Location of Marijuana Stores Divides Views in British Columbia

Most residents are OK with pot shops in their city and neighbourhood, but not a block away from their home. 

Vancouver, BC [October 17, 2018] – As the use of recreational marijuana is about to become legal across Canada, British Columbians hold differing views on the future location of pot shops, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, seven-in-ten residents (70%) say they approve of establishments that would sell marijuana and marijuana-related products being located anywhere in their municipality.

More than half of British Columbians (56%) also approve of pot shops located anywhere in their neighbourhood.

However, when asked to ponder the notion of a marijuana store located a block away from their home, the numbers tighten considerably. Half of British Columbians (50%) approve of this scenario, while a similar proportion (48%) disapprove.

The level of “strong disapproval” of a pot shop located a block away from home is highest than the level of “strong approval” (32% to 24%).

“There seems to a NIMBY sentiment when it comes to the future location of pot shops in the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Women, British Columbians aged 55 and over and those who reside in Vancouver Island are more likely to hold reservations on having marijuana stores close to their homes.”

British Columbians were also asked about the prospect of relying on the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR) to grow cannabis. Across the province, 49% of residents are “definitely” or “probably” in favour of this idea, while 44% are “definitely” or “probably” against it.

Residents aged 18-to-34 are more likely to support growing marijuana on ALR land (55%) than those aged 35-to-54 (47%) and those aged 55 and over (46%).

On a regional basis, the idea of growing cannabis in ALR land is decidedly more popular in Southern BC (67%) than in Vancouver Island (48%), Metro Vancouver (46%), the Fraser Valley (also 46%) and Northern BC (39%).

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 4 to October 7, 2018, among 877 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.3 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

Photo Credit: JPatrickBedell

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Most Canadians Support Mandatory Vaccinations for Children

Almost one-in-five believe the decision should be up to parents.

Vancouver, BC [October 3, 2018] – While a sizeable majority of Canadians are in favour of mandatory childhood immunization in their province, almost one-in-five believe the decision should be up to parents, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, 78% of Canadians believe vaccinations for children should “definitely” or “probably” be mandatory in their province.

Conversely, 18% think parents should “probably” or “definitely” be the ones deciding whether their children should be vaccinated.

In the late 1990s, a study published in the weekly medical journal The Lancet—which has since been discredited and retracted—attempted to link childhood vaccination and autism.

Across Canada, 23% of respondents think there “definitely” or “probably” is a correlation between the childhood vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella and autism in children—including 25% of Ontarians and Quebecers.

“One third of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (32%) and one-in-four of those aged 35-to-54 (25%) believe the widely debunked notion of childhood immunization leading to autism is definitely or probably true,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Respondents over the age of 55 are significantly less likely to think the same way (13%).”

When it comes to vaccinations and seasonal diseases (such as the flu), Canadians are more likely to reject a compulsory program.

Three-in-five Canadians (59%) think each person should “definitely” or “probably” be allowed to decide whether they want to get the flu vaccine, while just under two-in-five (38%) believe the flu vaccine should be mandatory in their province.

A majority of Canadians aged 18-to-34 (51%) voices support for the flu vaccine to be mandatory in their province, compared to 36% for those aged 35-to-54 and 29% for those aged 55 and over.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from August 27 to August 30, 2018, among 1,001 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Credit: Armin Kübelbeck

Canadian Employees Using Company-Issued Devices for Fun

Almost two thirds of the instant messages sent during work hours are not related to work.

Vancouver, BC [September 25, 2018] – Canadian employees whose smartphones are being financed by employers are spending more time sending instant messages to friends and family than connecting with colleagues to deal with tasks, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample asked Canadians who are employed full time and have a smartphone that their company is paying for about the instant messages they send while at work,

Just over a third of the instant messages that are sent during work hours on company-issued smartphones (35%) are interactions with colleagues for work-related tasks. Almost two thirds of the messages (65%) are interactions with family, friends and acquaintances for fun.

Across the country, full-time employees in Atlantic Canada are the most likely to use their company-issued devices for fun (69%), followed by those in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (67%), Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia (all at 65%) and Alberta (63%).

Full-time employees in the highest annual household income bracket are less likely to use their company-issued devices for fun (60%) than those in the lower income brackets.

“While a majority of instant messages sent from smartphones that employers are paying for are for fun, there are some generational differences,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Employees aged 55 and over are more likely to be having fun with company-issued devices during work hours than their younger counterparts.”

More than a third of full-time employees (35%) say they received a confusing message from someone they know because of auto-correct—a proportion that jumps to 47% among those aged 18-to-34. Millennial respondents are also more likely to have sent a confusing message because of auto-correct (45%, compared to the Canada-wide average of 30%).

Three-in-ten respondents (31%) say they declined an invitation to connect with a person through instant messaging in the last six months, and 18% say they left an instant messaging group they belonged to.

The most popular platform for instant messaging is Facebook Messenger, with 83% of respondents saying they use it during work hours, while more than half rely on messaging applications on their smartphone (62%), Skype (also 62%), Twitter Direct Messages (57%) and LinkedIn Messenger (also 57%).

Fewer respondents use WhatsApp (49%), Windows Live Messenger (33%) and Blackberry Messenger (16%) during work hours.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from May 7 to May 11, 2018, among 659 adults in Canada who are employed full-time and have a smartphone that their company is paying for. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Few Canadians Willing to Pay as News Content Shifts Online

Almost half say they do not visit any news sources that charge for online access.

Vancouver, BC [August 2, 2018] – Canadians have not embraced the concept of paying for news and information online, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative national sample, only 9% of Canadians say they are currently paying subscribers of at least one online news source that they find interesting—a proportion that rises to 14% among those aged 18-to-34.

Three-in-ten Canadians (31%) say they stop going to an online news source if there’s a limit on free articles and/or a paywall—including 39% of those aged 35-to-54.

“Content is increasingly moving online, but almost half of Canadians (47%) are not paying for any of it right now,” says Mario Canseco, President at Research Co. “Those over the age of 55 are more likely to say they do not visit any news sources that charge for online access (56%) than those aged 18-to-34 (41%) and those aged 35-to-54 (41%).”

More than half of Ontarians (52%) say they do not visit any news sources that charge for online access. The proportion of non-subscribers drops to 49% in British Columbia, 47% in Alberta, 46% in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, 44% in Atlantic Canada and 36% in Quebec.

Only 13% of Canadians say they get news and information from a hard copy of a local newspaper on a daily basis, and fewer access a hard copy of a national paper (9%) or a hard copy of a magazine (5%).

When it comes to radio and television, 41% of Canadians say they get their news and information from local television newscasts and news channels. A slightly smaller proportion (37%) watch national television newscasts and news channels every day. One-in-five (26%) listen to local radio newscasts daily, and 11% listen to national radio newscasts every day.

Almost a third of Canadians (32%) say they get news and information from Facebook on a daily basis. This is a substantially higher proportion than other sources, including websites from television news providers (20%), Twitter (18%), websites from national and local newspapers (14% each), websites from independent online news providers (8%), websites from radio stations (7%), websites of magazines (6%) and blogs (also 6%).

More than half of Canadians (56%) support the federal government’s proposal to invest $50 million over five years to support independent, non-governmental organizations that are expected to focus on delivering local journalism in communities.

Majorities of Canadians who voted for the New Democratic Party (NDP) (65%), the Liberal Party (61%) and the Conservative Party (52%) in the 2015 federal election endorse the proposal.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from May 7 to May 11, 2018, among 1,000 adults in Canada. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.1 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Credit: Liis Saar

Canadians Have Differing Views on BBQ Drinking Etiquette

More than half say they only consume the beer or cider they bring to a party or barbecue. 

Vancouver, BC [June 29, 2018] – As the country prepares for Canada Day celebrations, the conduct of Canadians who consume alcohol at a “BYOB” party or barbecue differs greatly by gender, age and region, a new Research Co. poll has found.

The online survey of a representative national sample asked Canadians who drink beer or cider to suppose they had just arrived at a party or barbecue and placed a six-pack of beer or cider they brought into a large cooler that was being used by everybody.

Across the country, three-in-five respondents (62%) say they would only drink the beer or cider they brought themselves.

One-in-four respondents (25%) say they would help themselves to any beer or cider that is in the cooler, but making sure not to consume more than six cans.

One-in-twenty respondents (5%) say they would drink any beer or cider that is in the cooler, even if more than six cans are consumed.

Women are more likely than men to say they would only consume what they brought to the party or barbecue (69% to 55%).

Conversely, men are more likely to say they would try anything in the cooler and keep a six-can maximum (30% to 20%) or drink anything, even if it’s more than the six-pack they brought themselves (8% to 2%).

Respondents aged 55 and over are less likely to only drink what they brought to the party or barbecue (54%) than those aged 35-to-54 (58%) and those aged 18-to-34 (73%).

“Millennials have sometimes been labelled as egotistical,” says Mario Canseco, President at Research Co. “But on this matter, they are more likely to steer clear of other people’s booze than their older counterparts.”

Atlantic Canadians are the most likely to say they would only drink what they brought to the party or barbecue (75%), followed by Albertans (72%), residents of Manitoba and Saskatchewan (70%), British Columbians (69%) and Ontarians (64%).

Quebecers are the least likely to only consume the six-pack they brought (47%, compared to the national average of 62%) and the most likely to consume more than six cans at the party (11%, compared to the national average of 5%).

Two thirds of Conservative Party voters in the last federal election (68%) would only consume what they brought, along with 64% of Liberal Party voters and 60% of New Democratic Party (NDP) voters.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from May 7 to May 11, 2018, among 836 adults in Canada who drink beer or cider. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Photo Credit: DarrenBaker