Canadians Divided on Physically Disciplining Children

Three-in-four agree with parents using “reasonable force”, but fewer think schoolteachers should be able to do the same.

Canadians are of two minds when it comes to the use of force to correct children, even if the Criminal Code makes no distinction between parents and schoolteachers, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Canadians, three-in-four respondents (74%) agree with allowing parents to physically discipline children in Canada.

When asked whether schoolteachers should be allowed to physically discipline children in Canada, only 43% of respondents agree, while half (50%) disagree.

“There is a sizeable gender gap on this issue,” says Mario Canseco, President at Research Co. “While half of men (51%) have no problem with physical punishment in the classroom, more than half of women (55%) disagree.”

Section 43 of the Criminal Code of Canada reads: “Every schoolteacher, parent or person standing in the place of a parent is justified in using force by way of correction toward a pupil or child, as the case may be, who is under his care, if the force does not exceed what is reasonable under the circumstances.”

Several countries around the world, including Denmark, Finland, Germany, New Zealand and Sweden, have adopted laws that forbid physical punishment towards children, either by parents or schoolteachers.

In Canada, Bill S-206—introduced by Senator Céline Hervieux-Payette—seeks to remove the justification in the Criminal Code available to schoolteachers, parents and persons standing in the place of parents of using force as a means of correction toward a pupil or child under their care.

When asked whether it’s time to abolish the legislation that allows schoolteachers and parents to use “reasonable force” to discipline children in Canada, one third of Canadians (34%) agree, but a majority (53%) disagree.

More than three quarters of Canadians (77%) report that they were physically disciplined as children by a parent or guardian—including 89% of Albertans, 84% of Conservative Party voters in the 2015 federal election and 83% of Canadians aged 55 and over.

Three-in-ten Canadians (31%) say they were physically disciplined as children by a schoolteacher. Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to say a schoolteacher physically punished them (54%) than those aged 35-to-54 (21%) and those aged 18-to-34 (17%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from May 7 to May 11, 2018, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Canadians Reject Taxes on Streaming Services

Quebec is the only region of the country where the idea is widely supported.

The idea of paying provincial or federal sales taxes for online streaming services is rejected by half of Canadians, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Canadians, 51% of respondents disagree with the idea, while more than a third (36%) agree with it.

Last year, the federal government suggested that companies that provide streaming media and video on-demand online—including Netflix, iTunes, Amazon and Spotify—should be taxed in Canada, with any revenues generated from this tax being used to fund Canadian film and television productions. Because these companies have no physical presence in Canada, they are currently not compelled to collect or remit provincial or federal sales taxes.

In the end, the federal government announced it would not tax streaming providers, and Netflix announced a $500 million investment in original Canadian film and television productions.

Rejection to a tax on streaming services is high across most provinces, with one glaring exception. While large majorities of Canadians in the Atlantic Provinces and the Prairies are opposed to this tax, 54% of Quebecers are in favour of it.

The Government of Quebec announced in March that it will require foreign-based online services to collect the general sales tax (GST) from its customers, starting in January 2019. Quebec claims it is losing up to $270 million each year by not collecting these taxes.

“This is an issue where Millennials and Baby Boomers across the country are in agreement,” says Mario Canseco, President at Research Co. “These two groups have the highest level of opposition to a tax on streaming services.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from May 7 to May 11, 2018, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Extraordinary Support for Banning Big Money in Vancouver Politics

Almost three-in-five residents believe parties should not raise funds from corporations and unions at all. 

Vancouver, BC [May 10, 2018] – Residents of Vancouver are overwhelmingly in favour of the push to ban big money in municipal politics, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of City of Vancouver residents, almost nine-in-ten respondents (87%) agree with the legislation enacted by the Government of British Columbia to ban corporate and union donations in local election campaigns, and establish a limit of $1,200 on an individual’s donations to a party and its candidates.

Sizeable majorities of residents across all demographics and party affiliations are in favour of the new guidelines, which came into effect in September 2017.

When introduced, the legislation that banned corporate and union donations in local election campaigns did not prevent municipal political parties from raising money from corporations and unions if those funds were used exclusively toward operational expenses, and not on an election campaign.

The Government of British Columbia announced a change to the Local Election Campaign Financing Act regulations on April 27, to ensure that union and corporate donations cannot be used to fund any expenses of elector organizations during the year of a general local election.

Almost three-in-five Vancouverites (59%) think the original law should “probably” or “definitely” change, and believe parties should not raise funds from corporations and unions at all.

Conversely, just over a quarter of Vancouverites (27%) believe the law should “probably” or “definitely” remain as originally tabled, and argue that parties should raise funds from corporations and unions for operational expenses.

It is important to note that support for modifying existing legislation is high among Vancouverites who voted for Vision Vancouver’s Gregor Robertson in the 2014 mayoral election (58%) and those who supported Kirk LaPointe of the Non-Partisan Association (NPA) in the same contest (61%).

“Vancouverites are decidedly happy with the ban on big money in municipal politics,” says Mario Canseco, President at Research Co. “And the spirit of the ban, when it comes to operational expenses, is shared by voters who cast ballots for the top two vote-getters in Vancouver’s last mayoral election.”

In a final question, four-in-five respondents (80%) voiced support for the recently approved zoning bylaw amendments that will allow grocery stores in Vancouver to sell alcoholic beverages.

According to the new guidelines, alcoholic beverages will not be in plain view of grocery store customers, who will have to go into a separate section of the store for their purchases.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from April 28 to April 30, 2018, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Photo Credit: Matthew Field.

Most Vancouverites Would Allow Permanent Residents to Vote

Citizens born in Canada are more likely to support the change than those who gained Canadian citizenship after immigrating from another country.

Vancouver, BC [May 8, 2018] – The proposal from Vancouver City Council that seeks to allow Permanent Residents of the city to cast ballots in municipal elections is currently supported by a majority of residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of City of Vancouver residents, 57% of respondents support allowing Vancouver’s Permanent Residents to vote in municipal elections, while more than a third (35%) are opposed.

In Canada, Permanent Residents are eligible for most social benefits that Canadian citizens receive (including health care coverage), can live, work or study anywhere in Canada, and are protected under Canadian law and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Permanent Residents must pay taxes and respect all Canadian laws at the federal, provincial and municipal levels. Permanent Residents cannot currently vote or run for political office in Canada, but are eligible to do so once they apply—and are granted—status as Canadian citizens.

Vancouver City Council’s motion asks the Government of British Columbia to “make the necessary changes” to allow Permanent Residents to vote in Vancouver’s municipal elections. About 60,000 Permanent Residents currently live in Vancouver.

Support for allowing Permanent Residents of Vancouver to vote in municipal elections is highest among residents aged 18-to-34 (68%), those who live on the East Side of Vancouver (62%) and women (58%).

“Residents of Vancouver aged 55 and over are more skeptical about the proposed change than their younger counterparts” says Mario Canseco, President at Research Co. “The level of support for the change is higher among Vancouverites who were born in Canada (58%) than among those who acquired citizenship after immigrating from another country (48%).”

Three-in-five Vancouverites (63%) think it makes sense to allow Permanent Residents, who contribute to the city by working, living and paying taxes here, to vote in Vancouver’s municipal elections.

However, 49% concede that allowing Permanent Residents to vote sets a dangerous precedent, as foreigners who have not sworn allegiance to Canada would have a say in the formation of governments.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from April 28 to April 30, 2018, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Photo Credit: Differense.

Carr Extends Lead as Preferred Mayoral Contender in Vancouver

Half of Vancouverites would like to see a single mayoral candidate supported by Vision Vancouver, the Greens, One City and COPE this year.

Vancouver, BC [May 3, 2018] – Green Party of Vancouver councillor Adriane Carr remains the most popular prospective mayoral contender in the city, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of City of Vancouver residents, more than a third of Vancouverites (35%) think Carr would be a “good choice” for Mayor—a nine-point increase since a Research Co. poll conducted in early April.

Only four other prospective contenders reach double digits on this question: current Vision Vancouver councillor Raymond Louie (19%), independent Jean Swanson (17%, +1), current Non-Partisan Association (NPA) councillor Hector Bremner (11%, +5) and current New Democratic Party (NDP) Member of Parliament Kennedy Stewart (10%).

One-in-five Vancouverites (22%) think Louie would be a “bad choice” for Mayor, while 16% (+4) feel the same way about Bremner.

Positive perceptions increased for two other prospective contenders: current Park Board commissioner John Coupar of the NPA (9%, +4) and urban geographer Colleen Hardwick (8%, +3). Simon Fraser University (SFU) professor Shauna Sylvester and activist Morgane Oger are seen as “good choices” for mayor by 7% of residents.

Half of Vancouverites (50%) would like to see a single mayoral candidate supported by Vision Vancouver, the Green Party of Vancouver, One City and the Coalition of Progressive Electors (COPE) this year, while one-in-four (23%) disagree.

Agreement with the notion of a “unity candidate” from the centre-left is highest among women (54%), respondents aged 55 and over (52%) and residents of the East Side (54%).

Vancouverites who voted for Vision Vancouver’s Gregor Robertson or COPE’s Meena Wong in 2014 are definitely more likely to endorse the idea of a “unity candidate” (64% and 62% respectively). Those who voted for Kirk LaPointe of the NPA four years ago are less interested (65% disagree).

The city is divided on whether it is time for the NPA to take control of City Council and the Mayor’s office, with 33% agreeing with the statement, 33% disagreeing with it, and 34% saying they are not sure. The highest level of agreement on this question is observed among men (44%), those in the highest income bracket (42%) and homeowners (41%).

Almost half of respondents (47%) say they are more enthusiastic about the upcoming municipal election than they have been in years past, while more than a third (37%) disagree. Robertson voters from 2014 are less likely to be enthusiastic about this year’s race (49%) than Wong (60%) and LaPointe (71%) voters.

When asked how they intend to vote in the 2018 election to Vancouver City Council, almost half of residents (47%) say they will “definitely” (9%) or “probably” (38%) select candidates individually, regardless of their affiliation. Conversely, almost two-in-five Vancouverites (38%) say they will “definitely” (11%) or “probably” (27%) select the most or all candidates from a specific party.

LaPointe voters from 2014 are decidedly more likely to say they’ll cast ballots on a partisan basis (68%), while Robertson and Wong voters are more likely to select candidates individually (57% and 54%, respectively).

Almost half of Vancouverites (49%) say they will “definitely” (15%) or “probably” (35%) prefer to have several parties represented in City Council when this year’s election is over. More than a third of residents (35%) say they will “definitely” (12%) or “probably” (23%) prefer a single party having a majority in Council.

Once again, LaPointe voters from 2014 are more likely to wish for a single party to have a majority (62%), while Robertson and Wong voters are more eager to have several parties in Council (56% and 64%, respectively).

The most important issues facing the City of Vancouver are housing (42%) and cost of living (36%), followed by poverty (5%) and government accountability (4%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from April 28 to April 30, 2018, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.
Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Photo Credit: Kenny Louie.