Support Still Strong for Automated Speed Enforcement in BC

The use of red light cameras to catch vehicles speeding at intersections is backed by two thirds of British Columbians.

Vancouver, BC [July 10, 2019] – Most British Columbians are in favour of a specific type of automated speed enforcement that will be present in some municipalities this summer, a new Research Co. poll has found. 

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, seven-in-ten residents (68%, -2 since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in August 2018) approve of using speed-on-green cameras, or red light cameras that also capture vehicles that speed through intersections.

Support for the use of speed-on-green cameras is highest among women (74%) and British Columbians aged 55 and over (76%). 

“Seven-in-ten British Columbians who do not drive (72%) are in favour of relying on speed-on-green cameras,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In addition, about three-in-five residents who drive five days a week or more (66%), three or four times a week (74%) and once or twice a week (64%) are also in favour of this measure.”

Automated speed enforcement works by using cameras or sensors to pick up a vehicle speeding. A ticket is then issued to the owner of the vehicle. Driver’s license points are not issued as the driver of the vehicle cannot be identified.

Earlier this year, the provincial government announced that 35 existing red light cameras will begin capturing vehicles that are speeding through intersections this summer. The cameras are located in 14 municipalities: Abbotsford, Burnaby, Coquitlam, Delta, Kelowna, Langley, Maple Ridge, Nanaimo, North Vancouver, Pitt Meadows, Port Coquitlam, Richmond, Surrey and Vancouver.

Just over half of British Columbians (52%, -3 since August 2018) approve of point-to-point speed enforcement, which uses cameras at two or more distant points on a road. The average speed of vehicles that pass between points is calculated and tickets are issued to vehicles whose average speed over the distance was excessive.

More than three-in-five British Columbians approve of two other types of automated speed enforcement: 69% (-2 since August 2018) for fixed speed cameras, or cameras that stay in one location and measure speed as a vehicle passes, and 63% (-2 since August 2018) for mobile speed cameras, which can be moved from place to place and measure speed as a vehicle passes.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from June 22 to June 26, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Quebec Leads Canada in Time Spent Making Dinner at Home

British Columbians are more likely to have dinner in front of a television set than residents of other Canadian provinces.

Vancouver, BC [July 5, 2019] – Most Canadians devote less than an hour to prepare dinner at home, but residents of Quebec are more likely to spend longer in the kitchen every night, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 60% of Canadians say they spend anywhere from 31 to 60 minutes preparing dinner for themselves and others in their household on an average weekday. 

Three-in-ten Canadians (30%) spend less than 30 minutes in the kitchen making dinner—a proportion that rises to 38% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan and 33% in Alberta.

“Canadian men are significantly more likely than Canadian women to devote as little time in the kitchen as possible,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 24% of female respondents say they spend less than half an hour making dinner each night, the proportion jumps to 36% among male respondents.”

While only 10% of Canadians devote more than 60 minutes to preparing dinner at home on an average weekday, the proportion rises to 20% in Quebec.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (71%) acknowledge having relied on frozen entrees cooked in the oven to prepare dinner at home in the past month, while three-in-five (60%) consumed frozen entrees cooked in the microwave.

Canadians report that 51% of the dinners they had at home over the course of the past month took place at the dining room, with no television. The remaining 49% of dinners happened at a different part of the home, with the television on.

The percentage of meals that occurred in the dining room is highest in Quebec (60%) and lowest in British Columbia (42%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 31 to June 3, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most British Columbians Agree with Ottawa’s Pipeline Decision

Three-in-five residents are unconvinced that the re-approved expansion will bring lower gas prices to the province.

Vancouver, BC [July 3, 2019] – A majority of British Columbians believe the federal government made the right call in re-approving the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion, but a similar proportion voice dissatisfaction with Ottawa’s overall performance on this file, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 56% of British Columbians (+4 since May 2018) agree with the federal government’s decision to re-approve the pipeline expansion.

One third of British Columbians (33%) disagree with the decision, and 11% are undecided.

Agreement with Ottawa’s course of action is highest among men (66%), British Columbians aged 55 and over (also 66%), residents of the Southern Interior (67%) and BC Liberal voters in the 2017 provincial election (72%).

Almost three-in-five British Columbians (59%) say they are disappointed with the way the federal government has handled the expansion. 

“As expected, dissatisfaction with the way Ottawa handled this issue is practically universal among strong opponents (95%) and moderate opponents (73%) of the project,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But 50% of British Columbians who moderately or strongly support the expansion are also unhappy with the federal government.”

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians (71%) think the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline will create hundreds of local jobs. 

Respondents are evenly divided on whether the pipeline expansion threatens the health and safety of British Columbians, with 46% agreeing with the statement and 44% disagreeing with it. Two-in-five (41%) believe the provincial government should do anything necessary to ensure that the expansion does not happen.

Only 30% of British Columbians recall seeing advertisements in favour of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion over the past few weeks. Among those who were exposed to the ads, 32% said they made them “more likely” to support the expansion.

Only 39% of British Columbians think gas prices will be lower in the province now that the expansion has been re-approved—one of the key messages of the ad campaign undertaken by the Government of Alberta. Three-in-five residents (61%) either disagree with this thought (33%) or are not sure (28%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from June 22 to June 26, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Flag, Armed Forces and Economy Make Canadians Proudest

Only two-in-five respondents in the country say they are proud of the Canadian justice system.

Vancouver, BC [June 28, 2019] – Three institutions and features of Canadian life are more likely to elicit feelings of pride among the country’s citizens, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, at least four-in-five Canadians say they are proud of the Canadian flag (93%), the Canadian Armed Forces (89%) and the Canadian economy (80%).

At least seven-in-ten Canadians are proud of the health care system (77%), hockey (72%) and the state of democracy in Canada.

“Men are significantly more likely than women (83% to 71%) to say that the health care system makes them proud,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “And while 90% of Ontarians are proud of the health care system, the rating plummets to 59% in Alberta and 58% in Quebec.”

More than half of Canadians say they are proud of multiculturalism (66%, including 73% in British Columbia), Indigenous culture (56%, including 63% in British Columbia) and bilingualism (55%, including 64% in Quebec).

The lowest ranked institutions and features included in this survey are the monarchy (47%), Parliament (45%) and the Canadian justice system (40%).

The monarchy has its highest rating in Alberta (57%) and its lowest in Quebec (22%). Parliament fares particularly poorly in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (31%), while fewer than three-in-ten British Columbians (27%) are proud of Canada’s justice system.

When the findings are compared to a similar online survey conducted in 2008, four institutions and features show the largest improvement on a Canada-wide basis: 

  • Parliament (from 32% in 2008 to 45% in 2019).
  • The state of democracy in Canada (from 57% in 2008 to 70% in 2019)
  • The Canadian economy (from 62% in 2008 to 80% in 2019).
  • The health care system (from 50% in 2008 to 77% in 2019).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 31 to June 3, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Just Under Half of Canadians Would Ratify CUSMA Trade Deal

Only one-in-five believe Canada has benefitted the most from free trade in North America.

Vancouver, BC [June 26, 2019] – A plurality of Canadians believe the country’s legislature should ratify a recently signed trade agreement, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 48% of Canadians think the Canada–United States–Mexico Agreement (CUSMA) should be ratified, while more than a third (36%) disagree and 16% are undecided.

Canada, the United States and Mexico signed the CUSMA in 2018. At the time the survey was conducted, none of the three national legislatures had ratified the agreement.

Support for Canada’s ratification of the CUSMA is highest among men (53%), those aged 18-to-34 (57%), British Columbians (51%), Ontarians (50%) and Atlantic Canadians (also 50%).

“More than half of Canadians who voted for the Liberal Party in the 2015 federal election (56%) want to see the CUSMA ratified,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This is significantly higher than what we see among those who voted for the Conservative Party (45%) or the New Democratic Party (NDP) (42%) four years ago.”

Canada, the United States and Mexico have been partners in the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) since 1994.

More than a third of Canadians (36%) believe the United States has benefitted the most from free trade in North America, while one-in-four (26%) select Mexico. 

Only 20% of Canadians believe Canada has been the biggest beneficiary in continental trade. The perception of Canada being the victor in North American trade is lowest among Albertans (6%), British Columbians (11%) and those aged 55 and over (15%).

Across the country, more than three-in-five Canadians (63%) say they are “very confident” or “moderately confident” that the Canadian federal government will do what’s best for the country when it comes to international trade.

Confidence in the federal government’s ability to handle international trade is highest among women (68%), Canadians aged 18-to-34 (66%) and British Columbians (63%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 31 to June 3, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Vancouverites Open to Changes in Single-Family Zoning

A sizeable majority supports a city-wide plan that makes all of Vancouver more affordable and accessible.

Vancouver, BC [June 21, 2019] – A majority of residents of the City of Vancouver would welcome a modification in existing zoning regulations, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative city-wide sample, 71% of Vancouverites think the city should allow the construction of duplexes, fourplexes, townhouses, and 3-4 storey apartments in neighbourhoods where now only single-family homes are permitted.

In addition, about three-in-four Vancouverites think the city should continue its practice of preserving heritage buildings even if it prevents the construction of new rental housing (74%) and are in favour of building more temporary modular housing for the homeless (also 74%).

When asked about specific projects that could be undertaken in their immediate neighbourhood, 28% of Vancouverites say they are not opposed to any type of building.

Fewer than one-in-ten Vancouverites voice opposition to new single-family homes (9%), townhouses (8%), fourplexes (also 8%) and duplexes (6%) in their immediate neighbourhood, and fewer than one-in-five feel the same way about 6-storey rental buildings (19%), 6-storey condo buildings (18%), 4-storey rental buildings (14%) and 4-storey condo buildings (12%).

More than a third of residents are opposed to having a new 20-storey rental (38%) or 20-storey condo building (38%) in their immediate neighbourhood. Three-in-ten (31%) feel the same way about temporary modular housing.

“Opposition to having condos and rental buildings in the neighbourhood is directly related to size,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There is definitely more resistance from residents in all areas of the city when it comes to pursuing larger projects.”

More than three-in-five Vancouverites (63%) say they favour a city-wide plan that emphasizes future growth and allows more people to afford and live in all parts of the city.

Significantly smaller proportions of residents are unsure about the city-wide planning process (19%) or voice support for protecting neighbourhoods from changing in the future (9%) or call for growth in some parts of the city, while keeping theirs intact (also 9%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 8 to April 20, 2019, among 606 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.0 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Think Trump Presidency Has Been Bad for Canada

Justin Trudeau leads Andrew Scheer by a 2-to-1 margin on being best suited to deal with the current American president.

Vancouver, BC [June 19, 2019] – Most people in Canada regard the presidency of Donald Trump in a negative light, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 65% of Canadians think having Trump as President of the United States has been “bad” or “very bad” for Canada.

Negative views on the effect of Trump’s tenure on Canada are highest among women (68%), those aged 55 and over (69%), Quebecers (71%) and British Columbians (73%).

“Only 17% of Canadians think Trump’s presidency has been good for Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Albertans (32%) and people who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2015 federal election (30%) are more likely to have positive views on Trump’s term so far.”

When asked which one of the two main federal party leaders is better suited to handle Trump and Canada’s relationship with the United States, 35% of respondents select Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau, while 17% pick Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Andrew Scheer.

In Alberta, Scheer outranks Trudeau on this question (28% to 16%), but the incumbent prime minister is ahead of his key rival in all other regions of the country, including Quebec (40% to 17%), Ontario (33% to 20%) and British Columbia (35% to 19%).

Two-in-five Canadians (40%) think Trump has performed “worse” than they expected since becoming president, while 46% believe he has done “about the same” as they envisioned.

Only 10% of Canadians believe Trump has “accomplished much” since he became president. Significant proportions of residents think the current White House occupant has “accomplished little” (37%) or believe it is too early to judge his achievements (39%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 31 to June 3, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Support More Action on Child Care

Nine-in-ten consider the investments to build a quality affordable child care system as “very important” or “moderately important.”

Vancouver, BC [June 13, 2019] – In an online survey of a representative provincial sample, 76% of British Columbians think the province should move more quickly to achieve the established goals of more affordable parent fees, more spaces, and better wages and education for those who work in child care settings, a new Research Co. poll conducted on behalf of the $10aDay Child Care Plan has found.

When parents who currently have a child enrolled in child care were asked about their experience, 64% said the current government investments are having a positive impact on their situation.

There is still more to be done, as 70% of parents report that their return to work was delayed because of lack of access to child care.

“British Columbians of all ages, regions and political allegiances agree that children, parents and employers benefit when there’s access to quality affordable child care,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co.

Two thirds of British Columbians (66%) believe the provincial government should continue to put a priority on public funding for child care, to make it more affordable and available for families. 

“Some parents are experiencing benefits of new investments in child care, but many families are still struggling when it comes to cost, finding a licensed space, and educators are still earning low wages—BC need further investments,” says Sharon Gregson, spokesperson for the $10aDay Child Care Plan.

Across the province, almost two-in-five parents who currently have a child in child care (38%) say they waited at least five months before a space became available for their child. Three-in-four parents (76%) say the cost of child care has put a financial strain on their families.

Four-in-five British Columbians (81%) believe that, when child care is affordable and available to parents, more mothers work and pay taxes. An even larger proportion of residents (86%) agree with the notion that having children today costs a lot more than it did 40 years ago.

About the $10aDay Child Care Plan

Since 2011, supporters across the province have advanced the $10aDay Child Care Plan as the solution to BC’s child care chaos calling for parent fees of no more than $10aDay, access to licensed spaces for all families who choose child care, and fair wages for early childhood educators.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 9 to May 12, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Sharon Gregson, $10aDay Child Care Plan.
[c] 604.505.5725
[e] info@10aday.ca

Canadians Are Comfortable Online, But Some Worries Remain

Seven-in-ten have received “scam” emails, and almost two thirds are concerned about someone hacking their devices.

Vancouver, BC [June 11, 2019] – While a large proportion of Canadians have embraced the Internet for banking and shopping, there are still lingering concerns about identity theft, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 87% of Canadians say they are comfortable accessing banking information online, and 86% feel the same way about shopping for goods and services online.

Just over four-in-five Canadians (82%) say they are comfortable commenting on online forums that require their email address, and 73% are comfortable making a charitable donation online.

“As expected, younger residents are less likely to have qualms about performing specific tasks on the Internet,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However, more than a third of Canadians aged 55 and over say they are not comfortable making charitable donations online.”

Over the past couple of months, 64% of Canadians have worried about somebody hacking into their own computer or smartphone. 

More than seven-in-ten Canadians have been concerned recently about computers and technology being used to invade their privacy (71%) and having their personal information stolen over the Internet (72%).

British Columbians (79%), Women (77%) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (74%) are more likely to say they have worried about having their personal information stolen online.

Across the country, 72% of Canadians say they have received an email—sometimes referred to as the “Nigerian Scam”—offering them money for assistance or help, and 62% have received a “phishing” email, where somebody tried to acquire information by masquerading as a trustworthy entity.

One-in-five Canadians (20%) say their email address has been hacked at some point, and 4% say hackers took control of their social media platform.

Two-in-five Canadians (39%) say their computer became infected with a virus while they were browsing the Internet. Men are more likely to have acquired a virus online than women (44% to 34%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 31 to June 3, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most British Columbians Want Slower Speeds on Residential Streets

Two-in-five residents say they perceive a car going over the speed limit on the street where they live “at least once a day.”

Vancouver, BC [June 7, 2019] – A sizeable proportion of British Columbians would like to see changes to municipal speed limits, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 58% of British Columbians say they would “definitely” or “probably” like to see the speed limit reduced to 30 km/h on all residential streets in their own municipality, while keeping the speed limit on arterial and collector roads at 50 km/h.

Support for the implementation of this policy is highest among women (63%), British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (62%) and residents of Vancouver Island (60%).

Earlier this year, Vancouver City Council unanimously passed a motion to establish a pilot project that will see the speed limit reduced to 30 km/h on select residential streets in the city. 

Two thirds of British Columbians (66%) believe the City of Vancouver’s pilot project is a “very good” or “good idea”, while 22% consider it “bad” or “very bad.”

“While many British Columbians are in favour of the City of Vancouver’s pilot project, there are some differences related to political allegiance,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) and the BC Green Party in the last provincial election are more supportive of the project (74% and 72% respectively) than those who voted for the BC Liberals in 2017 (60%).”

More than two-in-five British Columbians (42%) say they see a car that they perceive is circulating above the current speed limit on the street where they reside “at least once a day”, while only 16% say this “never” happens.

Residents of the Fraser Valley (54%), Northern BC (50%) and Southern BC (48%) are significantly more likely to perceive speeding vehicles on their street “at least once a day” than those who live in Vancouver Island (40%) and Metro Vancouver (39%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 26 to May 28, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Class Sizes, Teacher Shortage Worry Parents in British Columbia

Three-in-ten parents describe their own child’s class size as “too big”, while 60% say it is “about right.”

Vancouver, BC [June 5, 2019] – While a sizeable majority of parents in British Columbia are content with the education their children are receiving in school, certain concerns about the system persist, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of parents who have a child enrolled in K-12, 83% of respondents say the experience of their child with the education system has been “very positive” or “moderately positive.”

A majority of parents say they are “very satisfied” or “moderately satisfied” with the quality of instruction their child is getting in English (73%), Science (72%), Social Studies (also 72%), Math (68%), and French (60%). 

In addition, half of parents (50%) are satisfied with what their child is learning in other languages, but 21% are either undecided or say this particular subject is not applicable to their child.

One-in-five parents (21%) identify “large class sizes” as the biggest problem facing the education system right now, while 16% mention a “shortage of teachers” and 15% say it is “lack of safety in schools and bullying”. 

Other issues detected by parents as pressing concerns are an “outdated curriculum” (12%), “inadequate resources and facilities for children” (11%), “labour disputes between teachers and the government” (also 11%) and “bureaucracy and poor management” (9%).

“The education system faces different challenges across British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Large class sizes are an enormous anxiety in Northern BC, while residents of Southern BC are more likely to point to bureaucracy and mismanagement.”

Across the province, three-in-ten parents (31%) say their child’s class sizes are or have been “too big” while 60% describe them as “about right.”

Parents in Northern BC are more likely to say that class sizes are or have been “too big” (43%), followed by those who reside in Southern BC (35%), Vancouver Island (33%), the Fraser Valley (30%) and Metro Vancouver (28%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 20 to May 28, 2019, among 700 parents in British Columbia who have a child enrolled in Kindergarten, Elementary School (Grades 1 to 7) or High School (Grades 8 to 12). The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Drivers in British Columbia Are Considering Electric Vehicles

Seven-in-ten residents agree with the goal of making all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province “zero emission” by 2040.

Vancouver, BC [May 31, 2019] – A significant proportion of car drivers in British Columbia would consider acquiring a “zero emission” vehicle in the future, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 51% of British Columbians who drive their own vehicles say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that the next vehicle they acquire for themselves or their household will be electric.

Majorities of drivers in Metro Vancouver (55%) and Vancouver Island (52%) are likely to consider a “zero emission” vehicle as their next purchase. The proportion is lower in the Fraser Valley (43%), Southern BC (40%) and Northern BC (37%)

When asked about specific issues that might make them less likely to purchase an electric vehicle, 24% of drivers say that they are too expensive when compared to non-electric vehicles, 24% fear becoming stranded if they cannot find a charging station, and 23% say they do not have enough places to charge the vehicle in the areas where they usually drive.

“There are some significant regional differences when the concerns of potential electric vehicle owners are analyzed,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than a third of drivers who reside in Southern BC (35%) and Northern BC (45%) claim they lack places to charge electric vehicles, compared to just 20% among those who live in Metro Vancouver.”

Earlier this year, the Government of British Columbia passed legislation to ensure that, by the year 2040, all light-duty cars and trucks sold in the province will be “zero emission.” Seven-in-ten residents (70%) agree with this decision, while 21% disagree and 10% are undecided.

Almost half of British Columbians (49%) believe the goal established by the provincial government on “zero emission” vehicles is “achievable”, while 42% think it is “not achievable.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 20 to May 22, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Swearing is, By Far, The Biggest Etiquette Faux Pas in Canada

More than half of Canadians say they saw children misbehaving in public while their parents looked the other way.

Vancouver, BC [March 28, 2019] – Canadians report several different incidents involving improper manners over the past month, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 64% of Canadians say they witnessed someone swearing in public—a proportion that climbs to 71% in Alberta.

“It would seem that the language of Canadians is getting more colourful,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than two thirds of women and residents aged 55 and over report hearing someone swearing in public over the past month.”

More than half of Canadians (56%) say they witnessed children behaving badly in public while their parents looked the other way, while just under half saw someone littering or leaving trash behind in a public place (49%), someone interrupting or talking over them while they were speaking (48%) or someone cutting them off the road while they were driving (47%).

Other behaviours reported by Canadians include a person checking their phone or texting during a meeting or social event (45%, including 50% among those aged 55 and over), someone spitting in public (43%, including 50% in British Columbia) and experiencing rude customer service at a store (also 43%, including 47% in Ontario).

Fewer Canadians reported seeing chewing with their mouth open (39%, and 44% in Alberta), someone cutting the line at a store or counter (also 39%, and 47% in Atlantic Canada), someone using a cell phone during a performance or movie (34%, and 44% in Atlantic Canada), or someone making an obscene gesture (33%, including 43% in Alberta), 

The two lowest ranked items on the list of behaviours are someone delivering important information via text or e-mail instead of face-to-face (31%) and someone ignoring, or not responding to an invitation (19%).

There were two positive behaviours that were included in the survey. More than three-in-five Canadians (63%, and 79% in Atlantic Canada) witnessed someone holding the door open for a stranger. Just over one-in-four (27%, and 32% in British Columbia) saw someone giving up their seat for a person who was disabled, pregnant or elderly.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 22 to March 24, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Desire for Abortion Debate is Higher in the U.S. than in Canada

British Columbians and Quebecers are more likely to say that the procedure should be legal under any circumstances.

Vancouver, BC [July 12, 2019] – Americans are more likely than Canadians to call for a nationwide discussion on abortion, a new two-country Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of representative national samples, almost half of Americans (46%) believe a debate about abortion is long overdue in the country and want the discussion to be re-opened. 

Conversely, over a third of Americans (36%) believe there is no point in re-opening a debate about abortion right now.

In Canada, a significantly smaller proportion of residents (37%) would welcome a debate on abortion, while a majority (53%) thinks there is no point in revisiting the issue.

“Democrats in the United States are more likely to wish for a new debate on abortion (42%) than Republicans (34%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In Canada, Conservative Party voters in 2015 are more eager for a discussion (44%) than those who cast a ballot for the New Democrats (33%) or the Liberals (27%).”

Almost half of Canadians (46%) believe abortion should be legal under any circumstances, while more than two-in-five (43%) would allow the procedure only under certain circumstances. 

In the United States, just under three-in-ten Americans (28%) believe abortion should be legal under any circumstances, while almost half (48%) would allow it only under certain circumstances.

While almost one-in-five Americans (19%) think abortion should be illegal in all circumstances, only 5% of Canadians agree with this point of view.

Canadians aged 18-to-34 (48%), British Columbians (54%), Quebecers (also 54%), as well as Liberal (58%) and New Democratic Party (NDP) (55%) voters in the 2015 federal election, are more likely to say that abortion should be legal under any circumstances.

In the United States, men (21%), Americans aged 18-to-34 (21%), residents of the Midwest (24%) and those who identify as Republicans (26%) are more likely to support a ban on abortion.

Methodology:

Results are based on online studies conducted from July 2 to July 5, 2019, among representative samples of 1,000 adults Canada and the United States. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian and U.S. census figures for age, gender and region in each country. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for each country.

Find our full data set for Canada here, full data set for the United States here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca