected in the number of seats it has in the legislature. Two-in-five of these voters (40%) also think the current system does not work for everybody and needs to be changed.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 14 to November 16, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Robert Bourassa is Best Recent Premier for Quebecers

One-in-four residents of the province think Jean Charest has been the worst recent head of government. 

Vancouver, BC [November 14, 2018] – Long-serving Premier Bourassa is still regarded fondly in Quebec, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 24% of Quebecers believe Bourassa has been the best head of government the province has had since December 1985.

Lucien Bouchard is second on the list with 16%, followed by Jacques Parizeau with 14% and Jean Charest with 6%.

The ranking is lower for Philippe Couillard (4%), Bernard Landry (also 4%), Pauline Marois (3%) and Daniel Johnson Jr. (2%).

“There is no language gap in the perceptions of Quebecers when it comes to Robert Bourassa,” says says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Equal proportions of English and French speakers feel he has been the best recent premier.”

Bourassa is particularly popular among Quebecers aged 55 and over (31%) and those who voted for the Liberal Party of Quebec in this year’s provincial election (35%).

Conversely, those who cast a ballot for the Parti Québécois (PQ) this year believe Parizeau was the superior premier (26%, followed by Bouchard with 21%).

When asked who has been the worst recent premier of Quebec, Charest is first with 25%, followed by Marois with 20%, Couillard with 18% and Parizeau with 6%.

Men are more likely to select Charest as the worst recent head og government (30%, with Marois at 22%). Among women, Marois is in third place with 18%, behind Charest at 21% and Couillard at 20%.

There is a substantial difference when it comes to language on this question. Charest is regarded more negatively by French speakers (31%) and Marois by English speakers (35%)

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 20 to October 22, 2018,among 602 Quebec adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Quebec. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Assembléetest

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Ponder Solutions to Opioid Crisis

Education and awareness campaigns—as well as adding more spaces for drug rehabilitation—are very popular ideas.

Vancouver, BC [November 7, 2018] – British Columbians are clearly worried about the current situation related to the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in their community, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, almost two thirds (64%) refer to the issue as “a major problem”, while 25% consider it “a minor problem.”

“Concerns about opioids are no longer confined to urban centres in British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of residents in all regions of the province believe the problem is severe.”

When asked about specific solutions to the challenge at hand, 90% of British Columbians voice support for launching more education and awareness campaigns about drug use, and 88% would like to create more spaces for drug rehabilitation.

More than three-in-four British Columbians (78%) support reducing the prescription of opioids by medical professionals, and two thirds (66%) would set up more “harm reduction” strategies, such as legal supervised injection sites.

The idea of decriminalizing all drugs for personal use is more divisive, with 50% of residents opposing this course of action and 45% agreeing with it.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to endorse the decriminalization of all drugs for personal use (57%) than those aged 35-to-54 (43%) and those aged 55 and over (38%).

When it comes to the performance of political leaders, two-in-five British Columbians (41%) think BC Premier John Horgan and the provincial government are doing a “very good” or “good job” to come up with solutions to deal with the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs.

The rating is lower for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the federal government (37%) as well as Mayors and Councils across the province (35%).

Earlier this year, the Government of British Columbia launched a lawsuit against drug manufacturers and retailers, in an effort to recover public-health costs associated with an increase in the use of opioids. Across the province, 72% of residents agree with the provincial government’s decision, while 17% disagree with it.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 25 to October 28, 2018, among 801 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca