Swearing is, By Far, The Biggest Etiquette Faux Pas in Canada

More than half of Canadians say they saw children misbehaving in public while their parents looked the other way.

Vancouver, BC [March 28, 2019] – Canadians report several different incidents involving improper manners over the past month, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 64% of Canadians say they witnessed someone swearing in public—a proportion that climbs to 71% in Alberta.

“It would seem that the language of Canadians is getting more colourful,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “More than two thirds of women and residents aged 55 and over report hearing someone swearing in public over the past month.”

More than half of Canadians (56%) say they witnessed children behaving badly in public while their parents looked the other way, while just under half saw someone littering or leaving trash behind in a public place (49%), someone interrupting or talking over them while they were speaking (48%) or someone cutting them off the road while they were driving (47%).

Other behaviours reported by Canadians include a person checking their phone or texting during a meeting or social event (45%, including 50% among those aged 55 and over), someone spitting in public (43%, including 50% in British Columbia) and experiencing rude customer service at a store (also 43%, including 47% in Ontario).

Fewer Canadians reported seeing chewing with their mouth open (39%, and 44% in Alberta), someone cutting the line at a store or counter (also 39%, and 47% in Atlantic Canada), someone using a cell phone during a performance or movie (34%, and 44% in Atlantic Canada), or someone making an obscene gesture (33%, including 43% in Alberta), 

The two lowest ranked items on the list of behaviours are someone delivering important information via text or e-mail instead of face-to-face (31%) and someone ignoring, or not responding to an invitation (19%).

There were two positive behaviours that were included in the survey. More than three-in-five Canadians (63%, and 79% in Atlantic Canada) witnessed someone holding the door open for a stranger. Just over one-in-four (27%, and 32% in British Columbia) saw someone giving up their seat for a person who was disabled, pregnant or elderly.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 22 to March 24, 2019, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Tough Road Ahead for Trudeau and Liberals in British Columbia

More than half of British Columbians think that a different party leader would fare better as Canada’s Prime Minister.

Vancouver, BC [March 26, 2019] – A majority of British Columbians are looking at options beyond Justin Trudeau as the federal election nears, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative provincial sample, 53% of British Columbians believe that “a different party leader would do things better in Ottawa as Prime Minister than Justin Trudeau.”

Men are more likely to believe that a different leader would fare better as Canada’s head of government (56%, compared to 50% for women). 

One third (34%) of British Columbians who voted for the federal Liberal Party in the 2015 election also believe a different party leader would do things better in Ottawa than the incumbent.

“With a few months to go before the next federal campaign begins, animosity toward the current prime minister in British Columbia is strongest outside of Metro Vancouver,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of voters in the Fraser Valley (58%), Southern BC (57%) and Northern BC (55%) would prefer to have a different leader in charge.”

In addition, 50% of British Columbians think that “a different party would do things better in Ottawa as a government than the Liberals.” This group includes majorities of British Columbians aged 18-to-34 (54%) and 55 and over (51%), as well as one-in-four (25%) federal Liberal voters from 2015.

When asked if they expect the Liberal Party to form the government again after the next federal election, 38% of British Columbians believe that this will be the case, while 44% disagree.

More than half of British Columbians report being “very familiar” or “moderately familiar” with the policies and ideas of the Liberal Party (78%), the New Democratic Party (NDP) (72%), the Conservative Party (69%) and the Green Party (59%).

Only 16% of British Columbians are “very familiar” or “moderately familiar” with the policies and ideas of the People’s Party, while three-in-four (75%) say they are “not too familiar” or “not familiar at all” with them.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from March 8 to March 10, 2019, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:

Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Location of Marijuana Stores Divides Views in British Columbia

Most residents are OK with pot shops in their city and neighbourhood, but not a block away from their home. 

Vancouver, BC [October 17, 2018] – As the use of recreational marijuana is about to become legal across Canada, British Columbians hold differing views on the future location of pot shops, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, seven-in-ten residents (70%) say they approve of establishments that would sell marijuana and marijuana-related products being located anywhere in their municipality.

More than half of British Columbians (56%) also approve of pot shops located anywhere in their neighbourhood.

However, when asked to ponder the notion of a marijuana store located a block away from their home, the numbers tighten considerably. Half of British Columbians (50%) approve of this scenario, while a similar proportion (48%) disapprove.

The level of “strong disapproval” of a pot shop located a block away from home is highest than the level of “strong approval” (32% to 24%).

“There seems to a NIMBY sentiment when it comes to the future location of pot shops in the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Women, British Columbians aged 55 and over and those who reside in Vancouver Island are more likely to hold reservations on having marijuana stores close to their homes.”

British Columbians were also asked about the prospect of relying on the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR) to grow cannabis. Across the province, 49% of residents are “definitely” or “probably” in favour of this idea, while 44% are “definitely” or “probably” against it.

Residents aged 18-to-34 are more likely to support growing marijuana on ALR land (55%) than those aged 35-to-54 (47%) and those aged 55 and over (46%).

On a regional basis, the idea of growing cannabis in ALR land is decidedly more popular in Southern BC (67%) than in Vancouver Island (48%), Metro Vancouver (46%), the Fraser Valley (also 46%) and Northern BC (39%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 4 to October 7, 2018, among 877 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.3 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: JPatrickBedell

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Support Mandatory Vaccinations for Children

Almost one-in-five believe the decision should be up to parents.

Vancouver, BC [October 3, 2018] – While a sizeable majority of Canadians are in favour of mandatory childhood immunization in their province, almost one-in-five believe the decision should be up to parents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 78% of Canadians believe vaccinations for children should “definitely” or “probably” be mandatory in their province.

Conversely, 18% think parents should “probably” or “definitely” be the ones deciding whether their children should be vaccinated.

In the late 1990s, a study published in the weekly medical journal The Lancet—which has since been discredited and retracted—attempted to link childhood vaccination and autism.

Across Canada, 23% of respondents think there “definitely” or “probably” is a correlation between the childhood vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella and autism in children—including 25% of Ontarians and Quebecers.

“One third of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (32%) and one-in-four of those aged 35-to-54 (25%) believe the widely debunked notion of childhood immunization leading to autism is definitely or probably true,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Respondents over the age of 55 are significantly less likely to think the same way (13%).”

When it comes to vaccinations and seasonal diseases (such as the flu), Canadians are more likely to reject a compulsory program.

Three-in-five Canadians (59%) think each person should “definitely” or “probably” be allowed to decide whether they want to get the flu vaccine, while just under two-in-five (38%) believe the flu vaccine should be mandatory in their province.

A majority of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (51%) voices support for the flu vaccine to be mandatory in their province, compared to 36% for those aged 35-to-54 and 29% for those aged 55 and over.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 27 to August 30, 2018, among 1,001 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Credit: Armin Kübelbeck

Canadian Employees Using Company-Issued Devices for Fun

Almost two thirds of the instant messages sent during work hours are not related to work.

Vancouver, BC [September 25, 2018] – Canadian employees whose smartphones are being financed by employers are spending more time sending instant messages to friends and family than connecting with colleagues to deal with tasks, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample asked Canadians who are employed full time and have a smartphone that their company is paying for about the instant messages they send while at work,

Just over a third of the instant messages that are sent during work hours on company-issued smartphones (35%) are interactions with colleagues for work-related tasks. Almost two thirds of the messages (65%) are interactions with family, friends and acquaintances for fun.

Across the country, full-time employees in Atlantic Canada are the most likely to use their company-issued devices for fun (69%), followed by those in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (67%), Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia (all at 65%) and Alberta (63%).

Full-time employees in the highest annual household income bracket are less likely to use their company-issued devices for fun (60%) than those in the lower income brackets.

“While a majority of instant messages sent from smartphones that employers are paying for are for fun, there are some generational differences,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Employees aged 55 and over are more likely to be having fun with company-issued devices during work hours than their younger counterparts.”

More than a third of full-time employees (35%) say they received a confusing message from someone they know because of auto-correct—a proportion that jumps to 47% among those aged 18-to-34. Millennial respondents are also more likely to have sent a confusing message because of auto-correct (45%, compared to the Canada-wide average of 30%).

Three-in-ten respondents (31%) say they declined an invitation to connect with a person through instant messaging in the last six months, and 18% say they left an instant messaging group they belonged to.

The most popular platform for instant messaging is Facebook Messenger, with 83% of respondents saying they use it during work hours, while more than half rely on messaging applications on their smartphone (62%), Skype (also 62%), Twitter Direct Messages (57%) and LinkedIn Messenger (also 57%).

Fewer respondents use WhatsApp (49%), Windows Live Messenger (33%) and Blackberry Messenger (16%) during work hours.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 7 to May 11, 2018, among 659 adults in Canada who are employed full-time and have a smartphone that their company is paying for. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca