God Exists for British Columbians, But Few Attend Religious Services

Two thirds of residents (67%) say they only attend on special occasions, such as weddings, baptisms and funerals.

Vancouver, BC [April 18, 2019] – Most residents of British Columbia believe or tend to believe that God is real, but significantly fewer actively participate in religious ceremonies, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 39% of British Columbians are “convinced” that God exists, while 22% “tend to believe” that God exists.

Conversely, 16% of residents are “convinced” that God does not exist, and 13% “tend to believe” that God does not exist.

Women are more likely to be “convinced” that God exists than men (43% to 35%). British Columbians aged 55 and over are also more likely to be “convinced” about God’s existence (45%) than those aged 35-to-54 (38%) and those aged 18-to-34 (32%).

Two thirds of British Columbians (67%) say they never attend religious services other than weddings, baptisms or funerals. 

Only 3% of British Columbians attend services “at least once a week”, while 13% visit a church, temple or synagogue  “at least once a month.”

Similar proportions of British Columbians acknowledge having meditated (27%) or prayed to God (24%) over the past 12 months. 

Just over one-in-ten British Columbians (11%) visiteda mental health professional, such as a psychiatrist or a psychologist, and slightly fewer (7%) consulted with a “life coach” to help identify personal goals. 

Only 2% of residents say they confessed or sought advice from a religious figure.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 4 to April 7, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: Colin Knowles

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Six Months Later, British Columbians Content with Legal Marijuana

Across the province, 6% of adults say they tried cannabis for the first time after it was legalized.

Vancouver, BC [April 16, 2019] – Most British Columbians appear satisfied with both the legalization of marijuana and the framework to acquire cannabis in the province, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 63% of British Columbians agree with marijuana being legal in Canada, while 29% disagree.

Agreement with the legalization of cannabis in Canada is highest among British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (70%), as well as residents of Northern BC (72%) and Vancouver Island (also 72%).

More than two-in-five British Columbians (43%) acknowledge having consumed marijuana in Canada before it was legal, while 51% reveal they have never used cannabis in the country. 

Just over one-in-twenty British Columbians (6%) say they used marijuana in Canada only after it became legal last year, including 10% of those aged 18-to-34.

When asked to review the decisions that the provincial government has taken to enable the legal sale of marijuana in British Columbia, practically four-in-five residents agree with two measures: establishing 19 years as the legal age to purchase, sell or consume marijuana in the province (79%) and restricting marijuana smoking to areas where tobacco smoking is allowed (also 79%).

In addition, two thirds of residents (67%) agree with authorizing adults to grow up to four cannabis plants per household, as long as the plants are not visible from public spaces off the property, and home cultivation is banned in homes used as day-cares.

A majority of respondents to the survey (57%) agree with establishing the Liquor Distribution Branch (LDB) as the wholesale distributor of non-medical marijuana in British Columbia, while 31% disagree.

In October 2018, a Research Co. survey found that British Columbians were split on having a marijuana shop a block away from their home.

More than three-in-four British Columbians disagree with legalizing ecstasy (78%), powder cocaine (79%), heroin (also 79%), crack cocaine (83%), methamphetamine or “crystal meth” (83%) and fentanyl (84%).

“There is little appetite from British Columbians to extend marijuana’s legal framework to other substances,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Few residents want to allow other drugs to be readily available for any adult who wants to access them.”

In some countries, including the United States, a company can administer “drug tests” to employees, even if they do not operate machinery (such as pilots, truck drivers or crane operators). 

Three-in-five British Columbians (60%) think companies in British Columbia should be able to administer “drug tests” to any employee now that marijuana is legal—a proportion that rises to 68% among residents aged 55 and over.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 4 to April 7, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

United Conservatives Extend Their Lead in Alberta

Opposition leader Jason Kenney has overtaken incumbent Rachel Notley as the “Best Premier” for the province.

Vancouver, BC [April 15, 2019] – The United Conservative Party (UCP) has extended its advantage in the final stages of the provincial campaign in Alberta, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 49% of decided voters in Alberta (+4 since a Research Co. poll completed in early April) would support the UCP candidate in their riding in tomorrow’s provincial ballot.

The governing New Democratic Party (NDP) is in second place with 39% (-1), followed by the Alberta Party with 9% (+3) and the Liberal Party with 2% (-1). Two per cent of decided voters would back other parties or candidates.

The level of undecided voters across Alberta has dropped from 22% in early April to 10% in this survey. In the rural areas of the province, only 9% of residents are currently undecided (compared to 27% earlier this month).

Among decided voters, the UCP holds sizeable advantages over the NDP in three distinct demographics: men (57% to 29%), Albertans aged 55 and over (59% to 33%) and those who do not reside in Calgary or Edmonton (60% to 29%).

The opposition UCP is also the top choice for Albertans aged 35-to-54 (46% to 41%) and Calgarians (48% to 37%).

Conversely, the NDP is ahead of the UCP among women (48% to 40%), Albertans aged 18-to-34 (47% to 38%) and those who live in Edmonton (46% to 40%). 

“The UCP is holding on to a large majority of voters who cast a ballot for either the Wildrose Party (77%) or the Progressive Conservatives (84%) in 2015,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The New Democrats are losing 14% of their voters in the last election to the UCP.”

On the “Best Premier” question, Jason Kenney of the UCP holds a three-point lead over incumbent Rachel Notley of the NDP (36% to 33%), with Stephen Mandel of the Alberta Party and David Khan of the Liberal Party in single digits (9% and 2% respectively).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 13 to April 15, 2019 among 602 Alberta adults, including 542 decided voters in the 2019 provincial election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Alberta. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.0 percentage points for the entire sample and +/- 4.2 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Two-in-Five Canadians Always Alter Their Words to Avoid Swearing

Across the country, almost half (48%) admit to changing the way they speak sometimes, while 14% never do.

Vancouver, BC [April 11, 2019] – A sizeable proportion of Canadians admit to being cautious about how they speak in public, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 38% of Canadians say they always alter the way they speak to make sure they do not swear in public. 

Almost half of Canadians (48%) admit to sometimes altering the way they speak so as not to swear in front of certain people, while 14% claim to never alter the way they speak and do not worry about it if a curse word comes out.

Women (40%), residents aged 55 and over (42%) and Quebecers (43%) are more likely to say they always alter how they speak to prevent swearing.

Two thirds of Canadians (68%) say they hear swearing “frequently” or “occasionally” when they are talking with friends. More than half also report hearing curse words in conversations with strangers (55%), relatives (53%) and co-workers (52%).

“There are some differences across the country when it comes to listening to co-workers swear,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Ontarians are the most likely to report hearing curse words in the workplace (52%), while Albertans are at the bottom of this list (44%).” 

When asked about the times they use curse words themselves, more than half of Canadians (52%) say they swear “frequently” or “occasionally” when they are having a conversation with friends.

Significantly smaller proportions of Canadians say they rely on curse words when they are speaking with relatives (40%), co-workers (34%) and strangers (23%). 

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to acknowledge that they swear when having conversations with friends (73%), relatives (55%), co-workers (47%) and strangers (33%) than those aged 35-to-54 and those aged 55 and over.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from April 4 to April 7, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Would Like to Elect Their Next Senator

Almost two thirds of residents would like to have a non-binding ballot similar to the ones that have taken place in Alberta.

Vancouver, BC [April 9, 2019] – Many British Columbians want to play a role in the selection of the province’s next representative in the Red Chamber, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 64% of British Columbians would agree to hold a non-binding election—similar to the ones that have taken pace in Alberta—to choose a nominee for appointment to the Senate.

In mid-November, British Columbia Conservative Senator Richard Neufeld will step down after reaching the age of mandatory retirement. 

When asked which option they prefer for the Senate of Canada, more than a third of British Columbians (36%) say they would reform the Senate to allow Canadians to elect its members.

Smaller proportions of residents would prefer to abolish the Senate of Canada altogether (17%), have a selection committee that would appoint non-partisan Senators (14%) or have the sitting prime minister appoint members of the upper house (8%).

“The appetite for Senate reform in British Columbia is strongest among residents aged 55 and over,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “The notion of an Independent Advisory Board that would take care of Senate appointments, which has been in place under Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, is not particularly popular.”

Only 11% of respondents correctly identified the fact that British Columbia has six seats in the 105-member Red Chamber. 

A similarly low proportion (13%) was able to identify at least one of British Columbia’s current Senators: Mobina Jaffer, Larry Campbell, Yonah Martin, Richard Neufeld, Yuen Pau Woo and Bev Busson.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 28 to March 31, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: D. Gordon E. Robertson

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca