Vancouverites Remain Supportive of Plastic Reduction Plan

More than three-in-four  residents agree with banning the use of foam cups and take-out containers.

Vancouver, BC [November 27, 2019] – A majority of Vancouver residents continue to favour specific guidelines to reduce the use of plastics in the city, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative municipal sample, almost four-in-five Vancouverites (78%) are in favour of banning the distribution of single-use plastic utensils, unless they are directly requested by customers—down six points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2018.

In June 2018, Vancouver City Council voted to enact prohibitions on the use of specific plastic items as part of its “Zero Waste 2040” strategy. The full details of by-laws related to plastic straws, plastic bags, disposable cups and disposable utensils are expected to be released by November 30.

A ban on all expanded polystyrene foam (or “thermal”) cups and take-out containers will come into effect on January 1, 2020. More than three-in-four Vancouverites (76%, -9) agree with this course of action.

“Public support for the ban on foam cups and take-out containers is highest (87%) among Vancouverites aged 55 and over,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Sizeable majorities of residents aged 18-to-34 (72%) and 35-to-54 (73%) are also in favour of this prohibition.”

A ban on the distribution of single-use plastic straws, with appropriate exemptions for health care needs, is backed by 77% of Vancouverites (-8).

More than four-in-five Vancouverites (83%, -10) believe it would be a “good” idea to require restaurants and coffee shops to provide recycling options for the disposable cups they give out.

Almost two thirds of residents (65%, +11) think it would be a good idea to ban the distribution of disposable cups altogether, while three-in-five (60%, +5) say customers should pay an additional fee for the disposable cups they require when purchasing a beverage.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 12 to November 15, 2019, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Majorities of Canadians Oppose Trophy Hunting and Fur Trade

More than half of residents are also against using animals in rodeos and keeping animals in zoos or aquariums.

Vancouver, BC [November 22, 2019] – Sizeable proportions of Canadians voice opposition to two practices related to human interaction with animals, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than four-in-five Canadians (85%) are opposed to hunting animals for sport and three-in-four (75%) are against killing animals for their fur.

Opposition to the fur trade is highest in Ontario (81%) and British Columbia (79%), but also includes most residents of Atlantic Canada (75%), Quebec (74%), Alberta (also 74%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (61%).

Almost three-in-five Canadians (59%) are opposed to using animals in rodeos. More than half (52%) are against keeping animals in zoos or aquariums.

Residents of Alberta are evenly divided when it comes to the use of animals in rodeos (Agree 49%, Disagree 49%). In Manitoba and Saskatchewan, respondents are more likely to endorse the practice (50%) than to be against it (43%).

Majorities in Atlantic Canada (67%), Quebec (65%), British Columbia (62%) and Ontario (59%) are opposed to using animals in rodeos, as well as 67% of women and 64% of Canadians aged 18-to-34.

Conversely, 75% of Canadians are in favour of eating animals and two thirds (65%) are in favour of hunting animals for meat.

“Canadians hold very different views on the issue of hunting depending on whether the practice will lead to sustenance,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In both cases, the level of animosity towards hunting is higher among women than men.”

The Canadian Football League (CFL) is organizing a rodeo as part of this year’s Grey Cup festivities in Calgary.

Across the country, 35% of Canadians agree with this decision by the CFL, while 46% disagree and 19% are undecided.

Opposition to the idea of holding a rodeo as part of the Grey Cup weekend is highest in British Columbia (53%) and Quebec (51%). 

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 10 to November 13, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Dietmar Rabich

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Drivers Not Signaling Still the Biggest Problem in Canadian Roads

Almost half of Canadians say drivers in their city or town are worse than they were five years ago.

Vancouver, BC [November 20, 2019] – While some progress has been observed since last year, a significant proportion of Canadians continue to have negative experiences with drivers in their municipality, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-five Canadians (61%) say they witnessed a driver not signaling before a turn in the past month, down 10 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2018.

Almost half of Canadians (47%, -14) saw a car taking up two or more spots in a parking lot, and a smaller proportion (44%, -4) witnessed a driver not stopping at an intersection.

Albertans were more likely to see a car occupying more space than necessary in the past month (61%), while residents of Manitoba and Saskatchewan were more likely to witness drivers zooming through intersections (48%).

Over the past month, more than a third of Canadians also experienced a close call on the road, such as slamming the breaks or having to steer violently to avoid a collision (35%, -7) and saw a car turning right or left from an incorrect lane (34%, -11)

“This year’s survey shows some improvement, as fewer Canadians are reporting regrettable behaviour from drivers on the road,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion of respondents across the country who did not experience any problems increased from 16% in 2018 to 21% this year.”

Almost half of Canadians (47%, -3) say drivers in their city or town are worse than they were five years ago, while 40% believe they are the same and 7% think they are better now.

There are only two provinces where a majority of residents claim that driving behaviour has deteriorated: Alberta (57%, +4) and Ontario (52%, +1). British Columbia had the worst score on this question in 2018 (64%). The number dropped to 48% in 2019.

Once again, a majority of Canadians (56%, -2) state that there are specific groups or people in their city or town who are worse drivers than others. The proportion of Canadians who feel this way is highest in Alberta (65%), British Columbia (59%) and Ontario (also 59%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 4 to November 6, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Agree with Physician-Assisted Suicide Rules

Fewer than one-in-five of the province’s residents would completely ban medical assistance in dying.

Vancouver, BC [November 15, 2019] – Most British Columbians are in favour of allowing physician-assisted suicide under the guidelines implemented by the federal government, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, three-in-four British Columbians (75%) support allowing a person to seek medical assistance to die in Canada under the conditions authorized in June 2016.

In Canada, federal legislation allows physician-assisted suicide if five conditions are met:

  • Being eligible for health services funded by the federal government, or a province or territory (or during the applicable minimum period of residence or waiting period for eligibility).
  • Being at least 18 years old and mentally competent.
  • Having a grievous and irremediable medical condition.
  • Making a voluntary request for medical assistance in dying that is not the result of outside pressure or influence.
  • Giving informed consent to receive medical assistance in dying.

“The highest level of opposition to allowing physician-assisted suicide in British Columbia is observed in the Fraser Valley (32%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, Metro Vancouver holds the highest level of support (78%).”

When asked about their personal feeling about medical assistance in dying, almost three-in-five British Columbians (58%) think it should be allowed, but only under specific circumstances.

Fewer than one-in-five British Columbians (18%) think physician-assisted suicide should never be allowed, regardless of who requests it, while 12% believe it should always be permitted.

Just under half of British Columbians (47%) say they are satisfied with the regulations that are currently in place in Canada to deal with the issue of physician-assisted suicide. One-in-four residents of the province (25%) are dissatisfied and a similar proportion (28%) are undecided.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 4 to November 6, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca


Three-in-Four Canadians Back Temporary Ban on Vaping Products

A majority of residents would also support prohibiting flavoured vaping products.

Vancouver, BC [November 13, 2019] – A large proportion of Canadians support enacting a temporary prohibition on the sale and distribution of e-cigarettes, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-four Canadians (74%) would agree with their province implementing a vaping ban similar to the one that was recently enacted in Massachusetts.

Support for a temporary ban on all vaping products is high across all regions of the country, from 71% in Alberta to 77% in Atlantic Canada.

On Sept. 24, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker decreed a temporary four-month ban on all vaping products in the American state, following cases of lung damage associated with the use of e-cigarettes.

Just over one-in-ten Canadians (11%) say they used an electronic cigarette in the past year. The proportion is higher among those aged 18-to-34 (17%) and British Columbians (16%).

More than four-in-five Canadians (85%, -6 since a Research Co. survey conducted in 2018) want vaping products that contain nicotine to display a warning, similar to the one used for tobacco products. 

In addition, 73% of Canadians (-3) call for the use of e-cigarettes to be restricted to areas where smoking is currently allowed, and a majority (57%) want all flavoured vaping products to be banned 

Half of Canadians (50%, unchanged) say they would not consider dating a person who used electronic cigarettes—including 54% of British Columbians.

Canadians aged 55 and over (57%) are more likely to say they would shun a dating prospect because of vaping. The proportion is lower among Canadians aged 35-to-54 and 18-to-34 (47% each).

“When it comes to vaping and dating, there is no gender gap across Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Equal proportions of men and women say they wold not consider courting a vaper.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 21 to October 23, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca