British Columbians Endorse Money Laundering Public Inquiry

More than a third (36%) would place the emphasis on “identifying solutions to help reduce the impact of money laundering.”

Vancouver, BC [May 24, 2019] – A sizeable majority of British Columbians voice satisfaction with the provincial government’s decision to call a public inquiry into money laundering in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 86% of British Columbians “strongly agree” (55%) or “moderately agree” (31%) with this decision.

Victoria’s course of action is endorsed by 93% of residents who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the 2017 provincial election, as well as 86% of those who supported the BC Liberals and 80% of those who voted for the BC Green Party.

In surveys conducted by Research Co. in June 2018August 2018 and February 2019, more than three-in-four British Columbians voiced support for a public inquiry into money laundering. 

When asked about specific goals that the public inquiry should deal with, more than a third of British Columbians (36%) mentioned “identifying solutions to help reduce the current and future impact of money laundering in the province.”

“In Metro Vancouver, the proportion of residents who want the public inquiry to concentrate on solutions reaches 39%,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This course of action is also slightly more popular among women (38%) than men (35%).”

Three-in-ten residents (30%) believe “finding out those responsible (in government and crown corporations) for allowing money laundering to become such a big problem” should be the main priority.

Fewer British Columbians would concentrate the public inquiry’s efforts on “recovering ill-gotten gains and assets from people who laundered money in British Columbia” (17%) or “figuring out how money laundering became such a big problem” (11%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 16 to May 19, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Fewer Than Half of British Columbians Have an Emergency Kit

Three-in-four residents think an earthquake strong enough to damage buildings is “likely” to occur in the next 50 years.

Vancouver, BC [May 22, 2019] – Many British Columbians expect to face a destructive earthquake, but most have not assembled an emergency kit, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 76% of British Columbians say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that an earthquake strong enough to damage buildings will occur in the province in the next 50 years.

When asked about their level of concern about specific emergencies they might face, British Columbians place “a fire” (79%), “an earthquake” (68%), “high winds” (65%) and “intense rainfall” (61%) at the top of the list.

Fewer than three-in-five British Columbians are worried about being personally affected by “a flood” (57%), “heavy snowfall” (56%), “a toxic spill” (55%), “a terrorist attack” (54%), “a tsunami” (46%) or “a landslide” (also 46%).

Only 46% of British Columbians acknowledge having purchased or prepared an emergency kit with supplies they might need in case of an emergency.

“In spite of the high level of concern expressed about an earthquake affecting the province, more than half of British Columbians have not put together an emergency kit,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents aged 35-to-54 are doing better on this particular matter (55% have an emergency kit) than those aged 18-to-34 (45%) and those aged 55 and over (39%).”

Across the province, two-in-five residents (39%) have prepared an emergency plan that includes how to get in touch with family or friends in case of an emergency, and just over a third (35%) have established a meeting place with family or friends in case of an emergency.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 2 to May 5, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Five British Columbians Grow or Cultivate Plants at Home

More than half of the province’s home gardeners focus primarily on ornamental plants, while 29% are mostly growing food.

Vancouver, BC [May 17, 2019] – A majority of British Columbians can be safely described as home gardeners, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, three-in-five British Columbians (59%) say they currently grow or cultivate plants in their home, either indoors or outdoors.

The largest incidence of home gardeners is observed among British Columbians aged 35-to-54 (64%), residents of Northern BC (68%) and BC Green Party voters in the 2017 provincial election (70%).

More than half of the province’s home gardeners (56%) say they focus mostly on plants for ornamental purposes, while three-in-ten (29%) prefer to grow or cultivate plants for consumption, such as vegetables, fruits and herbs.

“There are some age discrepancies when it comes to the type of plants British Columbia’s home gardeners are interested in,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Growing plants that can be consumed is more popular among those aged 18-to-34 (53%), but less so among those aged 35-to-54 (31%) and those aged 55 and over (21%).”

One-in-four of British Columbia’s home gardeners (25%) say they spend less than $50 each year on gardening tools, plants and/or seeds. 

About two-in-five of British Columbia’s home gardeners (39%) allocate $50 to $100 a year for gardening, while more than a third (36%) spend more than $100 annually.

A majority of the province’s home gardeners (58%) say the plants they grow or cultivate are “about the same as most” in their neighbourhood, while 26% consider them “better” and 11% believe they are “worse.”

British Columbia’s home gardeners aged 18-to-34 (35%), men (30%) and those who reside in Southern BC (29%) are more likely to claim that their own plants are better than the ones grown by their neighbours.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 2 to May 5, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Job Responsibilities Dent Lifestyle for Employed British Columbians

Two-in-five residents who are employed say their work has put a strain on their relationships with family and friends.

Vancouver, BC [April 30, 2019] – A majority of British Columbians who work part time or full time acknowledge putting their career ahead of their health, leisure, family and spirituality, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 53% of employed British Columbians say work is “definitely” (23%) or “probably” (30%) taking precedence over lifestyle.

One third of employed British Columbians (33%) claim to have a perfect balance between work and lifestyle, while 12% say their lifestyle is taking precedence over work.

Almost half of employed British Columbians (47%) acknowledge having to stay late after work over the course of the past six months, while about three-in-ten missed a “lifestyle” engagement (such as a family gathering or leisure activity) because of work (29%) or had to reply to a work-related e-mail while they were with family or friends (28%).

One-in-four employed British Columbians (25%) had to take a work-related call on the cell phone while they were with family or friends, while similar proportions had to work from home on a weekend (24%) or had to work from home at night (21%).

“There is a staggering age gap when it comes to work getting in the way of the lifestyle of British Columbians,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 44% of those aged 55 and over say they did not experience any off-work interruptions, the proportion drops to 26% for those aged 35-to-54 and just 15% for those aged 18-to-34.”

More than two-in-five employed British Columbians (42%) say their work has put a strain on their relationships with family and friends, a proportion that reaches 48% among those aged 18-to-34 and 61% among those who live in Northern BC.

One-in-five employed British Columbians (19%) say it is easier for them to achieve a work-life balance than it was for their parents, while 41% believe that this undertaking is now harder.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 4 to April 7, 2019, among 646 adults in British Columbia who are employed full time or part time. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Blame Parents for Perceived Decline of Civility

More than half of residents (52%) think people in Canada have become less polite than five years ago.

Vancouver, BC [April 25, 2019] – A majority of Canadians believe residents have become cruder over the past five years, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 52% of Canadians think people in Canada have become “less polite” than they were five years ago.

Only 8% of Canadians think people are “more polite” than in 2014, while 33% say the situation is “about the same” as it was five years ago.

More than four-in-five Canadians (84%) think “parents failing to teach their children proper behaviour” are “definitely” or “probably” responsible for the current state of civility in the country.

Other negative factors mentioned by Canadians include “the influence of television and movies” (77%), “technology that enables people to talk face-to-face less often” (also 77%), “poor examples from celebrities, athletes and other public figures” (74%), “politicians engaging in personal attacks” (69%), “people being too busy with their lives” (66%) and “teachers and schools failing to teach students proper behaviour” (59%).

Three-in-ten Canadians (31%) say they deal with someone being rude and/or impolite when using social media “a few times a week.”

“Almost half of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (46%) say they experience impoliteness on social media a few times a week,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Only 12% of Canada’s Millennials say they only face rudeness on social media less often than a few times a year.”

Other instances in which Canadians experience someone being rude and/or impolite “a few times a week” include driving a car or riding in a car (25%), shopping at a store (16%), at the workplace (15%), walking on the street (14%) or using public transit (13%). 

One third of Canadians (33%) think the people they deal with on a daily basis in Canada say “please” and “thank you” less often than five years ago—a proportion that includes 40% of those aged 55 and over and 43% of Albertans.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 4 to April 7, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

God Exists for British Columbians, But Few Attend Religious Services

Two thirds of residents (67%) say they only attend on special occasions, such as weddings, baptisms and funerals.

Vancouver, BC [April 18, 2019] – Most residents of British Columbia believe or tend to believe that God is real, but significantly fewer actively participate in religious ceremonies, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 39% of British Columbians are “convinced” that God exists, while 22% “tend to believe” that God exists.

Conversely, 16% of residents are “convinced” that God does not exist, and 13% “tend to believe” that God does not exist.

Women are more likely to be “convinced” that God exists than men (43% to 35%). British Columbians aged 55 and over are also more likely to be “convinced” about God’s existence (45%) than those aged 35-to-54 (38%) and those aged 18-to-34 (32%).

Two thirds of British Columbians (67%) say they never attend religious services other than weddings, baptisms or funerals. 

Only 3% of British Columbians attend services “at least once a week”, while 13% visit a church, temple or synagogue  “at least once a month.”

Similar proportions of British Columbians acknowledge having meditated (27%) or prayed to God (24%) over the past 12 months. 

Just over one-in-ten British Columbians (11%) visited a mental health professional, such as a psychiatrist or a psychologist, and slightly fewer (7%) consulted with a “life coach” to help identify personal goals. 

Only 2% of residents say they confessed or sought advice from a religious figure.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 4 to April 7, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Colin Knowles

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Six Months Later, British Columbians Content with Legal Marijuana

Across the province, 6% of adults say they tried cannabis for the first time after it was legalized.

Vancouver, BC [April 16, 2019] – Most British Columbians appear satisfied with both the legalization of marijuana and the framework to acquire cannabis in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 63% of British Columbians agree with marijuana being legal in Canada, while 29% disagree.

Agreement with the legalization of cannabis in Canada is highest among British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (70%), as well as residents of Northern BC (72%) and Vancouver Island (also 72%).

More than two-in-five British Columbians (43%) acknowledge having consumed marijuana in Canada before it was legal, while 51% reveal they have never used cannabis in the country. 

Just over one-in-twenty British Columbians (6%) say they used marijuana in Canada only after it became legal last year, including 10% of those aged 18-to-34.

When asked to review the decisions that the provincial government has taken to enable the legal sale of marijuana in British Columbia, practically four-in-five residents agree with two measures: establishing 19 years as the legal age to purchase, sell or consume marijuana in the province (79%) and restricting marijuana smoking to areas where tobacco smoking is allowed (also 79%).

In addition, two thirds of residents (67%) agree with authorizing adults to grow up to four cannabis plants per household, as long as the plants are not visible from public spaces off the property, and home cultivation is banned in homes used as day-cares.

A majority of respondents to the survey (57%) agree with establishing the Liquor Distribution Branch (LDB) as the wholesale distributor of non-medical marijuana in British Columbia, while 31% disagree.

In October 2018, a Research Co. survey found that British Columbians were split on having a marijuana shop a block away from their home.

More than three-in-four British Columbians disagree with legalizing ecstasy (78%), powder cocaine (79%), heroin (also 79%), crack cocaine (83%), methamphetamine or “crystal meth” (83%) and fentanyl (84%).

“There is little appetite from British Columbians to extend marijuana’s legal framework to other substances,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Few residents want to allow other drugs to be readily available for any adult who wants to access them.”

In some countries, including the United States, a company can administer “drug tests” to employees, even if they do not operate machinery (such as pilots, truck drivers or crane operators). 

Three-in-five British Columbians (60%) think companies in British Columbia should be able to administer “drug tests” to any employee now that marijuana is legal—a proportion that rises to 68% among residents aged 55 and over.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 4 to April 7, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

United Conservatives Extend Their Lead in Alberta

Opposition leader Jason Kenney has overtaken incumbent Rachel Notley as the “Best Premier” for the province.

Vancouver, BC [April 15, 2019] – The United Conservative Party (UCP) has extended its advantage in the final stages of the provincial campaign in Alberta, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 49% of decided voters in Alberta (+4 since a Research Co. poll completed in early April) would support the UCP candidate in their riding in tomorrow’s provincial ballot.

The governing New Democratic Party (NDP) is in second place with 39% (-1), followed by the Alberta Party with 9% (+3) and the Liberal Party with 2% (-1). Two per cent of decided voters would back other parties or candidates.

The level of undecided voters across Alberta has dropped from 22% in early April to 10% in this survey. In the rural areas of the province, only 9% of residents are currently undecided (compared to 27% earlier this month).

Among decided voters, the UCP holds sizeable advantages over the NDP in three distinct demographics: men (57% to 29%), Albertans aged 55 and over (59% to 33%) and those who do not reside in Calgary or Edmonton (60% to 29%).

The opposition UCP is also the top choice for Albertans aged 35-to-54 (46% to 41%) and Calgarians (48% to 37%).

Conversely, the NDP is ahead of the UCP among women (48% to 40%), Albertans aged 18-to-34 (47% to 38%) and those who live in Edmonton (46% to 40%). 

“The UCP is holding on to a large majority of voters who cast a ballot for either the Wildrose Party (77%) or the Progressive Conservatives (84%) in 2015,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The New Democrats are losing 14% of their voters in the last election to the UCP.”

On the “Best Premier” question, Jason Kenney of the UCP holds a three-point lead over incumbent Rachel Notley of the NDP (36% to 33%), with Stephen Mandel of the Alberta Party and David Khan of the Liberal Party in single digits (9% and 2% respectively).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 13 to April 15, 2019 among 602 Alberta adults, including 542 decided voters in the 2019 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Alberta. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.0 percentage points for the entire sample and +/- 4.2 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two-in-Five Canadians Always Alter Their Words to Avoid Swearing

Across the country, almost half (48%) admit to changing the way they speak sometimes, while 14% never do.

Vancouver, BC [April 11, 2019] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians admit to being cautious about how they speak in public, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 38% of Canadians say they always alter the way they speak to make sure they do not swear in public. 

Almost half of Canadians (48%) admit to sometimes altering the way they speak so as not to swear in front of certain people, while 14% claim to never alter the way they speak and do not worry about it if a curse word comes out.

Women (40%), residents aged 55 and over (42%) and Quebecers (43%) are more likely to say they always alter how they speak to prevent swearing.

Two thirds of Canadians (68%) say they hear swearing “frequently” or “occasionally” when they are talking with friends. More than half also report hearing curse words in conversations with strangers (55%), relatives (53%) and co-workers (52%).

“There are some differences across the country when it comes to listening to co-workers swear,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Ontarians are the most likely to report hearing curse words in the workplace (52%), while Albertans are at the bottom of this list (44%).” 

When asked about the times they use curse words themselves, more than half of Canadians (52%) say they swear “frequently” or “occasionally” when they are having a conversation with friends.

Significantly smaller proportions of Canadians say they rely on curse words when they are speaking with relatives (40%), co-workers (34%) and strangers (23%). 

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to acknowledge that they swear when having conversations with friends (73%), relatives (55%), co-workers (47%) and strangers (33%) than those aged 35-to-54 and those aged 55 and over.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 4 to April 7, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Would Like to Elect Their Next Senator

Almost two thirds of residents would like to have a non-binding ballot similar to the ones that have taken place in Alberta.

Vancouver, BC [April 9, 2019] – Many British Columbians want to play a role in the selection of the province’s next representative in the Red Chamber, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 64% of British Columbians would agree to hold a non-binding election—similar to the ones that have taken pace in Alberta—to choose a nominee for appointment to the Senate.

In mid-November, British Columbia Conservative Senator Richard Neufeld will step down after reaching the age of mandatory retirement. 

When asked which option they prefer for the Senate of Canada, more than a third of British Columbians (36%) say they would reform the Senate to allow Canadians to elect its members.

Smaller proportions of residents would prefer to abolish the Senate of Canada altogether (17%), have a selection committee that would appoint non-partisan Senators (14%) or have the sitting prime minister appoint members of the upper house (8%).

“The appetite for Senate reform in British Columbia is strongest among residents aged 55 and over,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The notion of an Independent Advisory Board that would take care of Senate appointments, which has been in place under Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, is not particularly popular.”

Only 11% of respondents correctly identified the fact that British Columbia has six seats in the 105-member Red Chamber. 

A similarly low proportion (13%) was able to identify at least one of British Columbia’s current Senators: Mobina Jaffer, Larry Campbell, Yonah Martin, Richard Neufeld, Yuen Pau Woo and Bev Busson.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 28 to March 31, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: D. Gordon E. Robertson

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canucks First, But Whitecaps Have Momentum in British Columbia

Across the province, 16% of residents aged 35-to-54 are more interested in the Major League Soccer team than five years ago.

Vancouver, BC [April 4, 2019] – More than half of British Columbians relate to the Vancouver Canucks in an extremely positive way, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 53% of respondents say the National Hockey League (NHL) franchise is the sports team that most accurately represents British Columbia.

The BC Lions of the Canadian Football League (CFL) are second with 18%, followed by the Vancouver Whitecaps of Major League Soccer (MLS) with 5%, the Vancouver Giants of the Western Hockey League (WHL) with 2% and the Vancouver Canadians of Baseball’s Northwest League (NWL) with 1%.

Women (56%) are more likely to pick the Canucks as the team that best represents British Columbia than men (50%). The Lions fare better with residents aged 55 and over (22%) than with those aged 35-to-54 (14%) and those aged 18-to-34 (12%).

When asked if they have become more interested in each of these sports teams over the past five years, similar proportions of British Columbians select the Whitecaps (11%), the Canucks (10%) and the Lions (9%), while fewer mention the Giants (4%) and the Canadians (also 4%).

“Interest in the Canucks has increased more among British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (14%) and residents of the Fraser Valley (also 14%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The Whitecaps are being followed more closely now by Metro Vancouverites (16%) and those aged 35-to-54 (also 16%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 8 to March 10, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Ryan Adams

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Swearing is, By Far, The Biggest Etiquette Faux Pas in Canada

More than half of Canadians say they saw children misbehaving in public while their parents looked the other way.

Vancouver, BC [March 28, 2019] – Canadians report several different incidents involving improper manners over the past month, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 64% of Canadians say they witnessed someone swearing in public—a proportion that climbs to 71% in Alberta.

“It would seem that the language of Canadians is getting more colourful,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than two thirds of women and residents aged 55 and over report hearing someone swearing in public over the past month.”

More than half of Canadians (56%) say they witnessed children behaving badly in public while their parents looked the other way, while just under half saw someone littering or leaving trash behind in a public place (49%), someone interrupting or talking over them while they were speaking (48%) or someone cutting them off the road while they were driving (47%).

Other behaviours reported by Canadians include a person checking their phone or texting during a meeting or social event (45%, including 50% among those aged 55 and over), someone spitting in public (43%, including 50% in British Columbia) and experiencing rude customer service at a store (also 43%, including 47% in Ontario).

Fewer Canadians reported seeing chewing with their mouth open (39%, and 44% in Alberta), someone cutting the line at a store or counter (also 39%, and 47% in Atlantic Canada), someone using a cell phone during a performance or movie (34%, and 44% in Atlantic Canada), or someone making an obscene gesture (33%, including 43% in Alberta), 

The two lowest ranked items on the list of behaviours are someone delivering important information via text or e-mail instead of face-to-face (31%) and someone ignoring, or not responding to an invitation (19%).

There were two positive behaviours that were included in the survey. More than three-in-five Canadians (63%, and 79% in Atlantic Canada) witnessed someone holding the door open for a stranger. Just over one-in-four (27%, and 32% in British Columbia) saw someone giving up their seat for a person who was disabled, pregnant or elderly.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 22 to March 24, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Tough Road Ahead for Trudeau and Liberals in British Columbia

More than half of British Columbians think that a different party leader would fare better as Canada’s Prime Minister.

Vancouver, BC [March 26, 2019] – A majority of British Columbians are looking at options beyond Justin Trudeau as the federal election nears, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 53% of British Columbians believe that “a different party leader would do things better in Ottawa as Prime Minister than Justin Trudeau.”

Men are more likely to believe that a different leader would fare better as Canada’s head of government (56%, compared to 50% for women). 

One third (34%) of British Columbians who voted for the federal Liberal Party in the 2015 election also believe a different party leader would do things better in Ottawa than the incumbent.

“With a few months to go before the next federal campaign begins, animosity toward the current prime minister in British Columbia is strongest outside of Metro Vancouver,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of voters in the Fraser Valley (58%), Southern BC (57%) and Northern BC (55%) would prefer to have a different leader in charge.”

In addition, 50% of British Columbians think that “a different party would do things better in Ottawa as a government than the Liberals.” This group includes majorities of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (54%) and 55 and over (51%), as well as one-in-four (25%) federal Liberal voters from 2015.

When asked if they expect the Liberal Party to form the government again after the next federal election, 38% of British Columbians believe that this will be the case, while 44% disagree.

More than half of British Columbians report being “very familiar” or “moderately familiar” with the policies and ideas of the Liberal Party (78%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (72%), the Conservative Party (69%) and the Green Party (59%).

Only 16% of British Columbians are “very familiar” or “moderately familiar” with the policies and ideas of the People’s Party, while three-in-four (75%) say they are “not too familiar” or “not familiar at all” with them.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 8 to March 10, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Radio Still the Top Source Among Canadian Music Listeners

Half of Canadians think that, in this day and age, music creators are being fairly compensated for their work.

Vancouver, BC [March 21, 2019] – A sizeable majority of Canadians are relying on their radios for music, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 69% of Canadians say they listened to music on a regular radio over the past week.

One third of Canadians (32%) report listening to music on streaming services over the past week, while a similar proportion (31%) listened to music files stored in a device, such as a computer or phone.

One-in-five Canadians (21%) listened to LP records, cassettes or CDs in the past week, while 15% listened to music on satellite radio.

Across the country, 19% of Canadians say they paid to access a music streaming service in the last month, including 36% of those aged 18-to-34. 

Smaller proportions of Canadians paid for and downloaded a song online (12%) or bought a compact disc or LP record (9%).

On a regional basis, Atlantic Canadians are the undisputed leaders when it comes to paying to access music streaming services (35%), followed by residents of Alberta (25%), Ontario (19%), British Columbia (17%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (15%) and Quebec (11%).

“While radio is the top choice for music listeners of all ages in Canada, Millennials are definitely more likely to be embracing streaming services than their older counterparts,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The country’s youngest adults are also more likely to already be spending money on streaming services or downloaded songs.”

When asked if they think that, in this day and age, music creators are being fairly compensated for their work, half of Canadians (51%) believe that they “definitely” or “probably” are, while one third (33%) assert that they are not.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 21 to February 24, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Government’s Housing Taxes Remain Popular in British Columbia

Four-in-five residents endorse the increase in the foreign buyers tax, and more than two thirds agree with the “speculation tax.”.

Vancouver, BC [March 19, 2019] – Most British Columbians endorse the provincial government’s housing-related fiscal policies, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 68% of residents agree with the implementation of a “speculation tax” in specific urban areas targeting foreign and domestic homeowners who pay little or no income tax in BC, and those who own second properties that aren’t long-term rentals.

In a survey conducted by Research Co. in June 2018, 62% of British Columbians called the “speculation tax” a “very good” or “good” idea.

“While some government policies tend to cause extraordinary differences between residents according to political allegiance, the ‘speculation tax’ is different,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Those who agree with the ‘speculation tax’ include 82% of British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the 2017 provincial election, 70% of those who voted for the Green Party and 55% of those who voted for the BC Liberals.”

Four-in-five British Columbians (80%) agree with the provincial government’s decision to increase the foreign buyers tax from 15% to 20%, and three-in-four (75%) agree with the decision to expand the foreign buyers tax to areas located outside of Metro Vancouver.

More than three-in-five British Columbians also agree with increasing the property transfer tax from 3% to 5% for homes valued at more than $3 million (64%) and introducing a tax of 0.2% on the value of homes between $3 million and $4 million, and a tax rate of 0.4% on the portion of a home’s value that exceeds $4 million (66%).

Across the province, 39% of residents think the actions of the provincial government will be “effective” in making housing more affordable in British Columbia, while almost half (47%) believe they will be “ineffective.”

Residents who voted for the BC NDP in the last provincial election (56%) are more likely to expect the hosing measures to be effective, while those who cast a ballot for the BC Liberals (64%) or the BC Greens (48%) are more likely to deem them as ”ineffective.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 8 to March 10, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Four-in-Five Canadians Support Resource Development Projects

The majority of Canadians (61%) say they are tired of nothing getting built in the country.

Vancouver, BC [March 12, 2019] – A significant proportion of Canadians and British Columbians are in favour of resource development projects, a new Research Co. poll conducted on behalf of LNG Canada—a liquefied natural gas project currently under construction in Kitimat, B.C.—has found.

In the online survey of representative samples, 79% of Canadians and 71% of British Columbians express support for resource development projects. In addition, 61% of respondents across the country and 51% of those located in the westernmost province agree they are “tired of nothing getting built” in Canada and British Columbia—a proportion that rises to 67% in northern B.C.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) believe the “national economy will suffer if we can’t build resource projects.” In British Columbia, 63% feel this way about the possible effect on the provincial economy, including 74% of those in northern B.C.

More than half of Canadians (54%) believe the country’s reputation “is harmed by protests against resource development projects.” In British Columbia, 52% express the same sentiment about the effect of protests against resource development projects, and fewer than a quarter (23%) think it’s possible to have unanimous support for resource development projects. 

“When asked what would make them more likely to support resource development projects, a majority of British Columbians (57%) want assurances that the impact on the environment is limited,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Other important considerations are guaranteeing that Canadians will get the first opportunity to work on the project (53%) and providing training and apprenticeship opportunities for young Canadians (46%).”

Seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%) foresee a positive economic impact from LNG Canada’s liquefied natural gas export project in Kitimat, B.C., which is scheduled to deliver its first LNG cargo before mid-next decade. Broken down by region, over half of Vancouver Island residents (56%), two thirds of Metro Vancouverites (67%) and 86% of those in northern B.C. anticipate a positive economic impact from the project.

“LNG Canada has received significant support from First Nations at the facility and along the shipping route, as well as from northern communities overall,” says Susannah Pierce, LNG Canada’s Director, External Relations. “We are committed to these supporters. A project like ours is vital to the creation of training, employment and contracting opportunities, and we’re pleased to see that British Columbians and Canadians recognize the importance of resource projects as drivers of the Canadian economy.”

The poll also revealed that at least three-in-five Canadians have a positive opinion of four energy sources: wind (80%), hydropower (76%), natural gas (69%) and geothermal (61%). Canadians are divided on oil, with 43% having positive views and 46% having a negative opinion. The lowest ranked energy source for Canadians is coal, with 24% of residents expressing a positive view. 

Three-in-five Canadians (60%) believe Canada has a responsibility to “export natural gas to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) in other countries.” LNG exported from LNG Canada’s facility can displace the use of coal for power generation, reducing global GHGs by 60 to 90 mtpa, which is the equivalent of all GHGs produced in British Columbia annually.

In the online survey of representative samples, 79% of Canadians and 71% of British Columbians express support for resource development projects. In addition, 61% of respondents across the country and 51% of those located in the westernmost province agree they are “tired of nothing getting built” in Canada and British Columbia—a proportion that rises to 67% in Northern B.C.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) believe the “national economy will suffer if we can’t build resource projects.” In British Columbia, 63% feel this way about the possible effect in the provincial economy, including 74% of those in northern B.C.

More than half of Canadians (54%) believe the country’s reputation “is harmed by protests against resource development projects”. In British Columbia, 52% express the same sentiment about the effect of protests against resource development projects, and fewer than a quarter (23%) think it’s possible to have unanimous support for resource development projects. 

“When asked what would make them more likely to support resource development projects, a majority of British Columbians (57%) want assurances that the impact in the environment is limited,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Other important considerations are guaranteeing that Canadians will get the first opportunity to work on the project (53%) and providing training and apprenticeship opportunities for young Canadians (46%).”

Seven-in-ten British Columbians (70%) foresee a positive economic impact from LNG Canada’s liquefied natural gas export project in Kitimat, B.C., which is scheduled to deliver first LNG cargo mid-next decade. Broken down by region, over half of Vancouver Island residents (56%), two thirds of Metro Vancouverites (67%) and 86% of those in northern B.C. anticipate a positive economic impact from the project.

“LNG Canada has received significant support from First Nations at the facility and along the shipping route, as well as from northern communities overall,” says Susannah Pierce, LNG Canada’s Director, External Relations. “We are committed to these supporters. A project like ours is vital to the creation of training, employment and contracting opportunities, and we’re pleased to see that British Columbians and Canadians recognize the importance of resource projects as drivers of the Canadian economy.”

The poll also revealed that at least three-in-five Canadians have a positive opinion of four energy sources: wind (80%), hydropower (76%), natural gas (69%) and geothermal (61%). Canadians are divided on oil, with 43% having positive views and 46% having a negative opinion. The lowest ranked energy source for Canadians is coal, with 24% of residents expressing a positive view. 

Three-in-five Canadians (60%) believe Canada has a responsibility to “export natural gas to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) in other countries.” LNG exported from LNG Canada’s facility can displace the use of coal for power generation, reducing global GHGs by 60 to 90 mtpa, which is the equivalent of all GHGs produced in British Columbia annually.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 21 to February 24, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada; and an online study conducted from February 16 to February 18, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada and British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for the sample of Canadians and +/- 3.5 percentage points for the sample of British Columbians, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full Canada data set here, our full British Columbia data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

LNG Canada Media Relations
[c] 604.761.5529
[e] media@lngcanada.ca

Canadians Express a Preference for Prince William as Next King

Only one-in-five would rather have Prince Charles as King, and just over two-in-five view the heir apparent favourably.

Vancouver, BC [March 7, 2019] – If presented with a choice to select the next monarch, a considerable proportion of Canadians would prefer to have the Duke of Cambridge as King, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 41% of Canadians say they would rather see Prince William becoming King, while 20% would prefer Prince Charles.

One third of Canadian men (33%) would like to have Prince William as the next monarch, while 22% select Prince Charles. The gap is more extreme among Canadian women (50% in favour of Prince William, and 18% in favour of Prince Charles).

Three members of the Royal Family have the highest levels of favourability across Canada: Queen Elizabeth II (71%), Prince William (also 71%) and Prince Harry (70%).

A majority of Canadians also express favourable views of Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge (68%), Meghan, Duchess of Sussex (60%) and Prince Philip (54%).

In contrast, only 43% of Canadians have a favourable opinion of Prince Charles and 32% feel the same way about Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall.

When asked about Canada’s constitution, 31% of Canadians say Canada should remain a monarchy, while 33% believe Canada should have an elected head of state. One-in-five (19%) do not care either way and 17% are undecided.

Support for Canada having an elected head of state is highest in Quebec (53%), while residents of Atlantic Canada and Alberta are the most likely to call for the continuation of the monarchy (42% and 40% respectively).

“Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party in the last federal election are significantly more likely to endorse the monarchy (41%), while those who supported the New Democratic Party (NDP) in 2015 express a preference for an elected head of state (42%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Liberal voters are almost evenly divided when asked about this issue.”

Across the country, 56% of residents expect Canada to “definitely” or “probably” still be a monarchy twenty years from now, while 23% think the country will “definitely” or “probably” have an elected head of state.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 21 to February 24, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Diliff

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Say “No, Thanks” to Buying Montana from U.S.

Albertans and Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to give the thumbs up to a prospective purchase.

Vancouver, BC [February 28, 2019] – A majority of Canadians reject the notion of purchasing a bordering American state as was recently suggested in an online petition, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 56% of Canadians think the federal government should not consider purchasing Montana for $1 trillion.

The online petition—initiated in the United States—is calling on Americans to sign in support of selling the State of Montana to Canada for $1 trillion U.S., in order to eliminate the national debt in the U.S. 

The highest level of support for Canada’s eventual purchase of Montana is observed among men (32%), Canadians aged 18-to-34 (41%) and residents of Alberta (37%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (34%).

“We have many issues where there are glaring differences across party lines,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But when it comes to giving consideration to the purchase of Montana, similar proportions of Conservative (30%), Liberal (28%) and New Democratic Party (NDP) (26%) voters are in agreement.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 21 to February 24, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Robert M. Russell

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Troubled by Birth Tourism, Call for Change

Almost three-in-four residents think Canada should establish new guidelines for birthright citizenship.

Vancouver, BC [February 26, 2019] – Many residents of British Columbia are concerned about the practice of “birth tourism”, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 82% of British Columbians believe “birth tourism” can be unfairly used to gain access to Canada’s education, health care and social programs.

“Birth tourism” is the practice of traveling to a specific country for the purpose of giving birth there and securing citizenship for the child in a country that has birthright citizenship. 

Canada allows expectant mothers who are foreign nationals to gain automatic citizenship for their children born in Canada. 

There have been reports of unregulated “for profit” businesses that have facilitated the practice of “birth tourism”  in Canada. Across British Columbia, 49% of residents say they have followed this issue “very closely” or “moderately closely” over the past year.

More than three-in-five British Columbians say “birth tourism” can degrade the value of Canadian citizenship (66%) and can displace Canadians from hospitals (63%).

An e-petition endorsed by Joe Peschisolido, the Member of Parliament for the Steveston—Richmond East constituency, is calling on the federal government to commit public resources to determine the full extent of “birth tourism” across Canada. A considerable majority of British Columbians (85%) agree with this proposal.

Seven-in-ten British Columbians (73%) believe Canada should “definitely” or “probably” consider establishing new guidelines for birthright citizenship, while 18% would keep the existing standards.

“There is no substantial variation on these questions when the ethnicity of respondents is considered,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “We find that 71% of British Columbians of East Asian descent and 75% of those of European descent would like to see some modifications to the current rules for birthright citizenship.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 15 to February 17, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Canadians Would Welcome Biometrics to Make Purchases

Only 8% believe the technology will be available sometime in the next 10 years.

Vancouver, BC [February 21, 2019] – A significant proportion of Canadians would be comfortable with the use of biometrics (such as fingerprints, palm recognition or iris scans) to pay for things, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 49% of Canadians say they “definitely” or “probably” would like to see people relying on biometrics to make purchases, while two-in-five (40%) would not and 11% are not sure.

“Canadian Men (57%) and Millennials (54%) are definitely more likely to endorse biometrics at this stage,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There is also a higher craving for this type of technology from Quebecers (66%) and Albertans (55%).”

However, two-in-five Canadians (40%) say they do not expect biometric payments to materialize in the next 20 years, and 15% foresee that they will never be available.

When asked about the way they currently pay for things, Canadians rely on a combination of sources. One third of payments (34%) involve a debit card, followed by cash (31%) and credit cards (24%).

Across the country, 8% of all transactions are conducted through a smartphone—a proportion that climbs to 18% among Canadians aged 18-to-34—and 3% are done with a cheque.

Residents of Atlantic Canada (39%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (37%) and Alberta (also 37%) rely more heavily on debit cards than those in other parts of the country.

Seven-in-ten Canadians (70%) report that there was a time in the past month when they did not have any actual money (coins or bills) on them and had to use their credit card, debit card or smartphone to make a purchase of less than $10.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 2 to February 5, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Making Ends Meet is Difficult for Metro Vancouver Parents

Two-in-five parents think it is “likely” that their children will move away for their current municipality due to the high cost of living.

Vancouver, BC [February 19, 2019] – As British Columbia observes “Family Day”, a considerable proportion of parents in Metro Vancouver report experiencing anxiety over several issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of parents in Metro Vancouver, three-in-five (61%) say it is currently difficult to “make ends meet” for them and their families.

In the City of Vancouver, 79% of parents report that “making ends meet” is currently hard, compared to 52% in Surrey and 57% in other Metro Vancouver municipalities.

One third of parents (34%) say they have experienced housing-related stress and financial-related stress “occasionally” or “frequently” over the past year. 

A slightly smaller proportion of parents (31%) have endured work-related stress and family-related stress.

Half of parents in Metro Vancouver (50%) say it is “very difficult” or “moderately difficult” to save money in a bank account under the current circumstances, and 45% feel the same way about paying for day-to-day expenses.

Just over a third of Metro Vancouver parents (35%) have found it hard to pay for child care, while 14% say it is challenging to pay for transportation.

Across Metro Vancouver, 42% of parents say it is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that their children will have to move away from the municipality where they currently live due to the high cost of living.

“The views on the future vary greatly depending on where families currently reside,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While most parents in Surrey and other smaller municipalities expect their children to settle nearby, more than half of those in Vancouver believe their children will have to eventually relocate.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 3 to February 5, 2019, among 631 adult parents of children aged 0 to 18 in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Would Exclude Huawei from Future 5G Networks

A majority agrees with the way Canadian authorities have acted in the Meng Wanzhou case.

Vancouver, BC [February 12, 2019] – Many Canadians are concerned about the possible involvement of Chinese telecommunications firm Huawei in the development of the country’s 5G (or “Fifth Generation”) mobile networks, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 57% of Canadians think the federal government should not allow Huawei to participate in 5G.

On a regional basis, British Columbia has the highest level of rejection for Huawei’s involvement in 5G (73%), followed by Ontario (62%) and Alberta (57%).

The federal government is currently reviewing the guidelines for the development of 5G mobile networks, which are expected to provide Canadians with larger data capacity and faster connections.

In December, Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou was arrested in Vancouver. Meng faces charges in the United States—including bank fraud and obstruction of justice—and the U.S. has formally requested her extradition. 

Across Canada, 43% of respondents say they have been following media stories related to Meng’s arrest “very closely” or “moderately closely.”

More than three-in-five Canadians (63%) say they agree with the way Canadian authorities have acted in this case, while 25% disagree and 12% are undecided.

Support for Canada’s actions is highest among women (67%), residents aged 55 and over (73%) and Liberal Party voters in the 2015 federal election (76%).

“Most Canadians approve of the decisions that the federal government has taken on this file,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Most are also wary of enabling Huawei to play a role in Canada’s future telecommunications networks.”

More than half of Canadians (57%) think Canada should not work to establish closer ties with China—a proportion that includes majorities of those who voted for the Conservative Party (62%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (55%) in the last federal ballot.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from February 2 to February 5, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Raysonho

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Express Lukewarm Support for Multiculturalism

Two-in-five Canadians think that racism has become a more significant problem in Canada over the past two years.

Vancouver, BC [February 8, 2019] – Many Canadians are tepid supporters of the concept of multiculturalism and a sizeable proportion is expressing concerns about racism, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 62% of Canadians think multiculturalism has been “very good” or “good” for Canada, while 33% believe the policy has been “bad” or “very bad”.

 “Strong endorsement for multiculturalism stands at roughly the same level as strong rejection (13% and 14% respectively),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Most Canadians feel the policy has been positive, but few of them are willing to say it has been overwhelmingly beneficial.”

Across the country, 41% of Canadians believe racism has become a more significant problem over the past two years. 

Residents of Manitoba and Saskatchewan are the most likely to believe racism is on the rise (55%), while only 37% of Quebecers concur with this assessment.

When asked to select between two different policies, almost half of Canadians (49%) say that Canada should be a “melting pot” and want immigrants to assimilate and blend into Canadian society. 

A smaller proportion of respondents (42%) think that Canada should be a “mosaic” and say cultural differences within Canadian society are valuable and should be preserved.

Men (53%), Quebecers (also 53%), respondents aged 55 and over (61%) and Conservative Party voters in the 2015 federal election (62%) are more likely to express a preference for the “melting pot”.

Conversely, Canadians aged 18-to-34 (60%), British Columbians (52%) and those who voted for the Liberal Party (59%) or the New Democratic Party (NDP) (56%) in the last federal ballot endorse the concept of the “mosaic.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 14 to January 17, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Drfunko

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Hold Mixed Views on the Benefits of Immigration

Two-in-five Canadians aged 35-to-54 would reduce the number of legal immigrants who are allowed to relocate in Canada.

Vancouver, BC [February 5, 2019] – A plurality of Canadians regard immigration in a positive light, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, almost half of Canadians (46%) think immigration is having a mostly positive effect in Canada, including more than half of Quebecers (52%) and Atlantic Canadians (51%).

Conversely, 36% of Canadians believe immigration is having a mostly negative effect in the country, including 42% of Albertans.

“The way in which Canadians currently feel about immigration is related to age,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While sizeable proportions of residents aged 18-to-34 (55%) and 55 and over (46%) hold positive views, the proportion drops among those aged 35-to-54 (39%).”

While one-in-five Canadians (20%) would increase the number of legal immigrants who are allowed to relocate in Canada, 35% would keep the same levels and 36% call for a decrease.

Canadians aged 35-to-54 are the most likely to urge for a reduction in the number of legal immigrants to Canada (40%) and the least likely to believe an increase is warranted (15%).

A majority of Canadians (55%) believe the hard work and talent of immigrants makes Canada better, while two-in-five (39%) disagree—including 46% of British Columbians.

Half of Canadians (50%) believe immigrants should only be allowed in Canada if they adopt Canadian values—a proportion that rises significantly among Albertans (61%) and residents aged 55 and over (62%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 14 to January 17, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Wait Times, Red Tape Are Main Health Care Snags for Canadians

Four-in-five Canadians are confident that medical services will be there if they were to need them unexpectedly.

Vancouver, BC [January 30, 2019] – More than half of Canadians identify two issues as the main glitches facing the country’s health care system, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, a third of Canadians (33%) identify long wait times as the biggest problem facing the health care system, while one-in-four (24%) mention bureaucracy and poor management.

A shortage of doctors and nurses is third on the list with 18%, followed by little focus on preventive care (9%), inadequate resources and facilities (5%), lack of a wider range of services for patients (3%) and insufficient standards of hygiene (also 3%).

“There are some significant regional differences when it comes to the perceptions of Canadians on what needs to be fixed about the health care system,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Albertans and Quebecers are decidedly more critical on management, while Atlantic Canadians are more concerned about a lack of physicians.”

Across the country, four-in-five Canadians (79%) say they are “very confident” (25%) or “moderately confident” (54%) that Canada’s health care system would be there to provide the help and assistance they would need if they faced an unexpected medical condition or disease.

Canadians aged 55 and over are more likely to express confidence in the health care system (86%) than those aged 18-to-34 (79%) and those aged 35-to-54 (75%).

One-in-four Canadians (25%) think the health care system works well and only minor changes are needed to make it work better, while three-in-five (60%) believe there are some good things in Canada’s health care system, but many changes are required.

Just over one-in-seven Canadians (13%) believe the health care system has so much wrong with it that it needs to be completely rebuilt—a proportion that reaches 20% in Quebec and 16% in Alberta.

Three-in-four Canadians (74%) are opposed to the notion of the federal government making cuts to health care funding in order to reduce government debt. 

When asked if health care in Canada would be better than it is now if it were run by the private sector, a majority of Canadians (57%) disagree with the idea, while two-in-five (39%) are in agreement.

On a regional basis, two thirds of Quebecers (66%) assert that the private sector would do a better job delivering health care in Canada. In no other region of the country does this idea garner the backing of more than 40% of residents.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 14 to January 17, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Citobun

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Urge for New Guidelines After Plecas Report

Two thirds want all expenses related to the Legislative Assembly to be available for public scrutiny in a searchable website.

Vancouver, BC [January 28, 2019] – The release of a report from Speaker Darryl Plecas has prompted British Columbians to call for changes in the Legislative Assembly, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, three-in-four British Columbians (74%) agree with ensuring that all questionable spending outlined in the Plecas Report is re-paid, and seven-in-ten (70%) would subject the Legislative Assembly to public scrutiny under the Freedom of Information and Privacy Protection Act (FOIPPA).

Two thirds of British Columbians (68%) would make all expenses from every person who works for the Legislative Assembly available for public scrutiny in a searchable website, and three-in-five (59%) would establish an outside entity to review and oversee all future expenses related to the Legislative Assembly.

The Plecas Report—released on January 21—looks into allegations of misconduct by senior officers of the British Columbia Legislative Assembly. More than three-in-five residents of the province (63%) say they have followed the Plecas Report “very closely” or “moderately closely.”

Across the province, 57% of British Columbians agree with the way the Speaker acted, while 21% disagree and 22% are not sure.

Majorities of voters who supported the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (61%), the BC Green Party (60%) and the BC Liberals (55%) in the 2017 provincial election agree with the way Plecas chose to act.

When asked who is more responsible for the situation uncovered by the Plecas Report, 59% of British Columbians point the finger at the previous BC Liberal government, while 29% blame the current BC NDP government. 

“Voters from the three main provincial parties are in agreement about specific changes they would like to see in light of the issues addressed in the Plecas Report,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But when it comes to laying blame, there is an evident polarization, with most NDP and Green voters blaming the previous administration and most BC Liberal voters saying the current one is more responsible.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 25 to January 27, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Americans Blame Trump for Government Shutdown

More than half disagree with the president’s assertion that the current situation at the U.S.-Mexico border as “a crisis”.

Vancouver, BC [January 22, 2018] – A majority of Americans think the current president deserves the blame for the partial shutdown of the federal government, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Americans, 57% of United States residents think Donald Trump is more responsible for the situation, while one third (33%) blame the Democrats in Congress.

Trump’s approval rating stands at 38% this month, while 58% of Americans disapprove of his performance as president.

While a sizable majority of self-described Republicans (74%) agree with the way Trump is handling his duties, the proportion is decidedly lower among Independents (36%) and Democrats (6%).

The survey was conducted after President Trump addressed the nation from the Oval Office to discuss border security. Most Americans (54%) disagree with his assertion that the situation in the U.S.-Mexico border is “a crisis”.

Trump’s proposal to build a wall along the entire U.S.-Mexico border is endorsed by two-in-five Americans (40%), while a majority (55%) is opposed. Republicans are more likely to agree with the president’s plan (76%) than Independents (38%) and Democrats (7%).

Almost three-in-five Americans (59%) think it would be unreasonable for President Trump to declare a “national emergency” over the current situation at the U.S.-Mexico border.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 2 to January 4, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Carol M. Highsmith

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Would Ban Smoking in Multi-Family Buildings

Agreement with existing regulations on smoking in public spaces and private vehicles is also high. 

Vancouver, BC [January 17, 2019] – Most Canadians are in favour of prohibiting residents of apartment buildings and condominiums from smoking, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, seven-in-ten Canadians (72%) support banning smoking (tobacco and marijuana) in multi-family buildings, while one-in-four (25%) are opposed.

The highest level of support for the ban is observed among women (74%), Canadians aged 55 and over (also 74%), Quebecers (75%) and British Columbians (74%).

More than two thirds of Canadians (69%) agree with the federal government’s decision to implement plain and standardized tobacco packaging. This was one of several areas covered by Bill C-5, which also established guidelines for vaping products.

Practically nine-in-ten Canadians (89%) agree with banning smoking in indoor public spaces, public transit facilities and workplaces (including restaurants, bars and casinos).

In addition, three-in-four Canadians (76%) agree with banning smoking in private vehicles occupied by children.

“The regulations that have been in place for years to deal with smoking across Canada remain popular,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There is a high level of support for bringing multi-family dwellings to the list of places where people should not be allowed to smoke.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 2 to January 4, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Willing to Ban Clothing Donation Bins

More than seven-in-ten residents would have no problem taking clothes to a specific facility for donation, instead of relying on bins.

Vancouver, BC [January 15, 2019] – A sizable proportion of British Columbians supports a ban on clothing donation bins, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 70% of British Columbians agree with banning all clothing donation bins in their municipality after several fatalities have been reported in connection with the containers.

Across the province, 69% of residents say they have donated clothes to a charity through a bin or drop box over the course of the past year.

Women (76%) and British Columbians aged 55 and over (also 76%) are the most likely to have placed garments in a clothing donation bin over the past 12 months.

Most British Columbians (71%) believe charities should find a way to collect clothes without having to use donation bins.

In addition, 73% of residents say they would have no problem taking clothes to a specific facility for donation, instead of relying on the bins.

“All demographic groups in British Columbia are voicing support for the elimination of clothing donation bins,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “It is important to note that majorities of the heaviest current users of these containers—women and residents aged 55 and over—say they are willing to travel to a specific venue to make their donations.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 2 to January 4, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Mike Klassen

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Website Visits Crucial for British Columbians Who Dine Out

Almost two-in-five left a gratuity of more than 20% at a restaurant, while one-in-five walked out without leaving a tip.

Vancouver, BC [January 10, 2019] – Many British Columbians are venturing on the web to decide where to have their next meal outside the home, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 47% of British Columbians say they visited a restaurant’s website before making a reservation over the past year—including 62% of those who reside in the Lower Mainland.

Across the province, 48% of residents say they dine out about once a month or less. Conversely, 13% say they dine out a couple of times a week or more—a proportion that reaches 18% among those aged 18-to-34.

One-in-five British Columbians (19%) took a photograph of a dish that was served to them or someone at their table when dining out. Residents aged 18-to-34 are decidedly more likely to have pointed their cameras at food inside a restaurant (33%) than those aged 35-to-54 (18%) and those aged 55 and over (7%).

Millennials are also more likely to report waiting or standing in line for more than hour to enter a restaurant (12%, compared to the provincial average of 7%).

For the most part, the experiences of British Columbians who dine out have been positive over the past year. Almost two-in-five (38%) say they left a restaurant after tipping more than 20%, while only one-in-five (21%) admit to exiting a restaurant without tipping.

More than a third of British Columbians (35%) complimented good service to a restaurant manager over the past year—including 43% of those aged 55 and over—and only 15% actively complained about bad service.

One-in-four British Columbians (25%) say they sent a bad dish to the kitchen while dining out, and 28% affirm they were served hot food that was too cold.

More than half of British Columbians (52%) say they would go back to a restaurant where the food is great, but too expensive—including 70% of those aged 18-to-34.

Fewer British Columbians would revisit a restaurant where the food is great, but the service is terrible (36%) or a restaurant where the food is cheap, but not great (24%). Only one-in-twenty residents (5%) would go back to a restaurant where the service is great, but the food is terrible.

“There is an interesting gender gap when it comes to revisiting cheap restaurants that are not remarkable,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Men in British Columbia (29%) are more likely to have no qualms about this than women (18%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from January 2 to January 4, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Metro Vancouverites Ponder Best Way to Enjoy Granville Island

While 44% would turn the venue into a pedestrian zone, 61% say they would visit more often is parking were easier.

Vancouver, BC [January 8, 2019] – Granville Island remains a popular destination for Metro Vancouverites, but there is no clear consensus on whether personal vehicles should be allowed inside the venue, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 22% say they have gone to Granville Island six times or more over the past two years, while 42% have visited two to five times.

Among those who have visited the venue, 29% say their main reason was to go shopping at the Public Market, while 25% went sightseeing. Other reasons cited by visitors to Granville Island are going for a meal ort snack (17%), going to an Arts and Culture performance (16%) or shopping at a store that is not located inside the Public Market (5%).

Respondents were provided with three statements about the future of Granville Island. Metro Vancouverites are almost evenly split on whether the venue should be turned into a pedestrian zone where no personal vehicles would be allowed (44% agree with this idea, and 47% disagree).

Three-in-five Metro Vancouverites (61%) say they would visit Granville Island more often if it were easier to find a parking spot, and a majority (58%) disagrees with making all parking spaces at the venue paid.

“Residents of the City of Vancouver are decidedly more likely to support the notion of a car-free Granville Island,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But more than three-in-five of those who live in Surrey and other Metro Vancouver municipalities say they would actually make the trip to Granville Island more often if it were easier to find a place to park their vehicles.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 25, 2018, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Almost One-in-Five Canadians Say Global Warming is a Theory

Half of Canadians say the federal government is paying “the right amount” of attention to the environment. 

Vancouver, BC [January 4, 2019] – A large majority of Canadians believe in human-made climate change, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-five Canadians (60%) think global warming (or climate change) is a fact and is mostly caused by emissions from vehicles and industrial facilities.

An additional 15% of Canadians think global warming is a fact and is mostly caused by natural changes.

Almost one-in-five respondents (18%) refer to global warming as a theory that has not yet been proven—a proportion that includes 22% of Canadians aged 55 and over and 36% of those who voted for the Conservative Party in the 2015 federal election.

Across the country, two thirds of Canadians (66%) say it is more important to them to protect the environment, even at the risk of hampering economic growth.

A significantly smaller proportion of respondents (22%) say they would prefer to foster economic growth, even at the risk of damaging the environment.

“Political allegiance plays a big role in the struggle between environmental stewardship and economic development,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While more than three-in-five Canadians who voted for the Liberals or the New Democrats in 2015 believe environmental protection is paramount, the proportion falls to 47% among Conservative voters.”

Half of Canadians (50%) think the current federal government is paying the right amount of attention to the environment, including 59% of Liberal voters.

Conversely, 31% of Canadians believe Ottawa is not paying enough attention to the environment, including 40% of New Democrat voters in 2015.

About one-in-six Canadians (14%) think the federal government is paying too much attention to the environment, including 43% of Conservative voters.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 17 to December 20, 2018, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

One-in-Four Canadians Expect a Stressful Holiday Season

“Merry Christmas” is the overwhelming favourite greeting for the season.

Vancouver, BC [December 24, 2018] – While most Canadians are anticipating a blissful holiday season, there are some who are expecting more anxiety than merriment, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, a majority of Canadians (57%) say they foresee a holiday season that will be “more fun than stressful”, but one-in-four (25%) say they expect it to be “more stressful than fun.”

Residents of British Columbia and Quebec are the most likely to say they will enjoy a holiday season that is “more fun than stressful” (70% and 60% respectively).

In Alberta, residents are almost evenly divided: 45% expect more fun than stress, while 43% believe there will be more stress than fun.

Three-in-four Canadians (74%) say their preferred greeting for the season is Merry Christmas, while a significantly smaller proportion (14%) choose Happy Holidays.

“Affinity to Merry Christmas increases with age,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “On a regional basis, fewer than one-in-twenty Albertans express a preference for Happy Holidays.”

Across the country, more than a third of Canadians (38%) say religion is “very important” or “moderately important” to their daily lives, while three-in-five (62%) say it is “not too important” or “not important at all.”

Almost half of Canadians aged 55 and over (46%) say religion is important in their daily life, a proportion that drops to 40% among those aged 35-to-54 and 29% among those aged 18-to-34.

Residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba are way ahead of the Canadian average when it comes to the importance of religion (60%). Ontario and Atlantic Canada are second (43% each), followed by Alberta (42%, Quebec (30%) and British Columbia (25%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 3 to December 6, 2018, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Confusion Influenced Referendum Voters in British Columbia

Almost half of those who did not vote in the referendum say they did not feel informed about the issue.

Vancouver, BC [December 14, 2018] – A majority of British Columbians say confusion with the options offered in the Referendum on Electoral Reform influenced their final choice, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 49% of residents say they voted to keep the First Past the Post system for provincial elections, while 31% voted in favour of Proportional Representation and 20% did not cast their ballot.

Almost half of British Columbians who did not vote in the referendum (48%) say they did not feel informed enough to vote.

“Almost half of non-voters felt uninformed about the task at hand, even with a ballot that arrived at their home,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Among those who voted, support for the status quo was decidedly higher among older voters, while younger voters favoured a move to proportional representation.”

Across the province, 90% of voters say they are “very confident” or “moderately confident” in their selection on the referendum.

More than a third of voters (35%) say they did not vote in the second question—a proportion that reaches 53% among those who supported the First Past the Post system.

When asked about issues that influenced the way they voted, majorities of British Columbians mention the details of the three options on the second question not being fully fleshed out (59%), the three options listed on the second question being confusing and not clearly explained (55%), the notion of smaller parties holding the balance of power (55%), MLAs being appointed from party lists (53%) and coalition deals being worked out “in the back room” (50%).

In addition, 49% of respondents were concerned over fringe or extremist parties winning seats, urban centres having disproportionate influence over future governments, and the details of the chosen proportional representation option being left to an all-party committee.

Slightly smaller proportions of voters were influenced by the notion that voters from rural areas might lose local representation (45%) or the government possibly rigging the process for partisan gain (41%).

Almost four-in-five British Columbians (78%) agree that politicians are in a conflict of interest when it comes to making decisions about how we vote, and would like any future proposals to involve an independent, non-partisan citizens’ body. This includes 77% of those who voted for Proportional Representation and 82% of those who voted to keep the First Past the Post system.

British Columbians were also asked about possible actions in the event the First Past the Post system was retained after the referendum. A majority (55%) agrees with setting up an independent, non-partisan process to reflect on the results of this vote and recommend what British Columbia should do next, but 52% also think that no further steps should be taken at this time aimed at changing our electoral system.

Just over two-in-five British Columbians (44%) would like to set up a Citizens’ Assembly after the next election and any resulting recommendations for change to be voted on in the legislature.

British Columbians were also asked to imagine a scenario where an arms-length review panel recommended that British Columbia hold another referendum on electoral reform at the time of the next election with guarantees addressing the major concerns that arose in the recent referendum.

The ballot question would be: “British Columbia is proposing to elect our MLAs by Proportional Representation. This means that the MLAs elected in each region would accurately reflect the diversity of political views in each region. The number of MLAs in each region of BC would stay the same and voters would vote for individual candidates, not for party lists. There would be a moderate threshold to encourage parties to have broad policy platforms. If voters endorse Proportional Representation, an independent citizens’ panel with representatives from around the province would deliberate on and recommend a final system that would be voted on in the legislature in a free vote. If accepted, there would be a confirmation referendum after we have used the new system at least twice.”

If they were asked to vote on this question, 41% of respondents would select Proportional Representation, while 36% would cas a ballot to keep First Past the Post.

More than two thirds of British Columbians believe voters should be able to vote for their top candidate without worrying about ‘splitting the vote” (75%), that a party should only win majority power if its candidates won a majority of the votes (70%), and that the voting system should not disadvantage independent candidates (70%).

Majorities of British Columbians also endorse other concepts, such as almost all votes helping elect an MLA (64%), a party not holding majority power if its candidates won fewer than 40% of the votes (63%), voters being able to choose among different candidates from their preferred party (58%), MLAs being elected from different parties in close proportion to how voters voted in each region voted (57%), and voters being able to make their vote count for a more popular candidate rather than having it ignored (52%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 18 to December 20, 2018, among 803 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Negligible Public Support for Separation in Alberta

Older residents are more likely to believe that the province would be better off as its own country.

Vancouver, BC [December 20, 2018] – In spite of increased commentary and media coverage, the proportion of Albertans who believe they would benefit from an eventual independence from Canada remains low, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Albertans, 25% of respondents agree with the statement “Alberta would be better off as its own country.” More than two thirds of Albertans (69%) disagree with this notion, including 58% who “strongly disagree.”

“The level of support for the idea of an independent Alberta is roughly the same as it was in surveys conducted in 2014 and 2016,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Four years ago, with a Progressive Conservative government in Edmonton and a Conservative government in Ottawa, the findings were similar to what is observed in 2018.”

The idea of an independent Alberta is more attractive for residents aged 55 and over (34%), as well as people who voted for the Wildrose Party in the 2015 provincial election (38%).

Across the province, 69% of Albertans say their views are different from the rest of Canada, and 84% say they are very proud of the province they live in.

Three-in-five respondents (60%) say they consider themselves “Canadians first, and Albertans second”, while just under a third (31%) claim to be “Albertans first, and Canadians second.”

Albertans aged 55 and over are more likely to place the province ahead of the country (40%) than those aged 35-to-54 (30%) and those aged 18-to-34 (20%)

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 13 to December 16, 2018, among 601 adults in Alberta. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Alberta. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.0 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Gorgo

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Metro Vancouver Drivers Say It Is Harder to Find Parking Spots

Drivers aged 35-to-54 are more likely to say they ignore parking tickets than those aged 18-to-34 and those aged 55 and over.

Vancouver, BC [December 18, 2018] – A sizeable proportion of drivers in Metro Vancouver think it is tougher to find parking spots in the region, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites who drive to school or work on weekdays, four-in-five (81%) say it is “moderately harder” or “much harder” to find a parking spot in their municipality when they need one.

Across Metro Vancouver, 18% of drivers say they have received a parking ticket from a municipality over the past two years, while 20% have received a ticket from a parking management company.

While 76% of drivers say they quickly paid the fine from the last parking ticket they received from a municipality, only 51% of those who received a ticket from a parking management company behaved in the same fashion.

In addition, while 13% of drivers say they never paid the fine from the last ticket issued by a municipality, the proportion jumps to 34% for tickets issued by a parking management company.

“Some drivers are clearly not taking parking tickets seriously,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This is particularly significant among drivers aged 35-to-54, who are more likely to say they never pay any type of parking fine, compared with their younger and older counterparts.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 25, 2018, among 513 adults in Metro Vancouver who drive to school or work on weekdays. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.3 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Only One-in-Ten Canadians Will Spend More This Holiday Season

Residents are evenly split on whether they prefer actual gifts from people or cards they can use to choose whatever they want. 

Vancouver, BC [December 13, 2018] – While a considerable proportion of Canadians say they are in a more fortunate economic situation compared to last year, few of them are in a more generous mood this holiday season, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than one-in-four Canadians (27%) say they are better off financially than they were last year, while half (49%) say the situation has not changed and one-in-five (22%) say they are worse off.

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to say they are in a more fortunate economic situation this year (44%) than those aged 35-to-54 (24%) and those aged 55 and over (15%).

When asked about how much they think they will allocate to gifts this holiday season, only 11% of Canadians say they plan to spend more, while almost half (47%) foresee no changes and two-in-five (39%) say they will spend less.

“There are some staggering regional differences on holiday expenditures in Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents of Western provinces are more likely to say they will devote more money to gifts this year than those in Eastern provinces.”

More than a quarter of Ontarians (28%), Quebecers (26%) and Atlantic Canadians (31%) say they are better off financially this year, but fewer than one-in-ten in each of these regions plan to spend more on gifts in 2018.

In Ontario, 44% of residents say they will spend less on gifts this year than they did in 2017—the highest proportion in the country.

When asked about possible holiday gifts they may receive this year, Canadians are deeply divided. Across the country, 48% say they prefer to receive gifts someone chose for them, while 47% would rather get a gift card they can use to choose what they want.

Residents of British Columbia are the most likely to prefer actual gifts to cards (54%), followed by those in Ontario (50%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (47%), Quebec (45%), Atlantic Canada (also 45%) and Alberta (43%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 25, 2018, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Increasing Rental Stock a Priority for Metro Vancouverites

More than three-in-four believe Canada should consider banning most foreigners from purchasing real estate.

Vancouver, BC [November 26, 2018] – Many residents of Metro Vancouver believe more rental units should be made available in the next three years, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, three-in-five (57%) think we need to build more rental units than we did over the three-year period that ended in 2017.

From 2015 to 2017, there were 75,000 new housing units built in Metro Vancouver. Approximately 23 per cent of them were for rental use.

One third of Metro Vancouverites (34%) would like to see more than 75,000 units built in the region over the next three years, while 27% would keep the same pace and 19% believe we should build less.

New Zealand recently passed legislation that bans most foreigners from purchasing real estate in the country. There are exceptions for foreigners who hold residency status in New Zealand, as well as citizens from Australia and Singapore, due to existing free-trade agreements.

Across Metro Vancouver, 77% of residents would support having similar legislation in Canada, that would ban most foreigners from purchasing real estate in the country.

“Metro Vancouverites are of three minds when assessing the current housing crisis,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The most supported proposition is a ban on foreign owners, and while a majority would like to see an increase in rental properties, the appetite for increasing the pace of construction is not as high.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 25, 2018, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two-in-Five Canadians Say Their Home Heating Use Has Increased

Three-in-ten Canadians in a relationship say they change the temperature at home without telling their partner. 

Vancouver, BC [December 6, 2018] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians are relying more heavily on home heating this year, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, two-in-five Canadians (41%) say their energy and heating use at home has increased over the past few weeks—a proportion that reaches 46% in Atlantic Canada, and 43% in both Ontario and British Columbia.

Across the country, 9% of Canadians say they typically set their home heating at 18C or lower. Most residents select 19C or 20C (38%) and 21C or 22C (40%), while 6% set the thermostat at 23C or higher.

Respondents to this survey who are married or living with a significant other were asked who is in charge of setting the temperature at home. Two-in-five (40%) say they are solely responsible, while 18% say their spouse or partner takes care of this task, and 30% affirm that the decision is taken by both equally.

Women are more likely to say that the home thermostat is a joint responsibility (34%, compared to 25% for men), while men are more likely to say they are solely responsible for home heating settings at home (43%, compared to 38% for women).

Three-in-ten Canadians in a relationship (30%) admit that they change the temperature at home without telling their spouse or significant other “all of the time” (8%) or “most of the time” (22%), while just 19% say they have “never” done this.

“Women (35%) are more likely to acknowledge that they adjust the thermostat without telling their spouse or partner than men (25%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “On a regional basis, Quebecers are more likely to say they would never change the settings without consulting first (35%), while British Columbians (8%) are the least likely to do so.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 26 to November 29, 2018, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Want to See Calorie Counts in Restaurants

Support for enacting a mandatory measure across the province is highest among residents aged 18-to-34.

Vancouver, BC [December 4, 2018] – Most British Columbians believe restaurant menus should always provide nutritional guidelines, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, four-in-five British Columbians (81%) say they would like to have a regulation similar to the one currently in place in Ontario, where it is mandatory to display calories on any menu that lists or depicts standard food items offered for sale by a regulated food service premises.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to support this measure (85%) than those aged 35-to-54 (79%) and those aged 55 and over (also 79%).

In 2012, the Province of British Columbia implemented the Informed Dining initiative, a programdesigned to allow residents to have nutrition information available when eating at participating food service establishments. The program is not mandatory,

Across British Columbia, 41% of residents currently use an activity tracker—a proportion that rises to 47% in Metro Vancouver. These devices monitor certain fitness-related metrics, including distance walked, amount of exercise and/or calorie consumption.

“There are already many residents of British Columbia who are keeping track of their physical activity,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Having the opportunity to access nutritional information at all restaurants, and not only those currently taking part in the Informed Dining initiative, would certainly be a welcome development.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 14 to November 16, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two Thirds of Canadians Side with Evolution, Not Creationism

Only one-in-five respondents think God created human beings in their present form.

Vancouver, BC [November 28, 2018] – Most Canadians share the same point of view regarding the origin and development of human beings on earth, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, two thirds of Canadians (66%) say that human beings “definitely” or “probably” developed from less advanced forms of life over millions of years.

Conversely, one-in-five Canadians (21%) think that God “definitely” or “probably” created human beings in their present form within the last 10,000 years.

In Manitoba and Saskatchewan, 41% of residents believe in creationism—a significantly higher number than in all other provinces. Quebec has the smallest proportion of respondents who identify with creationism (10%).

“Age appears to play a role in shaping the perceptions of Canadians on the origin of life,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While half of those aged 18-to-34 (50%) definitely concur with evolution, the proportion drops among those aged 35-to-54 (45%) and those aged 55 and over (26%).”

Canadians hold more nuanced views on whethercreationism—the belief that the universe and life originated from specific acts of divine creation—should be part of the school curriculum in their province.

Across the country, almost half of respondents (46%) believe creationism should not be taught in schools, while more than a third (38%) think it should be.

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to believe that creationism should not be part of the school curriculum in their province (54%) than those aged 35-to-54 (44%) and those aged 55 and over (42%).

In British Columbia, a majority of residents (55%) are opposed to teaching creationism in schools, followed by Quebec (49%), Manitoba and Saskatchewan (45%), Ontario (44%), Alberta (43%) and Atlantic Canada (41%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 27 to August 30, 2018, among 1,001 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Becris from the Noun Project

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Metro Vancouverites Ponder Regulations for Ride-Hailing

Most residents support having a cap on the number of drivers, as well as a Class 4 license requirement.

Vancouver, BC [November 26, 2018] – Most residents of Metro Vancouver believe people who want to operate a ride-hailing service should hold a driver’s license that requires more training, a medical exam and security checks, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 57% say they are in favour of only allowing drivers with a commercial (or Class 4) license to operate a ride-hailing service.

Conversely, three-in-ten respondents (30%) would allow drivers with a standard (or Class 5) license to operate a ride-hailing service.

Two thirds of Metro Vancouverites (66%) want the provincial government to cap the number of ride-hailing drivers to reduce traffic congestion.

In contrast, one-in-four (23%) think the provincial government should have no restrictions on the number of ride-hailing drivers, even if this creates traffic congestion.

Earlier this month, the Government of British Columbia announced that ride-hailing services will be allowed to operate in the province by the Fall of 2019.

Almost half of Metro Vancouverites (49%) believe this is a reasonable timeline, because it takes time to review the effect of ride-hailing on existing transportation options.

Two-in-five Metro Vancouverites (42%) believe this is not a reasonable timeline and think ride-hailing should be allowed in the province earlier than the Fall of 2019.

“Women (55%), residents aged 55+ (53%) and voters who supported the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in the last election (59%) are more likely to think the government’s ride-hailing timeline is reasonable,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Men (47%), residents aged 18-to-34 (also 47%) and voters who supported the BC Liberals in the last election (52%) are more likely to say the timeline is not reasonable”.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 25, 2018, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Wpcpey

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Worried About Real Estate Tax Expansion

Most residents think the provincial government will apply the additional school tax for properties valued at $1 million.

Vancouver, BC [November 22, 2018] – Many British Columbians are concerned about the possibility of a new tax on real estate being expanded to include lower priced properties, a new Research Co. poll conducted for STEPUP has found.

The provincial government introduced the additional school tax of 0.2% on the value of homes between $3 million and $4 million, and a tax rate of 0.4% on the portion of a home’s value that exceeds $4 million.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, seven-in-ten residents (70%) think the provincial government will likely expand the additional school tax to properties valued from $2 million to $2.99 million.

A majority of residents (53%) think the provincial government will likely expand the additional school tax to properties valued from $1 million to $1.99 million, and two-in-five (42%) think the tax may be expanded to include all properties.

Three-in-five residents (61%) approve of an eventual expansion of the additional school tax to properties valued from $2 million to $2.99 million. However, 66% of home owners who reside in a property currently assessed at $2 million or more disapprove of this expansion.

Most residents (51%) disapprove of expanding the additional school tax to properties valued from $1 million to $1.99 million, and almost three-in-four residents (73%) disapprove of expanding the additional school tax to all properties.

“While two thirds of British Columbians (67%) approve of the additional school tax in its current form, support drops if it is applied to lower priced properties,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Homeowners are decidedly opposed to the idea of the tax being expanded to include their places of residence.”

In addition, most British Columbians (57%) are not confident that the revenue generated by the additional school tax will be used to provide education in the province.

Almost half of British Columbians (46%) think provincial politicians have sought to divide over the past year, while more than a third (36%) think they have sought to unite.

A majority of BC New Democratic Party (NDP) voters in the last provincial election (56%) think politicians have sought to unite, while seven-in-ten BC Liberal voters (70%) think they have sought to divide.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 2 to September 5, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Larry LaRose

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Canadians Would Not Date Someone Who Vapes

Most residents agree with the government’s decision to prohibit the sale of vaping products to minors and ban certain flavours.

Vancouver, BC [November 21, 2018] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians appear to be put off by users of electronic cigarettes, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 50% of Canadians say they would not consider dating a person who used e-cigarettes.

The areas where most residents say they would not date vapers are British Columbia (60%) and Ontario (52%).

Across the country, 11% of Canadians say they have used an electronic cigarette in the past year—a proportion that rises to 19% among those aged 18-to-34, 15% in Atlantic Canada and 13% in Alberta.

Majorities of Canadians agree with a series of policies to address vaping that were implemented by the federal government as part of Bill S-5, including prohibiting the sale of vaping products to minors (88%), restricting any reference to e-cigarettes as healthier than standard tobacco products (73%), restricting the use of testimonials and “lifestyle” advertising for vaping products (71%) and banning certain flavours of vaping products, such as “confectionery” (62%).

In addition, three-in-four Canadians (76%) believe there should be a ban on the use of e-cigarettes in public places where smoking is currently prohibited, and 91% want vaping products that contain nicotine to display a warning, similar to the one used for tobacco products.

“While vaping has been around for a few years, it has not become a pervasive ritual in Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Most Canadians are comfortable with vapers getting the same treatment that is afforded to smokers.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 27 to August 30, 2018, among 1,001 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Dead Heat in British Columbia’s Electoral Reform Referendum

Millennials are more likely to support changing the system, while Baby Boomers are keener on leaving things as they are.

Vancouver, BC [November 21, 2018] – There is no clear favourite as voters in British Columbia ponder their options in the referendum on electoral reform, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, 40% say they will “definitely” or “probably” vote for the current First Past the Post system, while 40% say they will “definitely” or “probably” vote for a proportional representation system.

Across the province, 15% of voters are undecided, including 20% of women, 19% of those aged 18-to-34 and 18% of those aged 35-to-54.

“A majority of voters aged 55 and over (57%) hold extremely favourable views of the current system,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In stark contrast, more than half of those aged 18-to-34 (53%) prefer proportional representation.”

Most British Columbians who plan to vote to keep the current First Past the Post system cite confusion with the options that are on the ballot (57%) as the main reason for their decision. Three-in-ten of these voters (31%) also consider that the existing system is fair because candidates need to win the election in their riding.

Conversely, almost half of proportional representation supporters (48%) think this system is fairer because the share of the votes a party receives is reflected in the number of seats it has in the legislature. Two-in-five of these voters (40%) also think the current system does not work for everybody and needs to be changed.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 14 to November 16, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Robert Bourassa is Best Recent Premier for Quebecers

One-in-four residents of the province think Jean Charest has been the worst recent head of government. 

Vancouver, BC [November 14, 2018] – Long-serving Premier Bourassa is still regarded fondly in Quebec, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 24% of Quebecers believe Bourassa has been the best head of government the province has had since December 1985.

Lucien Bouchard is second on the list with 16%, followed by Jacques Parizeau with 14% and Jean Charest with 6%.

The ranking is lower for Philippe Couillard (4%), Bernard Landry (also 4%), Pauline Marois (3%) and Daniel Johnson Jr. (2%).

“There is no language gap in the perceptions of Quebecers when it comes to Robert Bourassa,” says says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Equal proportions of English and French speakers feel he has been the best recent premier.”

Bourassa is particularly popular among Quebecers aged 55 and over (31%) and those who voted for the Liberal Party of Quebec in this year’s provincial election (35%).

Conversely, those who cast a ballot for the Parti Québécois (PQ) this year believe Parizeau was the superior premier (26%, followed by Bouchard with 21%).

When asked who has been the worst recent premier of Quebec, Charest is first with 25%, followed by Marois with 20%, Couillard with 18% and Parizeau with 6%.

Men are more likely to select Charest as the worst recent head og government (30%, with Marois at 22%). Among women, Marois is in third place with 18%, behind Charest at 21% and Couillard at 20%.

There is a substantial difference when it comes to language on this question. Charest is regarded more negatively by French speakers (31%) and Marois by English speakers (35%)

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 20 to October 22, 2018,among 602 Quebec adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Quebec. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Assembléetest

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Ponder Solutions to Opioid Crisis

Education and awareness campaigns—as well as adding more spaces for drug rehabilitation—are very popular ideas.

Vancouver, BC [November 7, 2018] – British Columbians are clearly worried about the current situation related to the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in their community, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, almost two thirds (64%) refer to the issue as “a major problem”, while 25% consider it “a minor problem.”

“Concerns about opioids are no longer confined to urban centres in British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of residents in all regions of the province believe the problem is severe.”

When asked about specific solutions to the challenge at hand, 90% of British Columbians voice support for launching more education and awareness campaigns about drug use, and 88% would like to create more spaces for drug rehabilitation.

More than three-in-four British Columbians (78%) support reducing the prescription of opioids by medical professionals, and two thirds (66%) would set up more “harm reduction” strategies, such as legal supervised injection sites.

The idea of decriminalizing all drugs for personal use is more divisive, with 50% of residents opposing this course of action and 45% agreeing with it.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to endorse the decriminalization of all drugs for personal use (57%) than those aged 35-to-54 (43%) and those aged 55 and over (38%).

When it comes to the performance of political leaders, two-in-five British Columbians (41%) think BC Premier John Horgan and the provincial government are doing a “very good” or “good job” to come up with solutions to deal with the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs.

The rating is lower for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the federal government (37%) as well as Mayors and Councils across the province (35%).

Earlier this year, the Government of British Columbia launched a lawsuit against drug manufacturers and retailers, in an effort to recover public-health costs associated with an increase in the use of opioids. Across the province, 72% of residents agree with the provincial government’s decision, while 17% disagree with it.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 25 to October 28, 2018, among 801 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Tight Senate Races Developing in Arizona and Florida

The gubernatorial contests in Ohio and Wisconsin are also very close in the final days of campaigning. 

Vancouver, BC [November 5, 2018] – Residents of two American states are headed to this year’s mid-term election with closely contested U.S. Senate races, according to a series of new polls conducted by Research Co. in five American states.

The surveys also show remarkably tight contests in three gubernatorial elections.

Arizona

In the race to take over the U.S. Senate seat vacated by Jeff Flake in Arizona, Democrat Kyrsten Sinema and Republican Martha McSally are locked in an extremely close race (50% to 49% among decided voters)

Incumbent Republican Doug Ducey seems headed for re-election as the Governor of the Grand Canyon State, with a 14-point lead over Democratic rival David Garcia (57% to 41% among decided voters).

Florida

Democrat Bill Nelson’s quest for a fourth-term in the United States Senate could see the closest race of his career. Nelson holds a two-point edge over Republican Rick Scott (51% to 49%).

In the Sunshine State’s gubernatorial race, Democrat Andrew Gillum is also ahead of Republican Ron DeSantis by two points (50% to 48%).

New Mexico

Incumbent Democratic U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich is first in New Mexico (52% among decided voters), followed by Republican Mick Rich (36%) and Libertarian Gary Johnson (12%).

In the contest to replace New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez, Democratic candidate Michelle Lujan Grisham holds a 12-point advantage over Republican challenger Steve Pearce (56% to 44% among decided voters).

Ohio

Incumbent Democratic U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown has a sizeable lead over Republican challenger Jim Renacci in the Buckeye State (58% to 42% among decided voters).

The race for governor is extremely tight, with both Democrat Richard Cordray and Republican Mike DeWine supported by 49% of decided voters in Ohio.

Wisconsin

Incumbent U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin appears headed to a new term in office, with a 12-point advantage over Republican rival Leah Vukmir in the Badger State (56% to 44% among decided voters).

The election for Governor is very close, with Democratic challenger Tony Evers barely ahead of incumbent Republican Scott Walker (49% to 48% among decided voters).

Methodology:

Results are based on online studies conducted from November 1 to November 3, 2018, among representative samples of 450 voters in five American states: Arizona, Florida, New Mexico, Ohio and Wisconsin. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age and gender in each state. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.6 percentage points for each state.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: R.Hood Photography

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Democrats Heavily Favoured in Six U.S. Senate Races

Incumbents lead in California, Michigan, Minnesota, New York and Pennsylvania.

Vancouver, BC [November 4, 2018] – Several members of the United States Senate appear ready to return to Washington D.C. after this year’s mid-term election, according to a series of new polls conducted by Research Co. in five American states.

The surveys also show Democratic Party candidates edging out Republican challengers in five gubernatorial races.

California

As was the case in 2016, the race for the U.S. Senate in the Golden State features two Democratic contenders. Incumbent Dianne Feinstein (62%) is ahead of challenger Kevin de León (38%).

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Gavin Newsom holds a 20-point lead over Republican rival John Cox among decided voters in California (60% to 40%).

Michigan

Incumbent Democratic U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow appears headed for a third term in office, with a 17-point lead over Republican John James (58% to 41%) in the Great Lakes State.

In the contest to replace Michigan Governor Rick Snyder, Democratic candidate Gretchen Whitmer is ahead of Republican Bill Schuette (52% to 47% among decided voters).

Minnesota

Incumbent U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar of the Democratic Party holds a comfortable lead over Republican Jim Newberger in the North Star State (60% to 38%).

In the special election to fill the U.S. Senate seat vacated after the resignation of Al Franken, Democrat Tina Smith is ahead of Republican Karin Housley (55% to 43%).

Democratic candidate Tim Walz is in a good position to replace fellow party member Mark Dayton as Governor of Minnesota. Walz holds a seven-point lead over Republican Jeff Johnson (53% to 46%).

New York

Democrat Kirsten Gillibrand would earn a new term in the U.S. Senate representing the Empire State, with a sizeable advantage over Republican Chele Chiavacci Farley (66% to 34%).

Incumbent Governor Andrew Cuomo of the Democratic Party holds a 19-point lead over Republican contender Marc Molinaro (58% to 39%) in New York.

Pennsylvania

Democrat Bob Casey Jr. would win a third consecutive election to the U.S. Senate in the Keystone State. Casey holds a 17-point lead over Republican rival Lou Barletta (58% to 41%).

Incumbent Democratic Governor Tom Wolf is 15 points ahead of Republican challenger Scott Wagner (57% to 42%) in Pennsylvania.

Methodology:

Results are based on online studies conducted from November 1 to November 3, 2018, among representative samples of 450 voters in five American states: California, Michigan, Minnesota, New York and Pennsylvania. The data has been statistically weighted according to U.S. census figures for age and gender in each state. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.6 percentage points for each state.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: R.Hood Photography

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Canadians Say Drivers Are Worse than Five Years Ago

In the past month, seven-in-ten Canadians witnessed a driver not signaling before a turn.

Vancouver, BC [October 31, 2018] – Canadians are not particularly thrilled with the behaviour they are observing on the country’s roads, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 50% of Canadians say drivers in their city or town are worse than they were five years ago, while only 4% say they are better.

The areas where most residents believe drivers are getting worse are British Columbia (64%), Atlantic Canada (59%), Alberta (53%) and Ontario (51%).

Seven-in-ten Canadians (71%) saw a driver not signalling before a turn in the last month, including 83% of British Columbians. In addition, three-in-five (61%) witnessed a car taking up two or more spots in a parking lot, including 77% of those in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

In the past month, almost half of Canadians (48%) saw a driver not stopping at an intersection, 45% witnessed cars turning right or left from an incorrect lane and 42% had a “close call” while in their vehicle.

Only 16% of Canadians did not witness any major problems on the roads in the past four weeks, including 26% of Quebecers.

A majority of Canadians (58%) believe there are specific groups or people in their city or town who are worse drivers than others. This proportion includes 68% of British Columbians, 60% of Albertans and 58% of Ontarians.

“Equal proportions of Baby Boomers and Millennials (60%) say there are some drivers who are worse than others in their municipality,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Those who volunteered a follow-up response were more likely to blame each other, with Canadians aged 18-to-34 pointing the finger at old drivers, and those aged 55 and over saying young drivers are responsible.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 27 to August 30, 2018, among 1,001 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Haljackey

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Majority of Quebecers Turn Their Backs on Sovereignty

Almost half of the province’s residents consider themselves Quebecers first and Canadians second.

Vancouver, BC [October 26, 2018] – Most residents of Quebec appear content with their province’s current status within Canada, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 34% of Quebecers agree with the statement “Quebec would be better off as its own country”, while a majority (53%) disagree.

The level of agreement with the statement on Quebec sovereignty is highest among voters who cast a ballot for the Parti Québécois (PQ) in the last provincial election (81%), but drops drastically among those who supported the Coalition Avenir Québec (CAQ) (38%), Québec solidaire (31%) and the Liberal Party of Quebec (19%).

Almost half of residents (48%) say they consider themselves “Quebecers first, and Canadians second” while just over two-in-five (43%) say they are “Canadians first, and Quebecers second.”

Men (54%) and residents aged 55 and over (52%) are more likely to consider themselves Quebecers first.

Only 18% of Liberal voters in this year’s provincial election consider themselves Quebecers first, compared to majorities of voters who supported the CAQ (57%), Québec solidaire (74%) and the PQ (89%).

“On a regional basis, residents of Montreal are more likely to refer to themselves as Canadians first,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But most of those who live in Quebec City and other areas of the province refer to themselves as Quebecers first.”

Two thirds of Quebecers (68%) think their views are different from the rest of Canada, but 51% disagree with the notion that Quebecers have more in common with the people of France than with those in other parts of Canada.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 20 to October 22, 2018, among 602 Quebec adults. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Quebec. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Zorion

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Mixed Reviews for Departing City Halls in Vancouver and Surrey

Most residents express disappointment with the current influence of developers on their municipal governments.

Vancouver, BC [October 19, 2018] – Residents of Vancouver and Surrey hold differing views about the pressing concerns affecting their municipalities and the performance of the current governments, a new Research Co. poll conducted for CTV Vancouver has found.

The online survey of representative samples shows that two thirds of Vancouver residents (67%) believe housing is the most important issue facing the city, followed by transportation (9%), poverty (also 9%) and economic development (5%).

In Surrey, 30% of residents believe housing is the most important issue, followed closely by crime (29%), transportation (20%) and poverty (7%).

“The views of Surrey residents vary greatly depending on where they live,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In Newton, concerns about crime are higher than anywhere else in the city, while in Cloverdale residents are more worried about transportation.”

The survey also asked residents whether the current municipal government is doing a “good job” or a “bad job” handling various matters.

In Vancouver, the best rated government competencies are promoting tourism to the city (74%), providing good sanitation services (68%), fostering artistic and cultural activities (58%) and protecting the environment (55%).

The rating is significantly lower for managing economic development ang growth (24%), dealing with homelessness and poverty (14%) and dealing with housing (10%).

Surrey gets its best marks on sanitation (68%) and arts and culture promotion (63%), but fewer than one-in-four residents are satisfied with how crime (22%), homelessness and poverty (also 22%) and housing (also 22%) have been dealt with.

Perceptions on housing affordability are especially dire in the two municipalities, with 90% of Vancouver residents and 87% of Surrey residents saying the situation is worse than it was four years ago.

A majority of City of Vancouver residents also believe quality of life (53%) and the influence of developers at City Hall (also 53%) is worse than it was in 2014. In addition, two thirds of Vancouverites (65%) say they do not like where Vancouver is going and think we need to change the course at City Hall.

In Surrey, more than half of residents (52%) say the influence of developers at City Hall is worse than it was four years ago, and a similarly high proportion (48%) feel the same way about public safety. Three-in-five residents of Surrey (60%) think it is time to change the course at City Hall.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 30 to October 2, 2018, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver and 400 adults in the City of Surrey. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in each city. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points for both samples, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data sets for Vancouver and Surrey and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

High Support for Transportation Projects in Metro Vancouver

Almost nine-in-ten residents are in favour of taking SkyTrain to the UBC Point Grey campus.

Vancouver, BC [October 18, 2018] – Two pending transportation projects are backed by a sizeable proportion of Metro Vancouver residents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, two thirds (68%) say they agree with the construction of the proposed Surrey–Newton–Guildford Light Rail Transit (LRT) project in Surrey.

In the City of Surrey, 62% of residents are in favour of the proposed LRT project, while 34% are not.

Four-in-five Metro Vancouver residents (82%) agree with the extension of the SkyTrain Millennium Line underneath Broadway to Arbutus in Vancouver—including 81% of those who live in the City of Vancouver.

In addition, 87% of Metro Vancouverites support extending the Millennium Line beyond Arbutus to the University of British Columbia (UBC) campus at Point Grey.

“Most residents of Metro Vancouver are keen to see these transportation projects through,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support is similarly high among those who drive, take public transit or bike to school or work.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 4 to October 7, 2018, among 635 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: PoYang

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Location of Marijuana Stores Divides Views in British Columbia

Most residents are OK with pot shops in their city and neighbourhood, but not a block away from their home. 

Vancouver, BC [October 17, 2018] – As the use of recreational marijuana is about to become legal across Canada, British Columbians hold differing views on the future location of pot shops, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, seven-in-ten residents (70%) say they approve of establishments that would sell marijuana and marijuana-related products being located anywhere in their municipality.

More than half of British Columbians (56%) also approve of pot shops located anywhere in their neighbourhood.

However, when asked to ponder the notion of a marijuana store located a block away from their home, the numbers tighten considerably. Half of British Columbians (50%) approve of this scenario, while a similar proportion (48%) disapprove.

The level of “strong disapproval” of a pot shop located a block away from home is highest than the level of “strong approval” (32% to 24%).

“There seems to a NIMBY sentiment when it comes to the future location of pot shops in the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Women, British Columbians aged 55 and over and those who reside in Vancouver Island are more likely to hold reservations on having marijuana stores close to their homes.”

British Columbians were also asked about the prospect of relying on the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR) to grow cannabis. Across the province, 49% of residents are “definitely” or “probably” in favour of this idea, while 44% are “definitely” or “probably” against it.

Residents aged 18-to-34 are more likely to support growing marijuana on ALR land (55%) than those aged 35-to-54 (47%) and those aged 55 and over (46%).

On a regional basis, the idea of growing cannabis in ALR land is decidedly more popular in Southern BC (67%) than in Vancouver Island (48%), Metro Vancouver (46%), the Fraser Valley (also 46%) and Northern BC (39%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 4 to October 7, 2018, among 877 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.3 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: JPatrickBedell

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Stewart Keeps Lead as Vancouver Mayoral Election Looms

More than half of voters are considering independent candidates for City Council.

Vancouver, BC [October 16, 2018] – Independent candidate Kennedy Stewart remains ahead as Vancouver’s mayoral campaign enters its final days, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative sample of City of Vancouver voters reproduced the ballot that will be used in the mayoral election, with the names of all 21 candidates listed in the order that was drawn last month.

In the survey, 36% of decided voters (+2 since early October) said they will vote for Stewart or have already voted for him in the advance polls.

Ken Sim of the Non-Partisan Association (NPA) is second with 23% (+3), followed closely by independent candidate Shauna Sylvester with 19% (+3).

Support is currently lower for Hector Bremner of Yes Vancouver (6%, -4), Wai Young of Coalition Vancouver (6%, -1), Fred Harding of VANCOUVER 1st (2%, -2) and David Chen of ProVancouver (2%, -5).

One third of voters in the City of Vancouver (33%) are undecided, including 41% of those aged 18-to-34 and 43% of women.

“Many Vancouver voters are still making up their minds about the candidates and parties they will support on October 20,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This group includes three-in-ten of those who voted for Kirk LaPointe in the last mayoral election, and more than a quarter of those who cast a ballot for Gregor Robertson.”

Sim and Stewart are virtually tied among male decided voters (32% and 31% respectively), while Stewart leads among female decided voters (42%, followed by Sylvester at 25%).

When it comes to the election for City Council, more than half of voters in Vancouver (53%) say they are “definitely” or “probably” considering voting for independent candidates.

The parties with the highest level of consideration for City Council from Vancouver voters are the Greens (47%), the NPA (35%), the Coalition of Progressive Electors (COPE) (34%), Vision Vancouver (29%) and OneCity (27%).

Consideration is currently lower for City Council candidates representing YES Vancouver (18%), VANCOUVER 1st (also 18%), Coalition Vancouver (also 18%) and ProVancouver (16%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 12 to October 14, 2018, among 401 voters in the City of Vancouver, including 265 decided voters in the 2018 mayoral election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points for the entire sample and +/- 6.0 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Support Mandatory Vaccinations for Children

Almost one-in-five believe the decision should be up to parents.

Vancouver, BC [October 3, 2018] – While a sizeable majority of Canadians are in favour of mandatory childhood immunization in their province, almost one-in-five believe the decision should be up to parents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 78% of Canadians believe vaccinations for children should “definitely” or “probably” be mandatory in their province.

Conversely, 18% think parents should “probably” or “definitely” be the ones deciding whether their children should be vaccinated.

In the late 1990s, a study published in the weekly medical journal The Lancet—which has since been discredited and retracted—attempted to link childhood vaccination and autism.

Across Canada, 23% of respondents think there “definitely” or “probably” is a correlation between the childhood vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella and autism in children—including 25% of Ontarians and Quebecers.

“One third of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (32%) and one-in-four of those aged 35-to-54 (25%) believe the widely debunked notion of childhood immunization leading to autism is definitely or probably true,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Respondents over the age of 55 are significantly less likely to think the same way (13%).”

When it comes to vaccinations and seasonal diseases (such as the flu), Canadians are more likely to reject a compulsory program.

Three-in-five Canadians (59%) think each person should “definitely” or “probably” be allowed to decide whether they want to get the flu vaccine, while just under two-in-five (38%) believe the flu vaccine should be mandatory in their province.

A majority of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (51%) voices support for the flu vaccine to be mandatory in their province, compared to 36% for those aged 35-to-54 and 29% for those aged 55 and over.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 27 to August 30, 2018, among 1,001 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Credit: Armin Kübelbeck

Canadian Employees Using Company-Issued Devices for Fun

Almost two thirds of the instant messages sent during work hours are not related to work.

Vancouver, BC [September 25, 2018] – Canadian employees whose smartphones are being financed by employers are spending more time sending instant messages to friends and family than connecting with colleagues to deal with tasks, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample asked Canadians who are employed full time and have a smartphone that their company is paying for about the instant messages they send while at work,

Just over a third of the instant messages that are sent during work hours on company-issued smartphones (35%) are interactions with colleagues for work-related tasks. Almost two thirds of the messages (65%) are interactions with family, friends and acquaintances for fun.

Across the country, full-time employees in Atlantic Canada are the most likely to use their company-issued devices for fun (69%), followed by those in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (67%), Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia (all at 65%) and Alberta (63%).

Full-time employees in the highest annual household income bracket are less likely to use their company-issued devices for fun (60%) than those in the lower income brackets.

“While a majority of instant messages sent from smartphones that employers are paying for are for fun, there are some generational differences,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Employees aged 55 and over are more likely to be having fun with company-issued devices during work hours than their younger counterparts.”

More than a third of full-time employees (35%) say they received a confusing message from someone they know because of auto-correct—a proportion that jumps to 47% among those aged 18-to-34. Millennial respondents are also more likely to have sent a confusing message because of auto-correct (45%, compared to the Canada-wide average of 30%).

Three-in-ten respondents (31%) say they declined an invitation to connect with a person through instant messaging in the last six months, and 18% say they left an instant messaging group they belonged to.

The most popular platform for instant messaging is Facebook Messenger, with 83% of respondents saying they use it during work hours, while more than half rely on messaging applications on their smartphone (62%), Skype (also 62%), Twitter Direct Messages (57%) and LinkedIn Messenger (also 57%).

Fewer respondents use WhatsApp (49%), Windows Live Messenger (33%) and Blackberry Messenger (16%) during work hours.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 7 to May 11, 2018, among 659 adults in Canada who are employed full-time and have a smartphone that their company is paying for. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Four-in-Five British Columbians Support a Handgun Ban

An even larger proportion of residents would forbid military-style assault weapons in their municipality.

Vancouver, BC [September 17, 2018] – An overwhelming majority of British Columbians would like to ban specific weapons in their municipalities, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, four-in-five residents (79%) support a ban on handguns within the limits of their municipality.

Last month, Montreal City Council adopted a motion calling for a nationwide ban on handguns and military-style assault weapons.

Across British Columbia, 86% of residents support a ban on military-style assault weapons in their city or town.

“Support for the course of action charted in Montreal is high across the entire province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Women and British Columbians aged 55 and over are definitely more likely to be in favour of implementing these bans.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 2 to September 5, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

 

Greens, Independents Surge in Vancouver Council Election

Almost half of residents would like to see several parties represented in City Council.

Vancouver, BC [September 11, 2018] – As Vancouverites consider their choices in the election to City Council, the parties that traditionally formed the government in the city are not particularly popular, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of City of Vancouver residents, 46% say they will “definitely” or “probably” consider voting for Green Party of Vancouver candidates in next month’s election to City Council, while 39% will “definitely” or “probably” cast ballots for independent candidates.

About a third of Vancouverites (32%) would “definitely” or “probably” consider voting for City Council candidates from the Coalition of Progressive Electors (COPE). The ranking is lower for Vision Vancouver (30%), the Non-Partisan Association (NPA) (also 30%), Yes Vancouver (24%), One City (19%), Coalition Vancouver (13%), Vancouver First (12%) and ProVancouver (9%).

“The Green Party is definitely outperforming all others in Vancouver when it comes to City Council,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There is also a large component of the electorate that is currently looking into independent candidates as viable options.”

Almost half of Vancouverites (47%, -3 since April) would “definitely” or “probably” prefer to see several parties represented in City Council, while 38% (+3 since April) would prefer a single party having a majority.

The survey was conducted before Ian Campbell of Vision Vancouver announced he was dropping out of the mayoral race. Across the city, the best ranked candidate is independent Kennedy Stewart with a score of +13 (23% think he is a “good choice” for mayor, while 10% deem him a “bad choice”).

Only two other candidates currently hold a positive score: independent Shauna Sylvester at +11 (19% “good”, 8% “bad”) and Ken Sim of the NPA at +4 (18% “good”, 14% “bad”).

David Chen of ProVancouver is even (11% “good”, 11% “bad”). The remaining candidates post negative scores, including Wai Young of Coalition Vancouver (-16), Hector Bremner of Yes Vancouver (-2) and Fred Harding of Vancouver First (also -2).

Vancouverites were also asked how much confidence they have in each of the declared mayoral candidates to help make Vancouver housing more affordable. 

Stewart is also ahead, with 33% of residents expressing “complete confidence” or “some confidence” in his ability, followed by Bremner (26%), Sylvester (also 26%), Sim (24%), Harding (22%), Chen (21%) and Young (19%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 4 to September 7, 2018, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

 

 

 

One-in-Six British Columbians Rely Solely on “Doctor Internet”

Women are more likely than men to search online for information on nutrition, exercise or weight control.

Vancouver, BC [September 5, 2018] – Many British Columbians are going online to seek information about health, but one-in-six are doing so without the added benefit of a visit to the doctor, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, 16% of residents acknowledge they went online to diagnose or treat a medical condition on their own, without consulting a doctor, over the past year.

Two thirds of British Columbians (68%) have searched online for information about a particular illness or condition over the past year.

There are some differences among specific demographic groups on what exactly residents are looking for online.

While 41% of British Columbians have sought information about prescription drugs online over the past year, the proportion climbs to 49% among those aged 55 and over.

More than half of women in British Columbia (54%) have searched online for information about nutrition, exercise and weight control, compared to just 41% of men in the province.

Across British Columbia, 23% of residents have sought information about mental health online, including 32% of those aged 18-to-34.

Millennials are also more likely to have searched online for information about sexual health (33%, compared to the provincial average of 18%).

More than a third of British Columbians (35%) have gone online to gather information before and after visiting their doctor,

“There is a generational gap when it comes to British Columbians who combine information from the Internet with a trip to the general practitioner,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Millennials are more likely to conduct research before they see their doctor, while Baby Boomers are more likely to go online after their visit.”

One-in-five British Columbians (22%) have sought information online about alternative or experimental treatments or medicines over the past year, including 35% in Northern BC.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 13 to August 14, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Enthralled by U.S. News in Trump Presidency

One-in-five residents have changed a brand of food they usually purchased to avoid buying from U.S. producers.

Vancouver, BC [August 30, 2018] – Some British Columbians have changed their news consumption and shopping habits since the election of Donald Trump as President of the United States, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, more than half of residents (52%) say they have paid more attention to American news that they did in years past since Trump’s election.

British Columbians aged 55 and over (64%) are more likely to say they are monitoring U.S. news more closely than those aged 35-to-54 (47%) and those aged 18-to-34 (42%).

Across the province, one-in-four British Columbians (25%) have changed a brand of food they usually purchased to avoid buying from U.S. producers—a proportion that includes 31% of residents aged 55 and over.

Almost one-in-five British Columbians (19%) have changed a brand of clothing they usually purchased to avoid buying from U.S. retailers—including 25% of those aged 18-to-34.

In addition, 16% of British Columbians have cancelled a planned holiday or vacation to the United States.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 13 to August 14, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Still Want Money Laundering Public Inquiry

Almost four-in-five would create an Anti-Corruption Commissioner, similar to the one currently in place in Quebec.

Vancouver, BC [August 23, 2018] – Most British Columbians remain adamant in their wish for a public inquiry into money laundering in the province’s casinos, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, three-in-four residents (76%, unchanged since June) believe the provincial government should “definitely” or “probably” call a public inquiry into money laundering in casinos.

“The appetite for a public inquiry into money laundering in casinos has not died down over the past two months,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There is also an extremely high proportion of residents who want to create an office to prevent corruption in the public sector.”

Across the province, 78% of British Columbians think British Columbia should establish an office similar to Quebec’s Anti-Corruption Commissioner, which was created “to ensure the coordination of actions to prevent and to fight corruption in the public sector, including in contractual matters.”

On June 27, BC Attorney General David Eby released an independent report, which detailed how organized crime groups relied on casinos to launder illegal drug money. Videos released on that same day showed people dragging bags of cash into Metro Vancouver casinos.

When asked who is to blame for the current situation related to money laundering in casinos, almost half of British Columbians (48%) place “all of the blame” or “some of the blame” on the British Columbia Lottery Corporation (BCLC).

Almost two-in-five residents (39%) think the previous provincial government headed by the BC Liberals deserves “all of the blame” or “most of the blame”, while about one-in-four (23%) feel the same way about the current provincial government headed by the BC New Democratic Party (NDP).

Only 21% of British Columbians place “all of the blame” or “most of the blame” for the current situation on the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP).

A majority of British Columbians (53%, +5 since June) say they have followed stories related to money laundering in the province’s casinos “very closely” or “moderately closely.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 13 to August 14, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Consumption of Frozen Treats Jumps in British Columbia Heat

More than four-in-five Millennials say they are spending more on ice cream, popsicles and freezies than they did last year.

Vancouver, BC [August 16, 2018] – In a summer when several temperature records have been broken in the province, British Columbians are opening their wallets in an effort to keep cool, a new Research Co. survey has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, more than seven-in-ten residents (72%) say they are spending more on frozen desserts—such as ice cream, popsicles and freezies—than they did last summer.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are leading the way in frozen treat consumption, with 85% of them saying they are spending more on these items than they did last year.

More than two-in-five British Columbians (42%) acknowledge that they are dining out more often this summer than in 2017, including 49% of Metro Vancouverites and 47% of Millennials.

Across the province, 15% of residents say they have spent more on appliances—such as fans and air conditioners—this summer than last, a proportion that climbs to 26% in the Fraser Valley.

In addition, 40% of British Columbians say they are spending more on cold beverages—including beer, cider and pop—than they did a year ago. In this category, residents of Vancouver Island (48%) and those aged 55 and over (43%) are the biggest consumers.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 13 to August 14, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Welcome Automated Speed Enforcement

The use of red light cameras to capture speeding vehicles is endorsed by seven-in-ten residents. 

Vancouver, BC [August 13, 2018] – Most British Columbians support the use of technology to enforce speed limits in the province’s roads, a new Research Co. survey has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, seven-in-ten residents (70%) approve of the use of speed-on-green cameras, or red light cameras that also capture vehicles that are speeding through intersections.

Automated speed enforcement works by using cameras or sensors to pick up a vehicle speeding. A ticket is then issued to the owner of the vehicle. Driver’s license points are not issued as the driver of the vehicle cannot be identified.

The provincial government announced last fall that red light cameras located at 140 intersections would record 24 hours a day. In the fall, the provincial government is expected to announce the number and locations of cameras that would be used to identify speeding vehicles.

In addition to the speed-on-green cameras, most British Columbians also endorsed three other types of automated speed enforcement.

Across the province, 71% of residents approve of using fixed speed cameras, or cameras that stay in one location and measure speed as a vehicle passes. These cameras can be placed in school zones or on other roads.

In addition, almost two thirds of British Columbians (65%) approve of using mobile speed cameras, which can be moved from place to place and measure speed as a vehicle passes.

A majority of residents (55%) also approved of point-to-point enforcement, which uses cameras at two or more distant points on a road. The average speed of vehicles that pass between points is calculated and tickets are issued to vehicles whose average speed over the distance was excessive.

“There is high support for all four types of automated speed enforcement across the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Point-to-point enforcement is the most contentious of all four, with more than a third of residents disapproving of its use.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 2 to August 5, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most British Columbians Support Community Benefits Agreements

Seven-in-ten support building publicly funded projects through Community Benefits Agreements.

Vancouver, BC [August 9, 2018] – British Columbians are taking note of Community Benefits Agreements (CBAs) and a sizeable majority endorses them for publicly funded projects, a new Research Co. survey has found.

A CBA prioritizes jobs to local residents, ensures employment opportunities for apprentices, Indigenous workers and women, and provides union wages and benefits.

In an online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, seven-in-ten residents (70%) either “strongly” (26%) or “moderately” (44%) support building publicly funded projects with CBAs, while 16% are opposed and 13% are undecided.

“Support for relying on CBAs for publicly funded projects is highest among Women (75%) and residents aged 18-34 (also 75%)”, says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support was also highest among those who live in Southern BC (86%), where the first two projects—the Pattullo Bridge replacement and Hwy 1—have been announced.”

Two thirds of British Columbians (68%) either “strongly” (23%) or “moderately” (45%) support the Community Benefits policy of dedicating 25% of the workforce on public projects to apprentices, while 14% are opposed and 18% are undecided.

When asked how familiar the public is with CBAs, one-in-four residents (22%) said they are “very familiar” (4%) or “moderately familiar” (18%) with them. Men (30%), residents aged 18-34 (25%) and those who live in Northern BC (28%) are more likely to be familiar with CBAs.

This survey was commissioned by the BC Building Trades Council.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 2 to August 5, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Proud of Province and Fond of Cascadia

Three-in-four British Columbians believe they will stay in the province for the rest of their lives.

Vancouver, BC [August 6, 2018] – More British Columbians are expressing affection for their fellow cascadians, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, two thirds of residents (66%) think they have more in common with the people of Seattle and Portland than with those in Toronto or Montreal. This represents an eight-point increase since a similar survey conducted in 2016.

“When it comes to the way British Columbians feel about the residents of Washington State and Oregon, Millennials are the driving force behind positive perceptions,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Among residents aged 18-to-34, this sentiment reaches 72%, compared to 65% for those aged 35-to-54 and 64% for those aged 55 and over.”

Across the province, three-in-four residents (77%) believe they will stay in British Columbia for the rest of their lives, and 87% say they are very proud of the province they live in.

Three-in-five residents (61%) think the views of British Columbians are different from the rest of the country. Still, only 17% of residents believe the province would be better off as its own country—a proportion that rises to 22% among residents aged 35-to-54.

When asked who the best premier of the past three decades has been, almost two-in-five British Columbians (38%) cannot pick a single person. Mike Harcourt is in first place with 15%, followed by Gordon Campbell and John Horgan with 12% each, and Christy Clark with 11%.

BC Liberal voters in the last provincial election regard Clark (26%) and Campbell (22%) as the best recent provincial heads of government. Conversely, those who supported the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) in last year’s ballot select Horgan (28%) and Harcourt (26%).

Three-in-ten British Columbians (31%) pick Clark as the worst premier of the past three decades—a proportion that includes 42% of women and 43% of those aged 18-to-34. Horgan is second with 17%, followed by Bill Vander Zalm with 11%.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 27 to June 29, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Few Canadians Willing to Pay as News Content Shifts Online

Almost half say they do not visit any news sources that charge for online access.

Vancouver, BC [August 2, 2018] – Canadians have not embraced the concept of paying for news and information online, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, only 9% of Canadians say they are currently paying subscribers of at least one online news source that they find interesting—a proportion that rises to 14% among those aged 18-to-34.

Three-in-ten Canadians (31%) say they stop going to an online news source if there’s a limit on free articles and/or a paywall—including 39% of those aged 35-to-54.

“Content is increasingly moving online, but almost half of Canadians (47%) are not paying for any of it right now,” says Mario Canseco, President at Research Co. “Those over the age of 55 are more likely to say they do not visit any news sources that charge for online access (56%) than those aged 18-to-34 (41%) and those aged 35-to-54 (41%).”

More than half of Ontarians (52%) say they do not visit any news sources that charge for online access. The proportion of non-subscribers drops to 49% in British Columbia, 47% in Alberta, 46% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, 44% in Atlantic Canada and 36% in Quebec.

Only 13% of Canadians say they get news and information from a hard copy of a local newspaper on a daily basis, and fewer access a hard copy of a national paper (9%) or a hard copy of a magazine (5%).

When it comes to radio and television, 41% of Canadians say they get their news and information from local television newscasts and news channels. A slightly smaller proportion (37%) watch national television newscasts and news channels every day. One-in-five (26%) listen to local radio newscasts daily, and 11% listen to national radio newscasts every day.

Almost a third of Canadians (32%) say they get news and information from Facebook on a daily basis. This is a substantially higher proportion than other sources, including websites from television news providers (20%), Twitter (18%), websites from national and local newspapers (14% each), websites from independent online news providers (8%), websites from radio stations (7%), websites of magazines (6%) and blogs (also 6%).

More than half of Canadians (56%) support the federal government’s proposal to invest $50 million over five years to support independent, non-governmental organizations that are expected to focus on delivering local journalism in communities.

Majorities of Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (65%), the Liberal Party (61%) and the Conservative Party (52%) in the 2015 federal election endorse the proposal.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from May 7 to May 11, 2018, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Credit: Liis Saar

High Support for Vancouver’s Plan to Limit Use of Plastics

More than nine-in-ten residents think restaurants and coffee shops should provide recycling options for the disposable cups they give out.

Vancouver, BC [July 26, 2018] – Most Vancouverites hold favourable views of the recently approved plan to ban specific plastic items by June 2019 in the city, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of City of Vancouver residents, 85% of respondents agree with banning the distribution of single-use plastic straws, with appropriate exemptions for health care needs.

Similarly high proportions of Vancouverites agree with both banning expanded polystyrene foam (or “thermal”) cups and take-out containers (85%) and banning the distribution of single-use plastic utensils, unless they are directly requested by customers (84%).

The “Zero Waste 2040” strategy also contemplates action to deal with disposable cups, including plastic cups for cold drinks and polycoat paper cups for hot drinks.

More than nine-in-ten Vancouverites (93%) think it would be a “very good” or “good” idea to require restaurants and coffee shops to provide recycling options for the disposable cups they give out.

Residents are more divided when it comes to two other proposals.

A majority of Vancouverites (55%) think it would be a good idea for customers to pay an additional fee for the disposable cups they require when purchasing a beverage, but more than a third (36%) believe this would be a bad idea.

“There is a sizeable gender gap on this question,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Support for charging additional fees on disposable beverage cups reaches 62% among women, but only 49% among men.”

In addition, while 54% of Vancouverites think it would be a good idea to ban the distribution of disposable cups altogether, one third (33%) disagree.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from July 13 to July 16, 2018, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Sim and Stewart Nearly Tied, Many Still Undecided in Vancouver

Vancouverites think housing affordability and the influence of developers are worse in their city than in other Metro Vancouver municipalities. 

Vancouver, BC [July 19, 2018] – With three months to go before Vancouverites select a new mayor and council, two candidates have solidified their position as early frontrunners, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of City of Vancouver residents, 26% of decided voters say they will support Ken Sim of the Non-Partisan Association (NPA), while 25% will cast a ballot for independent candidate Kennedy Stewart.

Ian Campbell of Vision Vancouver is third with 20%, followed by independent candidate Shauna Sylvester with 11%, Wai Young of Coalition Vancouver with 8%, Hector Bremner of Yes Vancouver with 5% and David Chen of ProVancouver with 4%.

The level of undecided voters in the City of Vancouver has dropped, from 47% in the June Research Co. survey, to 35% this month. The survey was conducted entirely after Patrick Condon, who was seeking the mayoral nod for the Coalition of Progressive Electors (COPE), announced he was withdrawing from the race.

Among decided voters, Sim is ahead among men (32%), residents of the West Side (31%) and those aged 55 and over (36%). Conversely, Stewart holds the upper hand among women (30%), residents of the East Side (29%) and Downtown (32%), and those aged 35-to-54 (31%).

“There are still many voters who are in the process of getting to know the contenders,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Almost two thirds (63%) feel they do not have enough information about candidates and parties to cast all their votes in the municipal election.”

When asked about specific issues, four-in-five Vancouverites (82%) think housing affordability is worse in their city than in other Metro Vancouver municipalities, and more than half (57%) feel the same way about the influence of developers.

Two-in-five Vancouverites (40%) think quality of life is better in their city, and three-in-ten (30%) believe public safety is also superior.

Only 29% of Vancouverites are satisfied with the actions taken by the federal government to deal with housing issues in their city. The satisfaction rating is higher for both the municipal government (32%) and the provincial government (38%).

Three-in-ten Vancouverites (31%) agree with the idea of all Metro Vancouver municipalities amalgamating into one, like Toronto and Montreal have, while almost half (48%) disagree with this notion.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from July 13 to July 16, 2018, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

The new Mexican president will be defined by two major challenges

Originally published in the Globe and Mail on July 3, 2018.

The victory of Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador in the Mexican presidential election is nothing short of historic. A political party that did not exist six years ago – the National Regeneration Movement or “Morena” – is poised to control the presidency and the national Congress, with the help of its coalition partners.

As the counting of ballots continues across Mexico, it appears that Mr. Lopez Obrador, or AMLO as most call him, will receive more than 50 per cent of the vote in the presidential race – a feat that eluded Vicente Fox in the so-called “change election” of 2000, which ended seven decades of single-party rule in the country.

This year, supporters of the defeated presidential candidates spent the last two weeks of the campaign arguing for an unsanctioned vote-swap that would propel either of them to victory. Talk of implementing a run-off in Mexican presidential elections has vanished, given the advantage that AMLO has over his rivals.

The primary focus of his campaign was to eradicate corruption. Many Mexicans have grown tired of jumping through endless bureaucratic hoops, and paying bribes along the way, so that the government can deliver the simplest of tasks.

Corruption, however, is not limited to government employees at service counters. The sight of eight different former state governors facing charges of embezzlement helped AMLO paint a picture of a Mexico where the well-connected thrive and the hard-working suffer. All eight governors were once members of the only two parties that have run the federal government.

In the end, Mr. Lopez Obrador capitalized on emotion in a way the other contenders could not match. He became a charismatic option who could point to the many misdeeds of past governments. The two other main presidential contenders were unable to defend themselves.

The youth vote – crucial in a country where 46 per cent of the electorate has not yet turned 35 – was particularly uninterested in which candidate had more experience or better credentials. AMLO outlined a country that was far more attractive than the CVs and university degrees of his rivals.

As proud as Mexicans should feel about their electoral process, there is a shameful reality that cannot be overlooked: violence. More than 130 candidates were killed in the nine months prior to election day. Since 2000, more than 100 journalists have brutally lost their lives.

Last year, drug-related violence claimed the lives of more than 29,000 people in Mexico. Retrieving the feeling of safety that Mexicans used to enjoy is directly related to AMLO’s key pledge: rooting out corruption.

During the campaign, Mr. Lopez Obrador suggested that Mexico should consider a form of amnesty for drug-related offences. This idea, which has not been satisfactorily explained, has befuddled Mexicans. After all, what the country is dealing with is not the aftermath of a state-sponsored campaign of terrorizing opponents for political gain, like in Chile, Argentina or South Africa. Just who, or what, will be forgiven is unclear.

The second challenge for the incoming Mexican president is handling the country’s finances. In February, as he was leading in voting-intention polls, AMLO asked to be part of the negotiating team that was discussing the future of the North American free-trade agreement with Canadian and U.S. officials.

It was unthinkable for the Mexican government to offer a seat to an opposition candidate, or his staff, at that particular point. Mr. Lopez Obrador’s cabinet will face a steep learning curve, which will be made even more difficult by the fact that they will be dealing with U.S. President Donald Trump.

Mr. Lopez Obrador is scheduled to take office on Dec. 1, just a few weeks after the midterm elections in the United States. He may encounter a weakened Mr. Trump if there are significant losses in Congress for the Republican Party. He will also deal with a Canadian federal government that may be in precampaign mode when bilateral discussions ensue.

The initial six months of the first purely leftist government in Mexico will require action on these two fronts. If the fight against corruption is not accompanied by tighter controls on the drug trade and a drop in violence, goodwill for the government will erode among voters. If the economy starts to tumble and the prospect of a devalued currency affects public mood, it will not be enough to argue that the country is “cleaner” than it was under previous administrations.

Credit: Diego Delso

Concerns About Crime Skyrocket in Surrey

More than half of residents say public safety in their city is worse than in other Metro Vancouver municipalities.

Vancouver, BC [July 2, 2018] – Public safety has emerged as a key issue as residents of Surrey prepare for October’s municipal election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of City of Surrey residents, 45% of respondents identify crime as the most important issue facing their city—a proportion that rises to 58% among those who reside in Newton.

Housing is second on the list of municipal concerns with 26%, followed by transportation with 10% and poverty with 7%.

More than half of residents (56%) think Surrey should have its own municipal police force, while 27% disagree.

When asked to compare their city to other Metro Vancouver municipalities on seven issues, more than half of residents (55%) say public safety is worse in Surrey than in other cities.

More than a third of respondents (35%) believe the influence of developers is worse in Surrey than in other areas of Metro Vancouver, while one-in-four (25%) think Surrey is better on housing affordability.

“There are certainly issues where Surrey residents believe they are luckier than their neighbours in adjacent areas,”, says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “But public safety is definitely not one of them.”

Many residents of Surrey say they are dissatisfied with the actions taken by the provincial government (49%), the federal government (51%) and the municipal government (53%) to deal with crime in Surrey, and almost half (48%) disagree with the notion that the legalization of marijuana will ultimately lead to lower crime rates in their city.

A majority of Surrey residents (52%) say they would like to see Dianne Watts as the city’s mayor again, including 60% of men and 74% of South Surrey residents.

Tom Gill, recently named as the Surrey First candidate for mayor, is seen as a good choice to lead the city by 15% of residents, and a bad choice by 14%. The rating is similar for former interim BC Liberals leader Rich Coleman (Good 20%, Bad 19%), who is said to be considering a bid.

Doug Elford of the Surrey Community Alliance is regarded as a good choice for mayor by 17% of residents, and 15% feel the same way about former Surrey First councillor Bruce Hayne, who now sits as an independent.

More than a third of residents (36%) have a positive opinion of the governing Surrey First party, while 21% hold negative views. Three opposition parties hold similar positive ratings (28% for the Surrey Community Alliance, 27% for both Proudly Surrey and People First Surrey).

Most residents of Surrey (53%) think the proposed Surrey–Newton–Guildford Light Rail Transit (LRT) project is a great idea.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 24 to June 28, 2018, among 401 adults in the City of Surrey. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Surrey. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: Leoboudv

Canadians Have Differing Views on BBQ Drinking Etiquette

More than half say they only consume the beer or cider they bring to a party or barbecue. 

Vancouver, BC [June 29, 2018] – As the country prepares for Canada Day celebrations, the conduct of Canadians who consume alcohol at a “BYOB” party or barbecue differs greatly by gender, age and region, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample asked Canadians who drink beer or cider to suppose they had just arrived at a party or barbecue and placed a six-pack of beer or cider they brought into a large cooler that was being used by everybody.

Across the country, three-in-five respondents (62%) say they would only drink the beer or cider they brought themselves.

One-in-four respondents (25%) say they would help themselves to any beer or cider that is in the cooler, but making sure not to consume more than six cans.

One-in-twenty respondents (5%) say they would drink any beer or cider that is in the cooler, even if more than six cans are consumed.

Women are more likely than men to say they would only consume what they brought to the party or barbecue (69% to 55%).

Conversely, men are more likely to say they would try anything in the cooler and keep a six-can maximum (30% to 20%) or drink anything, even if it’s more than the six-pack they brought themselves (8% to 2%).

Respondents aged 55 and over are less likely to only drink what they brought to the party or barbecue (54%) than those aged 35-to-54 (58%) and those aged 18-to-34 (73%).

“Millennials have sometimes been labelled as egotistical,” says Mario Canseco, President at Research Co. “But on this matter, they are more likely to steer clear of other people’s booze than their older counterparts.”

Atlantic Canadians are the most likely to say they would only drink what they brought to the party or barbecue (75%), followed by Albertans (72%), residents of Manitoba and Saskatchewan (70%), British Columbians (69%) and Ontarians (64%).

Quebecers are the least likely to only consume the six-pack they brought (47%, compared to the national average of 62%) and the most likely to consume more than six cans at the party (11%, compared to the national average of 5%).

Two thirds of Conservative Party voters in the last federal election (68%) would only consume what they brought, along with 64% of Liberal Party voters and 60% of New Democratic Party (NDP) voters.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from May 7 to May 11, 2018, among 836 adults in Canada who drink beer or cider. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: DarrenBaker

British Columbians Call for Public Inquiry into Money Laundering

Supporters of all three of the province’s main political parties are in favour of this idea. 

Vancouver, BC [June 20, 2018] – A sizeable majority of British Columbians are in favour of establishing a commission to look into the issue of money laundering in the province’s casinos, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, three-in-four residents (76%) think the provincial government should “definitely” or “probably” call a public inquiry into money laundering in casinos.

Last year, a report produced by accounting firm MNP LLP, found several irregularities at the River Rock Casino in Richmond, including the acceptance of “single cash buy-ins in excess of $500,000, with no known source of funds.”

Support for this public inquiry is high across all demographics, including 83% of British Columbians who voted for the BC Green Party in last year’s provincial election, 78% of those who supported the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) and 69% of those who cast a ballot for the BC Liberals.

Almost half of British Columbians (48%) say they have followed stories related to money laundering in the province’s casinos “very closely” or “moderately closely.”

Two measures recently implemented in an effort to curb money laundering in British Columbia’s casinos are endorsed by most residents.

Two thirds of British Columbians (68%) support banning ”high limit” table gambling, where bets are higher than $10,000. An even larger proportion of residents (86%) favour declaring the source of any cash deposits over $10,000 at casinos.

“British Columbians welcome the first modifications to the way casinos operate in the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “However, the high level of support for a public inquiry into money laundering outlines a sense of embarrassment from residents and the expectation that a similar situation does not happen again.”

Three-in-five British Columbians (62%) think pending gambling developments should be postponed so that more research can be conducted on their benefits and drawbacks.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from May 27 to May 29, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Credit: GoToVan

Stewart, Sim and Campbell Battle in Vancouver Race

Almost half of Vancouverites are undecided when asked which one of eight mayoral hopefuls would get their vote this year.

Vancouver, BC [June 14, 2018] – With just over four months to go before Vancouver elects a new mayor, many of the city’s residents are undecided, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of City of Vancouver residents, 47% of respondents are not sure who they would vote for if the mayoral election took place tomorrow.

Among decided voters, New Democratic Party (NDP) Member of Parliament Kennedy Stewart is in first place with 26%, followed by Ken Sim of the Non-Partisan Association (NPA) with 23%, and Ian Campbell of Vision Vancouver with 18%

Support is lower for current NPA councillor Hector Bremner (10%), independent Shauna Sylvester (9%), prospective Coalition of Progressive Electors (COPE) candidate Patrick Condon (8%), David Chen of ProVancouver (4%) and Wai Young of Coalition Vancouver (3%).

Male decided voters are more likely to be supporting Sim at this stage (30% to 22% for Stewart), while Stewart is ahead among female decided voters (29%, with Campbell in second place at 18%).

Stewart is seen as a “good choice” to become mayor by 18% of residents (+8 since late April), followed by Campbell (17%), Sim (16%), Bremner (11%, =) and Sylvester (also 11%, +4). Condon (8%), Young (7%, +1) and Chen (5%) are in single digits.

When asked about specific political parties, a majority of Vancouverites (54%, +6 since early April) have a positive opinion of the Green Party of Vancouver.

The rating is lower for Vision Vancouver (31%, +5), the NPA (30%, -2), COPE (28%, +1), One City (17%, +3), Coalition Vancouver (also 17%) and ProVancouver (11%).

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from June 9 to June 11, 2018, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Photo Credit: Xicotencatl

Ontario: Who Won and Why?

Originally published in National Observer on June 8, 2018.

The 2018 Ontario provincial election has delivered a majority government for the Progressive Conservative Party, gave the New Democrats official Opposition status and raised questions about the viability of the Liberal Party, which was reduced to single digits in seats.

A Research Co. exit poll, comprising the views of 503 Ontarians who cast a ballot in this electoral process, shows the different motivations of voters, as well as the effect of the events of the final week of campaigning, which included Premier Kathleen Wynne’s Saturday concession and the $16.5-million lawsuit filed by Rob Ford’s widow.

One of the traits that made this provincial election so compelling was the answer to the “time for change” question, especially when compared to other recent ballots. In Alberta and Manitoba, we saw many voters (82 per cent and 67 per cent respectively) embrace opposition leaders and abandon sitting governments. In Saskatchewan, the incumbent premier had little trouble holding on to a massive majority. In British Columbia, three-in-five voters wanted change in an election that resulted in a tie on the popular vote.

Ontario was decidedly different. More than three-in-five voters (77 per cent) said it was time for a change in government (five points lower than the 82 per cent observed in Alberta in 2015, and eight points higher than Manitoba in 2016). The sentiment for change was astonishingly high for both PC and NDP voters (94 per cent and 92 per cent respectively). However, one third of Liberal voters (33 per cent) also thought it was time for new leadership in the province, a sign of a base that perhaps grew unenthusiastic after the sitting premier acknowledged she would lose the election in the final weekend of the campaign.

Wynne’s plea for Liberal votes without a Liberal government seemed to split the public on the concept of “strategic voting”. Across the province, 45 per cent of Ontarians said they voted for the candidate in their riding who had the best chance of defeating a party they disliked, even if the candidate they voted for was not their first preference.

The proportion of “strategic voters” was highest among NDP supporters (55 per cent), who ended up becoming the official opposition. Andrea Horwath held a higher approval rating than the other three leaders in the last two weeks of the campaign, much in the same way Jack Layton posted impressive numbers on this question before the 2011 federal election. Both ended up taking their parties from third place to second place.

When it comes to the lawsuit against PC leader Doug Ford, the effect was negligible. Perceptions about the party’s leader were positive enough to facilitate a victory. When asked about six possible motivators for their vote, one-in-four PC voters (25 per cent) said the most important factor was “the party’s leader.” Among both Liberal and NDP voters, this factor was ranked lower, at 22 per cent.

Liberal voters were more likely to say the most important factor was “the party’s candidate in the riding” (20 per cent, compared to a paltry 10 per cent and seven per cent among NDP and PC voters respectively). Incumbent ministers and long-time serving legislators sought to establish a powerful connection with some of the Liberal base, especially after Wynne appealed for a balance of power.

“The party’s ideas and policies” is, by far, the most important factor for supporters of the three main parties (44 per cent for Liberals, 39 per cent for NDP and 34 per cent for PC). “Desire for change” moved 19 per cent of PC voters and 13 per cent of NDP voters, but the New Democrats also benefitted—although not enough to score an upset win—from the 15 per cent of voters who said “disgust with other contending candidates” was their main motivating factor—a far higher proportion than the PCs (10 per cent) and the Liberals (five per cent).

Finally, we look at the situation that led to Doug Ford becoming leader of the Progressive Conservatives. Among all voters in the election, 37 per cent said they would have voted for the Progressive Conservatives if Patrick Brown was still their leader. This includes 59 per cent of those who ended up casting a ballot for the Ford-led party, but also a sizeable proportion of Ontarians who ended up voting for the NDP (32 per cent) and the Liberals (27 per cent). This would suggest that Brown, even after the allegations that forced him to quit as leader, would have had a similar result as Ford.

Polling methodology: Results are based on an online study conducted on June 6 and June 7, 2018 among 503 Ontario adults who voted in the 2018 provincial election. The margin of error — which measures sample variability — is +/- 4.4 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Credit: DrRandomFactor

British Columbians Support Government’s Housing Measures

The opposition’s idea of a “Strata Pre-Sale Contract Flipping Tax” is backed by two thirds of residents.

Vancouver, BC [June 5, 2018] – A sizeable majority of British Columbians are in favour of specific housing measures announced by the provincial government in this year’s budget, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, three-in-five respondents (62%) think introducing a “speculation tax” of 2% of a property’s assessed value for vacant homes is a “very good” or “good” idea.

Two thirds of residents (67%) believe introducing a tax of 0.2 per cent on the value of homes worth between $3 million and $4 million, and a tax rate of 0.4 per cent on the portion of a home’s value that exceeds $4 million is also a “very good” or “good” idea.

A slightly higher proportion of British Columbians (69%) think increasing the property transfer tax from 3% to 5% for homes valued at more than $3 million is also a “very good” or “good” idea.

Three-in-four British Columbians (76%) say it was a “very good” or “good” idea to expand the foreign buyers tax to areas located outside of Metro Vancouver, and four-in-five (80%) feel the same way about increasing the foreign buyers tax from 15% to 20%.

The opposition BC Liberals have tabled the “Strata Pre-Sale Contract Flipping Tax Act 2018”, which calls for a provincial capital-gains tax on any profit from the sale of housing units before construction is completed. Almost two thirds of British Columbians (65%) think this is a “very good” or “good idea”.

Most residents who voted for the BC Liberals in last year’s provincial election are supportive of the current government’s measures, from a low of 53% for the “speculation tax” to a high of 77% for increasing the foreign buyers tax.

In addition, most residents who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) and the BC Green Party in the 2017 provincial ballot are in favour of the opposition’s pre-sale contract flipping proposal (62% and 73% respectively).

“In spite of some localized protests, the government’s housing measures are particularly popular with British Columbians,” says Mario Canseco, President at Research Co. “Support for these guidelines, as well as the recent proposal from the BC Liberals to address condo-flipping, is strong among all age groups and voters of the three main political parties.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from May 27 to May 29, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Ottawa’s Pipeline Actions Affect Views in British Columbia

Three-in-four residents are uncomfortable with using taxpayer money to subsidize a foreign company, half say they are now “less likely” to vote for the Liberal Party at the federal level, and a majority believes the provincial government has made the right decisions.

Vancouver, BC [May 31, 2018] – Many British Columbians appear disappointed about the way Ottawa has handled Kinder Morgan’s oil-tanker-pipeline proposal, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, three-in-four residents (76%) say they are uncomfortable with the idea of the federal government using taxpayer money to subsidize a foreign company.

The survey was conducted from May 25 to May 28, 2018, after the federal government expressed its willingness to “indemnify the Trans Mountain expansion against unnecessary delays”, but before Ottawa announced on May 29 that it was purchasing the existing pipeline and its expansion project for $4.5 billion.

Across the province, 57% of residents think the federal government made the wrong decision in announcing it would use taxpayer money to indemnify Kinder Morgan’s backers for any financial loss, and 49% say they are “less likely” to vote for the governing party in the next federal election—a proportion that includes 36% of residents who cast a ballot for Liberal candidates in 2015.

“British Columbians are evidently concerned about specific aspects of the pipeline proposal, but there are no conflictive views when it comes to the performance of the federal government,” says Mario Canseco, President at Research Co. “The federal Liberals, who had one of their best performances in the province in 2015, now stand to lose more than a third of their support base.”

Across the province, 52% of residents say they agree with Kinder Morgan’s proposal to build new oil tanker-pipeline structure, while 44% disagree with it. However, 54% agree with the B.C government’s stance that Kinder Morgan’s oil-tanker-pipeline proposal threatens the health and safety of residents.

In addition, 50% of British Columbians believe the provincial government has made the right decision by filing a case in the B.C. Court of Appeal asking if the province has jurisdiction to regulate the transport of oil through its territory, and 51% disagree with the notion that the federal government should do “anything necessary to get the pipeline built”.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from May 25 to May 28, 2018, among 1,255 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 2.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

Photo Credit: Peter Graham.

TV grapples with Netflix effect as more consumers cut cable ties

Originally published in Business in Vancouver on May 18, 2018.

At the end of the 2016-17 television season, The Big Bang Theory was the most popular television show in the United States, with a rating of 11.5.

This means that, whenever a new episode of the comedy show aired live, an estimated 11.5% of all television households in the country were watching it on their local station.

This might seem like a fantastic number for television producers, but it outlines a steady decline in traditional viewership.

Ten years earlier, in 2006-07, the most popular television show in the United States was the Wednesday edition of  American Idol, with a rating of 17.3. If we go back to 1996-97, ER topped the charts with a rating of 21.2. Ten years earlier, in 1986-87, the most popular television program in the United States was The Cosby Show, with a rating of 34.9.

At the time The Cosby Show managed to get more than a third of television households to tune in to NBC, a show with an 11.5 rating would not have made it into thetop 40. Its producers would have faced a reboot or cancellation. Now, reaching more than 10% of television households in a given night is cause for celebration.

The steep drop in live television viewership has been accompanied by advancements in technology. Personal video recorders and streaming video were still in their infancy in 1997, but became more prevalent 10 years later and are practically everywhere now. It is the ability to choose content that is making North American audiences abandon the tradition of waiting a week (or longer) for their favourite program.

Canada is not immune.

Most of the content Canadians can watch on prime time is shown on American networks and makes its way to our homes through cable television. A recent Research Co. survey shows that age and region play a role in the way we are reacting to the content that is at our disposal.

For starters, a third of Canadians (33%) have cut the cord and do not have cable television at home. More than seven in 10 Canadians aged 35 and over are keeping their cable, but millennials – a coveted group for advertisers – are looking elsewhere. Only 54% of Canadians aged 18 to 34 have a cable subscription.

This discrepancy presents a conundrum for advertisers, marketing managers and news content providers. Millennials are choosing other platforms for their content, with streaming services fast becoming a staple of their media consumption.

Among the cable subscribers we talked to, the feelings are not exactly pleasant. There is practically universal agreement with two thorny issues: 88% of Canadians say there are many channels included in their current cable television plan that they never watch and 85% agree with the notion of “paying too much money for cable television each month.”

The arrival of ultra-cheap cable packages has not made Canadians happier about their television content. Flipping through channels that are never watched can be cumbersome.

This unpleasantness is also reflected in the fact that a slightly smaller but still sizable proportion of Canadian cable subscribers (70%) say they are disappointed with the variety of programming they are getting from their cable television plan. The numbers are highest in Atlantic Canada (78%) and British Columbia (75%). This is not a stat that should be spurned by our province’s media providers: three-in-four B.C. residents with cable are dissatisfied with what they are paying for. If these current consumers become more aware of cable-less options, as millennials clearly have done, they might opt to cut the cord.

But cutting the cord has provided a different challenge for governments. With streaming services gaining prominence, the idea of a “Netflix tax” consumed a lot of airtime and ink last year. In the end, the federal government ultimately abandoned this idea, which is especially popular only in one province.

In Quebec, the provincial government has compelled streaming services to start charging the Quebec Sales Tax in 2019. The Quebec government seeks to generate approximately $270 million each year from this move and ensure that local content providers – which might have a hard time being featured on streaming services – can compete with American behemoths like Netflix or Amazon Prime Video.

At this stage, the Netflix tax seems like a distant memory in English Canada. But if consumers continue to walk away from traditional television, federal and provincial governments might consider following Quebec’s lead, even if protecting local culture is not invoked as the main reason for their action. 

Photo Credit: Gage Skidmore

Most Metro Vancouver Commutes Pleasant, But Three-in-Ten Suffer

A majority of commuters (51%) would be willing to make less money if they can get a job that is closer to their home.

Vancouver, BC [May 14, 2019] – Metro Vancouverites who have to get to school or work on weekdays report different experiences from their commute, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, two thirds of commuters in Metro Vancouver (68%) describe their weekday commute as “pleasant”, while three-in-ten (29%) consider it “annoying.”

While half of commuters in Metro Vancouver (49%) report no major changes in their trips to school or work compared to five years ago, 20% consider their commute “better” now, while 25% think it is “worse.”

“The mode of transportation plays a role in defining the perceptions of Metro Vancouver’s commuters,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Those who drive to school or work are more likely to say that their commute is now worse than in 2014 (31%) than those who take public transit (19%),” 

Commuters who say their trips to school or work are “very” or “moderately” pleasant are primarily satisfied with being in control of the entertainment (19%), dealing with traffic that is usually manageable (15%) and getting things done on the way, such as reading the paper or answering e-mails (14%).

Conversely, the aspects that frustrate annoyed commuters are traffic (28%), dealing with bad drivers (20%) and overcrowding at public transit vehicles (16%).

Four-in-five commuters in Metro Vancouver (81%) say living close to their workplace is important to them, and 78% concede that they would work from home more often if they could to avoid commuting.

Three-in-four commuters in Metro Vancouver (75%) would choose a prospective employer based on where the office they would work at is located. More than half would seriously consider moving from their current home if they changed jobs and had a longer commute (55%) and would be willing to make less money if they can get a job that is closer to their home (51%).

Commuters are divided on the issue of paying for tolls on roads and bridges if it guaranteed a shorter time to get to school or work, with 48% disagreeing with this course of action and 43% agreeing with it.

Almost half of commuters (48%) say their ideal choice to get to school or work would be to drive, while 28% would prefer to take public transit, 14% would walk and 7% would bike.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 29 to May 1, 2019, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Love Coffee, Few Are Keen Travel Mug Users

A third of British Columbians who consume coffee outside of their home never bring their own travel mug to the coffee shop.

Vancouver, BC [May 9, 2019] – Many British Columbians enjoy coffee when they are away from home, but only about one-in-five rely on travel mugs “all of the time”, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, only one-in-five British Columbians (20%) say they never have coffee outside of their home in a regular week.

About three-in-ten British Columbians (29%) have one or two cups of coffee outside of their home in a week, while a similar proportion (30%) consumes three to six cups. 

More than one-in-five British Columbians (22%) drink seven or more cups of coffee outside of their home each week.

A third of British Columbians who consume coffee outside of their home (34%) say they never bring their own travel mug to the coffee shop, while about half (46%) say they do this “only a few times” or “some of the time.” 

Only 19% of British Columbians who consume coffee outside of their home “always” rely on their travel mug when they visit a coffee shop.

“Three-in-five female coffee drinkers in the province (60%) acknowledge using their travel mug at a coffee shop at least a few times,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Among men, the proportion of travel mug users is actually higher, at 71%.”

Among British Columbians who consume coffee outside of their home, the favourite venue to visit is Tim Hortons (43%), followed by Starbucks (31%).

When asked about which stores they never visit, 20% of British Columbians who consume coffee outside of their home mentioned Tim Hortons, while 18% selected Starbucks. About a third (34%) say they do not have a place they would never go to in order to get coffee.

Almost two thirds of British Columbians who consume coffee outside of their home (65%) say they are part of a loyalty program (where they may receive merchandise, rewards, coupons, or free products) at their favourite coffee shop.

Membership in loyalty programs is higher among British Columbians who select Starbucks as their favourite coffee shop (77%) than among those who picked Tim Hortons (65%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 2 to May 5, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca