British Columbians Want Referendum Outcome to Be Respected

Supporters of all three major provincial parties in the province believe the will of voters should stand.

Vancouver, BC [December 14, 2018] – As British Columbians await the results of the 2018 Referendum on Electoral Reform, most residents believe the results of the democratic process should be respected, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 73% of British Columbians think the provincial government should honour the results of referendum, regardless of the final voter turnout.

The Referendum on Electoral Reform was a mail-in ballot. A voting package was mailed to British Columbians between October 22 and November 2. The results of the referendum are expected to be announced before the end of the year.

Majorities of residents who voted to keep the current First Past the Post system for provincial elections (74%) or to move to a proportional representation system (71%) believe the result of the referendum should be respected.

Most British Columbians who voted for the BC New Democratic Party (NDP) (75%), the BC Liberals (71%) and the BC Greens (66%) in last year’s provincial election think the outcome of the referendum should stand, regardless of how many voters participated.

When asked how they voted in the democratic process, equal proportions of residents (38%) say they chose to keep the current First Past the Post system or to adopt a proportional representation system.

Almost one-in-four respondents (24%) say they did not vote in the referendum—including 27% of women, 27% of those aged 18-to-34, and 29% of Fraser Valley residents.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from December 11 to December 13, 2018, among 801 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Only One-in-Ten Canadians Will Spend More This Holiday Season

Residents are evenly split on whether they prefer actual gifts from people or cards they can use to choose whatever they want. 

Vancouver, BC [December 13, 2018] – While a considerable proportion of Canadians say they are in a more fortunate economic situation compared to last year, few of them are in a more generous mood this holiday season, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, more than one-in-four Canadians (27%) say they are better off financially than they were last year, while half (49%) say the situation has not changed and one-in-five (22%) say they are worse off.

Canadians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to say they are in a more fortunate economic situation this year (44%) than those aged 35-to-54 (24%) and those aged 55 and over (15%).

When asked about how much they think they will allocate to gifts this holiday season, only 11% of Canadians say they plan to spend more, while almost half (47%) foresee no changes and two-in-five (39%) say they will spend less.

“There are some staggering regional differences on holiday expenditures in Canada,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Residents of Western provinces are more likely to say they will devote more money to gifts this year than those in Eastern provinces.”

More than a quarter of Ontarians (28%), Quebecers (26%) and Atlantic Canadians (31%) say they are better off financially this year, but fewer than one-in-ten in each of these regions plan to spend more on gifts in 2018.

In Ontario, 44% of residents say they will spend less on gifts this year than they did in 2017—the highest proportion in the country.

When asked about possible holiday gifts they may receive this year, Canadians are deeply divided. Across the country, 48% say they prefer to receive gifts someone chose for them, while 47% would rather get a gift card they can use to choose what they want.

Residents of British Columbia are the most likely to prefer actual gifts to cards (54%), followed by those in Ontario (50%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (47%), Quebec (45%), Atlantic Canada (also 45%) and Alberta (43%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from November 24 to November 25, 2018, among 700 adults in Metro Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Metro Vancouver. The margin of error— which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.7 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Stewart Keeps Lead as Vancouver Mayoral Election Looms

More than half of voters are considering independent candidates for City Council.

Vancouver, BC [October 16, 2018] – Independent candidate Kennedy Stewart remains ahead as Vancouver’s mayoral campaign enters its final days, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative sample of City of Vancouver voters reproduced the ballot that will be used in the mayoral election, with the names of all 21 candidates listed in the order that was drawn last month.

In the survey, 36% of decided voters (+2 since early October) said they will vote for Stewart or have already voted for him in the advance polls.

Ken Sim of the Non-Partisan Association (NPA) is second with 23% (+3), followed closely by independent candidate Shauna Sylvester with 19% (+3).

Support is currently lower for Hector Bremner of Yes Vancouver (6%, -4), Wai Young of Coalition Vancouver (6%, -1), Fred Harding of VANCOUVER 1st (2%, -2) and David Chen of ProVancouver (2%, -5).

One third of voters in the City of Vancouver (33%) are undecided, including 41% of those aged 18-to-34 and 43% of women.

“Many Vancouver voters are still making up their minds about the candidates and parties they will support on October 20,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “This group includes three-in-ten of those who voted for Kirk LaPointe in the last mayoral election, and more than a quarter of those who cast a ballot for Gregor Robertson.”

Sim and Stewart are virtually tied among male decided voters (32% and 31% respectively), while Stewart leads among female decided voters (42%, followed by Sylvester at 25%).

When it comes to the election for City Council, more than half of voters in Vancouver (53%) say they are “definitely” or “probably” considering voting for independent candidates.

The parties with the highest level of consideration for City Council from Vancouver voters are the Greens (47%), the NPA (35%), the Coalition of Progressive Electors (COPE) (34%), Vision Vancouver (29%) and OneCity (27%).

Consideration is currently lower for City Council candidates representing YES Vancouver (18%), VANCOUVER 1st (also 18%), Coalition Vancouver (also 18%) and ProVancouver (16%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 12 to October 14, 2018, among 401 voters in the City of Vancouver, including 265 decided voters in the 2018 mayoral election. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points for the entire sample and +/- 6.0 percentage points for the sample of decided voters, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Half of Vancouverites Ponder Independents in Council Election

Consideration for both Green Party and Non-Partisan Association (NPA) candidates increased by five points since September.

Vancouver, BC [October 11, 2018] – Voters in Vancouver continue to take a serious look at candidates from the Green Party and Independents as they contemplate their options in the election to City Council, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of City of Vancouver residents, 51% (+5 since September) say they will “definitely” or “probably” consider supporting Green Party of Vancouver candidates in this month’s municipal ballot.

A similarly high proportion of Vancouverites (50%, +12) say they will “definitely” or “probably” consider voting for any of the 27 independent candidates that will be listed on the ballot.

“The electorate’s appetite for independent voices is high across all age groups in Vancouver,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “A majority of voters aged 55 and over (57%) are considering independent candidates for one of their 10 votes.”

When it comes to established political parties, 35% of Vancouverites (+5) say they would “definitely” or “probably” consider voting for City Council candidates from the Non-Partisan Association (NPA), and 34% (+2) feel the same way about contenders from the Coalition of Progressive Electors (COPE).

The level of consideration is currently lower for candidates representing Vision Vancouver (27%, -3), Yes Vancouver (23%, -1), ProVancouver (22%, +13), Coalition Vancouver (22%, +9), One City (21%, +2) and Vancouver First (16%, +4).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 4 to October 7, 2018, among 402 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

 

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Stewart Remains Ahead in Vancouver Mayoral Race

Support for the independent candidate is highest among women and voters aged 18-to-34.

Vancouver, BC [October 9, 2018] – Independent candidate Kennedy Stewart currently has a higher level of support than all other contenders in Vancouver’s mayoral race, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of City of Vancouver residents, 34% of decided voters will cast a ballot for Stewart, while 20% would support Ken Sim of the Non-Partisan Association (NPA).

Independent candidate Shauna Sylvester is third with 16%, followed by Hector Bremner of Yes Vancouver with 10%, David Chen of ProVancouver and Wai Young of Coalition Vancouver each with 7%, and Fred Harding of Vancouver First with 4%.

More than a quarter of residents (26%) are undecided, down five points since a similar Research Co. survey completed last month. This group includes 31% of women and 24% of those who voted for Vision Vancouver’s Gregor Robertson in the 2014 mayoral election.

“Almost half of Vancouverites who supported Robertson in the last election are saying they would be voting for Stewart this year,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Conversely, Sim is holding on to two-in-five residents who voted for Kirk LaPointe in the 2014 election.”

Stewart holds a double-digit lead over Sim among women (41% to 16%) and is virtually tied with the NPA candidate among men (27% to 25%). The independent candidate is also the top choice for voters aged 18-to-34 (38%, followed by Sim at 19% and Bremner at 14%).

Residents were asked individually about which of the seven candidates would be a “good choice” for mayor in the city. The top ranked contenders are Stewart (35%), Sylvester (27%), Sim (20%) and Bremner (13%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 4 to October 7, 2018, among 402 adults in the City of Vancouver. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in the City of Vancouver. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 4.9 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca