Seven-in-Ten Vancouverites Happy with Separated Bike Lanes

Men and residents aged 55 and over are more likely to believe that the city currently has too many separated bike lanes.

Vancouver, BC [December 13, 2019] – More than two thirds of City of Vancouver residents appear satisfied with bike infrastructure, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative municipal sample, practically seven-in-ten Vancouverites (69%) support having separated bike lanes in the city, while 25% are opposed and 5% are undecided.

“It is not surprising to see 90% of Vancouverites who commute to school or work on a bike express support for this type of infrastructure,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “We also see that majorities of Vancouverites who commute by taking public transit (79%) and driving (69%) are also in favour of having separated bike lanes.”

Across the city, 40% of residents believe Vancouver currently has the right number of separated bike lanes. In addition, 30% of Vancouverites think there are too many separated bike lanes and some should be removed, and 21% feel there are not enough separated bike lanes and more should be added.

About a third of Vancouverites aged 55 and over (33%) and aged 35-to-54 (32%) believe that the city has too many separated bike lanes at this stage. The proportion is significantly lower among residents aged 18-to-34 (24%).

Men are also more likely to believe that some separated bike lanes should be removed than women (36% and 24% respectively).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 12 to November 15, 2019, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Gas Prices Stirring New Behaviours in British Columbia Drivers

Just under one-in-five drivers in the province have gone to the United States with the sole purpose of purchasing cheaper fuel.

Vancouver, BC [December 11, 2019] – A significant proportion of drivers in British Columbia are taking steps to deal with the cost of fuel in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, half of drivers in British Columbia (51%) say they have purchased gas for their vehicle in their community even if the tank was not near empty because prices were suddenly lower.

Drivers in Vancouver Island (56%) are more likely to have purchased gas after they noticed a drop in prices.

Two-in-five drivers in the province (39%) say they have purchased less gas for their vehicle in their community—or did not fill up the entire tank—because prices were suddenly higher.

Almost half of drivers in the Fraser Valley (47%) have chosen not to completely fill up because of inflated gas prices.

Just under one-in-five drivers in British Columbia (18%) say they have driven to the United States with the sole purpose of purchasing cheaper gas for their vehicle.

“Two-in-five drivers who reside in the Fraser Valley (40%) say they have visited the United States only to get gas in the past year” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “They have been joined by one-in-five (21%) drivers in Metro Vancouver.”

The Government of British Columbia recently introduced legislation to compel oil and gas companies to disclose supply and pricing data. More than four-in-five British Columbians (85%) support this legislation, including 90% of residents aged 55 and over.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 27 to November 29, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Canadians Happy Without Penny, Not Ready to Abandon Nickel

More than half of residents disagree with taking the five-cent coin out of circulation in Canada.

Vancouver, BC [December 6, 2019] – After almost seven years of life without the penny, most Canadians appear satisfied with the decree to abolish the one-cent coin, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-four Canadians (75%) agree with the federal government’s decision to take the penny out of circulation in February 2013.

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to welcome the decision to abolish the penny (81%) than those aged 35-to-54 (74%) and those aged 55 and over (72%).

“On a regional basis, one-in-five residents of Atlantic Canada (21%), British Columbia (20%) and Ontario (also 20%) seem more nostalgic about the penny,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (18%), Alberta (15%) and Quebec (14%).”

The notion of taking the nickel out of circulation is definitely not as popular. Across the country, more than a third of Canadians (36%) agree with abandoning the five-cent coin, while more than half (55%) disagree.

Once again, the views on this issue vary by age. Canadians aged 18-to-34 are slightly more likely to suggest that the nickel should be abandoned (41%) than those aged 35-to-54 (39%) and those aged 55 and over (29%).

The regions with the highest level of rejection for the idea of not having a five-cent coin in Canada are Saskatchewan and Manitoba (63%), Atlantic Canada (59%), Ontario (58%) and British Columbia (55%). The proportion is lower in Alberta (50%) and Quebec (47%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 25 to November 27, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Believe Human Beings on Earth Evolved

There is a deep divide on whether creationism should be part of the school curriculum across the provinces.

Vancouver, BC [December 3, 2019] – A majority of Canadians continue to point to evolution as the reason for the development of human beings on earth, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-five Canadians (61%) believe human beings “definitely” or “probably” evolved from less advanced life forms over millions of years, down five points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2018.

Conversely, almost one-in-four Canadians (23%, +2 since 2018) believe God created human beings in their present form within the last 10,000 years. Fewer than one-in-five Canadians (17%, +5) are undecided on this question.

British Columbia is home to the largest proportion of residents who side with evolution to explain the origin and development of human beings on the planet (67%), followed by Quebec (64%), Ontario (60%), Alberta (59%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (57%) and Atlantic Canada (54%).

When asked whether creationism—the belief that the universe and life originated from specific acts of divine creation—should be part of the school curriculum in their province, Canadians are deeply divided.

While 38% of Canadians think creationism should be taught in their province’s classrooms (unchanged since 2018), 39% think that it should not (-7) and 23% (=7) are undecided.

Fewer than two-in-five residents of Ontario (37%), Atlantic Canada (36%), Quebec (36%) and British Columbia (35%) are in favour of teaching creationism in schools. The proportion is slightly higher in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (43%) and Alberta (45%).

“Religious affiliation plays a role in how Canadians feel about discussing creationism in the classroom,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Canadians who identify themselves as Catholics or Protestants are significantly more likely to endorse the teaching of creationism in schools (48% each) than those who have no religion (22%) or identify as Atheists (20%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 4 to November 6, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Would Ban Mobile Phones in K-12 Classrooms

Public support for the measure that was implemented in Ontario earlier this year is high among parents and non-parents alike.

Vancouver, BC [November 29, 2019] – The notion of forbidding students from using their mobile phones in classrooms unreservedly is very popular in British Columbia, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 88% of British Columbians think the province should implement a ban on the use of mobile phones during instructional time in K-12 classrooms.

Earlier this year, the Province of Ontario restricted the use of mobile phones in K-12 classrooms, unless the devices are required for health or medical purposes, or to support educational needs as decided by an instructor.

In British Columbia, residents aged 55 and over are more likely to express support for a prohibition (85%) than those aged 35-to-54 (80%) and those aged 18-to-34 (68%).

At least four-in-five residents of Vancouver Island (86%), the Fraser Valley (83%) and Metro Vancouver (80%) are in favour of banning mobile phones during instructional time in K-12 classrooms. Support is lower, but still high, in Northern BC (75%) and Southern BC (62%).

“More than four-in-five British Columbians who have a child currently enrolled in K-12 are supportive of a classroom mobile phone ban (81%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is similar (77%) for those who have no children in school at this point.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 6 to November 8, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Vancouverites Remain Supportive of Plastic Reduction Plan

More than three-in-four  residents agree with banning the use of foam cups and take-out containers.

Vancouver, BC [November 27, 2019] – A majority of Vancouver residents continue to favour specific guidelines to reduce the use of plastics in the city, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative municipal sample, almost four-in-five Vancouverites (78%) are in favour of banning the distribution of single-use plastic utensils, unless they are directly requested by customers—down six points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2018.

In June 2018, Vancouver City Council voted to enact prohibitions on the use of specific plastic items as part of its “Zero Waste 2040” strategy. The full details of by-laws related to plastic straws, plastic bags, disposable cups and disposable utensils are expected to be released by November 30.

A ban on all expanded polystyrene foam (or “thermal”) cups and take-out containers will come into effect on January 1, 2020. More than three-in-four Vancouverites (76%, -9) agree with this course of action.

“Public support for the ban on foam cups and take-out containers is highest (87%) among Vancouverites aged 55 and over,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Sizeable majorities of residents aged 18-to-34 (72%) and 35-to-54 (73%) are also in favour of this prohibition.”

A ban on the distribution of single-use plastic straws, with appropriate exemptions for health care needs, is backed by 77% of Vancouverites (-8).

More than four-in-five Vancouverites (83%, -10) believe it would be a “good” idea to require restaurants and coffee shops to provide recycling options for the disposable cups they give out.

Almost two thirds of residents (65%, +11) think it would be a good idea to ban the distribution of disposable cups altogether, while three-in-five (60%, +5) say customers should pay an additional fee for the disposable cups they require when purchasing a beverage.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 12 to November 15, 2019, among 400 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Majorities of Canadians Oppose Trophy Hunting and Fur Trade

More than half of residents are also against using animals in rodeos and keeping animals in zoos or aquariums.

Vancouver, BC [November 22, 2019] – Sizeable proportions of Canadians voice opposition to two practices related to human interaction with animals, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than four-in-five Canadians (85%) are opposed to hunting animals for sport and three-in-four (75%) are against killing animals for their fur.

Opposition to the fur trade is highest in Ontario (81%) and British Columbia (79%), but also includes most residents of Atlantic Canada (75%), Quebec (74%), Alberta (also 74%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (61%).

Almost three-in-five Canadians (59%) are opposed to using animals in rodeos. More than half (52%) are against keeping animals in zoos or aquariums.

Residents of Alberta are evenly divided when it comes to the use of animals in rodeos (Agree 49%, Disagree 49%). In Manitoba and Saskatchewan, respondents are more likely to endorse the practice (50%) than to be against it (43%).

Majorities in Atlantic Canada (67%), Quebec (65%), British Columbia (62%) and Ontario (59%) are opposed to using animals in rodeos, as well as 67% of women and 64% of Canadians aged 18-to-34.

Conversely, 75% of Canadians are in favour of eating animals and two thirds (65%) are in favour of hunting animals for meat.

“Canadians hold very different views on the issue of hunting depending on whether the practice will lead to sustenance,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “In both cases, the level of animosity towards hunting is higher among women than men.”

The Canadian Football League (CFL) is organizing a rodeo as part of this year’s Grey Cup festivities in Calgary.

Across the country, 35% of Canadians agree with this decision by the CFL, while 46% disagree and 19% are undecided.

Opposition to the idea of holding a rodeo as part of the Grey Cup weekend is highest in British Columbia (53%) and Quebec (51%). 

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 10 to November 13, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Dietmar Rabich

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Drivers Not Signaling Still the Biggest Problem in Canadian Roads

Almost half of Canadians say drivers in their city or town are worse than they were five years ago.

Vancouver, BC [November 20, 2019] – While some progress has been observed since last year, a significant proportion of Canadians continue to have negative experiences with drivers in their municipality, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-five Canadians (61%) say they witnessed a driver not signaling before a turn in the past month, down 10 points since a similar Research Co. survey conducted in 2018.

Almost half of Canadians (47%, -14) saw a car taking up two or more spots in a parking lot, and a smaller proportion (44%, -4) witnessed a driver not stopping at an intersection.

Albertans were more likely to see a car occupying more space than necessary in the past month (61%), while residents of Manitoba and Saskatchewan were more likely to witness drivers zooming through intersections (48%).

Over the past month, more than a third of Canadians also experienced a close call on the road, such as slamming the breaks or having to steer violently to avoid a collision (35%, -7) and saw a car turning right or left from an incorrect lane (34%, -11)

“This year’s survey shows some improvement, as fewer Canadians are reporting regrettable behaviour from drivers on the road,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion of respondents across the country who did not experience any problems increased from 16% in 2018 to 21% this year.”

Almost half of Canadians (47%, -3) say drivers in their city or town are worse than they were five years ago, while 40% believe they are the same and 7% think they are better now.

There are only two provinces where a majority of residents claim that driving behaviour has deteriorated: Alberta (57%, +4) and Ontario (52%, +1). British Columbia had the worst score on this question in 2018 (64%). The number dropped to 48% in 2019.

Once again, a majority of Canadians (56%, -2) state that there are specific groups or people in their city or town who are worse drivers than others. The proportion of Canadians who feel this way is highest in Alberta (65%), British Columbia (59%) and Ontario (also 59%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 4 to November 6, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Three-in-Four Canadians Back Temporary Ban on Vaping Products

A majority of residents would also support prohibiting flavoured vaping products.

Vancouver, BC [November 13, 2019] – A large proportion of Canadians support enacting a temporary prohibition on the sale and distribution of e-cigarettes, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, three-in-four Canadians (74%) would agree with their province implementing a vaping ban similar to the one that was recently enacted in Massachusetts.

Support for a temporary ban on all vaping products is high across all regions of the country, from 71% in Alberta to 77% in Atlantic Canada.

On Sept. 24, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker decreed a temporary four-month ban on all vaping products in the American state, following cases of lung damage associated with the use of e-cigarettes.

Just over one-in-ten Canadians (11%) say they used an electronic cigarette in the past year. The proportion is higher among those aged 18-to-34 (17%) and British Columbians (16%).

More than four-in-five Canadians (85%, -6 since a Research Co. survey conducted in 2018) want vaping products that contain nicotine to display a warning, similar to the one used for tobacco products. 

In addition, 73% of Canadians (-3) call for the use of e-cigarettes to be restricted to areas where smoking is currently allowed, and a majority (57%) want all flavoured vaping products to be banned 

Half of Canadians (50%, unchanged) say they would not consider dating a person who used electronic cigarettes—including 54% of British Columbians.

Canadians aged 55 and over (57%) are more likely to say they would shun a dating prospect because of vaping. The proportion is lower among Canadians aged 35-to-54 and 18-to-34 (47% each).

“When it comes to vaping and dating, there is no gender gap across Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Equal proportions of men and women say they wold not consider courting a vaper.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 21 to October 23, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Metro Vancouverites Angered by Litterers and Lazy Dog Owners

Other frustrations include drivers who use hand-held cell phones and those who park in handicapped spots without a decal.

Vancouver, BC [November 8, 2019] – At least seven-in-ten residents of Metro Vancouver are angry after witnessing four specific illegal behaviours, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, 73% of residents say they become upset when they see a person littering and when dog owners decide not to pick up dog waste.

Animosity towards negligent dog owners rises with age, from 70% and 72% among Metro Vancouverites aged 18-to-34 and 35-to-54 respectively, to 82% among those aged 55 and over.

More than two thirds of Metro Vancouver residents are also angry when they see someone using a hand-held cell phone when driving (72%), parking in a handicapped spot without a decal (70%) and throwing cigarette butts on the ground (67%).

Two other driving violations make more than three-in-five Metro Vancouverites upset: speeding on a municipal road or street (65%) and not wearing a seatbelt when driving a car or riding in a car (61%).

Women are more likely to become upset after witnessing a driver speeding (71%) or a person inside a car who is not wearing a seatbelt (66%) than men (59% and 55% respectively). 

Smoking in a patio, or within 5 metres of doorways, open windows, or air intakes has been illegal in British Columbia for more than a decade. A majority of Metro Vancouverites (59%) are angry when they witness this particular behaviour.

“Residents of the City of Vancouver are more likely to become enraged by the actions of smokers,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion of Vancouverites who are upset is higher than in other municipalities when it comes to people lighting up in places other than designated areas.”

Fewer than half of Metro Vancouverites are angered after witnessing four other behaviours: riding a bicycle on the sidewalk (46%), riding a bicycle without a helmet (45%), watering the lawn outside permitted hours (40%) and jaywalking (38%).

Almost three-in-four Metro Vancouverites (73%) consider that most of the residents of their city “definitely” or “probably” follow existing laws and by-laws, while one-in-five (21%) believe most people “definitely” or “probably” do not.

Residents of Vancouver are more likely to deem most inhabitants as law-abiding (80%) than those who live in Burnaby (70%), Surrey (68%) and the remaining municipalities (72%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 24 to October 27, 2019, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.7 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two Thirds of British Columbians Unaffected by Carbon Tax

Residents are divided on whether the goal of making people more mindful of their carbon consumption has been achieved.

Vancouver, BC [November 6, 2019] – Most British Columbians believe the provincial carbon tax—originally implemented on July 1, 2008—has not been detrimental to their domestic assets, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 66% of British Columbians believe that the provincial carbon tax has not negatively affected the finances of their household, while one-in-five (21%) think it has.

Men (28%) are more likely to believe that the carbon tax has negatively affected their household finances than women (15%). Residents aged 18-to-34 are also more likely to have an adverse opinion on this issue (26%) than those aged 35-to-54 (20%) and those aged 55 and over (15%).

When asked if they think the introduction of the carbon tax in British Columbia has led people to be more mindful of their carbon consumption, residents of the province are deeply divided.

While 45% of British Columbians believe the carbon tax has led people to change their behaviour, 44% disagree and 13% are undecided.

“Residents of Northern BC (63%) are more likely to believe that the carbon tax has made residents more mindful,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The numbers are significantly lower in the Fraser Valley (45%), Southern BC (44%), Metro Vancouver (43%) and Vancouver Island (42%).”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 25 to October 28, 2019, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error — which measures sample variability — is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Edmonton Eskimos Franchise Name OK for Most Canadians

Younger Canadians are more likely to feel the name is unacceptable than their older counterparts.

Vancouver, BC [October 23, 2019] – Most Canadians see no problem with the current name of the Canadian Football League (CFL) franchise that plays in Edmonton, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 60% of Canadians say they believe the name of the Edmonton Eskimos is acceptable, while 23% consider it unacceptable.

The same proportion of Canadians (60%) think the name of the Chilliwack Chiefs of the British Columbia Hockey League (BCHL) is acceptable.

In 2017, 57% of Canadians thought the franchise name of the Edmonton Eskimos was acceptable and 21% found it unacceptable.

“There is a pronounced generational gap when Canadians are asked about the current name of Edmonton’s CFL franchise,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While 67% of Canadians aged 55 and over see no problem with the name, the proportion drops to 60% among those aged 35-to-54 and 49% among those aged 18-to-34.”  

More than three-in-five Canadians believe the names of three other North American professional sports franchises are acceptable: the Atlanta Braves of Major League Baseball (MLB) (66%), the Chicago Blackhawks of the National Hockey League (NHL) (65%) and the Kansas City Chiefs of the National Football League (NFL) (62%).

A majority of respondents also regard the MLB’s Cleveland Indians (57%) and the NFL’s Washington Redskins (54%) as acceptable names for a professional sports franchise.

The highest level of rejection for a franchise name is observed for the Washington Redskins, with 29% of Canadians saying the moniker is unacceptable—a proportion that rises to 38% among respondents aged 18-to-34.

Photo Credit: tewarianuj

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 24 to September 26, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Canadian Voters “Happy” With Liberal Minority Scenario

Most voters would welcome an alliance or agreement involving the New Democratic Party (NDP) in the House of Commons.

Vancouver, BC [October 22, 2019] – Canadian voters who participated in the 43rd federal election are divided in their assessment of the incoming House of Commons, a new Research Co. “exit poll” has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of Canadians who cast a ballot in this year’s federal election, 49% of voters say they are happy with the expected outcome of the democratic process: a minority government led by the Liberal Party. A similar proportion of Canadian voters (45%) are “upset” with this scenario.

“Voters aged 18-to-34 (52%) are more content with the outcome of the election than those aged 35-to-54 (46%) and those aged 55 and over (47%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of Quebecers (57%) and Atlantic Canadians (56%) are also happy with the prospect of a minority Liberal government, while 55% of Albertans and 52% of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba are upset.”

More than half of Canadian voters (56%) said they would be “happy” if the New Democratic Party (NDP) is included in an alliance or agreement to support another party in the House of Commons.

A smaller proportion of Canadian voters (47%) would welcome a similar role for the Green Party in the lower house. Conversely, only 20% of Canadian voters would be “happy” with the Bloc Québécois participating in any alliance or agreement in the House of Commons. 

Canadian voters were also asked about the possibility of uniting the centre-left parties. The most popular proposal is a formal merger between the Liberal Party and the NDP, which would make 46% of Canadians “happy”—including 69% of Liberal voters and 73% of NDP voters.

Possible mergers involving other combinations are not as popular, including one with Liberals, New Democrats and the Green Party (43%), one with New Democrats and Greens (37%), and one with Liberals and Greens (36%).

In addition, 71% of Canadian voters believe that the party that wins the most seats should form the government—a proportion that includes 84% of Conservative voters and 72% of Liberal voters.

Two thirds of Canadian voters (67%) believed it was time for a change of government in Canada. This sentiment is highest in two regions where the Conservative Party was particularly popular this year: Alberta (83%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (77%).

One third of Canadian voters (32%) say they cast a ballot for a candidate that was not their first choice, but that they perceived as having the best chance to defeat a party that they really do not like in their constituency.

Canadian voters aged 18-to-34 appear to have voted strategically (43%) more often than those aged 35-to-54 (30%) and those aged 55 and over (25%). On a regional basis, more than a third of Quebecers (36%) and Atlantic Canadians (42%) cast their ballot this way.

While the main motivator for Canadian voters was the party’s ideas and policies (27%), there are some differences among the federal parties.

About one-in-five Liberal voters (19%) and Bloc Québécois voters (22%) were primarily motivated by the party’s leader. Conservative voters had desire for change (17%) and disgust with other candidates (16%) as bigger influences, and 15% of New Democrat voters were motivated by the candidate in their riding.

A majority of Conservative voters (61%) think Andrew Scheer should remain as leader of the party. 

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 20 to October 21, 2019, among 803 adults in Canada who voted in the federal election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Grits and Tories Are in Statistical Tie Ahead of Canadian Election

The NDP’s Jagmeet Singh closes the campaign with the highest approval rating and momentum score of all federal leaders.

Vancouver, BC [October 20, 2019] – A jump in voter support for the New Democratic Party (NDP) and the Bloc Québécois has affected the fortunes of Canada’s two major political parties on the eve of the country’s federal election, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 32% of decided voters (-4 since a Research Co. survey conducted in late September) would cast a ballot for the Liberal Party’s contender in their constituency.

The Conservative Party remains a close second with 31% (-2), followed by the NDP with 19% (+4), the Green Party with 8% (-1), the Bloc with 7% (+2) and the People’s Party with 2% (=).

“In September, the Liberals enjoyed a six-point lead among female decided voters,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Now, partly due to a surge in support for the New Democrats, the governing party is practically tied with the Conservatives.”

On a regional basis, the Conservative Party continues to dominate in Alberta (61%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (51%). In both Ontario and Atlantic Canada, the Liberal Party is in first place (39% and 34% respectively).

An extremely close race developed in British Columbia, with each of the three major parties garnering the support of more than a quarter of decided voters, with the Greens at 14%.

In Quebec, where the Liberals had a 14-point advantage over the Bloc in September, the election has also tightened considerably. The Liberals now stand at 34% (-3), while the Bloc has jumped to 32% (+9)

NDP leader Jagmeet Singh heads to tomorrow’s election with the highest approval rating of all leaders at 57% (up 15 points since late September).

The numbers held steady for Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Andrew Scheer (38%, unchanged) and Green Party leader Elizabeth May (44%, also unchanged). 

The approval rating for incumbent Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau improved by three points to 44%, while his disapproval numbers dropped by the same margin to 51%. 

The lowest ranked leader is once again Maxime Bernier of the People’s Party (18%, +1).

Singh is the only party leader to post a positive momentum score (+20), with almost two-in-five Canadians (38%) saying their opinion of the NDP leader has improved since the start of the campaign.

Bernier has the lowest momentum score (-25), with Trudeau at -24,  Scheer at -21 and May at -5.

When asked which one of the main party leaders would make the “Best Prime Minister”, Trudeau remains in first place with 30% (-3), followed by Scheer with 23% (-1) and Singh with 21% (+8). The other contenders are in single digits.

Trudeau holds a nine-point edge over Scheer on the “Best Prime Minister” question among men (33% to 24%) and a six-point lead among women (28% to 22%). 

Singh gets his best numbers on this question with women (26%, just two points behind Trudeau) and Canadians aged 18-to-34 (32%, eight points ahead of Trudeau).

About one-in-four Canadians (24%, +3) think the economy and jobs is the top issue facing Canada, followed by the environment (20%, -2), health care (also 20%, +2) and housing, homelessness and poverty (16%, -1).

The way Canada’s regions feel about issues did not go through any radical shifts since late September. Housing, homelessness and poverty is still most pressing concern for British Columbians (28%), while the environment is especially important for Quebecers (31%).

As was the case last month, health care is the top issue in Atlantic Canada (36%) and Manitoba and Saskatchewan (22%), while the economy and jobs takes precedence in Alberta (37%) and Ontario (27%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 18 to October 20, 2019, among 957 Canadian adults, including 890 decided voters in the 2019 federal election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points for the entire sample and +/- 3.3 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Some Marijuana Users in British Columbia Shun Licensed Retailers

Across the province, 24% of consumers say they have not acquired any cannabis at a licensed retailer.

Vancouver, BC [October 18, 2019] – A year after marijuana became legal in Canada, only a third of cannabis users in British Columbia are acquiring their product exclusively at licensed retailers, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, only 33% of British Columbians who have consumed marijuana since legalization say that “all” of their cannabis was acquired at a licensed retailer.

About one-in-five marijuana consumers in British Columbia (19%) say “most” of their cannabis was obtained at a licensed retailer, and 14% acknowledge that “some” of it was purchased this way.

One-in-four marijuana consumers in British Columbia (24%) say that “none” of the cannabis they have used since legalization has been acquired at a licensed retailer—including 37% of consumers aged 55 and over.

Across the province. 44% of residents say they consumed marijuana in Canada before it became legal, while 43% have never tried it. 

In April, only 6% of British Columbians said they had consumed marijuana only after it became legal,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Now, the proportion has risen to 13%, including more than one-in-five residents aged 18-to-34 (22%).”

As was the case in a Research Co. survey conducted six months ago, more than three-in-five British Columbians (63%) agree with marijuana being legal in Canada, while 29% disagree.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (70%) and residents of Northern BC (67%) are more likely to endorse the legal status of marijuana.

When asked to review the decisions that the provincial government has taken to enable the legal sale of marijuana in British Columbia, four-in-five residents (81%) agree with prohibiting the use of marijuana on school properties and in vehicles.

Sizeable majorities of residents also agree with establishing 19 years as the legal age to purchase, sell or consume marijuana in the province (73%), restricting marijuana smoking to areas where tobacco smoking is allowed (74%), authorizing adults to grow up to four cannabis plants per household, as long as the plants are not visible from public spaces off the property, and home cultivation is banned in homes used as day-cares (60%), and establishing the Liquor Distribution Branch (LDB) as the wholesale distributor of non-medical marijuana in British Columbia (56%)

Two thirds of British Columbians (67%, +7 since April) think companies that operate in the province should be able to administer “drug tests” to any employee now that marijuana is legal.

More than seven-in-ten British Columbians disagree with legalizing ecstasy (72%), heroin (76%), powder cocaine (77%), crack cocaine (79%), methamphetamine or “crystal meth” (also 79%) and fentanyl (also 79%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 7 to October 10, 2019, among 800 adult British Columbians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error — which measures sample variability — is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two-in-Five Canadian Social Media Users Are Finding “Fake News”

About three-in-ten have been exposed to racist content on their social media feeds.

Vancouver, BC [October 16, 2019] – A sizeable proportion of social media users in Canada say they have seen “fake news” in their feeds, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample of social media users, 41% of respondents say they found links to stories on current affairs that were obviously false.

“Almost half of Canadian social media users aged 18-to-34 (48%) say they have found blatantly false stories on social media,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The proportion is lower among those aged 35-to-54 (41%) and those aged 55 and over (36%).”

About three-in-ten Canadian social media users (29%) say they have found racist content or comments in their feed. About one-in-five also report finding homophobic content or comments (21%) and content or comments offensive to people with disabilities (20%).

Canadian social media users aged 18-to-34 are more likely to report someone for offensive content or comments (35%, compared to the national average of 21%) and to post something on social media that they deleted after thinking it over twice (28%, compared to the national average of 21%). 

When asked about specific ideas that could be implemented on social media platforms, two thirds of Canadian users (68%) are in favour of banning “anonymous” accounts to only allow people to comment and post if they use their real name and likeness.

Three-in-five Canadian social media users (60%) believe “creeping” should be dealt with and would like platforms to always allow users to see who has viewed their profiles, photos and posts.

A sizeable proportion of respondents (72%) acknowledge that it is difficult to discern which social media accounts are real and which ones are fake.

More than three-in-five social media users (63%) believe politicians who have a social media account should not be able to block users from engaging with them.

Canadian social media users who voted for the Liberal Party or the New Democratic Party (NDP) in the 2015 federal election (67%) are more likely to support block-free accounts for politicians than those who voted for the Conservative Party (60%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 24 to September 26, 2019, among 840 adult social media users in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.4 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Would Make Federal Election Day a Holiday

A majority of respondents also want local candidates to participate in at least one debate in their constituency.

Vancouver, BC [October 10, 2019] – A significant proportion of Canadians would like to have an entire day to cast ballots in a federal election without having to show up for school or work, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, almost three-in-five Canadians (58%) agree with declaring election day a public holiday in Canada. 

A third of Canadians (32%) are not in favour of this idea, and 11% are undecided.

“Canadians aged 18-to-34 (72%) are significantly more likely to concur with the notion of making election day a holiday,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Canadians aged 35-to-54 (57%) and those over the age of 55 (48%) are not as enthusiastic.” 

Sizeable majorities of Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (70%), the Liberal Party (66%) and the Conservative Party (63%) would welcome this change.

A majority of Canadians (62%) believe voting should be mandatory in federal elections, while 29% disagree and 9% are undecided.

Residents aged 55 and over (68%) and Quebecers (67%) are more likely to be in favour of compulsory voting in elections to the House of Commons.

Almost seven-in-ten Canadians (69%) believe it should be mandatory for candidates to attend at least one public debate in their riding with the candidates from other parties, while 18% disagree and 13% are undecided.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 24 to September 26, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Want Ottawa to Do More on Environment

Air pollution, the pollution of rivers lakes and reservoirs, and global warming are the main concerns for residents.

Vancouver, BC [October 4, 2019] – A sizeable proportion of British Columbians is disappointed with the way the federal government has dealt with environmental issues, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, 45% of respondents believe that the federal government in Ottawa has not paid enough attention to the environment.

About three-in-ten British Columbians (29%) think Ottawa has paid the right amount of attention to the environment, while 17% believe it has focused too much on this issue.

“The level of criticism towards the federal government on environmental issues is decidedly higher among two groups of British Columbians,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of residents aged 55 and over (55%) and women (53%) think Ottawa should be paying more attention to the environment.”

The rating is slightly better for the two other levels of government, with 43% of British Columbians thinking their provincial and municipal administrations are not paying enough attention to the environment.

While more than half of residents of the Fraser Valley (52%) think their municipal governments have not done enough on the environmental front, the rating is lower in Metro Vancouver (44%), Vancouver Island (42%), Southern BC (39%) and Northern BC (36%).

When asked about their personal concerns about environmental problems, a majority of British Columbians mentioned air pollution (58%), the pollution of rivers, lakes and reservoirs (57%), global warming or climate change (55%) and the pollution of drinking water (55%).

Other issues that have British Columbians personally concerned are the contamination of soil and water by toxic waste (50%), deforestation and the clearance of naturally occurring forests (46%), the extinction of plant and animal species (45%), the depletion of fish stocks through overfishing (also 45%), the loss of tropical rain forests (44%) and the maintenance of the supply of fresh water for household needs (41%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 26 to September 29, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Metro Vancouverites Consider Working Conditions for Ride-Hailers

Sizeable majorities of residents would also limit the number of cars on the road and call for more wheelchair accessible vehicles.

Vancouver, BC [October 2, 2019] – As Metro Vancouver prepares to welcome ride-hailing companies, many residents appear concerned over the working conditions of drivers, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, three-in-four residents (75%) think British Columbia should require ride-hailing drivers and taxi drivers to be paid a minimum wage, as well as benefits such as overtime and vacation pay.

“Men (78%) and Metro Vancouverites aged 35-to-54 (76%) are more likely to call for ride-hailing policies similar to what the State of California is currently pondering,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents who voted for any of the three major parties in the last provincial election are in agreement on this matter as well.”

Seven-in-ten Metro Vancouverites (71%) think ride-hailing companies should devote 17% of their fleet to wheelchair accessible vehicles. Support for this measure is highest among women (72%) and residents aged 55 and over (80%).

Almost two thirds of Metro Vancouverites (64%) think the provincial government should limit the number of ride-hailing cars on the road—including 68% of men and 72% of residents of the City of Vancouver.

Across Metro Vancouver, 42% of residents believe ride-hailing companies should be allowed to operate in British Columbia, if they compete on an equal footing with taxis.

A smaller proportion (39%) believe ride-hailing companies should be allowed to operate in British Columbia without reservations, while only 6% of Metro Vancouverites would ban ride-hailing in the province.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 20 to September 23, 2019, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.7 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Liberals and Conservatives Gain in Canadian Federal Campaign

Justin Trudeau holds a nine-point advantage over Andrew Scheer in the “Best Prime Minister” question.

Vancouver, BC [September 28, 2019] – The two main federal parties in Canada increased their level of voter support over the past couple of months, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 36% of decided voters (+2 since a Research Co. survey conducted in July) would cast a ballot for the Liberal candidate in their riding in next month’s federal election.

The Conservative Party remains in second place with 33% (+2), followed by the New Democratic Party (NDP) with 15% (-2), the Green Party with 9% (-1), the Bloc Québécois with 5% (+1) and the People’s Party with 2% (-1).

The two main parties hold the same level of support among male decided voters (36% for each), while the Liberals have a six-point lead over the Conservatives among women (36% to 30%).

Voters aged 18-to-34 currently prefer the Liberals (35%, with the Conservatives at 22% and the NDP at 20%). The Liberals are barely ahead among voters aged 35-to-54 (36% to 34%), while the Tories hold the same edge among voters aged 55 and over (38% to 36%).

“The Conservatives are keeping more than four-in-five decided voters (84%) who supported the party in 2015,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The retention rate is not as respectable at this point for the NDP (71%) and the Liberals (68%).”

The approval rating for Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau remains at 41%, with more than half of Canadians (54%, +4) disapproving of his performance.

NDP leader Jagmeet Singh improved his standing by seven points and is now at 42%. The approval rating is higher for Green Party leader Elizabeth May (44%, +2) and lower for Official Opposition and Conservative Party leader Andrew Scheer (38%, +2). Maxime Bernier of the People’s Party dropped to 17% (-4).

Trudeau posted the lowest momentum score at -34, with 46% of Canadians saying their opinion of the incumbent prime minister has worsened since the start of the campaign. Bernier (-24) and Scheer (-17) also had negative numbers. Singh is the only leader with a positive momentum score (+3), while May is even.

On the “Best Prime Minister” question, Trudeau is first with 33%, followed by Scheer with 24%, Singh with 13% and May with 9%.

The environment is now the top issue facing Canada at 22% (+6), followed by the economy and jobs (21%, +2), health care (18%, -1) and housing, homelessness and poverty (17%, +4).

Health care is identified as the top issue in Atlantic Canada (33%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (23%), while the environment is top among Quebecers (33%). Housing, homelessness and poverty is the most important matter for British Columbians (24%), while the economy and jobs is first in Alberta (38%) and Ontario (23%).

Trudeau is the preferred leader to handle foreign affairs (32%)  health care (28%), and housing, homelessness and poverty (25%). May is clearly ahead on the environment (28%, with Trudeau at 21%)

The Liberal and Conservative leaders are tied or virtually even on four issues: crime and public safety (Scheer 26%, Trudeau 25%), economy and jobs (Trudeau 28%, Scheer 27%), energy and pipelines (Trudeau 25%, Scheer 25%) and accountability and leadership (Scheer 25%, Trudeau 24%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 24 to September 26, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Unsolicited Calls and Messages Affect Most British Columbians

More than a third of the province’s  residents received a text asking about their support for a party or policy.

Vancouver, BC [September 27, 2019] – A significant proportion of British Columbians recently had to deal with unsolicited text messages and calls on their mobile phone, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, 37% of respondents say that, over the course of the past two months, they received text messages asking them if they support a specific party or policy sent by an individual they do not know.

Men (42%) and British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (44%) are more likely to report getting text messages of a political nature from unknown senders.

A similar proportion of British Columbians (35%) received phone calls and/or phone messages from an individual purporting to represent a government agency (such as the Canada Revenue Agency).

Women (36%) and Metro Vancouverites (39%) are more likely to have received calls or messages from a scammer over the past two months.

Three-in-ten British Columbians (31%) say they received phone calls or messages over the past two months where an individual speaks Cantonese or Mandarin, including 42% of those who reside in Metro Vancouver.

“Younger British Columbians appear to be more affected by unsolicited phone calls and messages than their older counterparts,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “While only 40% of residents aged 55 and over say they did not receive any of the three types of calls or messages included in the survey, the proportion falls to 25% among those aged 35-to-54 and 20% among those aged 18-to-34.”

More than a third of British Columbians (37%) have reported an unwanted call or phone number to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre (formerly known as PhoneBusters).

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (46%), men (43%) and residents of both Northern BC (47%) and the Fraser Valley (44%) are more likely to have contacted the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre to report an unwanted call or number.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from September 11 to September 14, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca