British Columbians Want Referendum Outcome to Be Respected

Supporters of all three major provincial parties in the province believe the will of voters should stand.

Vancouver, BC [December 14, 2018] – As British Columbians await the results of the 2018 Referendum on Electoral Reform, most residents believe the results of the democratic process should be respected, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 73% of British Columbians think the provincial government should honour the results of referendum, regardless of the final voter turnout.

The Referendum on Electoral Reform was a mail-in ballot. A voting package was mailed to British Columbians between October 22 and November 2. The results of the referendum are expected to be announced before the end of the year.

Majorities of residents who voted to keep the current First Past the Post system for provincial elections (74%) or to move to a proportional representation system (71%) believe the result of the referendum should be respected.

Most British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (75%), the BC Liberals (71%) and the BC Greens (66%) in last year’s provincial election think the outcome of the referendum should stand, regardless of how many voters participated.

When asked how they voted in the democratic process, equal proportions of residents (38%) say they chose to keep the current First Past the Post system or to adopt a proportional representation system.

Almost one-in-four respondents (24%) say they did not vote in the referendum—including 27% of women, 27% of those aged 18-to-34, and 29% of Fraser Valley residents.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 11 to December 13, 2018, among 801 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Only One-in-Ten Canadians Will Spend More This Holiday Season

Residents are evenly split on whether they prefer actual gifts from people or cards they can use to choose whatever they want. 

Vancouver, BC [December 13, 2018] – While a considerable proportion of Canadians say they are in a more fortunate economic situation compared to last year, few of them are in a more generous mood this holiday season, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than one-in-four Canadians (27%) say they are better off financially than they were last year, while half (49%) say the situation has not changed and one-in-five (22%) say they are worse off.

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to say they are in a more fortunate economic situation this year (44%) than those aged 35-to-54 (24%) and those aged 55 and over (15%).

When asked about how much they think they will allocate to gifts this holiday season, only 11% of Canadians say they plan to spend more, while almost half (47%) foresee no changes and two-in-five (39%) say they will spend less.

“There are some staggering regional differences on holiday expenditures in Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents of Western provinces are more likely to say they will devote more money to gifts this year than those in Eastern provinces.”

More than a quarter of Ontarians (28%), Quebecers (26%) and Atlantic Canadians (31%) say they are better off financially this year, but fewer than one-in-ten in each of these regions plan to spend more on gifts in 2018.

In Ontario, 44% of residents say they will spend less on gifts this year than they did in 2017—the highest proportion in the country.

When asked about possible holiday gifts they may receive this year, Canadians are deeply divided. Across the country, 48% say they prefer to receive gifts someone chose for them, while 47% would rather get a gift card they can use to choose what they want.

Residents of British Columbia are the most likely to prefer actual gifts to cards (54%), followed by those in Ontario (50%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (47%), Quebec (45%), Atlantic Canada (also 45%) and Alberta (43%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 25, 2018, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Increasing Rental Stock a Priority for Metro Vancouverites

More than three-in-four believe Canada should consider banning most foreigners from purchasing real estate.

Vancouver, BC [November 26, 2018] – Many residents of Metro Vancouver believe more rental units should be made available in the next three years, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of Metro Vancouverites, three-in-five (57%) think we need to build more rental units than we did over the three-year period that ended in 2017.

From 2015 to 2017, there were 75,000 new housing units built in Metro Vancouver. Approximately 23 per cent of them were for rental use.

One third of Metro Vancouverites (34%) would like to see more than 75,000 units built in the region over the next three years, while 27% would keep the same pace and 19% believe we should build less.

New Zealand recently passed legislation that bans most foreigners from purchasing real estate in the country. There are exceptions for foreigners who hold residency status in New Zealand, as well as citizens from Australia and Singapore, due to existing free-trade agreements.

Across Metro Vancouver, 77% of residents would support having similar legislation in Canada, that would ban most foreigners from purchasing real estate in the country.

“Metro Vancouverites are of three minds when assessing the current housing crisis,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The most supported proposition is a ban on foreign owners, and while a majority would like to see an increase in rental properties, the appetite for increasing the pace of construction is not as high.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 25, 2018, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two-in-Five Canadians Say Their Home Heating Use Has Increased

Three-in-ten Canadians in a relationship say they change the temperature at home without telling their partner. 

Vancouver, BC [December 6, 2018] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians are relying more heavily on home heating this year, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, two-in-five Canadians (41%) say their energy and heating use at home has increased over the past few weeks—a proportion that reaches 46% in Atlantic Canada, and 43% in both Ontario and British Columbia.

Across the country, 9% of Canadians say they typically set their home heating at 18C or lower. Most residents select 19C or 20C (38%) and 21C or 22C (40%), while 6% set the thermostat at 23C or higher.

Respondents to this survey who are married or living with a significant other were asked who is in charge of setting the temperature at home. Two-in-five (40%) say they are solely responsible, while 18% say their spouse or partner takes care of this task, and 30% affirm that the decision is taken by both equally.

Women are more likely to say that the home thermostat is a joint responsibility (34%, compared to 25% for men), while men are more likely to say they are solely responsible for home heating settings at home (43%, compared to 38% for women).

Three-in-ten Canadians in a relationship (30%) admit that they change the temperature at home without telling their spouse or significant other “all of the time” (8%) or “most of the time” (22%), while just 19% say they have “never” done this.

“Women (35%) are more likely to acknowledge that they adjust the thermostat without telling their spouse or partner than men (25%),” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “On a regional basis, Quebecers are more likely to say they would never change the settings without consulting first (35%), while British Columbians (8%) are the least likely to do so.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 26 to November 29, 2018, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Want to See Calorie Counts in Restaurants

Support for enacting a mandatory measure across the province is highest among residents aged 18-to-34.

Vancouver, BC [December 4, 2018] – Most British Columbians believe restaurant menus should always provide nutritional guidelines, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, four-in-five British Columbians (81%) say they would like to have a regulation similar to the one currently in place in Ontario, where it is mandatory to display calories on any menu that lists or depicts standard food items offered for sale by a regulated food service premises.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to support this measure (85%) than those aged 35-to-54 (79%) and those aged 55 and over (also 79%).

In 2012, the Province of British Columbia implemented the Informed Dining initiative, a programdesigned to allow residents to have nutrition information available when eating at participating food service establishments. The program is not mandatory,

Across British Columbia, 41% of residents currently use an activity tracker—a proportion that rises to 47% in Metro Vancouver. These devices monitor certain fitness-related metrics, including distance walked, amount of exercise and/or calorie consumption.

“There are already many residents of British Columbia who are keeping track of their physical activity,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Having the opportunity to access nutritional information at all restaurants, and not only those currently taking part in the Informed Dining initiative, would certainly be a welcome development.”

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 14 to November 16, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca