British Columbians Ponder Solutions to Opioid Crisis

Education and awareness campaigns—as well as adding more spaces for drug rehabilitation—are very popular ideas.

Vancouver, BC [November 7, 2018] – British Columbians are clearly worried about the current situation related to the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in their community, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, almost two thirds (64%) refer to the issue as “a major problem”, while 25% consider it “a minor problem.”

“Concerns about opioids are no longer confined to urban centres in British Columbia,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Majorities of residents in all regions of the province believe the problem is severe.”

When asked about specific solutions to the challenge at hand, 90% of British Columbians voice support for launching more education and awareness campaigns about drug use, and 88% would like to create more spaces for drug rehabilitation.

More than three-in-four British Columbians (78%) support reducing the prescription of opioids by medical professionals, and two thirds (66%) would set up more “harm reduction” strategies, such as legal supervised injection sites.

The idea of decriminalizing all drugs for personal use is more divisive, with 50% of residents opposing this course of action and 45% agreeing with it.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are more likely to endorse the decriminalization of all drugs for personal use (57%) than those aged 35-to-54 (43%) and those aged 55 and over (38%).

When it comes to the performance of political leaders, two-in-five British Columbians (41%) think BC Premier John Horgan and the provincial government are doing a “very good” or “good job” to come up with solutions to deal with the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs.

The rating is lower for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the federal government (37%) as well as Mayors and Councils across the province (35%).

Earlier this year, the Government of British Columbia launched a lawsuit against drug manufacturers and retailers, in an effort to recover public-health costs associated with an increase in the use of opioids. Across the province, 72% of residents agree with the provincial government’s decision, while 17% disagree with it.

Methodology:

Results are based on an online study conducted from October 25 to October 28, 2018, among 801 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Four-in-Five British Columbians Support a Handgun Ban

An even larger proportion of residents would forbid military-style assault weapons in their municipality.

Vancouver, BC [September 17, 2018] – An overwhelming majority of British Columbians would like to ban specific weapons in their municipalities, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, four-in-five residents (79%) support a ban on handguns within the limits of their municipality.

Last month, Montreal City Council adopted a motion calling for a nationwide ban on handguns and military-style assault weapons.

Across British Columbia, 86% of residents support a ban on military-style assault weapons in their city or town.

“Support for the course of action charted in Montreal is high across the entire province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Women and British Columbians aged 55 and over are definitely more likely to be in favour of implementing these bans.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from September 2 to September 5, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

 

 

British Columbians Still Want Money Laundering Public Inquiry

Almost four-in-five would create an Anti-Corruption Commissioner, similar to the one currently in place in Quebec.

Vancouver, BC [August 23, 2018] – Most British Columbians remain adamant in their wish for a public inquiry into money laundering in the province’s casinos, a new Research Co. poll has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, three-in-four residents (76%, unchanged since June) believe the provincial government should “definitely” or “probably” call a public inquiry into money laundering in casinos.

“The appetite for a public inquiry into money laundering in casinos has not died down over the past two months,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “There is also an extremely high proportion of residents who want to create an office to prevent corruption in the public sector.”

Across the province, 78% of British Columbians think British Columbia should establish an office similar to Quebec’s Anti-Corruption Commissioner, which was created “to ensure the coordination of actions to prevent and to fight corruption in the public sector, including in contractual matters.”

On June 27, BC Attorney General David Eby released an independent report, which detailed how organized crime groups relied on casinos to launder illegal drug money. Videos released on that same day showed people dragging bags of cash into Metro Vancouver casinos.

When asked who is to blame for the current situation related to money laundering in casinos, almost half of British Columbians (48%) place “all of the blame” or “some of the blame” on the British Columbia Lottery Corporation (BCLC).

Almost two-in-five residents (39%) think the previous provincial government headed by the BC Liberals deserves “all of the blame” or “most of the blame”, while about one-in-four (23%) feel the same way about the current provincial government headed by the BC New Democratic Party (NDP).

Only 21% of British Columbians place “all of the blame” or “most of the blame” for the current situation on the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP).

A majority of British Columbians (53%, +5 since June) say they have followed stories related to money laundering in the province’s casinos “very closely” or “moderately closely.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 13 to August 14, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

Consumption of Frozen Treats Jumps in British Columbia Heat

More than four-in-five Millennials say they are spending more on ice cream, popsicles and freezies than they did last year.

Vancouver, BC [August 16, 2018] – In a summer when several temperature records have been broken in the province, British Columbians are opening their wallets in an effort to keep cool, a new Research Co. survey has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, more than seven-in-ten residents (72%) say they are spending more on frozen desserts—such as ice cream, popsicles and freezies—than they did last summer.

British Columbians aged 18-to-34 are leading the way in frozen treat consumption, with 85% of them saying they are spending more on these items than they did last year.

More than two-in-five British Columbians (42%) acknowledge that they are dining out more often this summer than in 2017, including 49% of Metro Vancouverites and 47% of Millennials.

Across the province, 15% of residents say they have spent more on appliances—such as fans and air conditioners—this summer than last, a proportion that climbs to 26% in the Fraser Valley.

In addition, 40% of British Columbians say they are spending more on cold beverages—including beer, cider and pop—than they did a year ago. In this category, residents of Vancouver Island (48%) and those aged 55 and over (43%) are the biggest consumers.

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 13 to August 14, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca

British Columbians Welcome Automated Speed Enforcement

The use of red light cameras to capture speeding vehicles is endorsed by seven-in-ten residents. 

Vancouver, BC [August 13, 2018] – Most British Columbians support the use of technology to enforce speed limits in the province’s roads, a new Research Co. survey has found.

In the online survey of a representative sample of British Columbians, seven-in-ten residents (70%) approve of the use of speed-on-green cameras, or red light cameras that also capture vehicles that are speeding through intersections.

Automated speed enforcement works by using cameras or sensors to pick up a vehicle speeding. A ticket is then issued to the owner of the vehicle. Driver’s license points are not issued as the driver of the vehicle cannot be identified.

The provincial government announced last fall that red light cameras located at 140 intersections would record 24 hours a day. In the fall, the provincial government is expected to announce the number and locations of cameras that would be used to identify speeding vehicles.

In addition to the speed-on-green cameras, most British Columbians also endorsed three other types of automated speed enforcement.

Across the province, 71% of residents approve of using fixed speed cameras, or cameras that stay in one location and measure speed as a vehicle passes. These cameras can be placed in school zones or on other roads.

In addition, almost two thirds of British Columbians (65%) approve of using mobile speed cameras, which can be moved from place to place and measure speed as a vehicle passes.

A majority of residents (55%) also approved of point-to-point enforcement, which uses cameras at two or more distant points on a road. The average speed of vehicles that pass between points is calculated and tickets are issued to vehicles whose average speed over the distance was excessive.

“There is high support for all four types of automated speed enforcement across the province,” says Mario Canseco, President of Research Co. “Point-to-point enforcement is the most contentious of all four, with more than a third of residents disapproving of its use.”

Methodology:
Results are based on an online study conducted from August 2 to August 5, 2018, among 800 adults in British Columbia. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in British Columbia. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is +/- 3.5 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty.

Find our full data set here and download the press release here. 

For more information on this poll, please contact:
Mario Canseco, President, Research Co.
[c] 778.929.0490
[e] mario.canseco@researchco.ca